1-24-13 Arlington Enterprise

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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Serving the Communities of Arlington and Green Isle, Minnesota
Volume 127 Arlington, MN 55307 Thursday, January 24, 2013 Number 26
Single copy $1.00
By Karin Ramige Cornwell
Manager
The Sibley East School
Board received 20 applica-
tions for the open superin-
tendent position, according
Ed Waltman from the South
Central Service Cooperative
(SCSC).
The application period
closed on Friday, Jan. 18.
Waltman said nine candi-
dates have superintendent ex-
perience , while 11 are
“emerging leaders” who are
currently district principals or
administrators.
The final candidate list will
consist of both applicants
with experience as a superin-
tendent and emerging leaders,
a decision the board made at
a Sept. 17 planning session.
The SCSC search consult-
ants will perform a final
screen of the applicants dur-
ing the week of Jan. 21 and
prepare a recommendation of
candidates to be interviewed
to the board.
Waltman will present a list
of six candidates to the board
during a special board work
session at the Arlington cam-
pus at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Jan.
28.
The first round of inter-
views will be held in Arling-
ton on Monday, Feb. 4 and
Tuesday, Feb. 5.
During this round each can-
didate will be interviewed by
the board and the community
interview group.
Final interviews for the top
three candidates will be held
on Monday, Feb. 11, Tuesday,
Feb. 12 and Thursday, Feb.
14.
One candidate will be inter-
viewed each day. A commu-
nity meeting will be held with
each candidate starting at 4
p.m. each day.
This will give staff, par-
ents, students and community
members the opportunity to
meet the candidates and ask
questions.
There will also be an op-
portunity to meet each candi-
date after the finalist inter-
view with the School Board
at approximately 7:15 p.m.
each of the three days.
The board plans to approve
a final contract at its regular
board meeting that will be
held on Tuesday, Feb. 19 due
to the President’s Day holi-
day.
Community
Interview group
The community group con-
sists of five teachers who
were selected by the teacher’s
association, six community
members who were selected
by board members and two
school administrators.
The purpose of the group is
to provide the board with im-
portant feedback on the
strengths and areas of con-
cern of each candidate,
though the group will not
rank the candidates.
The community group will
be given a form for each can-
didate. Individually each
member of the group will be
asked to list the strengths of
the candidate, areas of con-
cern, and provide any other
comments. Each member of
the group will also be asked
on the form if the candidate
should receive further consid-
eration.
At the end of the second
evening of interviews, the
board will receive all of the
feedback forms from the
community group for review
and consideration.
Sibley East Principals
Steve Harter and Mari Lu
Martens will represent the ad-
ministration team.
Teachers Ann Walsh,
Christine Butler, Dan Tack-
mann, Sheila Knacke, and
Jeff Eppen were selected by
the teachers’ association to
participate in the interview
process.
Sibley East community
members Dan Hislop, Pete
Arneson, Bob Rezner, Mary
Krentz, Phil Keithan, and
Sarah Ziegler were selected
by the board to represent the
communities in the district.
SE receives 20 applications for superintendent position
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Sibley East One-Act Play
Members of the Sibley East Senior High School’s
One-Act Play rehearsed a scene from its production
“Rewrite” on Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 22. Left to right:
Brandon Raghu, Jenny Rovinsky, Katelyn Reid, Emily
Somerville, Elizabeth Becker and Elizabeth Becerra. A
complete article appears on page 2 in this week’s edi-
tion of the Arlington Enterprise.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington City Coun-
cil, during its regular meeting
on Tuesday evening, Jan. 22,
unanimously approved a mo-
tion to hire Cynthia Smith-
Strack to provide interim city
administrator services until
the full-time position is filled.
The goal is to have a perma-
nent city administrator on
staff by June 1.
The City Council, which
received the recommendation
from the Employee Relations
Committee, made the move
moments after it unanimously
approved a motion to accept
the resignation of City Ad-
ministrator Matt Jaunich ear-
lier in the regular meeting.
Jaunich recently accepted
an offer to become the first
ever Sibley County adminis-
trator. His final day as the Ar-
lington city administrator will
be Friday, Feb. 8.
Smith-Strack, the principal
owner of the Municipal De-
velopment Group, Inc., cur-
rently provides six to eight
hours of planning and zon-
ing/economic development
authority duties for the City
of Arlington at a rate of $78
per hour.
In her expanded role,
Smith-Strack will work an
addition 12 to 14 hours per
week for about 16 weeks.
According to Jaunich, the
cost savings from not paying
a full-time city administrator
for roughly 16 weeks will
more than cover the costs for
interim city administrator
services and an executive
search firm.
The Arlington City Council
will hold its next regular
meeting at 6:30 p.m. Monday,
Feb. 4.
Arlington hires interim city administrator
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
Following the recent trend
with Sibley County’s Santa’s
Helpers Program, the num-
bers of families and children
served was down in 2012
from the year before.
Vicki Stock, Public Health
and Human Services Direc-
tor, gave a report about the
recent campaign to the board
of commissioners at the
meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 22.
“We actually had 47 fewer
families, but only 46 fewer
children that participated in
the program,” said Stock
about 2011 which was a pro-
gram high water mark. “We
mailed out 732 invitations
where qualified people had
the option if they want to par-
ticipate or not.”
In 2012, the program
served 554 children and 222
families. The most served in
the last five years was in
2011 with 601 children and
268 families. The figures
were slightly lower in 2010
and slightly higher in 2009.
Eligibility is for children
from birth to age 15. Some
people donated items that
were used or new for parents.
The program has an “adult
room” where children can
pick out a gift for mom or
dad.
“We are unique, the only
county I am aware of that
does that,” said Stock about
offering a chance for children
to give presents to their par-
ents.
To be eligible for the
Santa’s Helper Program, fam-
ilies have to be on a public
assistance program. It does
include the reduced school
lunch or Minnesota Action
Council programs.
Stock said the cost analysis
of the program is a conserva-
tive estimate of time tracked,
which is difficult to do. Sib-
ley County has 10 committee
people from the Public
Health and Human Services
office working throughout
the year. They have organiza-
tional meetings and attend
civic organization meetings,
plus coordinate volunteers.
“We had 15 other staff par-
ticipating in the program,”
said Stock. “For anticipated
costs, I took the average
salaries. We had the commit-
tee spend about 608 total
hours and staff worked 222
hours. In addition, we had
clerical staff put in about five
hours answering phones. The
total estimated cost is a little
over $17,000 to the county.”
