1-16-14 Arlington Enterprise

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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Serving the Communities of Arlington and Green Isle, Minnesota
www.arlingtonmnnews.com Single copy $1.00
Volume 130 • Number 28 • Thursday, January 16, 2014 • Arlington, MN 55307
City Council to seek bids for electrical project
By Kurt Menk Editor The Arlington City Council, during its most recent regular meeting, unanimously approved a motion to approve the advertisement of bids for the 2014 Electrical Improvement Project. City Council members James Jaszewski, Jennifer Nuesse, Curt Reetz, Jason Ruehling and Galen Wills all voted in favor of the motion. Bid item number one will include a new approximately 5,260-foot feeder line from the new electrical substation to the downtown switch building. This is the core of the project. Bid item number two will include a new approximately 1,000-foot tie line between the new substation east feeder and the old south feeder. This item is important to bypass the old substation. It is not critical, but does weaken the reliability in the future if it is not completed. Bid item number three will include a new approximately 680-foot Prairie Line Trail underground conversion of the existing overhead line. It is being required by Sibley County for improvement and minimal reliability. Bid item number four will include electrical line and substation materials. The project was originally slated for 2013, but was pushed back to 2014, according to City Administrator Liza Donabauer. The bids will be opened on Thursday, Feb. 13 and be considered by the City Council at a future meeting.
Other Business
The City Council, in other business, reviewed the 2013 building permit report as presented. In 2013, there were 120 building permits which had a
total valuation of $859,391. The list included one new construction, 17 addition and remodeling permits, 43 roof, siding and window permits, seven garage and accessory permits, 21 plumbing and mechanical permits, 12 miscellaneous permits and 19 land use permits.
County Commissioners consider new ways of doing things in 2014
By Dave Pedersen Correspondent Sibley County is looking into some possible changes in the way of doing things, mainly involving who will do it. The deliberation took place at the year’s first meeting of the Board of Commissioners on Tuesday, Jan. 7. One area involved filling the vacant part-time position of deputy emergency management director. Another concerned a possible cooperative opportunity between the Sibley and Nicollet County Soil and Water Conservation Districts (SWCD). The commissioners also wondered what can be done to speed up employee background checks. By law the county must have two people filling roles in emergency management. Sibley County has a part-time director and part-time deputy director, both trained in the field. Since the deputy position is open, County Administrator Matt Jaunich asked if the County Commissioners would consider some alternatives. There was talk about the possibility to partner with other entities. Research found that if Sibley County forms a Joint Powers Board with another county it would need state approval in advance. A resolution would be needed by both counties stating the intention. They must develop bylaws and any other documents that must be approved by the state. The counties would have to perform an actual exercise to show they can handle an emergency in either county. “I was surprised how difficult the process is to join with another county,” said Jaunich. “The state said there are no other counties that have done that. Some counties have a full-time emergency manager and designate someone from another department to be the deputy.” Jaunich said a grant funded position in Region 9 is designed to help counties in District 1 and Sibley County does not qualify. “Another option is to move Emergency Management Director Bryan Gorman to fulltime and then designate someone to the deputy position,” adds Jaunich. “We can talk to other counties asking how they make this work.” County Commissioner Jim Swanson wondered if it would be possible to have two or three alternates from different departments who were trained to fill in if needed. County Commissioner Bill Pinske said he understood the deputy position is not because there is more work, but if someone is on vacation or out of town. “If we go full-time with it I would like to figure out if there can be some additional duties,” said Pinske. “McLeod went to a full time position, but it has a lot more people.” Jaunich is concerned that he will continue to have difficulty keeping a part-time deputy and does not want to look for a new one every five or six months. “A full-time position would provide some stability,” said Jaunich. “My understanding is we have enough work for 40 hours between the two positions. Maybe our director can explain more about it.” The board agreed to pursue available options. Joint Powers Board. “It is worth looking at any consolidation we can do to save both entities money if we can,” said Swanson. “Nicollet County is looking to at least temporarily work with another county to get things done until they decide what they want to do with its open manager position. It is in our best interest to look at it.” Jaunich said there is no space at the current Gaylord office to merge and house everybody. “We should look into it, but if it involves going to the Nicollet County pay schedule that will be an issue,” said Pinske. Sibley County is set up where the SWCD board gets funds for doing business, including hiring employees as independent contractors. Jaunich will communicate the interest of the board to look at options. In another staff related matter, Jaunich said he has been asked why it takes so long to conduct employee background checks. The delay can hinder the hiring process. “There are four options out there for us now split into two different areas,” said Jaunich. “One is a public background check and the other is a full criminal history check that includes both public and private data. Now we do the full criminal history check which does not allow an opportunity for an on line search.” The only way to do it is through the mail or to do an impersonal background check that takes two to three weeks. Jaunich said more counties are going through a private third party hired to do background checks. County Auditor Lisa Pfarr said if the staff person would be handling funds it is one of the keys that trigger a full background check. Swanson asked if the coun-
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Bicycling In The Snow
Courtney Goethke, left, and Tommy Goethke, Jr., right, took advantage of the warm weather and rode their bikes on the sidewalk in front of their house along the 100 block of East Chandler Street in Arlington on Sunday afternoon, Jan. 12.
Other Area
The other area involving a possible joint effort is combining the Sibley and Nicollet Soil and Water Conservation Districts. Nicollet County asked Jaunich if Sibley County would consider working together, having one person directing the two offices. Jaunich said there would still be a lot of details that have to be ironed out. He learned that the two counties could not essentially eliminate one of the offices, but they can join together with a
Chamber will hold planning session
By Kurt Menk Editor The Arlington Area Chamber of Commerce will hold a planning session at the Arlington Haus Too from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 4, according to Chamber President Todd Sandberg. Pizza, salad and beverages will be provided by the Chamber. Chamber members are encouraged to RSVP to an email sent by Sandburg about this event. In addition, Chamber members are also strongly encouraged to respond to a recently e-mailed survey.
Sibley County
Continued on page 3
Sibley County Board of Commissioners regroup for the new year
By Dave Pedersen Correspondent The Sibley County Board of Commissioners organized for the new year during its meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 7. County Commissioner Joy Cohrs was elected board chair person and County Commissioner Jim Nytes was elected vice chairperson. The Henderson Independent was designated as the official county newspaper for 2014 for the publication of legal notices, publications and delinquent tax lists. The Arlington Enterprise won the bid for designation of the first newspaper for publication of the 2013 financial statement. The Gaylord Hub was designated as the second publication of the statement. A goal setting workshop was set for 1 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 11 where elected officials will talk about where they want to go as a county. Committee and board appointments for 2014 were set. Committees that will no longer be in existence are the Agriculture Development Board, Hazardous Material Advisory, Minnesota River Board, Personnel/Policy Compensation Administration Plan Review Committee, Radio Communications Task Force and Three Rivers Resource Conservation and Development.
Other Business
• In other business, a new agreement was approved for recycling services between the Tri-County Solid Waste Joint Powers Board and Waste Management, Inc. The counties involved in the three-year plan are LeSueur and Sibley. Al Christensen, Tri-County Director, said in the previous contract that Sibley County’s monthly fee was $1,265.23 compared to $240.51 per
month in the new proposal. The result is a savings of about $1,000 per month. Christensen said recycling contracts have become cheaper over the years. The old way of doing business was to pay large amounts per month and then get recovery rebates to offset the costs. There was a change to having flat rates. • County Commissioners approved a formal letter to a county veterans group and granted permission to display a replica of the USS Sibley in the county courthouse in Gaylord. • The board accepted an amendment to the construc-
tion agreement between the Sibley Wind Substation and Sibley County that will lower the letter of credit (LOC) from $300,000 to $25,000 while the project is limited in the winter. The LOC will be raised to $500,000 before construction activity ramps up in the spring. This would show good faith in the negotiations for road access in Cornish Township, plus replace high cost funds with much lower cost funds from a tax equity investor during down time. • In a breakdown of Sibley County attorney work, David Schauer said criminal prose-
cutions of adults went down from 61.3 cases in 2012 to 55.2 in 2013. Juvenile/human services matters went up from 24.3 in 2012 to 32.2 in 2013. • It was noted that 185 residents of Sibley County have enrolled in South Country Health Alliance as a result of the federal health care reform. • The next Sibley County board of appeal and equalization meeting was set for 6 p.m. Monday, June 16. • County offices will be closed on Monday, Jan. 20 for Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The next board meeting is 9 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 28.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 16, 2014, page 2 www.arlingtonmnnews.com
News Briefs
Students named to Dean’s List
Three local and area students were recently named to the Dean’s List at St. Cloud State University. To be eligible for this honor, a student must achieve a grade point average of 3.75 or higher on a 4.0 scale. The Arlington residents included Kale Peterson, School of Education, Elementary Education; and Matt Pichelmann, College of Liberal Arts, Psychology. The Green Isle resident is Nicholas Justen, School of Public Affairs, Business Economics.
Bade named to Dean’s List
Sibley East graduate Mackenzie Bade was recently named to the Dean’s List at North Dakota State University. To be eligible for this honor, a student must achieve a grade point average of 3.5 or higher. She is the daughter of Ken and Kim Bade, Arlington.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Another pop machine damaged
A pop machine was reportedly damaged at Four Seasons Park in Arlington last week, according to the Arlington Police Department. Two other pop machines were damaged in the community during the previous week. People who have any information about these incidents are encouraged to contact the Arlington Police Department at 507-964-5200.
Snowmobiling
This caravan of snowmobilers from Cologne drove through Arlington on Sunday afternoon, Jan. 12. This picture was taken along County Road 9 near the intersection with Highway 5. Left to right: David Traver, Collin Bingham, Matthew Traver, Dylan Bingham and Jake Thompson.
Accident south of Gibbon
A one-vehicle accident, without injuries, reportedly occurred along County Road 2 about four miles south of Gibboon at 12:45 p.m. Monday, Jan. 6, according to the Sibley County Sheriff’s Department. David B. Dalgleisch, 38, Gibbon, was driving a 2004 Chevy Trailblazer southbound on County Road 2 when he reportedly lost control of the vehicle around an icy curve, according to the report. The vehicle entered the ditch and rolled onto its side. There was moderate damage to the vehicle. The Gibbon Police Department also assisted at the scene.
Sibley County is in running for major road project grant funds
By Dave Pedersen Correspondent Sibley County Public Works Director Tim Becker has applied for $800,000 in grants to make major improvements on a 4 1/2-mile stretch of CSAH 6 on the east side of the county. The County Commissioners passed a resolution supporting the grant application at the meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 7. The Minnesota Department of Transportation is offering grant funding for Transportation Alternative Projects (TAP). Sibley County’s concept application advanced to the second phase. The concept application is for two projects, the first in 2017 and second in 2018. Phase 1 involves replacing two bridges and three large box culverts on CSAH 6 from CSAH 12 to CSAH 5. The total project cost would be $1.2 million. Each grant is eligible to receive up to $400,000 in funding. Each grant requires a resolution saying the county will maintain the project. Becker said that the county has secured $145,000 from the state for bridge bonding. The rest of the cost can come from the county CSAH road fund. The second grant application is for widening the remaining portions of CSAH 6 from CSAH 12 to provide an aggregate shoulder area for bicycle and pedestrian traffic. The widening project is estimated to cost a total of $1,382,000. “This is the only segment of CSAH 6 that does not have a six-foot or wider shoulders on it,” said Becker. “The reason these two projects would become eligible for the TAP program is because we would be using the proposed shoulder area as a bike lane. The City of Henderson promotes pedestrian and bike traffic in that area because of the scenic byway and tourism.” County Commissioner Jim Nytes said most of the county gravel trucks use that road, plus there is a lot of grain traffic there. “This is proposed as a bike path, but it is more for safety on the road where there is no shoulder,” said Nytes. “When stuck behind a big truck or bike on the road, I have seen someone speed around them. It is a very dangerous situation with no margin for error because there is no shoulder.”
Bigaouette to lead BP board
The Belle Plaine School Board recently and unanimously selected director Matt Bigaouette as school board chairperson for 2014, according to an article in the Belle Plaine Herald. Bigaouette was first elected in 2007. This is his first year as chairperson of the school board. Bigaouette is a graduate of the Sibley East Senior High School Board in Arlington. He is the son of Francis and Wendy Bigaouette, Arlington.
Semi and train collide in City of Gaylord
By Kurt Menk Editor A semi and train accident, without injuries, reportedly occurred on Angie Drive in Gaylord at about 10 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 14, according to information in The Gaylord Hub. The Minnesota Prairie Line train was traveling west while the semi, from Quebec, Canada, was heading north after turning right on Angie Drive, according to the Gaylord Police Department. There was no hazardous material on the train or the semi, the police said. The front passenger side of the semi sustained damage while the train received minor damage, according to police. Weather may have been a factor in the collision, the police said.