This does not include the
more than 150 hours of time
donated from within the com-
munity. The program re-
ceived monetary donations of
a little over $8,000, which
was down slightly from 2011
when $10,000 was donated.
“We like to have a little
carry over so the committee
can watch for sales through-
out the year and pick out
gifts,” said Stock. “This year
we spent a little over $8,000
on gifts, so we do have a little
fund balance.”
The program did donate a
nominal amount to American
Lutheran Church in Gaylord
for use of its facility.
“It is a lot of work, but we
do get a lot of help from the
civic organizations who col-
lect gifts in the cities and
bring them to us,” reported
Stock. “We would not be able
to do this without them and
volunteers in general.”
• In other Public Health
and Human Services busi-
ness, Stock said Sibley Coun-
ty was selected as part of a
state wide review of child
support cases in 2012.
Four cases were selected,
two involving medical sup-
port and two involving inter-
state cases where the dads of
non-custodial parents live in
another state. Stock was
pleased to report that zero er-
rors were reported.
Stock added that the state
put down goals for child sup-
port collections in 2012. The
goal for collections of current
support was set at 72 percent
and Sibley County came in at
75 percent. For collections
that are behind in support
payment, the goal was to col-
Santa’s Helpers
Continued on page 3
Santa’s Helpers Program
maintains strong support
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington City Coun-
cil, during its regular meet-
ing on Tuesday night, Jan.
22, unanimously approved a
motion to approve a propos-
al from Brimeyer Fursman,
LLC, Maplewood, to con-
duct an executive search for
a new administrator for the
City of Arlington.
The City Council made
the move after it had earlier
and unanimously accepted
the resignation of current
City Administrator Matt
Jaunich effective Friday,
Feb. 8. Jaunich was recently
hired as the first ever Sibley
County administrator.
The cost for the executive
search will be $18,875.
The City Council, inci-
dentally, used Brimeyer
Fursman, LLC, to conduct
its search for a new city ad-
ministrator during 2007.
Jaunich was hired as a result
of that search.
Timeline
Brimeyer Fursman, LLC,
will work closely with the
City Council on the timing
of the search. The following
information is just a sug-
gested timeline.
A representative from
Brimeyer Fursman, LLC,
will hold a kickoff meeting
with the City Council some-
time during the week of
Monday, Jan. 28.
A collection of profile
data, which will consist of
interviews with the City
Council, staff and commu-
nity members, will be con-
ducted between Monday,
Jan. 28 and Friday, Feb. 8.
The position profile will
be approved on Monday,
Feb. 11.
Recruitment for the open
position will start Tuesday,
Feb. 12.
The deadline for applica-
tions will be Friday, March
15.
The candidates will be
screened and reviewed from
Friday, March 15 through
Tuesday, April 2.
A progress report will be
given and the City Council
will select finalists on Tues-
day, April 9.
The reference and creden-
tial checks will be conduct-
ed from Wednesday, April
10 through Monday, April
22.
Interviews with the final-
ists will be conducted on
Friday, April 26 and Satur-
day, April 27.
The ultimate goal is to
have the city administrator
on board by June 1.
Guarantee
Brimeyer Fursman, LLC,
offers an 18-month guaran-
tee on the effectiveness of
the city administrator pro-
vided the mayor and City
Council and Brimeyer Furs-
man agree that all phases of
the process have been suc-
cessfully completed. Should
the mayor and City Council
determine it necessary to
terminate the city adminis-
trator due to failure to ade-
quately perform the duties
as specified in the profile
and as represented by the
process, the firm will refill
the position at no additional
fee and will charge for ex-
penses only.
Arlington hires search firm to
find a new city administrator
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 24, 2013, page 2
A51-9El
Open House
in honor of
Jerry Kemp’s
80
th
Birthday
Saturday, Jan. 26,
6:00-9:00 pm
Alrington Haus Too
147 W. Main Street
Arlington
*2-3SEa
Many thanks to the Glencoe,
New Auburn, Arlington &
Plato Fire Departments which
answered our call for help as
our machine shed was struck
by lightning on May 26, 2012.
The efforts of the departments
working together saved the
surrounding structures.
Thanks again for your help &
the Lord bless you all.
John W. & Jeanette Kohnen
*2CE3ASj
New Auburn
VFW
Post #7266
Charitable
Donations 2012 =
$
31,291
Scholarships
$
2,250; fireworks over High Island on July 4
th $
7,750;
City of New Auburn Parks
$
400 and Fire Department
$
1,000;
Salvation Army
$
625; Friends of High Island
$
6,250; Veteran’s events
and organizations
$
6,810; GSL and Sibley East schools
$
3,812;
donations to organizations and individuals under the age of 18 for
various qualifying activities
$
1,800; miscellaneous
$
594. Total
$
31,291.
Charitable gambling operation is located at the
High Island Hide Away in New Auburn.
A3CEa
• Central Air Conditioning
• Air Duct Cleaning
• Service Work
320-864-6353
or Gaylord 507-237-2330
2110 9
th
St. E. • Glencoe
www.glencoephinc.com
Lic.#
062054-PM
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GLENCOE
Plumbing & Heating, Inc.
Thank You
A big thank you to everyone
for sharing in my retirement.
The celebration at the Com-
munity Center was wonderful.
Many fond memories were
shared. The program was de-
lightful.
A special thank you to all
who helped with the celebra-
tion.
Thank you for all the cards
and letters congratulating me
on retirement.
Dean H. Bergersen, MD
*3E4Sa
Thank You
A sincere thank you from
the family of Patricia Sauter
to everyone for your care,
support, sympathy, service,
prayers, flowers, food, cards
and memorials during Pat’s
illness and death. You have
touched our hearts with your
kindness and we are forever
greatful. Thank you.
The Family of Patricia Sauter
*3E4Sa
Annual Soup ‘n’ Sandwich Luncheon
Sunday, January 27
serving 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
Peace Lutheran Church • 514 Freedom Drive, Arlington, MN
Menu: chicken noodle and wild rice soups, chili,
ham & egg salad sandwiches, bars, beverage
Adults:
$
7; Children: 6-10
$
3.50; 5 & Under: Free
*
2
-
4
S
,3
E
a
Green Isle Lions Club’s annual
Dinner & Show
Green Isle School Gymnasium
Sat., February 2
Social Hour 6 p.m.
Dinner 7 p.m.