Engagement
ZumBerge - Sommerfeld
Amber ZumBerge and Mark Sommerfeld announce their engagement. Amber is the daughter of Kevin and Wendy ZumBerge, Arlington. Mark is the son of Jim and Mary Sommerfeld, Sleepy Eye. Amber and Mark are both employed at Sanborn Manufacturing of Springfield, Amber as Inventory Control Specialist and Mark as Master Electrician. Mark also farms. The couple currently resides in Sleepy Eye. A Jan. 25 wedding is planned in New Ulm.
Call us at: 507-964-5547
Arlington Enterprise
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Mark Sommerfeld and Amber ZumBerge Green Isle American Legion #408
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Community Calendar
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19th Annual St. Arthur’s Council Knights of Columbus
FRIENDS OF HIGH ISLAND
Monday, January 20: Martin Luther King Jr. Day - Both banks will be closed. Tuesday, January 21: Knight’s of Columbus, St. Mary’s Parish Hall, 8 p.m.
2 Annual High Island Lake, New Auburn, MN
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Friday, Jan. 17 • 4:30-8 p.m.
Arlington Community Center
FISH BOIL
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 16, 2014, page 3 www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Longtime fire chief in Hamburg steps down
There has been a changing of the guard at the Hamburg Fire Department as Justin Buckentin has taken over for longtime Fire Chief Brad Droege, according to an article in the Norwood Young America Times. Droege has served on the Hamburg Fire Department for 35 1/2 years including 28 years as an officer. He took over as fire chief 19 years ago and will remain on the department as third assistant chief.
Bobcat is destroyed in fire
By Kurt Menk Editor A Bobcat was reportedly destroyed in a fire at the Dale Schultz residence about three miles northeast of Arlington at 11:37 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 12, according to Arlington Fire Chief John Zaske. The Bobcat was owned by Darin Schultz, according to the report. The local fire department was on the scene for approximately 50 minutes, according to Zaske. The Arlington Fire Department, Zaske said, has responded to seven calls within the first dozen days of 2014.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Interview With Dan Vos
Students at the Green Isle Community School recently interviewed former Green Isle resident and current Waconia resident Dan Vos for the annual Elders Celebration which will be held in May. Front Row: (left to right) Carter Hendley, Tyson Grams, Audrey Parrott, Abby Koch, Emma Hecksel, Jack Stewart and Gavin Latzke. Middle Row: (l to r) Johnny Garcia, Sami Pollack, Skyler Koch, Lindsey Czarnecki, Dan Vos, Ariana Lunow, Beau Stewart, Grace Schwartz, Joseph Roepke and Chris Verdinez. Back Row: (l to r) Teacher Kristen Strauss, Dakota Hendley, Adam Stewart, Aaron Ehrich, Jordan Latzke, Nathan DeVries, Sam Menne, Greg Pollack, Sean Alander, Matt Hartman, Cody DeVries and teacher Lindsai Muench.
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Innovative biogas facility helps Arlington electric utility comply with renewable energy law
Food processing and agricultural waste converted into electrical power is now part of the electricity profile of Arlington and 11 other municipal electric utilities which are members of the Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (MMPA). The Hometown BioEnergy facility, located in Le Sueur, has begun operation on schedule and is producing electricity from biogas created from agricultural and food processing waste. The 8 Megawatt facility is the largest of its kind in the country to employ an anaerobic digestion process -- a technology used extensively in Europe. “Anaerobic digestion is a natural process where waste is heated in large tanks, and the microbial action results in methane biogas,” said Kelsey Dillon, the project director of the MMPA facility. “The process is similar to what happens in a home septic system, where microbes degrade and stabilize organic matter; but in our case, we heat the material to accelerate the production of biogas on a commercial scale,” according to Dillon. “At optimal times when the power is needed, we draw off the biogas from storage and use it to fuel the electrical generators on the plant site,” she said, pointing out that this ability to time power production is a significant advantage to the technology. While the electricity from the site will be consumed in Le Sueur, it is considered by state regulators to be part of the MMPA’s total renewable energy supply. According to state law, by 2025 utilities will be required to have at least 25 percent of their power generated through renewable means (such as wind, solar, hydro or biomass). The anaerobic digestion process results in two byproducts – a liquid that will become fertilizer for area farmers and dried solid fuel that will be sold to be burned in boilers. Dillon said Hometown BioEnergy is working with area businesses and communities to identify waste that can be converted to energy, rather than ending up in a landfill or land applied. MMPA board chairman Steve Schmidt, also a City of Anoka council member, said, “Homeowners and businesses who rely on our member municipal utilities will benefit from our mix of cost-effective and local renewable energy generation sources.” MMPA’s long-time management partner, Avant Energy of Minneapolis, managed the facility’s innovative design and construction. MMPA financed the $45 million facility through a combination of federal stimulus grants and municipal bond sales. Project Director Dillon said, “This project is great for Minnesota and MMPA communities because it takes waste from Central Minnesota and converts it into electricity that is used locally and helps meet renewable energy requirements. “We also hope it serves as an inspiration for other renewable energy facilities of this type in the state and around the country,” Dillon said.
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Business & Professional Directory
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Arlington Chiropractic Clinic
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Sibley County Continued from page 1
ty can do different degrees of background checks with personnel. He asked, “If some positions are not as critical why do we have to do such an extensive background check? Could we develop different levels?” Jaunich will work with the human resource director to identify who could get a less extensive background check in some cases.
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 16, 2014, page 4 www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Opinions
Lieutenant governors have few defined duties and often make little or no impact
Our View: Let the voters decide if there should be a position of lieutenant governor
Think quick. Who is the current lieutenant governor in Minnesota? The answer to the question is Yvonne Prettner Solon. On Tuesday, Prettner Solon announced that she will not join Governor Mark Dayton on the ticket again as he seeks re-election later this year. Prettner Solon thanked the governor for the opportunity to focus on issues she cared about. However, she regretfully admitted that she had not been involved in the making of policy as much as she had originally hoped when named to the ticket less than four years ago. It should come as no surprise that most Minnesotans cannot name the individual who holds the position of lieutenant governor. The position has few defined duties and almost all lieutenant governors have made little or no impact at all during their respective stays in that office over the years. The position of lieutenant governor is vaguely defined in the Minnesota State Constitution. The role of the lieutenant governor, according to the state constitution, is to succeed the governor if that office is vacated or to stand in temporarily if he or she cannot perform the duties of the chief executive. Candidates for governor or governors who seek re-election almost always use the position of lieutenant governor for potential political gain. Pretter Solon, for example, was not originally selected for her political abilities and talents. Governor Dayton selected the former state senator and Duluth City Council member to attract more female voters and support from the Iron Range. Candidates for lieutenant governor, for most of Minnesota’s history, have run alone on their own ballots. That all changed in 1974 when lieutenant governors started to be elected on the ticket as running mates to the winning gubernatorial candidates. The current position of lieutenant governor has an annual salary of nearly $80,000. When the cost of staff are considered, however, the cost of having a lieutenant governor is closer to $250,000 per year. Since the position of lieutenant governor has a limited role and office holders make little or no impact, the State Legislature should place a constitutional amendment on a future ballot and let the voters decide whether or not to eliminate this position. -K.M.
Guest Columns
A renewed commitment to our neighbors in need
By John Marty State Senator This month marks 50 years since President Lyndon Johnson declared a “war on poverty.” There were huge victories in that war during the following decade, but after that, the federal government reversed course, cut anti-poverty programs, and our national government effectively surrendered. A half century later, as Minnesota and the nation pull out of the recession, some families are doing better economically, and some are doing incredibly well. Yet there are working people and their families staying in homeless shelters because they cannot afford housing. Countless people with mental health or physical health challenges cannot get even basic care. As many as one in three children are growing up in families that cannot afford basic needs. Children raised in poverty are stripped of the opportunity we want for all young people - they are more likely to suffer from asthma and other health problems, their brain development and academic potential is compromised. Some overcome the odds and succeed, but many more do not. We are not proud of this. Sometimes we’d rather just ignore this ugly reality. But despite the federal government’s long-ago surrender in the war on poverty, people haven't stopped caring, and many community and religious leaders continue pushing to end poverty. About 10 years ago, some Minnesota faith leaders drafted a “Common Foundation” which stated, “We believe it is the Creator’s intent that all people are provided those things that protect human dignity and make for healthy life: adequate food and shelter, meaningful work, safe communities, healthcare, and education.... We are all called to work to overcome poverty, and this work transcends any particular political theory or party and any particular economic theory or structure.” Minnesota, through its legislature, took up the cause in 2008 with a bipartisan commission to map a route to end poverty. Recognizing it is not something we can change overnight, the commission’s charge - reflected in its name - was the “Legislative Commission to End Poverty in Minnesota by 2020.” 2014 marks the half-way point to the target date for accomplishing the goal. In 2008, one in ten Minnesotans lived in poverty. Now, it is slightly worse, and for some populations, much worse - almost half of African American children live in poverty. Fortunately, there appears to be new momentum. Last year, the state began addressing early childhood education needs. In 2014, it looks like the legislature will significantly increase the minimum wage. And the Dayton administration recently spelled out a bold plan to prevent and end homelessness in Minnesota. But even if we get a phased-in hike in the minimum wage to $9.50/hour, that’s not enough to live on. Many low income parents work at two, or even three, jobs to make ends meet. And, even if we do end homelessness, we must ensure that health care, and childcare, and food, and other necessities are affordable. The challenge is great, but 50 years after our nation declared war on poverty, there are signs of hope. Pope Francis has been outspoken about the moral obligation to end poverty, “A way has to be found to enable everyone to benefit from the fruits of the earth, and not simply to close the gap between the affluent and those who must be satisfied with the crumbs falling from the table, but above all to satisfy the demands of justice, fairness and respect for every human being.” There has been a positive, bipartisan response. Even Newt Gingrich has taken note of the problem of income inequality, calling on fellow politicians to “embrace the pope’s core critique that you do not want to live on a planet with billionaires and people who do not have any food.” Most of us recognize that poverty is morally unacceptable; many also understand ignoring the problem hurts our economy. We can use 2014, the halfway point in Minnesota's timeline, to recommit our state to building an economy that doesn't leave people behind, and doesn't rob so many children of their potential. It’s an ambitious agenda - providing living wage jobs, increasing the earned income tax credit, strengthening the childcare assistance program, delivering health care for all but the well-being of all Minnesotans matters. Paul Wellstone was right: “We all do better, when we all do better.”
Too Tall’s Tidbits
Happy Birthday and Happy Anniversary to the following local and area residents compliments of the Arlington Lions Club Community Calendar. January 17 In Memory Of Don Sauter, Ann Walsh, Bruce Hanneman, Dennis Overson, Sydney Burnevik and Tony Kloeckl. January 18 Ashley Burtyk, Carol Paulsen, Heather Fahey, Kimberly Arabian and Kristie Watson. January 19 Dale Pichelmann, Garrett Kroells, Morgan Kroells and Jean Hamblin. January 20 In Memory Of Emma Nordhausen, Dana Lenertz, Emily Archer and Levi Wendinger. January 21 Jeff Weber, Keri Henke, Rebecca Schlueter, and Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Van Moorlehem. January 22 In Memory Of Bernard Rucks, Cassie Johnson, John Zaske, Paul Utendorfer, Mr. and Mrs. Brian Diehn, and Mr. and Mrs. Lyle Rud. January 23 Mary Jo Krentz. ***** Teacher: “Can you give me an example of a national disaster?” Class clown: “How about my last report card?” ***** A boy went to the ballet with his mother. As the program began, the boy leaned over his seat and whispered, “Mom, they’re all dancing on their toes.” “Yes, I know,” said his mother. “That’s the way they do it.” The boy watched for a moment longer and then said, “Well, why don’t they just get taller dancers?” ***** A truck driver was driving along the highway when he saw a sign, “Low Underpass Ahead.” Thinking his truck could for sure make it, he drove under and got stuck. Soon all the cars were honking their horns and shouting. Before long, a cop came and said, “What’s the problem, got stuck, huh?” Thinking quickly, the truck driver smiled and said, “No, I didn’t get stuck, I was delivering this bridge and ran out of gas.” ***** A zookeeper saw a visitor throwing $100 bills into the monkey cage. “Why you doing that?” he asked. “The sign says its ok,” the visitor replied. “No it doesn’t,” the zookeeper replied. “Sure it says ‘Do not feed. $100 fine.’” replied the visitor. ***** A passenger train is creeping along, slowly. Finally it creaks to a halt. A passenger sees a conductor walking by outside. “What’s going on?” she yells out the window. “Horse on the track!” replies the conductor. Ten minutes later, the train resumes its slow pace. However five minutes later it stops again. The lady sees the conductor walking by again. She leans out and yells, “What happened? We caught up to that horse again?” ***** What happens if you get scared half to death twice? ***** Question: How many psychiatrists does it take to change a light bulb? Answer: Only one, but the light bulb has to want to change.
Trust...but definitely verify
By Lee H. Hamilton Of all the numbers thrown at us over the course of last year, one stands out for me. I hope we can avoid repeating it this year. That number is 12. It’s the percentage of Americans in a December Quinnipiac poll who said they trust the government in Washington to do what is right most or all of the time. It’s a depressingly small number — especially compared to the 41 percent who say they “hardly ever” trust the government. This meshes with recent polls that echo a bleak truth: trust in government is at historically low levels. That’s not all, though. Americans are feeling vulnerable and highly distrustful of both government and private-sector prying. More worrisome, a few months ago an AP poll found that fewer than a third of Americans trust one another. The poll’s message is clear: our society is in the midst of a crisis in trust. This might seem like a touchyfeely concern, but it’s not. Trust is essential to our political system and
Letters This page is devoted to opinions and commentary. Articles appearing on this page are the opinions of the writer. Views expressed here are not necessarily those of the Arlington Enterprise, unless so designated. The Arlington Enterprise strongly encourages others to express opinions on this page. Letters from our readers are strongly encouraged. Letters for publication must bear the writer’s signature and address. The Arlington Enterprise reserves the right to edit letters for purpose of clarity and space.
our way of life. The belief that people and institutions will do what they say they will do is the coin of the realm in our society. It is what allows people to work together — in their daily interactions with others and in their communities, legislatures and Congress. Negotiation, compromise, collegiality, and the mechanisms our complex and diverse society depends on are impossible without trust. Trust is one of the medley of virtues that have allowed our institutions to develop and prosper, along with honesty, competence, responsibility, and civility. A breakdown in trust between Congress and the executive branch invariably brings problems: the turmoil of the Vietnam War era, Watergate, Iran-Contra, our current budget travails. A society-wide lack of trust imposes real costs. It makes the drafting of laws and their implementation extremely difficult: government becomes more expensive because it requires more emphasis on regulations and enforcement.
In fact, you could argue that we see all around us the results of our trust deficit. Government dysfunction, an economy performing below its potential, public officials’ scandals and misdeeds, trusted institutions’ willingness to skirt the law and standards of good conduct, our social safety net under attack because people mistrust recipients — all of these speak to a society struggling as trust weakens. Yet here’s a question. Do the polls match your experience? In my case, they do not. Trust still figures in my dealings with institutions and individuals, most of whom are good people trying to live a decent life and to be helpful to others. They deal with one another honorably and with care. I’m convinced that this is because, no matter what the polls say at the moment, the habits instilled by parents, schools, and a vast number of public and private institutions do not just disappear.
Hamilton
Continued on page 5
Arlington ENTERPRISE
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 16, 2014, page 5 www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Obituaries
Pastor Paul L. Bortnem, 71, Arlington
Pastor Paul L. Bortnem, age 71, of Arlington, died at the Sibley Medical Center in Arlington on Monday, Jan. 13. A memorial service will be held at Zion Lutheran Church in Arlington at 11 a.m. Friday, Jan. 17. The Rev. Pastor J a m e s C a r l s o n Paul Bortnem will officiate. Visitation will be held at the Kolden Funeral Home in Arlington from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 16. It will continue one hour prior to the memorial service at the church on Friday, Jan. 17. In lieu of flowers memorials are preferred. Paul was born to Harold and Vicky (Hoyer) Bortnem in Volga, S,D., on April 29, 1942. He married Rosine Englund on July 10, 1966. Paul’s call to serve began in parish ministry as an intern in Wahpeton, N.D., followed by stops in Foremost, Provost, and Edmonton, AB Canada. He served as a chaplain in Thief River Falls, and Lubbock, Texas, and returned to parish ministry in Slaton and Posey, Texas. He later served parishes as an interim in Tyler, Olivia, Bemidji, Glyndon, Lester Prairie, Bernadotte, Lafayette, and Swan Lake, Minn., and Jamestown, Hillsboro, Wahpeton, and Williston, N.D. Paul was a faithful servant, pastor, mentor and counselor. He loved people and treasured the many friendships made during his years of ministry. Paul’s faith and belief in the Good News centered his life and touched everyone he met. He loved spending time with family and friends, listening to his grandchildren play violin and attending their various sporting events, woodworking in his shop, reading a good book and sharing quiet moments with Rosine. Paul is survived by his wife, Rosine; children, Peter (Kristin) Bortnem of Cokato and Rebekah (Mark) Lundstrom of Arlington; grandchildren, Ella and Jens Lundstrom, and Soren and Charlie Bortnem; sisters, Yvonne (Bob) Franseen of Duluth and Veronna (John) Capone of Brookings, S.D.; and brotherin-law, Steve (Clara Strege) Englund of Lancaster; and nephews, David (Heather Murphy) Franseen and Chris Franseen. He is preceded in death by his parents.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Front Row: (left to right) Seth Fredin, James Schealler and Joel Mercier. Back Row: (l to r) Sierra Suedbeck and
Alexus Kreft. Missing from the photo is Ella Lundstrom.
SE junior high knowledge bowl team finishes 4th in regional competition
By Kurt Menk Editor The Sibley East black knowledge bowl team recently completed a successful season with a fourth place finish among 27 teams in the regional competition. The Sibley East black team consisted of freshmen Seth Fredin, Alexus Kreft, Ella Lundstrom, Joel Mercier, James Schealler and Sierra Suedbeck. The team participated in a written test comprised of 60 questions and a total of four oral rounds which each contained 45 questions. Sibley East scored a total of 94 points just behind St. James and Dakota Meadows Middle School who tied with 98 points each. Jordan captured top honors with a total of 114 points. “It was an excellent finish to the junior high knowledge bowl season,” said Sibley East coaches Jill Warzecha and Vikki Louwagie. Many other Sibley East students participated in Knowledge Bowl this season and gained valuable experience for the upcoming seasons, according to Warzecha and Louwagie. Sibley East took three teams to invitational meets throughout the season. The seventh graders included Kasha Bates, Robbie Dinning, Madison Grove, Colton Harens, Morgan Mathews, Madisyn Petree, Sydney Schott, Michaela Sylvester, Justin Vinkemeier Jenifer Wear and Abby Widmer. The eighth graders consisted of Katelyn Brinkman, Kaili Diehn, Lindsey Flieth Carron Kranz, Kelsey Luepke, Kiana Montes, Neyland Ott, Haley Rohwer, Logan Tesch and Jaci Tourtellott. The freshmen were Seth Fredin, Scott Holmquist, Alexus Kreft, Tanner Kurtzweg, Sadie Lane, Ella Lundstrom, Joel Mercier, Adam Peterson, James Schaeller, Jenna Schuft, Sierra Suedbeck and Brandon Uecker. The Sibley East senior high knowledge bowl season, under the direction of Vikki Louwagie, will begin this week.
Hilda Marie Oelfke, 95, of Arlington
Funeral services for Hilda Marie (Huepenbecker) Oelfke, 95, of Arlington, formerly of Hamburg, were held on Saturday, Jan. 11, at Emanuel Lutheran Church in Hamburg. The Rev. Donald Andrix officiated. M r s . Oelfke died on Tuesday, Hilda Oelfke Jan. 7, 2014, at Glencoe Regional Health Services long-term care facility. Organist was Cheryl Andrix, and the congregational hymns were “Abide With Me,” “Amazing Grace (My Chains Are Gone)” and “For All The Saints.” Pallbearers were Brad Oelfke, Todd Thomas, Mathew Mathwig, Eric Oelfke, Riley Thomas and Paul Mathwig. Interment was at the church cemetery. Hilda Marie Huepenbecker was born on March 2, 1918, in Helen Township, McLeod County, to William and Amanda (Graupmann) Huepenbecker. She was baptized as an infant on March 31, 1918, by the Rev. R. Zielinski and confirmed in her faith as a youth on March 20, 1932, by the Rev. J. H. Bunge, both at St. Paul’s Evangelical Church in Plato, Minnesota. She received her education in Glencoe, graduating with the Glencoe High School class of 1936. Hilda Huepenbecker was united in marriage to Leonard Oelfke on June 17, 1939, at St. Paul’s Evangelical Church in Plato by the Rev. Bunge. They made their home on the family farm near Hamburg, until they moved to Arlington in 1977. Their marriage was blessed with two sons and one daughter, Ronald, Loren and Marlys. The Oelfkes shared 39 years of marriage before Mr. Oelfke died on Jan. 2, 1978. Mrs. Oelfke especially cherished the time she spent with family and friends. Mrs. Oelfke was a member of Emanuel Lutheran Church of Hamburg, where she was a past member of the Ladies Aid. She enjoyed traveling, baking, gardening, embroidery, playing cards and word find puzzles. She remained in her own home until May 2013, when she became a resident at Glencoe Regional Health Services long-term care. Survivors include her sons, Ronald (Vera) Oelfke of Plato, Loren Oelfke of Arlington; daughter, Marlys (Gerry) Thomas of Mayer; grandchildren, Susan (Paul) Mathwig, Brad (Kathy) Oelfke, Todd (Kris) Thomas, Kimberly (Marty) Miller; great-grandchildren, Amanda Tigre, Daniel Mathwig, Matthew Mathwig, Jenna (David) Mathews, Caitlyn Mathwig, Eric Oelfke, Krysta Oelfke, Riley Thomas, Megan Thomas, Will Miller; great-great-grandchildren, Isabel, Joselyn and Kristen Tigre, Leah Westphal, Hailey Mathwig, Blake and Bryce Mathews; brother, Elwood (Doris) Huepenbecker of Mankato; sister, Doris (Orville) Schrupp of Plato; sister-in-law, Mavis Huepenbecker of Glencoe; nieces, nephews, other relatives and many friends. Preceding her in death were her parents, William and Amanda Huepenbecker; husband, Leonard Oelfke; great-grandsons, Brady Thomas, Michael Oelfke; sister, Lorna Birkholz and her husband, Martin; brother, Frederick Huepenbecker; brothers-in-law, George Oelfke and his wife, Trudy, Otto Oelfke and his wife, Florence; sister-in-law, Esther Graupmann and her husband, Wilmer. Arrangements were by the Johnson-McBride Funeral Chapel of Glencoe. Online obituaries and guest book are available at www.hantge. com. Click on obituaries/ guest book.
Hamilton Continued from page 4
These habits include the experience of grappling with the challenges that representative democracy throws at us — and they serve as a reminder that we need trust in one another to make our national experiment in representative government work. As idealistic or even naive as this may sound, we need to work toward more trust among our people and between people and their government. Some new laws might help, but the challenge is more basic than law can address. Higher standards of conduct at all levels of American life must become the norm. Trust may have weakened, but most of us do not see or experience a corrupt America. Even as we have become a larger, more diverse nation, a sense of community remains crucially important to make this country safe and secure for ourselves and our children. We cannot take for granted our success at self-government over the centuries: the only invisible hand guiding and preserving our institutions is our collective will. Events in recent years have given us plenty of reason to be distrustful. Clearly, healthy skepticism is warranted in the wake of the NSA revelations, the problems with the rollout of the Affordable Care Act, and other evidence of both government and corporate misbehavior. In the end, however, “trust but verify” is still the golden standard. Our ability to function and move forward as a society rests on trust. Think about it. Lee Hamilton is Director of the Center on Congress at Indiana University. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for 34 years.
Marian Martha Nagel, 84, Mankato
Marian Martha Nagel, age 84, of Mankato, passed away peacefully on Tuesday morning, Nov. 12, 2013, at Autumn Grace where she had resided for the past several Marian years. Nagel For as much as she will be missed by her family and many friends, her loss may be reconciled by her accomplishments and her many acts of kindness. She was a devoted mother and championed for many worthy causes. She will be remembered for her warm smile and her true love for literature and nature. Marian was born in Wells on Sept. 21, 1929. She grew up on a farm with her parents, Julius & Martha Prescher, and 12 other siblings. She was married to Melvin H. Nagel in 1950 and they had three children, Charles Nagel of Lafayette, Dan Nagel of Mission Viejo, Calif., and Lou Ann Nagel of Buda, Texas. She is also survived by her three grandchildren, Colton Nagel, Jacob Nagel and Natalie Nagel, all of Mission Viejo, Calif.; and her two sisters, Eleanor Possin of Hartland, and Shirley Eckert of Mapleton. A Memorial Service will be held sometime this summer. Notification of time and place is pending.