Dinner provided by Chef Craig’s Catering
Entertainment by The Stevie Ray’s Comedy Troupe
$
20 Donation per person .50
¢
Set-ups •
$
1.00 Beer
THREE CASH PRIZES:
$
100,
$
75,
$
50 (Need not be present to win)
Silent Auction & Door Prizes
(All Proceeds for Community Projects)
Tickets can be purchased from any Green Isle Lions
member or at CornerStone State Bank in Green Isle.
A
2
-
4
S
,
3
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4
E
a
Wednesday, Jan. 30: Arlington Fire De-
partment Relief Association, Arlington Fire
Hall, 7:30 p.m.
Community
Calendar
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER
Arlington State Bank
(507) 964-2256
Fax (507) 964-5550
www.ArlingtonStateBank.com
MAIN BANK
Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (straight thru)
DRIVE THRU
Monday - Thursday, 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.,
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Member
FDIC
News Briefs
Tank blown into truck
Strong winds reportedly caused a tank to blow into a
truck near the Hutchinson Co-op on Saturday afternoon,
Jan. 19, according to the Arlington Police Department.
Son born to Arlington couple
Adam and Sarah Cowell, Arlington, would like to an-
nounce the arrival of their son, Henry Otto Cowell.
Henry was born at the Ridgeview Medical Center in
Waconia at 8 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 10. He weighed nine
pounds, two ounces and measured 20 inches.
Henry was welcomed home by his proud big sister,
Addie.
Grandparents are Joe and Ruby Nagel, Henderson,
and Bill and Nancy Cowell, Gaylord.
Mailbox damaged in Arlington
An individual or individuals reportedly damaged a
mailbox at the Jared Urch residence along the 700 block
of West Brooks Street in Arlington around 10 p.m.
Monday, Jan. 14, according to the Arlington Police De-
partment.
Tools taken from business
An individual or individuals reportedly took several
tools from a business at the Bradley Stier residence
along 200th Street in rural Belle Plaine, according to the
Sibley County Sheriff’s Department.
The tools are valued in excess of $3,000, according to
the report.
Icy roads cause accident
A one-vehicle accident without injuries reportedly oc-
curred near the intersection of County Road 8 and
County Road 4 at 5:35 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 19, according
to the Sibley County Sheriff’s Department.
Christopher Koob, 25, New Ulm, was driving on a
deceptively icy County Road 8 when his vehicle turned
sideways, entered the north ditch, rolled over and came
to rest on its driver’s side doors.
The vehicle was totaled, according to the report.
Students named to Dean’s List
Gaylord residents Derek Almich and Paige Swenson,
both graduates of the Sibley East Senior High School,
were recently named to the Dean’s List at Southwest
Minnesota State University.
Almich and Swenson received High Honors which is
an academic achievement for students with a grade
point average between 3.8 and 4.0.
Haupt named to Dean’s List
Melinda Haupt, a graduate of the Sibley East Senior
High School, was recently named to the Dean’s List at
Southwest Minnesota State University.
Haupt made the Honors List which is an academic
achievement for students with a grade point average be-
tween 3.5 and 3.79.
She is the daughter of Tom Haupt, Arlington, and
Linda Haupt, Arlington.
Hirings approved at meeting
The Arlington City Council, during its regular meet-
ing on Tuesday night, Jan. 22, unanimously approved a
pair of motions to hire officers for the Arlington Fire
Department.
Keith Dressen was hired as the first assistant chief for
a two-year term.
Doug Mackenthun was hired as a safety and training
officer for a two-year term.
City Council members Ben Jaszewski, Jennifer
Nuesse, Curt Reetz, Jason Ruehling and Galen Wills
supported both motions.
Engagement
Matt Turner, Burnsville,
and Brittany Kubal, Burns-
ville, are engaged to be mar-
ried on Saturday, Feb. 9.
Brittany is a graduate of the
Burnsville High School. She
just graduated from Winona
State University where she re-
ceived a degree in Elementary
Education.
She is the daughter of
Tammy and the late Gary
Kubal, Burnsville. She is also
the granddaughter of Reuben
and Dorene Willmsen, Arling-
ton, and Don and Shirley
Kubal, Arlington.
Matt is a graduate of the
Burnsville High School. He is
currently employed as an
LPN at Fairview-Ridges and
is a member of the Army Re-
serves. He is the son of Greg
and Liz Hawley, Burnsville.
Kubal - Turner
Matt Turner and
Brittany Kubal
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Ribbon Cutting Ceremony
Members and friends of the Arlington Area Chamber
of Commerce held a ribbon cutting ceremony to cele-
brate the grand re-opening and renovation project at
Jerry’s Home Quality Foods in Arlington. The ceremo-
ny was held on Tuesday morning, Jan. 22. Front Row:
(left to right) Chamber Secretary Terry Klages, store
manager Derek Hahn, store owner Jerry Hahn and
Chamber President Steve Gillaspie. Back Row: (l to r)
Jim Kreft, Kay Schumacher, Scott Sorenson, Marge
Kloeckl, Dave Hennies and Jim Heiland.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East Senior
High School will perform
“Rewrite” during the sub sec-
tion one-act play contest at
Jordan on Saturday, Jan. 26.
The one-act play is an orig-
inal production by Sibley
East Director Cheryl Rovin-
sky.
“Every young woman
fondly remembers the fairy
tales of her childhood, the
handsome prince who braves
all to rescue the beautiful
princess and take her away
for a much deserved happily
ever after,” Rovinsky writes.
“But what happens when
that’s what she thinks she is
going to get? And what do
you think she will do when
she doesn’t get it? Our Young
Woman decides enough is
enough and that maybe her
favorite fairy tales need a
dose of down and dirty reali-
ty. Are our fairy tale princes
and princesses going to stand
for this injustice? Will our
young woman realize that
happily ever after is what you
make of it (in more ways than
one)? You’ll just have to wait
and see. Because happily ever
after is never what it seems at
first glance.”
The cast in order of appear-
ance includes Melanie Rovin-
sky (Young Woman), Marissa
Eckberg (Princess One), Bai-
ley Brockoff (Prince One),
Katelyn Reid (Princess Two),
Brandon Raghu (Prince Two),
Allison Larson (Princess
Three), Ben Steinborn
(Prince Three), Alleyce
Somerville (Princess Four),
Jordan Bruss (Boyfriend,
Voice of Prince Four), Emily
Somerville (Fairy One), Eliz-
abeth Becerra (Fairy Two),
Elizabeth Becker (Fairy
Three) and Jenny Rovinsky
(Fairy Four).