History
85 Years Ago
January 17, 1929 Louis Kill, Editor Thursday morning when Panning Brothers went to their store to open it for the day’s business, they found the front door had been jimmied and robbers had taken practically all the stock of men’s shoes, leather coats and vests, heavy mittens and silk underwear and stockings; also some silk ties and wool blankets. At this writing it is hard to tell the exact amount taken but it is estimated that the loss will total between $1,500 and $2,000. As the Panning brothers carried no insurance the loss is a hard blow to the firm. Our doctors say that the epidemic of flu is subsiding in the community. Perhaps the frigid weather of the past two weeks was a means of putting a damper on it. The ice harvest is on and the work of refilling the ice houses of the village is in full swing. Considerable ice is being taken from Silver Lake again this year. However, the bulk of it will be shipped from Waconia, as this is in excellent quality and can be used for all purposes. The Citizens Ice Co., which has about thirty patrons, has moved its ice house to the railroad yards and will pack the ice directly from the cars. opening. Carpenters are now fitting the doors and panels in the foyer and lobby, and it is hoped to have the chairs and carpeting installed in the auditorium within a week, after which the projection and sound equipment will be put in. The heating and air conditioning systems have been completed and in operation for some time, and most of the electrical work and plumbing is completed. A change of ownership in the local Red Owl Store took place this week when Galen Westensee sold the grocery stock and fixtures to Mr. F. E. Thiede of Menominee, Wis. Mr. Thiede is taking over the business today. A Florida bound vacation trip ended just twenty miles from home, 45 minutes after their departure, for the Arnold Schrupp family early Saturday morning, with Mrs. Schrupp and daughter Fayetta, ending up in Mankato’s Immanuel hospital with injuries they received in a four-car crackup on highway 169, about a mile north of Mankato. Mrs. Schrupp, 56, suffered undetermined injuries, and the daughter, 17, suffered head cuts. Both were thrown from the car driven by son Calvin. The father also was in the car, but neither he nor his son were injured. Thirteen phones were installed in Henderson over the past year, and many more have been ordered, to be installed when materials become available, according too Chief Operator Norma Wiest. ton community is observing her 100th birthday today January 16th. Mrs. Wiemann is the oldest of a family of 12 children born to Mr. and Mrs. Martin Bandelin. A rural Gaylord man, Calvin Schrupp, has been appointed Sibley County Agricultural Inspector for a period from January 1, 1969 to January 1, 1970. His salary will be $2,100 per year. A sample of residents in this area will be asked about their television sets in their households as part of a nationwide survey the week of January 20, Director Guy A. Lutz of the Bureau of the Census Regional Office in St. Paul announced. The questions are aimed at determining the proportion of households in the U.S. with television sets, and the proportion with color sets, and the proportion with sets which can receive UHF.
25 Years Ago
January 19, 1989 Kurt Menk, Editor Andy Schatz, a five-year-old rural Green Isle boy is recovering from a severe eye injury he suffered during a recent BB gun accident. He was rushed to the Waconia Ridgeview Hospital and immediately transported by ambulance to the University of Minnesota Children’s Hospital. According to his parents Roger & Karen Schatz, surgery was performed but was unsuccessful. Sibley County Commissioners are considering hiring one administrator to oversee the social services and public health nursing departments when they move to the Poquette building this spring.
Welcome, Dr r. Carlin
Ridgeview Sibley Medical Center is pleased to welcome Emma Carlin, MD. Dr r. Carlin is board certified in family medicine and sees patients of all ages at the Arlington and Gaylord clinics. Emma Carlin, MD For appointments, call 507-964-2271.
65 Years Ago
January 20, 1949 Louis Kill, Editor Work on the new Lido Theater is being rushed with all possible speed in the hope that it will be completed by February 5th, the tentative date set for the
45 Years Ago
January 16, 1969 Val Kill, Editor Mrs. Caroline Wiemann, a lifelong resident of the Arling-
SIBLEY MEDICAL MEDICAL CENTER
www.sibleymedical.org
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 16, 2014, page 6 www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Sports
SE wrestlers dominate opponents
By Kurt Menk Editor The Sibley East varsity wrestling team dominated their opponents during a pair of meets last week. Sibley East defeated visiting Spectrum and Le SueurHenderson in Arlington on Friday night, Jan. 10. The Wolverines also defeated five opponents in Arlington on Saturday, Jan. 11. Sibley East will travel to Norwood Young America on Thursday night, Jan. 16. The Wolverines will compete in the Eden Prairie Wrestling Tournament on Saturday, Jan. 18. Sibley East will also travel to St. James on Tuesday night, Jan. 21. Sibley East 56 Spectrum 15 106-pounds: Tommy Wentzaff won by a major decision over Gary Leshovsky (S) 155, 113-pounds: Tanner Pasvogel (SE) was pinned by Esteban Teigan (S) 3:58. 120-pounds: Mitch Heibel (SE) was decisioned by Ryan Killeen (S) 7-1. 126-pounds: Logan Tesch (SE) was pinned by Luke Nolden (S) 0:52. 132-pounds: Jason Meyer (SE) pinned Sam Rogers (S) 3:23. 138-pounds: Both teams forfeited this match. 145-pounds: Hunter Retzlaff (SE) pinned Josiah Roberts (S) 3:50. 152-pounds: Quinlan Riffenburg (SE) won by a major decision over Noah Rogers (S) 12-2. 160-pounds: Hunter Voight (SE) pinned Noah Staupe (S) 1:14 170-pounds: Paul Schmidt (SE) won by a forfeit. 182-pounds: Austin Kube (SE) pinned Shane Herrlin (S) 1:11. 195-pounds: Cody Voight (SE)) won by a forfeit. 220-pounds: Nathan Rose (SE) pinned Eliot Uecker (S) 1:31 285-pounds: Jon DuFrane (SE) won by a forfeit. Sibley East 54 LeSueur-Henderson 23 106-pounds: Tommy Wentzlaff (SE) lost by a technical fall to Keon Naranjo (LSH) 19-4. 113-pounds: Tanner Pasvogel (SE) pinned Tucker Colling (LSH) 3:57. 120-pounds: Mitch Heibel (SE) was decisioned by Austin Anderly (LSH) 11-5. 126-pounds: Logan Tesch (SE) lost by a technical fall to Dylan Pauly (LSH) 21-4. 132-pounds: Jason Meyer (SE) pinned Jordan Carlson (LSH) 3:13. 138-pounds: Austin Brockhoff (SE) pinned Luke Wilson (LSH) 1:21. 145-pounds: Quinlan Riffenburg (SE) pinned Trevor Block (LSH) 5:08. 152-pounds: Hunter Retzlaff (SE) pinned Caleb Radloff (LSH) 2:52. 160-pounds: Mitch Wentzlaff (SE) pinned Mason Straub (LSH) 0:42. 170-pounds: Jake Wentzlaff (SE) won by a forfeit. 182-pounds: Aaron Kapke (SE) was pinned by Trenton Rogich (LSH) 3:33. 195-pounds: Cody Voight (SE) lost by a major decision to Clayton Colling (LSH) 141. 220-pounds: Nathan Rose (SE) won by a forfeit. 285-pounds: Jon DuFrane (SE) won by a default over Joe Abrahamson (LSH). Sibley East 41 River Valley 15 106-pounds: Justin Vinkemeier (SE) was pinned by Devin Johnson (RV) 1:57. 113-pounds: Tommy Wentzlaff (SE) was pinned by Conner Bertram (RV) 3:10. 120-pounds: Both teams forfeited this match. 126-pounds: Logan Tesch (SE) won by a major decision over James Ploeger (RV) 151. 132-pounds: Mason Voight (SE) pinned Tyson Meidl (RV) 3:03. 138-pounds: Austin Brockhoff (SE) won by a major decision over Sam Baier (RV) 12-0. 145-pounds: Quinlan Riffenburg (SE) decisioned Gerrit Meidl (RV) 9-2. 152-pounds: Hunter Retzlaff (SE) won by a forfeit. 160-pounds: Both teams forfeited this match. 170-pounds: Both teams forfeited this match. 182-pounds: Austin Kube (SE) was decisioned by Tim Krueger (RV) 11-5. 195-pounds: Cody Voight (SE) pinned Nathanial Rosado (RV) 1:45. 220-pounds: Jon DuFrane (SE) won by a forfeit. 285-pounds: Nathan Rose (SE) pinned Tyler Baird (RV) 0:52. Sibley East 60 St. Agnes 9 106-pounds: Justin Vinkemeier (SE) won by a forfeit. 113-pounds: Tanner Pasvogel (SE) pinned Justin Hernandez (SA) 0:44. 120-pounds: Mitch Heibel (SE) pinned Max Cummings (SA) 0:44. 126-pounds: Logan Tesch (SE) won by a forfeit. 132-pounds: Mason Voight (SE) won by a forfeit. 138-pounds: Both teams forfeited this match. 145-pounds: Quinlan Riffenburg (SE) pinned Joe Ryan (SA) 0:38. 152-pounds: Hunter Retzlaff (SE) pinned Anthony Tuarnowski (SA) 0:51. 160-pounds: Sibley East forfeited this match to Roger Dickerson (SA). 170-pounds: Austin Kube (SE) pinned Mark Jackson (SA) 3:14. 182-pounds: Both teams forfeited this match. 195-pounds: Cody Voight (SE) was decisioned by Wyatt Lanning (SA) 10-5. 220-pounds: Nathan Rose (SE) pinned Kevin Henry (SA) 0:48. 285-pounds: Jon DuFrane (SE) won by a forfeit. Sibley East 44 Trinity at River Ridge 29 106-pounds: Justin Vinkemeier (SE) was pinned by Jack Ridgeway (T) 1:21. 113-pounds: Tanner Pasvogel (SE) won by a technical fall over Andrew Michalek (T) 15-0. 120-pounds: Tanner Pasvogel (SE) pinned Steven Brewer (T) 0:17. 126-pounds: Sibley East forfeited this match to Peter Swanson (T). 132-pounds: Mason Voight (SE) pinned Mike Swanson (T) 0:35. 138-pounds: Austin Brockhoff (SE) pinned Colm Maines (T) 1:57. 145-pounds: Hunter Voight (SE) was pinned by Bryant Ridgeway (T) 3:36. 152-pounds: Hunter Retzlaff (SE) decisioned Dietrich Balsbaugh (T) 6-0. 160-pounds: Paul Schmidt (SE) lost by a technical fall to John Paul Monhaut (T) 19-1. 170-pounds: Andrew Schauer (SE) was pinned by Sam Swanson (T) 2:41. 182-pounds: Austin Kube (SE) pinned Dave Dahl (T) 3:45. 195-pounds: Both teams forfeited this match. 220-pounds: Nathan Rose (SE) won by a forfeit. 285-pounds: Jon DuFrane (SE) won by a forfeit. Sibley East 71 Cretin-Derham Hall 5 106-pounds: Tommy Wentzlaff (SE) pinned Casey Malone (CDH) 5:45. 113-pounds: Tanner Pasvogel (SE) won by a technical fall over Casey Bulmer (CDH) 20-3. 120-pounds: Mitch Heibel (SE) pinned Austin Miller (CDH) 1:42. 126-pounds: Mason Voight (SE) lost by a technical fall to Josh Goldberg (CDH) 15-0. 132-pounds: Jason Meyer (SE) won by a forfeit. 138-pounds: Austin Brockhoff (SE) won by a forfeit. 145-pounds: Hunter Retzlaff (SE) pinned Jack Gallagher (CDH) 3:32. 152-pounds: Hunter Voight (SE) pinned Dan Gainer (CDH) 2:11. 160-pounds: Jake Wentzlaff (SE) pinned Campbell Wozniak (CDH) 1:17. 170-pounds: Andrew Schauer (SE) pinned Noah Tischer (CDH) 3:13. 182-pounds: Austin Kube (SE) pinned Noah Kelliher (CDH) 3:54. 195-pounds: Cody Voight (SE) pinned Cam Garret (CDH) 1:34. 220-pounds: Nathan Rose (SE) pinned Jack Gainer (CDH) 0:56. 285-pounds: Jon DuFrane (SE) pinned Conner Roering (CDH) 5:52. Sibley East 63 Robbinsdale Armstrong 9 106-pounds: Justin Vinkemeier (SE) decisioned Gunner Johansen (RA) 6-4. 113-pounds: Tanner Pasvogel (SE) pinned Bryce DeWitt (RA) 3:34. 120-pounds: Mitch Heibel (SE) pinned James Young (RA) 1:27. 126-pounds: Logan Tesch (SE) won by a forfeit. 132-pounds: Jason Meyer (SE) pinned Kevin Trinh (RA) 2:58. 138-pounds: Austin Brockhoff (SE) pinned Ben Highland (RA) 2:53. 145-pounds: Quinlan Riffenburg (SE) was decisioned by Miguel Gonzalez (RA) 86. 152-pounds: Hunter Retzlaff (SE) pinned Brandon Lundeen (RA) 1:03. 160-pounds: Jake Wentzlaff (SE) pinned Quas Assideq (RA) 4:25. 170-pounds: Paul Schmidt (SE) was pinned by Troy Smith (RA) 1:44. 182-pounds: Austin Kube (SE) decisioned Steven Holten (RA) 8-4. 195-pounds: Cody Voight (SE) pinned Sam Appleget (RA) 1:55. 220-pounds: Nathan Rose (SE) pinned Hutton Adams (RA) 1:20. 285-pounds: Jon DuFrane (SE) decisioned Stanley Dokken (RA) 3-0.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Sibley East junior McKenzie Sommers (50) grabbed one of her dozen re-
bounds against Le Sueur-Henderson on Thursday night, Jan. 9.
SE girls basketball team topples the Giants 61-34
By Kurt Menk Editor A strong second half propelled the Sibley East varsity girls basketball team past visiting Le Sueur-Henderson 6134 in Minnesota River Conference action on Thursday night, Jan. 9. “The girls really came out refocused and ready to work,” said Sibley East head coach Todd Warzecha. “We scored 38 points in the second half which is our highest half output of the season.” Warzecha added, “We really stepped up the defense and forced 25 turnovers in the second half which led to easy opportunities on the offensive end. It was a great overall effort.” Junior McKenzie Sommers sparked the Lady Wolverines with 23 points in the win. Seniors Megan Eckberg and Kimberly Kurtzweg hooped seven points each while senior Jessica Garza and sophomore McKayla Stumm netted six points apiece. Junior Shelby Voight and senior Maren Miner scored four and three points respectively while juniors Autumn Dose and Kelli Martens had two points each. Senior Britany Reierson added one point. The Lady Wolverines hit 19 of 46 attempts from twopoint range for 41 percent and nailed three of 27 shots from beyond the three-point arc for 11 percent. Sibley East also canned 14 of 21 free throw attempts for 67 percent. Sibley East collected 20 offensive rebounds and 26 defensive boards in the victory. Sommers pulled down a dozen caroms while Eckberg snared nine rebounds. Sophomore Katie Tuchtenhagen and Garza yanked down six and five caroms respectively. Garza also contributed seven steals and four assists while Kurtzweg and Sommers had four thefts apiece. The Lady Wolverines, 2-2 in the MRC and 4-5 overall, will travel to Tri-City United in conference play at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 17.
C-squad
The Sibley East C-squad girls basketball team defeated visiting Le Sueur-Henderson 39-28 on Thursday evening, Jan. 9. Hannah Wentzlaff and Alli Harter sparked the Lady Wolverines with 15 and 14 points respectively. Ana Zuniga and Alyssa Stoeckman netted three points apiece while Perla Lopez and Alison Eibs added two points each. Wentzlaff and Stoeckman also snared 11 and six rebounds respectively.
SE boys drop 3 road games
By Kurt Menk Editor The Sibley East varsity boys basketball team dropped three games on the road last week. The Wolverines, 1-4 in the Minnesota River Conference and 4-11 overall, will host Mayer Lutheran in Minnesota River Conference action at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 16. Sibley East will travel to Jordan in MRC play at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 21. Watertown-Mayer 75 Sibley East 71 The visiting Sibley East varsity boys basketball team stayed close throughout the game, but lost to WatertownMayer 75-71 in Minnesota River Conference action on Tuesday night, Jan. 7. Junior Zac Weber and senior Brody Rodning led the Wolverines with 28 and 22 points respectively. Senior Ben White and junior Darin Neisen scored seven and six points respectively while junior Jordan Petzel netted four points. Senior Cordell Bates and junior Andrew Bullert added two points each. Individual and team statistics were unavailable from this game. Maple River 66 Sibley East 62 The visiting Sibley East varsity boys basketball team, for the second consecutive game, stayed close, but came up short in a 66-62 loss to Maple River in non-conference action on Thursday evening, Jan. 9. Senior Brody Rodning tossed in 26 points during the loss. Junior Jordan Petzel also hit double figures with 10 points while junior Zac Weber scored eight points. Senior Cordell Bates and junior Darin Neisen netted six points each while junior Andrew Bullert hooped four points. Junior Lukas Bullert added two points. Individual and team statistics were unavailable from this game. Tri-City United 70 Sibley East 52 The visiting Sibley East varsity boys basketball team got off to a slow start and lost to Tri-City United 70-52 in Minnesota River Conference action on Friday night, Jan. 10. Senior Brody Rodning poured in 24 points during the loss. Junior Zac Weber also hit double digits with 12 points while senior Ben White had five points. Juniors Lukas Bullert and Zach Garza netted four points each while senior Colin Mehlhop tallied two points. Junior Jordan Petzel added one point. Individual and team statistics were unavailable from this game.
Milestone
Senior Hunter Retzlaff recorded his 150th career win for the Wolverines during the past week.
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Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Grade PreK-2 Wrestlers
The following youngsters in grades K-2 are participants in the Sibley East Youth Wrestling Program. Front Row: (l to r) Mausten Krueger, Blake Swenson, Oliver Rechtzigel, Cohen Neisen, Jameson Pershau, Atley Strack, Tanner Johnson, Trent Wisch and Brayden Linsneier. Middle Row: (l to r) Axel Weber, Bryce Stainbrook, Elijah Pufahl, Jorge Soria, Connor Bartlette, Tommy Ziegler, Caden Willmsen, Chaldin Wisch and Nathan Strobel. Back Row: (l to r) Coach Dan Morton, William Schulte, Lucas Luepke, Riley Drexler, Ryan Maynesson, Henry Strobel, Bryce Klancke, Parker Burdorf and coach Donovan Steele.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Grade 3-6 Wrestlers
The following youngsters in grades 3-6 are participants in the Sibley East Youth Wrestling Program. Front Row: (left to right) Matthew Ziegler, Riley Drexler, Zachary Pazdernik, Taylor Grob, Drayden Morton, Derek Steele, Logan Steele and Cole Lovaas. Middle Row: (l to r) Owen Reid, Aaron Ehrich, Joey Mueller, Tucker Hendrycks, Lincoln Carpenter, Keegan Effertz, Kylin Goossen, McCabe Voight, and Jothan Mendoza. Back Row: (l to r) Coach Dan Morton, Ciara Pierce, Ian Malinowski, Migual Maris, Beauen Harbarth, Bo Rechtzigel, Roman Jaquez, Logan McCormick and coach Donovan Steele.
Legals
Certificate of Assumed Name State Of Minnesota 1. List the exact assumed name under which the business is or will be conducted: Ridgeview Sibley Home Care. 2. Principal place of business: 601 West Chandler St, Arlington, MN 55307 3. List the name and complete street address of all persons conducting business under the above Assumed Name: Sibley Medical Center, 500 South Maple Street, Waconia, MN 55387 4. I, the undersigned, certify that I am signing this document as the person whose signature is required, or as agent of the person whose signature would be required who has authorized me to sign this document on his behalf. I further certify that I have completed all required fields, and that the information in this document is true and correct and in compliance with the applicable chapter of Minnesota Statutes. I understand that by signing this document I am subject to the penalties of perjury as set forth in Section 609.48 as if I had signed this document under oath. Dated: January 2, 2014 /s/Katherine J. Douglas Authorized Agent, Authorized to sign on behalf of Todd Sandberg, President Email address for Official Notices: todd.sandberg@sibleymedical.org List a name and daytime phone number of a person who can be contacted about this form: Jackie Bernu, 612-492-7796 Publish: January 9 and 16, 2014 Certificate of Assumed Name State of Minnesota 1. List the exact assumed name under which the business is or will be conducted: Ridgeview Arlington Clinic 2. Principal place of business: 601 West Chandler St, Arlington, MN 55307 3. List the name and complete street address of all persons conducting business under the above Assumed Name: Sibley Medical Center, 500 South Maple Street, Waconia, MN 55387. 4. I, the undersigned, certify that I am signing this document as the person whose signature is required, or as agent of the person whose signature would be required who has authorized me to sign this document on his behalf. I further certify that I have completed all required fields, and that the information in this document is true and correct and in compliance with the applicable chapter of Minnesota Statutes. I understand that by signing this document I am subject to the penalties of perjury as set forth in Section 609.48 as if I had signed this document under oath. Dated: January 2, 2014 /s/ Katherine J. Douglas Authorized Agent, Authorized to sign on behalf of Todd Sandberg, President Email address for Official Notices: todd.sandberg@sibleymedical.org List a name and daytime phone number of a person who can be contacted about this form: Jackie Bernu, 612-492-7796 Publish: January 9 and 16, 2014 Certificate of Assumed Name State of Minnesota 1. List the exact assumed name under which the business is or will be conducted: Ridgeview Sibley Home Care. 2. Principal place of business: 601 West Chandler St, Arlington, MN 55307 3. List the name and complete street address of all persons conducting business under the above Assumed Name: Sibley Medical Center, 500 South Maple Street, Waconia, MN 55387 4. I, the undersigned, certify that I am signing this document as the person whose signature is required, or as agent of the person whose signature would be required who has authorized me to sign this document on his behalf. I further certify that I have completed all required fields, and that the information in this document is true and correct and in compliance with the applicable chapter of Minnesota Statutes. I understand that by signing this document I am subject to the penalties of perjury as set forth in Section 609.48 as if I had signed this document under oath. Dated: January 2, 2014 /s/ Katherine J. Douglas Authorized Agent, Authorized to sign on behalf of Todd Sandberg, President Email address for Official Notices: todd.sandberg@sibleymedical.org List a name and daytime phone number of a person who can be contacted about this form: Jackie Bernu, 612-492-7796 Publish: January 9 and 16, 2014 NOTICE OF HEARING Please take notice that a hearing for confirmation of the Viewer’s Report, which has been filed with the Watershed District, will be held on January 27, 2014, at 1:30 p.m. at the Sibley County Service Center, 111 8th Street, Gaylord, Minnesota. The Viewer’s Report is of a redetermination of benefits ordered by the High Island Creek Watershed District Board of Managers for High Island Project 13 which is the old Sibley County Ditch No. 6A. The lands affected are located in Sections 9, 10, 15 and 16, Township 113, Range 27, Sibley County, Minnesota, and property owners are City of Arlington, Seneca Foods Corp., Patricia M. Geib Revocable Trust, Esther Beseke, Paul W. and Naomi Doehling, State Bank of Hamburg, Jonathan Suedbeck and Becky Suedbeck Harbarth, Arlington Economic Development Authority, William R. and Peggy Ann Soeffker, Vincent O. Danielson Revocable Trust and Karilyn R. Danielson Revocable Trust, State of Minnesota Department of Transportation, Sibley County and Minnesota Valley Regional Rail Authority. The purpose of this hearing is to determine if the Viewer’s Report should be confirmed by the Board of Managers. Dated this 31st day of December, 2013. High Island Creek Watershed District Board of Managers Publish: January 9, 16 and 23, 2014 JESSENLAND TOWNSHIP The Jessenland Township Planning and Zoning Commission meets the third Monday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Jessenland Town Hall located on Sibley County Highway 6. If the third Monday of the month falls on a national holiday then the alternate meeting date of the fourth Monday of the month will be used. Publish: January 16
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Youngsters win in KC free throw contest
to prevent proper vision, $125, Gaylord PD; Bradley C. Smith, 42, Grandview, Mo., driver must carry proof of insurance when operating vehicle, dismissed, Gaylord PD; Saengnakhone Soukchaleun, 24, Minneapolis, speed, $135, Gaylord PD; Michael D. Becker, 52, New Ulm, speed, $135, MSP; Clinton A. Bennett, 32, Winthrop, possess/sale small amount of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, $185, MSP; Lydia M. Bonnett, 24, New Ulm, speed, $145, MSP; Jolynn A. Hahn, 54, Winthrop, speed, $125, MSP; Karl Hailperin, 31, St. Peter, duty to drive with due care-speed greater than reasonable, $125, MSP; Michael R. Henderson, 24, Winthrop, speed, continued, unsupervised probation one year, pay costs, remain law-abiding, no moving violations, $145, MSP; Bettyann J. Johnson, 50, Lafayette, railroad-stop or yield sign violation, $125, MSP; Dana M. Kirkbride, 49, New Hope, speed, $135, MSP; Ricky L. Koester, 41, Northfield, speed, $135, MSP; Kenneth M. Newsome, 49, Tampa, Fla., duty to drive with due care-speed greater than reasonable, $125, MSP; Jessica A. Peterson, 28, Winthrop, speed, $135, driver must carry proof of insurance when operating vehicle, dismissed, MSP; Chad A. Sigurdson, 32, Mound, driving after cancellation-inimical to public safety, unsupervised probation two years, local confinement one year, stay 335 days for one year, credit for time served four days, remain lawabiding, no misdemeanor moving violations or greater, $285, speed, dismissed, MSP; Gary D. St. John, 39, Arlington, seat belt required, $110, MSP; Gerry E. Wright, 52, Cosmos, expired medical card, seatbelt violation in commercial vehicle, $210, MSP; Brady B. Beckstead, 20, Cleveland, require/permit offense by another, local confinement 90 days, credit for time served 90 days, $85, possess/sale small amount of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia-use or possession, dismissed, SO; Andrew D. Burdick, 25, Chanhassen, duty to drive with due care-speed greater than reasonable, $125, SO; Kenneth L. Gitter, 52, Robbinsdale, speed, $145, SO; Jonathan M. Johnson, 26, Le Sueur, driver must carry proof of insurance when operating vehicle, dismissed, Isaura Mendoza, 28, Gaylord, driver must carry proof of insurance when operating vehicle, dismissed, SO; Chandra L. Steinhaus, 40, Le Sueur, DWI-operated motor vehicle under influence of alcohol, DWIoperate motor vehicle-alcohol concentration 0.08 within two hours, dismissed, careless driving, stay of imposition, supervised probation one year, sign probation agreement, follow all instructions of probation, contact with probation, follow all conditions set forth in probation agreement, no alcohol/controlled substance use, no possession of alcohol or drugs, random testing, chemical dependency evaluation/treatment, sign all releases of information, follow recommendations of evaluation, victim impact panel, no driver license violations, no driving without insurance, no alcohol violations, $385, SO; Cory G. Hanson, 42, Gibbon, seat belt required, driver must carry proof of insurance when operating vehicle, continued, unsupervised probation one year, pay costs, remain law-abiding, no driving without insurance, $395, Winthrop PD; Robert M. Hazelton, 40, Ogema, domestic abuse-violates order for protection within ten years of previous conviction/adj of delinq, supervised probation two years, local confinement 365 days, stay 275 days for two years, credit for time served ten days, consecutive other case, keep court/attorney informed of current address, follow all instructions of probation, sign probation agreement, sign all releases of information, remain law-abiding, no violations of an order for protection, follow any/all orders for protection/harassment orders in effect, $140, Winthrop PD; Stewart J. Paskewitz, 27, Vesta, speed, $135, Winthrop PD; Eldwin R. Schmidt, 85, Winthrop, failure to yield to vehicle/pedestrian, $135, Winthrop PD.