The crew includes Vanesa
Aguilera (Director’s Assis-
tant), Elizabeth Zuniga (Tech
Supervisor), Isaac Elseth
(Tech Assistant), Haley
Cameron (Stage Crew), Jean
Sickmann (Production Secre-
tary), Lena Burgess (Stage
Crew) and Mackenzie Pom-
plun (Stage Crew).
SE will perform its one-act play
at sub section contest in Jordan
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 24, 2013, page 3
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Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-2850
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Miller
Law
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RAPHAEL J. MILLER
ROXANN M. BERANEK
Attorneys at Law
332 Sibley Ave. 1042 First Ave.
Gaylord, MN Gibbon, MN
Tel. 507-237-2954 Fax: 507-237-2347
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Free consultation on personal injury claims
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(507) 964-2864
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Member: MN River Builders Assn.
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ATTORNEY AT LAW
302 West Main
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-5753
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Saturdays by Appointment
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Jeff cell: 612-756-0595
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A 22-year-old Henderson
man has been charged after
an altercation in front of the
Main Street Sports Bar in
Hutchinson on Thursday
night, Jan. 17, according to
the KDUZ/KARP Radio
website.
Kyle Robert Trebesch has
been charged with gross mis-
demeanor obstruction of legal
process, misdemeanor prop-
erty damage in the fourth de-
gree, and fleeing a police of-
ficer on foot.
The Hutchinson Police De-
partment was called to the
scene for a fight in progress
just after 11 p.m. Thursday,
Jan. 17. On arrival, police al-
legedly saw Trebesch push a
female, apparently his girl-
friend. At that time, an officer
approached the suspect. The
suspect ran away at that time
and the officer followed. The
officer later caught up with
the suspect behind the Gold
Coin restaurant.A skirmish
allegedly occurred between
the two individuals. The offi-
cer suffered only bumps and
bruises in the scuffle. Other
officers arrived and helped to
subdue Trebesch. He was
then arrested and taken into
custody.
Henderson man charged after Hutchinson incident
By Karin Ramige Cornwell
Manager
The Sibley East School
Board elected Brian Brandt
as the 2013 school board
chairperson with a 5-0 vote at
its annual organizational
meeting on Monday Jan. 14.
Board member Beth
DuFrane was unable to attend
the meeting.
Anne Karl was elected to
serve as the vice-chairperson
and board member Scott
Dose will serve as the clerk
for another year.
Newly elected board mem-
ber Michele “Missy” Weber
was sworn in as the newest
member of the board.
Brandt also was sworn in
for the new term. DuFrane,
who was re-elected, will be
sworn in at a later time.
During the organizational
meeting the board also as-
signed committee appoint-
ments.
Appointments are as fol-
lows:
• Community Education
and Early Childhood Family
Education – Brandt.
• School Policy Committee
(Due Process, Discipline,
Meet/Confer, School Lunch
Appeals, MSHSL, Minnesota
River Conference, and Title
IX) – Dose.
• Negotiations (certified),
School Insurance, Finance,
Shared Decision – Weber,
Karl and Dan Woehler, alter-
nate-DuFrane.
• Negotiations (non-certi-
fied) – Brandt, Dose,
Woehler; alternate - Weber.
• River Bend Special Edu-
cation District Board – Karl.
• MSBA legislative liai-
son – Dose.
• Staff Development Dis-
trict Committee – DuFrane.
• Sibley County Collabora-
tive Council – Brandt.
• School District Facilities-
Weber, Brandt and Dose, al-
ternate – Woehler.
• Continuing education –
DuFrane.
• Transportation – Karl.
• Technology – Weber.
• Extra-curricular activities
committee – Brandt, Dose
and Karl.
• Calendar committee –
Brandt and DuFrane.
• Standing committees on
site based and staff develop-
ment is made up of members
from the certified negotiating
committee – Weber, Karl and
Dan Woehler, alternate-
DuFrane.
Other Action
In other action, the board:
• Approved the Arlington
Enterprise and Gaylord Hub
as the official newspapers of
the district.
• Approved Arlington State
Bank, Pro Growth Bank-Gay-
lord, First National Bank of
Minnesota, CornerStone
Bank of Green Isle, and MS-
DLAF+ as the district’s offi-
cial depositories.
• Delegated Janna Tessmer
and Jayne Ihrke to transfer
and make electronic fund
transfers on behalf of the dis-
trict for the 2013 fiscal year.
• Approved memberships
to the Minnesota School
Boards Association, South
Central Service Cooperative,
River Bend Education Dis-
trict, Minnesota High School
League, Minnesota River
Conference and Socrates.
• Approved the increase of
the mileage rate from 55
cents per mile to the current
IRS 56.5 cents per mile.
• Re-appointed Tony Nerud
as the school district attorney.
• Kept the school board
compensation at the current
level. Current board compen-
sation is $50 per meeting and
$120 after four hours, and an
additional $500 per year each
for the chairperson and clerk.
• Accepted the leave of ab-
sence request for Molly
McGinley from April 12 to
the end of the school year.
• Accepted the resigna-
tion/retirement of Judy
Pioske, special ed paraprofes-
sional, effective Feb. 1.
• Approved a motion di-
recting the superintendent
and administration to make
recommendations for adjust-
ments in curriculum, pro-
grams and staffing for the
2013-14 school year.
• Discussed including dis-
trict financial reviews at
school board meetings.
• Advised the board will
hold a study session Monday,
Jan. 28, at 6:30 p.m. in room
149 at the Arlington campus.
The topic of the session
will be to discuss and finalize
the superintendent candidate
list for interview and review
the interview process.
• The next regular school
board meeting will be held
Tuesday, Feb. 19 at 6:30 p.m.
at the Arlington campus.
The board is expected to
approve the new superintend-
ent contract at the meeting.
Brandt elected chairperson of
the Sibley East School Board
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Jordan Thomes, left, and Tyler Bates,
right, have been selected as the Sibley
East Senior High School’s nominees
for the Triple A Award.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Seniors Jordan Thomes and
Tyler Bates have been chosen
as the Sibley East Senior
High School’s nominees for
the Triple A Award. This
award honors student excel-
lence in the arts, academics
and athletics.
Jordan Thomes
In the area of fine arts,
Thomes participated in choir
in grades 7-11.
Thomes, in the area of aca-
demics, is a member of the
National Honor Society and
the “A” Honor Roll. She has
also been a past Student of
the Month. In addition,
Thomes was selected as Aca-
demic All State in volleyball
last fall.
In the area of athletics,
Thomes was a two-year
starter and three-year letter-
winner in volleyball. She is
also a three-year starter and
four-year letterwinner in bas-
ketball. In addition, she will
come into the spring season
as a two-year starter and
three-year letterwinner for the
softball team.