Sibley County Court
The following misdemeanors, petty misdemeanors and gross misdemeanors were heard in District Court December 27-January 3: Minnesota State Patrol (MSP); Sheriff ’s Office (SO); Department of Natural Resources (DNR); MN Department of Transportation (MNDOT): Joshua L. Doehling, 34, Arlington, speed, continued, unsupervised probation six months, pay costs, no speeding, $100, Arlington PD; Maurice Q. Berry, 19, Morton, possession of drug paraphernalia, possess/sale small amount of marijuana, driving after revocation, dismissed, Gaylord PD; Dustin D. Hambleton, 27, Brownton, domestic assaultcommits act with intent to cause fear of immediate bodily harm or death, local confinement 56 days, credit for time served 56 days, concurrent other case, $125, neglect of a child-likely substantial harm physical/emotional health, dismissed, Gaylord PD; Karen M. Johnson, 51, Faribault, speed, $145, Gaylord PD; Alejandra S. Mata, 20, Gaylord, driving without a valid license or vehicle class/type, driver who is not owner must later produce proof of insurance if required, dismissed, traffic accidents-collision with unattended vehicle-notify victim or police, continued, unsupervised probation one year, pay costs, pay restitution before fines, fees and surcharges, , remain lawabiding, no driver license violations, no driving without insurance, $450, Gaylord PD; Joseph C. Yetzer, 45, Farmington, pharmacy-legend drugs-unlawful possess/sell/give away/barter/exchange/distribute, driving after suspension, dismissed, Henderson PD; Clinton A. Bennett, 32, Winthrop drugs-possess/sale small amount of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, $185, MSP; Jose R. Cardenas, 38, Winthrop, windshield tinted or glazed, driver must carry proof of insurance when operating vehicle, dismissed, MSP; Kenneth M. Dakken, 56, Fargo N.D., speed, $125, MSP; Karl Hailperin, 31, St. Peter, duty to drive with due care-speed greater than reasonable, $125, MSP; Mark A. Huntington, 50, Le Sueur, speed, $225, MSP; Lela S. Kampfer, 25, New Ulm, speed, driver must carry proof of insurance when operating vehicle, continued, unsupervised probation one year, pay costs, remain law-abiding, no driver license violations, no driving without insurance, $225, MSP; Dana M. Kirkbride, 49, New Hope, speed, $135, MSP; Levi J. Koenen, 21, Clara City, speed, $135, MSP; Katherine A. Larson, 22, Shoreview, speed, $225, MSP; Norma L. Martinez-Vazquez, 27, Arlington, driving without a valid license of vehicle class/type, speed, $285, MSP; Justine S. Myers, 23, Kingston, speed, $135, MSP; Joseph P. Pitt, 25, Chippewa Falls, Wis., speed, $135, MSP; Cole O. A. Raisbeck, 20, Hutchinson, speed, $125, MSP; Alissha N. Reeves, 29, Gaylord, unsafe equipment-unlawful to drive any vehicle which is in unsafe condition, $110, MSP; Abdi S. S. Sayid, 36, Burnsville, speed, continued, unsupervised probation one year, pay costs, no moving violations, $125, MSP; Jennifer L. M. Becker, 27, Green Isle, speed, $125, SO; Scott W. Brown-Mooney, 42, Le Center, driving after suspension, $275, SO; Ruth T. Cortez, 57, New Auburn, stray/companion animals-dog bites, dog running at large, keeping an unlicensed dog, dismissed, SO; Kenneth L. Gitter, 52, Robbinsdale, speed, $145, SO; Dustin D. Hambleton, 27, Brownton, fleeing a peace officer by a means other than a motor vehicle, local confinement 56 days credit for time served 56 days, concurrent other case, $135, SO; Vanessa M. Kizer, 34, Winthrop, driving after revocation, local confinement two days, credit for time served two days, $260, SO; Timothy J. Magnus, 35, Jordan, speed, driver must carry proof of insurance when operating vehicle, unsupervised probation one year, pay costs, remain law-abiding, no driver license violations, no driving without insurance, $245, SO; Sebastian Sanchez, 19, Gaylord, driving after revocation, $185, SO; Daniel J. Stamereilers, 27, North Mankato, reckless drivingdrives with willful or wanton disregard for safety, duty to drive with due care-speed greater than reasonable, driving after revocation, dismissed, SO; Jameel L. Williams, 34, Gaylord, stray/companion animal-dog bites, pay restitution before fines, fees, and surcharges, $630.79, dog running at large, keeping an unlicensed dog, dismissed, SO; Bernard J. Wixon, 66, Arlington, speed, continued, unsupervised probation one year, pay costs, remain law abiding, no moving violations, $145, SO; Joseph C. Yetzer, 45, Farmington, driving after revocation, continued, unsupervised probation one year, remain law-abiding, no driver license violations, no driving without insurance, pay costs, $200, driver must carry proof of insurance when operating vehicle, dismissed, SO; Samuel J. Pendleton, 17, Morton, speed, $145, Winthrop PD; Jesse R. Rider, 18, Gibbon, seat belt required, $110. Winthrop PD. The following felonies were heard in District Court December 27- January 3: Joseph C. Yetzer, 45, Farmington, drugs-possess schedule 1,2,3,4-not small amount marijuana, continued, supervised probation five years, local confinement seven days, credit for time served seven days, community work service 40 hours for indeterminate, follow all conditions set forth in the probation agreement, follow all instructions of probation, sign probation agreement, sign all releases of information, contact with probation, no alcohol/controlled substance use, no possession of alcohol or drugs, random testing, remain law-abiding, no same or similar, chemical dependency evaluation/treatment, follow recommendations of evaluation, keep court/attorney informed of current address, $600, Henderson PD; Maurice Q. Berry, 19, Morton, drugs-possess schedule 1,2,3,4-not small amount marijuana, continued, supervised probation three years, local confinement six days, credit for time served six days, sentence to service 20 days for indeterminate, contact with probation, follow all conditions set forth in the probation agreement, follow all instructions of probation, sign probation agreement, sign all releases of information, chemical dependency evaluation/treatment, follow recommendations of evaluation, no alcohol/controlled substance use, no possession of alcohol or drugs, random testing, remain law-abiding, keep court/attorney informed of current address, $600, SO; Daniel J. Stamereilers, 27, North Mankato, fleeing a peace officer in a motor vehicle, continued, supervised probation three years, sentence to service five days for indeterminate, electronic home monitor 45 days for indeterminate, pay costs, no misdemeanor moving violations, follow all instruction of probation, follow all conditions set forth in the probation agreement, sign probation agreement, contact with probation, remain law abiding, driver improvement clinic within six months, $400, SO. The following misdemeanors, petty misdemeanors and gross misdemeanors were heard in District Court January 3-10: Minnesota State Patrol (MSP); Sheriff’s Office (SO); Department of Natural Resources (DNR); MN Department of Transportation (MNDOT): Fredric C. Bullert, 60, Gaylord, DWI-operate motor vehicle under influence of alcohol, stay of imposition, supervised probation two years, local confinement 30 days, sign probation agreement, follow all conditions set forth in the probation agreement, sign all releases of information, chemical dependency evaluation/treatment, follow recommendation of evaluation, follow all instructions of probation, victim impact panel, no alcohol related offenses, no alcohol/controlled substance use, no possession of alcohol or drugs, random testing, remain law-abiding, contact with probation, $485, DWIoperate motor vehicle-alcohol concentration 0.08 within two hours, dismissed, Gaylord PD; Jessica A. Cruz, 31, Gaylord, driving after suspension, dismissed, Gaylord PD; Steven H. Mehlhop Jr., 35, Gaylord, windshield covered with frost or steam
Four boys and three girls were first place winners in the local 2013 Knights of Columbus Free Throw Contest which was held at the Sibley East Senior High School in Arlington on Sunday afternoon, Jan. 13. Each contestant shot three warm up free throws and then 15 consecutive free throws. The boy winners were Oscar Kreft (10-year-old di-
vision), Aaron Flieth (11year-old division), Austin Weck-werth (13-year-old division) and Gavin Bates (14year-old division) The girl winners were Taylor Bachman (9-year-old division), Gabby Bates (10-yearold division) and Madisyn Petree (12-year-old division). There were nearly 20 participants in the six boys and girls age division.
The local winners will now compete in the District Free Throw Contest in Le Sueur on Sunday afternoon, Feb. 16. In the event that the champion is unable to attend, the second place winner will attend. The local contest was sponsored by the local Knights of Columbus organization. The chairperson for the free throw contest was Tom Noack.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
The following youngsters were first place winners in the annual Knights of Columbus Free Throw Contest. Front Row: (left to right) Gabby Bates, Taylor
Bachman and Madisyn Petree. Back Row: (l to r) Oscar Kreft, Gavin Bates, Austin Weckwerth and Aaron Flieth.
Blue Earth County Fair to move to Mankato
Shareholders of the Blue Earth County Fair Association voted by an overwhelming margin to move the fair from its current location in Garden City to the edge of Mankato, according to the KNUJ Radio website. The final tally was 175 votes to authorize the sale and 76 votes against it. The move is contingent on the construction of a new fairgrounds from scratch. A feasibility study will be done to determine the cost of obtaining at least 30 acres near Mankato and constructing the buildings necessary to host a fair. The study will also determine whether moving the financially struggling fair would return it to profitability. The vote came after over an hour of comments from shareholders, some for the move, some against it. The move could happen as soon as 2015. Two independent auditors were on hand to oversee the vote to verify its legitimacy.
Menus
SENIOR DINING Call 326-3401 for a meal Suggested Donation $3.85 Meals are served at Highland Commons dining room Monday-Friday Monday: Tator tot casserole, green beans, peaches, bread with margarine, pudding, low fat milk. Tuesday: Roast pork, whole potatoes, buttered cooked cabbage, bread with margarine, rosy applesauce, low fat milk. Wednesday: Lasagna, California blend vegetables, lettuce salad with dressing, garlic bread, bar, low fat milk. Thursday: Oven crispy chicken, mashed potatoes with gravy, mixed vegetables, bread with margarine, poke cake, low fat milk. Friday: Meaty beef stew with carrots and potatoes, cole slaw, breadstick with margarine, apricots, low fat milk. SIBLEY EAST ELEMENTARY BREAKFAST MENU Arlington and Gaylord Breakfast is served at 8:00 a.m. daily. A 1/2 pint of milk is served with each meal daily. Menu is subject to change. Monday: No School. Tuesday: Pop Tart, cheese stick, juice, milk. Wednesday: Frudel, juice, milk. Thursday: Muffin, seeds, juice, milk. Friday: Mini pancake, juice, milk. SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL MENU Arlington A 1/2 pint of milk and an enriched grain product is served with each meal. Additional milk is available for 40 cents each. Menu is subject to change. Monday: No School. Tuesday: Chicken nuggets, seasoned rice, vegetable, dipping sauces, fruit, milk. Wednesday: Hot dog on whole grain bun, oven potatoes, brown beans, veggie sticks, fruit, milk. Thursday: Tator tot hotdish, creamy fruit, veggie sticks, breadstick, milk. Friday: Sloppy Joe on whole grain bun, oven potatoes, veggie sticks, fruit, milk. SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL MENU Gaylord A 1/2 pint of milk and an enriched grain product is served with each meal. Additional milk is available for 40 cents each. Menu is subject to change. Monday: No School. Alternate: Tuesday: Chicken nuggets, seasoned rice, green beans, broccoli, fruit, milk. Alternate: Cheese stuffed sticks. Wednesday: Hot dog on whole grain bun, oven potatoes, baked beans, veggie sticks, fruit, milk. Alternate: Soup & salad bar. Thursday: Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes, corn, fruit, milk. Alternate: Cold cut sandwich. Friday: Sloppy Joe, oven potatoes, veggie sticks, fruit, milk. Alternate: Teriyaki chicken rice bowl.
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Church News
ZION LUTHERAN 814 W. Brooks St. Arlington – (507) 964-5454 James Carlson, Pastor Sunday, January 19: 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Sunday School/fellowship. Tuesday January 21: 9:00 a.m. Quilting. 6:00-7:00 p.m. TOPS in church basement. Wednesday, January 22: 3:45 p.m. 7th & 9th Confirmation. 4:30 p.m. 8th Confirmation. Thursday, January 23: 9:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. Zion service on cable. 9:00 a.m. Quilting. 2:00 p.m. Newsletter deadline. CREEKSIDE COMMUNITY CHURCH Christian & Missionary Alliance Pastor John Cherico 114 Shamrock Drive Arlington – 507-964-2872 email: creeksidecc@mediacombb.net Saturday, January 18: 10:00 a.m. - Noon HTM Mobile Food Shelf at Creekside. Special soup luncheon provided. All are welcome to receive free groceries. Sunday, January 19: 9:00 a.m. Sunday school for children age 4-6th grade and Adult Sunday school. 10:30 a.m. Worship service. Wednesday, January 22: 7:008:30 p.m. R.E.A.C.H. youth group at Terry and Becky Shogren’s home, 6th through 12th grade. Thursday, January 23: 6:30 p.m. Men’s community Bible study at Chuck Peik’s home. 1:00 & 7:00 p.m. Women’s community Bible study, “Revelation” at Jean Olson’s home. SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST 7th Ave. N.W., Arlington (507) 304-3410 Pastor Robert Brauer 507-234-6770 Saturday: Church services at 9:30 a.m. Bible study at 11:00 a.m. Fellowship dinner at 12:00 p.m. All are welcome. UNITED METHODIST Arlington Rodney J. Stemme, Pastor www.arlingtonunited methodist.org Saturday, January 18: 8:00 a.m. A-Men men’s group. 10:00 a.m. Women’s Bible study at Bette Nelson’s. Sunday, January 19: 9:00 and 11:00 a.m. Worship. 10:15 a.m. Sunday school. Monday, January 20: 6:30 p.m. SPPRC. Deadline for February newsletter items. Tuesday, January 21: 7:00 p.m. Ad. Council. Wednesday, January 22: 7:00 p.m. Choir and Confirmation. 8:15 p.m. Bible study. Thursday, January 23: 10:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. Worship on cable TV. 1:00 & 7:00 p.m. Women’s Bible study at Jean Olson’s. ST. PAUL LUTHERAN (WELS), Arlington Bruce Hannemann, Pastor WEBSITE: www.stpaularlington.com EMAIL: Bruce.Hannemann@stpaul arlington.com Friday, January 17: 4:00 p.m. BB @ Belle Plaine grades 3-6. 5:00 p.m. Grades 5-8. Saturday, January 18: 9:00 a.m. Grades 3-6 home with Redwood Falls. 10:00 a.m.Grades 58. Sunday, January 19: 8:45 a.m. Sunday school. 9:00 a.m. Family Bible study, 10:00 a.m. Worship, fellowship & choir. 6:30 p.m. Youth group meeting. Monday, January 20: No School. 10:00 a.m. Calendar info due. Tuesday, January 21: 10:00 a.m. Good Samaritan service. Wednesday, January 22: 2:00 p.m. Bible Study. 3:45 p.m. Public school Confirmation class. 7:30 p.m. Choir. Thursday, January 23: 10:00 a.m. Bulletin information due. 11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Services on cable TV channel 8. GAYLORD ASSEMBLY OF GOD Gaylord Bob Holmbeck, Pastor Friday, January 17: 4:00 p.m. Shakopee prison visit. 6:30 p.m. Thomas Bible study, 8510 Penn Ave., Bloomington. Sunday, January 19: 9:00 a.m. Sunday school. 10:00 a.m. Sunday worship service. 1:15 & 1:30 p.m. Oak Terrace worship service. Wednesday, January 22: 6:30 p.m. Wednesday evening Bible classes and Youth Focused. 8:00 p.m. Supper-Welcome! ST. PAUL’S UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Henderson (507) 248-3594 (Office) Deb Meyer, Pastor Find us on Facebook: St. Paul’s UCC - Henderson Sunday, January 12: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School. 10:00 a.m. Worship with Communion ST. PAUL’S EV. REFORMED CHURCH 15470 Co. Rd. 31, Hamburg Dan Schnabel, Pastor 952-467-3878 www.stpaulsrcus.org Sunday, January 19: 8:30 a.m. Sunday school and Bible study. 9:30 a.m. Worship service. Wednesday, January 22: 6:30 p.m. Catechism class. ORATORY OF ST. THOMAS THE APOSTLE Jessenland 507-248-3550 Fr. Sam Perez Thursday: Weekly Mass at 5:00 p.m. ST. MARY, MICHAEL AND BRENDAN AREA FAITH COMMUNITY Fr. Keith Salisbury, Pastor Friday, January 17: 8:30 a.m. Mass (Mar). 4:30-8:00 p.m. KC Fish Boil. Saturday, January 18: 5:00 p.m. Mass (Mar). Sunday, January 19: 7:30 a.m. Mass (Bre). 9:00-10:15 a.m. Elementary religious education (Mar). 9:00 a.m. Mass (Mic). 10:30 a.m. Mass (Mar). Monday, January 20: 8:30 a.m. Mass (Bre and Mar). 8:00 p.m. AA and AlaNon (Mar). Tuesday, January 21: 8:30 a.m. Mass (Bre and Mar). Wednesday, January 22: 8:30 a.m. Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m. Word and Communion (Oak Terrace). 5:00 p.m. Mass (Mar). 7:00-8:00 p.m. Jr./Sr. High Elementary Religious Education (Mar). Thursday, January 23: 8:30 a.m. Mass (Bre and Mic). 7:30 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous (Mic). TRINITY LUTHERAN 32234 431st Ave., Gaylord Rev. James Snyder, Sunday, January 19: 10:00 a.m. Worship service. ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN (Missouri Synod) Arlington Pastor William Postel Phone 507-964-2400 Thursday, January 16: 5:30 p.m. Deadline for bulletin information. Sunday, January 19: 9:00 a.m. Bible class. 10:00 a.m. Worship. Wednesday, January 22: 6:00 p.m. Confirmation. EVANGELICAL COVENANT CHURCH 107 W. Third St., Winthrop Pastor Kyle Kachelmeier (507) 647- 5777 Parsonage (507) 647-3739 www.wincov.org Saturday, January 18: 9:00 a.m. Clothes Closet. 10:00 a.m. Food Cupboard. Sunday, January 19: Blood pressure checks before and after service. 9:30 a.m. Worship. 10:45 a.m. Sunday school. Monday, January 20: Meals on Wheels this week. Wednesday, January 22: 9:00 a.m. Prayer coffee. 6:00 p.m. AWANA. Thursday, January 23: 9:30 a.m. Women’s Bible study. 6:30 p.m. Men’s group meeting at Chuck Peik’s. ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN Green Isle Pastor Eric W. Rapp Friday, January 17: 10:00 a.m. Deadline for Sunday bulletin. Sunday, January 19: 9:00 a.m. Worship. 10:00 a.m. Sunday school. 10:15 a.m. Bible study with Rhonda. 3:30 p.m. Bible study with Pastor. Monday, January 20: Joint Elders meeting. Tuesday, January 21: LWML meeting Wednesday, January 22: 6:307:30 p.m. Confirmation and Wednesday night school grades 1-5. PEACE LUTHERAN (Missouri Synod), Arlington Kurt Lehmkuhl, Pastor www.hispeace@frontiernet.net Saturday, January 18: 5:00 p.m Worship service. Sunday, January 19: 8:15 a.m. Sunday school. 9:30 a.m. Worship service with Holy Communion. Monday, January 20: 11:30 a.m. Feeding of the 500 Club. Wednesday, January 22: 3:45 p.m. Catechism. ZION LUTHERAN Green Isle Township Pastor Eric W. Rapp Friday, January 17: 10:00 a.m. Deadline for Sunday bulletin. Sunday, January 19: 10:30 a.m. Worship. 3:30 p.m. Bible study at St. Paul’s with Pastor. Monday, January 20: 8:00 p.m. Joint Elders meeting at St. Paul’s. Tuesday, January 21: LWML meeting at St. Paul’s. Wednesday, January 22: 6:307:30 p.m. Confirmation and Wednesday night school grades 1-5 at St. Paul’s.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 16, 2014, page 9 www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Senior citizens urged to protect their money and prevent wire transfer fraud
Older Americans are scammed out of an estimated $2.5 billion dollars a year and an increasingly prevalent tool used by fraudsters is wire transfer fraud. Seniors are frequently tricked into wiring money, believing they are paying for the release of a grandchild from jail or to secure the payment of jackpot winnings in foreign countries. The Commerce Department reminds Minnesotans to take advantage of the strengthened consumer protections intended to fight this type that were passed by the legislature and signed into law by Governor Mark Dayton in 2013. “The new money transfer consumer protections will stop fraudsters who have too long targeted seniors through wire transfer fraud,” said Commerce Commissioner Mike Rothman. “Being defrauded out of tens of thousands of dollars late in life can be devastating – and it happens to thousands of seniors every year. Seniors and their loved ones need to protect themselves from fraud and spot the signs of elder financial abuse through wire transfer fraud.” Under the new law, when consumers send money transfers, they may request the money transmitter to notify them if a person attempts to collect their money transfer at a location other than the one they have designated. Consumers may also request that the money transmitter provide them with verification that their money transfer was collected at the location they designated and the name of the person collecting their money transfer. The new law prohibits money transmitters from allowing a person to collect a money transfer at a location other than the location a consumer has designated unless the money transmitter has obtained consumer’s authorization to do so. Also included in the new law are expanded tools for the Commerce Department to regulate the industry and increased penalties for bad actors. If seniors choose to use a money transmitter to send money, they are reminded to utilize the destination provision to ensure their money is going to the right place. With this new law, the money transmitter must promptly notify the sender if a person has attempted to receive the transfer in a different location than specified by the sender. Signs of elder financial abuse and exploitation If you are concerned that a senior might be a victim of fraud and financial abuse, be on the lookout for unusual behaving including: • Unusual banking transactions that are inconsistent with past behavior, • Uncharacteristic attempts to wire large sums of money or closing accounts without regard to penalties, and • Changes in spending habits, such as giving large, unexpected gifts, suddenly missing routine bill payments, or developing secrecy around money. Other signs of financial fraud might be: • Confusion over recent financial transactions that included property transfers, refinanced mortgages, or legal documents, such as wills, have unexplained changes, • A lack of basic amenities or belongings have gone missing, • A new friend has taken an unusual interest in a senior and has assumed power of attorney or gained access to financial accounts, and • A caregiver is unable to adequately provide for the senior’s basic needs and is secretive about the senior’s finances. Statistics show that up to 80 percent of elder financial abuse goes unreported. Victims often face barriers in reporting due to embarrassment, fear of their abuser, and fear of losing their freedom. How can you protect yourself and your family members? End the Call – There is no such thing as being rude when protecting yourself and your investments from scammers. Trust your instincts. If you do not remember buying a lottery ticket or entering a sweepstakes, the call is most likely a scam. If you receive a call from a family member in danger, hang up and call loved ones to verify. Phone a Friend - When Commissioner Rothman’s grandmother is called by a solicitor over the phone, the first thing she does is call Commissioner Rothman. You should identify a trusted friend or family member you can call for questions and advice. Report the Fraud – The Minnesota Department of Commerce is here to help. Report the fraud so others don’t fall victim to the same scam. The Minnesota Department of Commerce Consumer Help Line can be reached by phone at (651) 539-1600 or (800) 657-3602. Complaints can also be sent by email to consumer.protection@state.mn.u s <mailto:consumer.protection@state.mn.us> or by mail to Minnesota Department of Commerce, 85 7th Place East, Suite 500, Saint Paul, MN 55101.
McGraw Monument Works, Inc., LeSueur
e offer traditional funeral options and cremation as well as honoring all family wishes. Did you know that some families have a traditional visitation and funeral and then cremation? We also provide Irrevocable Funeral Trusts so the monies can be sheltered in the event of an extended nursing home stay. eel free to contact us for a no obligation visit. Pre-planning and possibly pre-funded final expenses can relieve family stress and even save money.