She is the daughter of Bob
and Gail Thomes, Arlington.
Tyler Bates
In the area of fine arts,
Bates was active in band in
grades 5-8 and has been in-
volved in choir during the
past six years.
Bates, in the area of aca-
demics, is a member of the
“B” Honor Roll. He has also
been a past Student of the
Month.
In the area of athletics,
Bates was a three-year starter
and three-year letterwinner in
football where he was chosen
as the Offensive Player of the
Year in the Minnesota River
Conference and made the All
Metro All State Team last
fall. Bates is a three-year
starter and three-year letter-
winner in basketball. In addi-
tion, he was a first-year
starter on the baseball team
last spring.
He is the son of Eric and
Kris Bates, Arlington.
Thomes and Bates selected as
Sibley East Triple A nominees
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington Fire De-
partment will hold its annu-
al dance at the Arlington
Community Center from 8
p.m. to midnight Saturday,
Jan. 26.
Music will be provided
by Eagle River.
The officers for the local
fire department include Fire
Chief John Zaske, First As-
sistant Keith Dressen, Sec-
ond Assistant Corey Car-
penter, Treasurer Curtis
Ling, Secretary Rick
Schmidt, Safety and Train-
ing Officer Bobbi Zaske
and Safety and Training Of-
ficer Doug Mackenthun.
The remaining members
of the local fire department
consist of Grant Bening,
Chad Carpenter, Brent
Doetkott, Jim Farber, Luke
Geib, Spencer Haggen-
miller, Tim Haggenmiller,
Dan Herrmann, Jeff Otto,
Jen Otto, Jeremy Otto, Tom
Pfarr, Jon Piotter, Josh
Pflanz, Tom Pomplun,
Jason Quast, Nick Rauch,
Jon Rose, Jim Soeffker,
Paul Soeffker, Jeff Tuchten-
hagen and Tony Voigt.
Firefighters dance is Saturday, Jan. 26
lect 71 percent in 2012 and
Sibley County was at 73 per-
cent.
• Stock updated the board
on the desire to purchase
Dragon Speak software for
social workers and case man-
agers.
Along with other public
health directors in Region 9,
Stock met to get proposed
prices. She will be bringing
more information and request-
ing approval next month.
“The cost for the initial year
is going to be higher because
we have to buy the equipment
and there are other first-year
costs such as training,” said
Stock. “I believe in the long
run it is going to help us to
meet our performance guide-
lines and make staff more ef-
ficient in the long run.”
Stock noted that social
workers have some down time
while waiting between home
visits among other things.
With this they can sit in their
car and do their dictation
while it is fresh in their mem-
ory.
“I believe the cost will be in
the $20,000 range the first
year, and then the cost will
drop off drastically,” said
Stock. “I will be requesting
this for nine staff members.
We are getting a price break
of 25 percent if we can go re-
gionally. If the board thinks it
makes sense to do it, this
would be the best time.”
Information put into an iPad
or laptop will automatically
go from the field into the so-
cial service computer system.
Stock added, “It is very effi-
cient and wonderful the way it
looks.”
Santa’s Helpers Continued from page 1
WWW.ARLINGTONMNNEWS.COM
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 24, 2013, page 4
Chamber marketing
committee continues to
meet and discuss ideas
Our View: Continue to be
creative and think outside the box
Opinions
Staf f
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Publish-
ers; Kurt Menk, Edi t or; Kari n
Ramige, Manager; Marvin Bulau,
Production Manager; Barb Math-
wig, Of fice; Ashley Reetz, Sales; and Jean Olson, Proof Reading.
Letters
This page is devoted to opin-
ions and commentary . Articles appearing on this page are the opinions of the
writer . V iews expressed here are not necessarily those of the Arlington Enterprise, unless so desig-
nated. The Arlington Enterprise strongly encourages others to express opin-
ions on this page.
Letters from our readers are
strongly encouraged. Letters for
publication must bear the writer’ s signature and address. The Arlington Enterprise reserves the right
to edit letters for purpose of clarity
and space.
Ethics
The editorial staf f of the Arlington Enterprise strives to present the news in a
fair and accurate manner . W e appreciate errors being brought to our attention.
Please bring any grievances against
the Arlington Enterprise to the attention of the editor . Should dif ferences continue, readers are encour-
aged to take their grievances to the
Minnesota News Council, an organi-
zation dedicated to protecting the
public from press inaccuracy and un-
fairness. The News Council can be contacted at 12 South
Sixth St., Suite 940, Minneapolis,
MN 55402, or (612) 341-9357.
Press Freedom
Freedom of the press is guar-
anteed under the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitu- tion:
Established in 1884.
Postmaster send address changes to:
Arlington Enterprise.
402 West Alden Street, P.O. Box 388,
Arlington, MN 55307.
Phone 507-964-5547 FAX 507-964-2423.
Hours: Monday-Wednesday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.;
Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 2 p.m.; and Friday closed.
Entered as Periodicals postal matter at Arlington,
MN post office. Postage paid at Arlington USPS No.
031-980.
Subscription Rates: Minnesota – $33.00 per year. Out-
side of state – $38.00 per year.
Arlington ENTERPRISE
Guest Columns
Letter To The Editor
The Arlington Area Chamber of Commerce, over the years, has dab-
bled in some marketing and promotional work, but without any real
consistency. Some Chamber members, during this time, have expressed
their desire for the organization to arrive at a consistent plan to market
and promote local businesses. That expression from some Chamber
members has hit a peak during the past few months.
The original marketing committe, which was established late last
year, has received that message loud and clear and is determined to
change the way members think about the Chamber when it comes to
marketing and promoting businesses.
The original marketing committee, whose membership continues to
grow, believes an important lesson is to first listen to the Chamber
members. One constant complaint over the years is that members pay
their annual dues and are placed on a list for the Chamber to hit up for
donations and money for marketing ideas.
One remedy to counter this complaint, according to the original mar-
keting committee, is for the group to promote a drawing before Easter
and Thanksgiving. The event would be free to Chamber members who
wish to participate. It would also be free to people who would have the
opportunity to sign up for the drawing. Most importantly and unlike
most Chamber ideas from the past, people would actually have to walk
into a business to sign up for the drawing. Hams and lily plants could
be given away for the Easter drawing while turkeys and other prizes
could be handed out for the Thanksgiving drawing. All prizes would be
purchased by the marketing committee from local businesses.