W F V
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN (WELS), Arlington Pastor Bruce W. Hanneman
8:45 a.m. Sunday School, 9:00 a.m. Adult Bible Study 10:00 a.m. Worship
Blessings
Jesus said to the people who believed in him, “You are truly my disciples if you remain faithful to my teachings. And you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free.” John 8:31-32 NLT
HUTCHINSON CO-OP AGRONOMY LEON DOSE,
Arlington Branch Manager Office (507) 964-2283 100 Years. 100 Reasons. Cell (320) 583-4324 Phone 952-467-2992 statebankofhamburg.com STATE BANK OF
Local Representative Leah Schrupp Arlington, MN 55307 612-308-8169
Visit our INDOOR AND OUTDOOR DISPLAYS 3 miles North of LeSueur on Highway 169 30945 Forest Prairie Road (507) 665-3126 HOURS: M-F 8-5
Weekends by appointment.
A32-27eowEa
isit our web site at www.koldenfuneralhome.com for more information and current obituaries. Directors: Karl Kolden, owner Rosemary Kolden, owner Darrell Kolden, Greggory Borchert, Shawn Kirby, Tonya Borth
HAMBURG
507-964-2201
www.koldenfuneralhome.com
Commercial and Industrial Builders Green Isle, MN 55338 ph. 507.326.7901 fax: 507.326.3551 www.vosconstruction.com
HC
23189 Hwy. 5 North, Arlington, MN 55307 arlington@hutchcoop.com
FUNERAL SERVICES
• ARLINGTON
A20(every4thWk)Ea
Arlington State Bank
Serving the Community Since 1895
CONVENIENCE STORE
Hwy. 5 N., Arlington 507-964-2920
411 7th Ave. NW • (507) 964-2251
Homestyle Pizza Real or Soft Serve Ice Cream Gas – Diesel – Deli – Videos
job market.
See the Arlington ENTERPRISE
See what’s brewing on the
BANKING SERVICES FDIC EQUAL 964-2256 HOUSING Arlington LENDER
Member
A & N Radiator Repair
Allen & Nicki Scharn, Owners 23228 401 Ave., Arlington 877-964-2281 or 507-964-2281 Bus.
Arlington Haus
Your Hometown Pub & Eatery 1986-2009
(507) 964-2212
CRAIG BULLERT ARLINGTON, MN
Certified ASE Technician on Staff
Also distributor for Poxy Coat II Industrial Grade Coatings/Paint
Arlington • 1-507-964-2473
www. chefcraigs .com
MID-COUNTY CO-OP
700 W. Lake St., Box 177 Cologne, MN 55322 (952) 466-3700 or TOLL FREE: 1-888-466-3700
FUNERAL SERVICE
P.O. Box 314 Arlington, MN 55307 Phone (507) 964-2201
23180 401 Ave., Arlington
Phone 507-964-2264
Arlington ENTERPRISE
402 W. Alden, Arlington
CLASSIFIEDS
507-964-5547
Online at www.Arlington MNnew.com
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 16, 2014, page 10 www.arlingtonmnnews.com
McLeod Publishing ONE WEEK: $1580
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The McLeod County Chronicle Silver Lake Leader The Glencoe Advertiser The Sibley Shopper Arlington Enterprise The Galaxy
nd Week 1/2 Price 2 3-WEEK SPECIAL: 3rd Week FREE
To place an ad: Call: 507-964-5547; Fax: 507-964-2423; E-Mail: info@ArlingtonMNnews.com; Mail: P.O. Box 388, Arlington, MN 55307
AGRICULTURE AUTOMOTIVE EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE LIVESTOCK REAL ESTATE & PETS
RENTAL
SERVICES
All ads appear online at GlencoeNews.com All Six Papers Reach Over 50,000 Readers Weekly in over 33 Communities The McLeod County Chronicle Mondays at Noon The Glencoe Advertiser, The Sibley Shopper Advertising Deadlines The Arlington Enterprise & The Silver Lake Leader Tuesdays at Noon & The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
FOR SALE
Heating/Air Conditioning
REAL ESTATE
Houses
Glencoe: 307 13th St. E. 2BR, 1BA single family. 1,254 Sq. ft. Detached garage. Lease or cash. Call for details 877-553-5348.
RENTAL
Want To Rent
Father and Son Operation looking for farmland to rent. Call (320) 523-1116 or (320) 522-0272. Wanted: Farmland to rent 2014 and beyond. Curtis Weckwerth (507) 380-9128, Wayne Franzeen (507) 380-2466. Young farmer looking for land to rent for 2014 and beyond. Competitive rates and reference available. Call Austin Blad (320) 2213517.
SERVICES
LIESKE TRACTOR Wanted: Your OLD TRACTORS, any condition, make or model. We also specialize in new and used TRACTOR PARTS AND REPAIR. Call Kyle. Located west of Henderson. (612) 203-9256.
Special-95% Goodman gas furnace and programmable thermostat, $2,200 installed or AC unit, $1,900 installed. J&R Plumbing Heating AC, Lester Prairie (320) 510-5035.
RENTAL
Apartment
CUSTOM LOG SAWING- Cut at your place or ours. White oak lumber decking and firewood. Give Virgil a call. Schauer Construction, Inc. (320) 864-4453.
Lawn, Garden
AUTOMOTIVE
Parts, Repair
$$ DOLLARS PAID $$ Junk vehicles, repairable cars/trucks. FREE TOWING. Flatbed/ wrecker service. Immediate pick up. MondaySunday, serving your area 24/7. (952) 220-TOWS.
SERVICES
2BR Apartment with garage, water/sewer/garbage included. $450/mo. No pets. New Auburn (320) 327-2928.
Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington is seeking the following positions: • (1) Full-Time LPN evening position, 8 shifts per pay period. Benefit eligible. • (2) Part-Time Cook positions, 5 shifts per pay period, 5:45am-1:45pm. • (1) Resource Housekeeping/Laundry Assistant, on-call hours only. • Activity Assistant needed for every other Saturday.
Adult Care
Do you need a caregiver? Contact Michelle Furr at Advantage Care LLC. Respite Care and In-home Care available. (320) 522-0700.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
CONKLIN© DEALERS NEEDED! Lifetime career in marketing, management and applying “Green” products made in America. Full time/ part time. For a free catalog call Franke’s Conklin Service now at (320) 238-2370. www.frankemarketing.com. Looking for a qualified babysitter or daycare in Arlington, with availability for Tuesday and Thursdays for a 16-month old and 5 year old. Contact Eric Selman (254) 7237189. Part time maintenance person for apartment complex in Gaylord. Must live within 10 minutes driving time of work site. Call (507) 2375449 for application.
Think Spring! 20% off early orders. Perennials, shrubs, trees, bare root fruit trees, strawberries, etc. Our gift shop is open! This Old House “Garden and Gifts”, Arlington. (507) 964-5990.
Building Contractors
Village Cooperative of Hutchinson (320) 234-7761. 55+ Senior living. on-2BR, 2BA unit available. Call for your tour! Come in and check out our many amenities and how to receive homeowner benefits with Cooperative Living! Equal Housing Opportunity. 1BR-ARLINGTON! Smoke free and open NOW! (507) 964-2430 or 800-676-6505. www.lifestyleinc.net, tdd (507) 451-0704. Equal Housing Opportunity. Updated, spacious one and two BR apartments in Renville. Includes heat, water garbage. New stove, fridge, air conditioner. Petfriendly. Call (320) 564-3351 for appointment. 30 Years professional home repair service. Interior/exterior. Fair rates for quality work. Call (320) 3590333.
Wanted To Buy
BUYING JUNK BATTERIES We buy used batteries. Paying $10 for automotive batteries. We pick up. Call 800-777-2243.
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information, call Tiffany Brockhoff, Human Resource Director at 507-964-2251 or email:
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap Drug-Free Workplace Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life.
A2tfnESGa
tbrockof@good-sam.com
LIVESTOCK, PETS
Animal Care
Dairy Relief Service available. Milking, feeding, heard health, breeding, etc. Couple with 20 plus years experience. Booking now. Call (320) 815-7308.
Work Wanted
HANDYMAN: Will do remodeling of kitchens, bathrooms, hanging doors and windows, painting, sheet rocking, texturizing or any minor repairs inside or outside. Will also do cleaning of basements/garages. Call (320) 8482722 or (320) 583-1278.
WWW.A RLINGT ON MNNEWS.COM
House
2BR house with garage and 3BR apartment-main floor of duplex. Call (320) 212-3217.
AG SCENE
Independent Living
55+ Arlington Sr. Apartment ONLY
One-Bedrooms Available Apply NOW Move this Winter!
2014
Available...
1 & 2 Bedroom
Apartments Available
All utilities, except electric
A16-28E,17-29ASGa
FREE Application FREE Damage Deposit FREE 1st Month Rent
Lease Today!
800-873-1736 or 507-642-8701 kanderson@amberfieldplace.com www.amberfieldplace.com
This favorite section contains excellent local stories on the impact of agriculture in our area. Reach out to the strong agricultural areas of Renville, McLeod, Sibley & Carver Counties.
Delivered to more than 18,900 homes in 21 communities. “Ag Scene” will be inserted in the Feb. 22 Renville County Shopper & Feb. 23 Glencoe Advertiser.
Income based Must be 62 or older or handicapped
Highland Commons Arlington 507-964-5556
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
A52-4E,1-4Sa
Managed by Great Lakes Management Co.
CALL TODAY TO RESERVE ADVERTISING SPACE IN THIS POPULAR SPECIAL EDITION!
Call
AUCTIONS
450+ GUNS at auction Sat., Jan. 25th Prairie Du Chein, WI. Rare Colts & Winchesters, NIB hunting guns/pistols, military surplus & advanced arms/ammo 608/326-8108 www.kramersales.com
HEALTH
PELVIC/TRANSVAGINAL MESH? Did you undergo transvaginal placement of mesh for pelvic organ prolapse or stress urinary incontinence between 2005 and the present? If the mesh caused complications, you may be entitled to compensation. Call Charles H. Johnson Law and speak with female staff members 800/535-5727
MISCELLANEOUS
GUARANTEED INCOME for your retirement. Avoid market risk & get guaranteed income in retirement! Call for free copy of our safe money guide plus annuity quotes from A-rated companies! 800/631-4558 APPLIANCE REPAIR We fix it no matter who you bought it from! Call ServiceLive and get referred to a pro today: 800/324-5295 DISH TV RETAILER Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) Save! Ask About same day Installation! Call now! 800/297-8706 DONATE YOUR CAR truck or boat to Heritage For The Blind. Free 3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing, all paperwork taken care of 800/439-1735
320-864-5518 Fax 320-864-5510
Ask for Karin Ramige Cornwell, karinr@glencoenews.com Sue Keenan, suek@glencoenews.com Brenda Fogarty, brendaf@glencoenews.com or Ashley Reetz, ashleyr@ArlingtonMNnews.com, 507-964-5547.
FOR SALE
WINTER IN ARIZONA Beat the cold, heated pool. Large 12’ x 55’ fully finished mobile home, Arizona City. Asking $9,000. Email: jkorpa100@hotmail.com 520/466-5208
MISCELLANEOUS
ATTENTION MN TAXPAYERS What’s going on legislatively? This is a must read: The Great Minnesota Exodus Tax Acts of 2013 by Bob Smith 3rd http://gopherstatepolitics.blogspot.com SAWMILLS From only $4897.00. Make & save money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: 800/578-1363 Ext.300N w w w. N o r w o o d S a w m i l l s . c o m CANADA DRUG CENTER is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 75% on all your medication needs. Call today 800/259-1096 for $10.00 off your first prescription and free shipping.
Final Deadline is Thurs., Feb. 6
Check our Web site to see last year’s edition, www.glencoenews.com, click on Special Sections.
Delivered to the entire Glencoe Advertiser & Renville County Shopper areas
• Arlington • Bird Island • Brownton • Danube • Gaylord • Glencoe • Green Isle • Hamburg
AUTOS WANTED
CASH FOR CARS: All cars/trucks wanted. Running or not! Top dollar paid. We come to you! Any make/ model. Call for instant offer: 800/871-9145
AUTO CRUSHING
JUNK 1 Now paying cash for semis, gravel trucks, farm trucks, road graders, caterpillars, garbage trucks and heavy equipment. Paying Cash, call Scott 605/202-0899 Your ad here!
Only $249 to reach a statewide audience of 3 million readers!!! 1-800-279-2979
YOUR AD HERE!
One phone call & only $249 to reach a statewide audience of 3 million readers!!!
• Hector • Hutchinson • Lake Lillian • Lester Prairie • Norwood • Olivia • Plato
1-800-279-2979
1x2
Misc. Service
Sounds like multiplication? It’s newspaper talk for a one column by 2 inch ad. Too small to be effective? You’re reading this one! Put your 1x2 in the Arlington Enterprise. 507-964-5547
• Renville • Sacred Heart • Silver Lake • Stewart • Winsted • Young America
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