Another idea is find ways to reach out to new residents in town as
well as the citizens of Green Isle who have always been tremendous
supporters of the Arlington business community.
These are just a few ideas that the original marketing committee has
discussed and plans to put into action during 2013. The additional good
news is that other people have joined the original marketing committee
and are eager to bring their ideas to their first meeting. In addition, the
newly expanded marketing committee is always open to new ideas
from other Chamber members. The goal is to be creative, think outside
the box and come up with a plan for the Chamber to consistently mar-
ket and promote Chamber-member businesses now and in the future.
-K.M.
Editor’s Note: Arlington Enterprise Editor Kurt Menk is the chair-
person of the marketing committee for the Arlington Area Chamber of
Commerce.
Too Tall’s Tidbits
Happy Birthday and Happy An-
niversary to the following local and
area residents compliments of the
Arlington Lions Club Community
Calendar.
January 25
Amy Leonard, Elias Schroeder, Jan-
ice Rose, Jenna Felmlee, Levi Allen,
Marissa Reilly and Sandi Boecker.
January 26
Ali Pedraza, Blake Battcher, Court-
ney Hildebrandt and Laura Kicker.
January 27
Gabe Schroeder, Mark Sickmann
and Steve Roth, Sr.,
January 28
Briana Brau, Janessa Selle, Maxine
Godwin and Melissa Bigaouette.
January 29
Angela Koepp.
January 30
Aaron Oelfke, Dan Thomes, Heidi
Tackmann and Karissa Olhsen.
January 31
Patty Geib, and Mr. and Mrs. Tony
Kloeckl.
*****
While on a road trip, an elderly
couple stopped at a roadside restau-
rant for lunch. After finishing their
meal, they left the restaurant, and re-
sumed their trip.
When leaving, the elderly woman
unknowingly left her glasses on the
table, and she didn't miss them until
they had been driving for about 40
minutes.
By then, to add to the aggravation,
they had to travel quite a distance
before they could find a place to turn
around, in order to return to the
restaurant to retrieve her glasses.
All the way back, the elderly hus-
band became the classic grouchy old
man. He fussed and complained, and
scolded his wife relentlessly during
the entire return drive. The more he
chided her, the more agitated he be-
came. He just wouldn't let up for a
single minute.
To her relief, they finally arrived
at the restaurant. As the woman
got out of the car, and hurried in-
side to retrieve her glasses, the old
geezer yelled to her, “While you're
in there, you might as well get my
hat and the credit card.”
*****
Change is inevitable, except
from a vending machine.
*****
A burglar broke into a house one
night. He shined his flashlight
around, looking for valuables when
a voice in the dark said, “Jesus
knows you're here.”
He nearly jumped out of his skin,
clicked his flashlight off, and froze.
When he heard nothing more, he
shook his head and continued.
Just as he pulled the stereo out so
he could disconnect the wires, clear
as a bell he heard, “Jesus is watching
you.”
Startled, he shined his light around
frantically, looking for the source of
the voice. Finally, in the corner of
the room, his flashlight beam came
to rest on a parrot.
“Did you say that?” he hissed at
the parrot.
“Yes,” the parrot confessed, then
squawked, “I'm just trying to warn
you that he’s watching you.”
The burglar relaxed. “Warn me,
huh? Who in the world are you?”
“Moses,” replied the bird.
“Moses?” the burglar laughed.
“What kind of people would name a
bird Moses?”
The parrot replied, “The kind of
people who would name a Rot-
tweiler Jesus.”
*****
A policeman pulled a female driv-
er over and asked to see her license.
After looking it over, he said to
her, “Lady, it stipulates here on your
license that you should be wearing
glasses.”
“Well, I have contacts,” the
woman replied.
“Look lady, I don’t care who
you know,” snapped the officer.
“You’re getting a ticket.”
*****
Few women admit their age; few
men act it.
By Sheldon Richman
We would do the young victims of
the Newtown shootings no honor by
frantically enacting futile restric-
tions on freedom.
It may be satisfying to “do some-
thing.” But two things ought to be
kept in mind. First, liberty is never
more in peril than when politicians
sense that the people want them to
do something — anything.
Second, a false sense of security
is worse than no security at all. Leg-
islating in the heat of emotion will
not prevent future attacks, but it will
do irreparable harm to innocent peo-
ple.
The proposition that restrictions
on gun sales will prevent shootings
has been debunked many times. One
wonders how often it must be point-
ed out that someone who is willing
to commit murder is not likely to be
deterred by gun laws or gun-free
zones, which merely amount to an
invitation to killers seeking to create
maximum mayhem before killing
themselves. Increases in violent
crime followed tighter gun laws in
Britain and Australia.
Adam Lanza, the Sandy Hook
school killer, used a semiautomatic
rifle modeled on a gun used in com-
bat, but it does not follow that if the
so-called assault-weapons ban were
reinstated, mass shootings would
stop.
The original ban singled out rifles
based on cosmetic considerations,
but even a more comprehensive ban
wouldn’t make anyone safer. Mil-
lions of such rifles exist and would
not disappear with the passage of a
ban. Nor would the existing supply
be confiscated.
Thus, a plentiful black market
would exist. Anyone who wants a
banned rifle badly enough will have
no trouble getting one. However, ri-
fles are used in only a small percent-
age of crimes — and let’s not forget
that violent crime has been declining
for decades.
Gun controllers propose that gun
sales occurring outside of licensed
stores, such as at gun shows or be-
tween private individuals, should be
subject to buyer background checks.
It takes only a moment to see that
that requirement would make no one
safer. How would it be enforced? In-
formal sales by definition are be-
yond the view of the authorities. It’s
already against the law for convicted
felons to possess firearms. Does
anyone believe that restriction is ef-
fective?
Again, someone determined to
commit murder will get a gun with-
out a background check. But having
people believe otherwise may keep
them from adopting sensible precau-
tions.
James Alan Fox, a professor of
criminology at Northeastern Univer-
sity, points out another problem with
background checks: “Most mass
murderers do not have criminal
records or a history of psychiatric
hospitalization.” Furthermore, let’s
remember that Lanza took guns
from his mother, a legal gun owner.
Nothing the gun controllers can
think of will keep guns away from
those who intend to do harm.
Unfortunately, some opponents of
gun control try to take people’s
minds off guns by blaming shoot-
ings on mental illness. If people
with mental problems could be more
easily locked up, goes the argument,
we’d all be safer. This is an espe-
cially dangerous idea.
As Fox writes, “Certainly, people
cannot be denied their Second
Amendment rights just because they
look strange or act in an odd man-
ner.” But that is what some people
seem to want.
Proposing to lock people up (even
in a purported hospital) before they
have been convicted of a crime
mocks the principles of justice we
routinely pay lip service to. (True,
these principles have been violated
routinely in the “war on terror.” Our
task, however, is to stop this out-
rage, not make it more common.)
Some commentators lament that it
is not as easy to commit people as it
used to be, but be careful what you
ask for. Psychiatrists have no special
skill at predicting who will be vio-
lent, and while they use terms like
“mental disorder,” there are no ob-
jective tests for psychiatric “dis-
eases.”
Expanding the mental-health laws
would save no lives, but it would
jeopardize the freedom of people
who pose no harm to anyone.
No legislative gimmick will pre-
vent mass shootings. An open socie-
ty is a risky society, and giving more
power to our guardians only raises
the ancient question: Who will pro-
tect us from our protectors?
In the end, there’s no substitute
for taking self-defense seriously.
Sheldon Richman is vice president
and editor at The Future of Freedom
Foundation (www.fff.org) in Fairfax,
Va.
Additional laws will not make us safer
By Jay Platt
What is a hero? Webster’s diction-
ary defines a hero as someone who’s
admired for his achievements and
noble qualities, and one who shows
great courage. Fortunately, today we
have many examples of real heroes.
Look no further than the U.S. mili-
tary, police and firefighters -- men
and women who put their lives at
risk for others.
A real hero also is the person who
is fighting cancer or some other
chronic illness, and does so with
great dignity and grace. Though
they may be in pain or discomfort,
they somehow make those around
them feel better, do better, and be
better.
Which brings me to Lance Arm-
strong.
I was a supporter of his since his
first Tour de France win. Coming
back from cancer the way he did,
and racing the way he did drug-free
(supposedly), inspired me to no end.
When others questioned how he was
able to do the things he did without
any help from performance-enhanc-
ing drugs, I defended him as if he
were a personal friend.
As a cancer survivor myself, and
someone who continues to battle the
disease daily, he inspired me. He
gave me strength when I felt like I
had none. He even motivated me to
challenge myself by attempting de-
manding physical feats, like hiking
the 2,100-mile Appalachian Trail be-
ginning to end. When I got tired and
Platt
Continued on page 5
What Lance Armstrong teaches us about real heroes
To The Editor,
It’s that time of year again when
our thoughts become centered on
pro-life and the treasure of an un-
born baby….a time to delve deep for
answers to mend fractured habits to-
wards preservation of life.
We are at an imperative time in
history that demands we recognize
another life issue that looms large.
The earth has a fever. With every
degree her temperature rises, she be-
comes more ill and less capable of
sustaining nourishing systems. We
know how we feel when we get a
temperature. Well the earth is con-
nected to her people, and she needs
us all to be her doctor. Earth schol-
ars believe that if we can apply
needed medicines to combat climate
change within the next five years,
her systems may be salvaged. If
not, our future looks bleak.
Land and ocean systems - our
food sources - are in jeopardy.
Species are endangered and dying –
are we not among them? We know
that we now grow our own atmos-
phere, our own sicknesses, our own
storms, our own deserts. We also
know that we can emulate healthy
systems by changing our methods.
We can take to mind the heart of
our creator and recognize that all
creation is holy – the land, its crea-
tures, plants, peoples, each one of
us. Are we not spiritual beings hav-
ing a human experience, called to
bring harmony out of chaos, to seek
and own the sacredness within all, to
honor creation’s interconnectedness
and grow justice and peace?
When earth can no longer keep
her permafrost frozen, the methane
reservoirs within them will release.
Methane is 25 times more potent
than carbon.
Earth’s sustaining ability for life
is being jeopardized and destroyed
by human choices. It is time for all
of us to acknowledge the evidence
and travel the high road together.
Dee Czech
Arlington
Climate change, a pro-life issue
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 24, 2013, page 5
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Obituary
Marvin Kopischke, age 98,
of Arlington, died at the Ar-
lington Good Samaritan Cen-
ter on Thursday, Jan. 17.
Funeral services were held
at Zion Lutheran Church in
Arlington at 11 a.m. Tuesday,
Jan. 22. Rev. James Carlson
officiated.
Visitation was held at the
Kolden Funeral Home in Ar-
lington at 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Monday, Jan. 21, and contin-
ued one hour prior to the
service time at the church on
Tuesday, Jan. 22.
Interment was held at St.
John’s Lutheran Cemetery in
Morgan at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Jan. 22.
Marvin Kopischke was
born to Fred and Ernstine
(Fenske) Kopischke in Mor-
gan on July 20, 1914. He was
baptized and confirmed at St.
John’s Lutheran Church in
Morgan, and spent his school
years in Morgan as well. He
enlisted in the U.S. Army
during World War II. During
his time in the Army, he
worked on road construction
in both Canada and Alaska,
and his dedication earned him
the rank of Technical Ser-
geant.
In November of 1957, Mar-
vin was united in marriage to
Margaret Hanson at St.
John’s Lutheran Church in
Morgan. In the spring of
1976, Marvin was married to
Charlotte Leach, in St. Paul.
Marvin made his living run-
ning heavy machinery, and
worked road construction for
41 years in both Minnesota
and South Dakota.
Marvin enjoyed horses and
rodeos, and also enjoyed trav-
eling and gardening.
Marvin is survived by his
wife, Charlotte; stepsons,
Allan (Cheryl) Leach and
Gordon (Maureen) Leach;
stepdaughter-in-law, Marlene
Leach; nine step-grandchil-
dren; sister-in-law, Virginia
Kopischke; brother-in-law,
Jim Whitcomb; and several
nieces and nephews.
Marvin was preceded in
death by his first wife, Mar-
garet; and three siblings, Frie-
da, Meta and Emil.
Marvin Kopischke, 98, Arlington
Sibley County each year
recognizes those people who
have fought or lost their
struggle with cancer at a very
inspiring event called the
Relay For Life.
The funds raised by teams
and other means at this event
are donated to the American
Cancer Society which is an
organization that provides re-
sources and financial support
to those people who know
cancer all two well.
It is an important fact that
the teams relaying do not just
come out for the annual
event, but raise funds year
round for the American Can-
cer Society.
To kickoff the fundraising
festivities, the Sibley County
Relay For Life will host its
annual kickoff meeting at the
Gaylord Public Library at
5:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 28.
Individuals who have a
team or are thinking of form-
ing a team are encouraged to
attend this meeting.
People who have any ques-
tions can contact Jeri Oden-
thal at 612-418-6880.
Sibley County Relay For Life will
hold kickoff meeting on Jan. 28
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Wolverines of the Month
The following students were recently
chosen as Wolverines of the Month at
the Sibley East Junior High School in
Gaylord. Front Row: (left to right) Faith
Young, Edgar Lopez and Kimberly Ve-
lazquez. Back Row: (l to r) Neyland Ott
and Lucas Trebesch.
wanted to quit, I’d think to
myself, “If Lance can do the
things he does, I can do this,
too.”
So, his recent revelations to
Oprah Winfrey hit me like a
50-pound sledgehammer to
the chest. When he admitted
to lying about taking perform-
ance enhancing drugs, I felt
like he had personally lied to
me. And that's when I knew
that he is nothing more than a
fake hero.
Fake heroes have none of
the qualities of a real hero.
Rather, they lie, cheat, steal,
and do whatever it takes to
make themselves look good
and heroic. Winning, to them,
is the most important thing,
and who they hurt in the
process really doesn't matter.
All of which, sadly, describes
Lance Armstrong.
I know he still will have his
defenders. I’ve already heard
from people who have basi-
cally said, “Well, what about
all the good he’s done for can-
cer research?” While that is
true, and I certainly hope that
Livestrong is not negatively
affected by Armstrong’s ad-
mission, the fact is that the
whole organization was start-
ed based on a lie.
He never would have had
the millions of dollars, the
fame, and the incredible story
if it had not been for the lie
that he told for so long. And,
although it is uncomfortable
to say so, how do we know
that he did not get cancer be-
cause of his taking perform-
ance enhancing drugs? Would
that have changed his story?
I'm sure, for many, it would
have.
And what of his admission
now? Surely, that took
courage? It was heroic, right?
Hardly! First of all, look at to
whom he chose to tell all of
the details. Oprah Winfrey. I
have no doubt that was a well-
thought-out strategy on his
part. He, undoubtedly, was
advised to go where he would
most likely garner sympathy
and do it before an audience
that probably knows little
about cycling, and that is most
likely to give him a pass on
his transgressions.
Even with all that though,
he still could have done the
heroic thing. But he did not.
He could have looked into the
camera and said in the sincer-
est way he could muster that
steroids are not the way. That
he, in all likelihood, gave
himself cancer in his quest for
fame. Think of the kids who
could have benefited from
hearing such a thing. Instead,
however, he defiantly said
that since everyone else was
supposedly doing it, he felt
justified in doing it, too. Very
hero like, huh?
Jay Platt was medically re-
tired from the Marine Corps
in 1998 after suffering com-
plications from the cancer von
Hippel Lindau (VHL), a ge-
netic disease that resulted in
brain and spinal tumors, kid-
ney cancer, and the loss of his
left eye. Told his future would
be considerably dimmer than
his past, Platt set out to re-
build himself physically, men-
tally and spiritually, and to
challenge himself by setting
demanding physical goals. He
is one of fewer than 300 peo-
ple to have hiked the 2,100-
mile southbound Appalachian
Trail; one of three to swim
from Alcatraz Island to San
Francisco with hands and feet
tied; and the only person to
swim across the Mississippi
while blindfolded, handcuffed
and shackled.
Platt Continued from page 4
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington City Coun-
cil, at its regular meeting on
Monday night, Jan. 21, unani-
mously approved a motion to
accept a $7,850 bid from
Univar, Savage, to purchase a
mosquito sprayer.
According to City Admin-
istrator Matt Jaunich, there is
$8,000 in the Capital Im-
provement Plan (CIP) Fund
to cover this purchase.
In unrelated business, the
City Council also unanimous-
ly approved a motion to ac-
cept a $7,748 bid from
Arnold’s, Glencoe, to pur-
chase a lawn mower for the
parks and public cemetery.
Jaunich said there is $7,000
in the CIP to assist with this
expense. The additional
monies, he said, will be taken
out of reserves.
The City Council will hold
its next regular meeting at
6:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 4.
City Council accepts bids for equipment
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 24, 2013, page 6
Sports
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Junior Nathan Rose, who
wrestles at 195 and 220
pounds for the Sibley East
varsity wrestling team,
recorded his 150th career
victory last week.
Rose reached the mile-
stone with a forfeit against
Maple River on Thursday
evening, Jan. 17.
Andrew Bates currently
holds the Sibley East
school record with 164 ca-
reer wins.
Nathan is the son of Tony
and Jenny Rose, Arlington.
Rose records 150th career win
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
wrestling team placed fourth
during the Eden Prairie
Wrestling Tournament on
Saturday, Jan. 19.
St. Michael-Albertville
captured top honors with
238.5 team points. Owatonna
(161), Annandale-Maple
Lake (135.5), Sibley East
(117.5), Eden Prairie (117),
Anoka (114), Somerset (64),
New Richmond (48) and
Spectrum (18) rounded out
the field.
Nathan Rose (195) was the
lone champion for Sibley
East.
Individual Results
106-pounds: Tanner Pasvo-
gel (SE) was decisioned by
Cullen Gallagher (AN) 6-3 in
the opening round. In the
consolation round, Pasvogel
pinned Kameron Dunn (EP)
3:34. In his next match,
Pasvogel decisioned Ryan
Killeen (S) 5-2. In the third-
place match, Pasvogel won
by a major decision over Gar-
ret Hildebrandt (NR) 10-2.
113-pounds: Sibley East
did not have a wrestler en-
tered in this weight class.
120-pounds: Nathan
Thomes (SE) was pinned by
Tommy Thorn (SM-A) 3:56
in the opening round. In the
consolation round, Thomes
was decisioned by Nick
Schneider (EP) 9-7.
126-pounds: Sibley East
did not have a wrestler en-
tered in this weight class.
132-pounds: Steven Roth
(SE) was decisioned by
Abram Anderson (NR) 10-3
in the opening round. In the
consolation round, Roth was
pinned by Nick Anderson (A)
0:45.
138-pounds: Hunter Ret-
zlaff (SE) pinned Casey
Schuhn (NR) 3:35 in the
opening round. In the semi-
final round, Retzlaff deci-
sioned Bobby LeRoy (SM) 3-
0. In the championship
match, Retzlaff was deci-
sioned by Cole Sladek (SM-
A) 7-3.
145-pounds: Mitch Went-
zlaff (SE) was pinned by Sam
Begin (A) 3:36 in the opening
round. In the consolation
round, Wentzlaff won by a
technical fall over Wechtor
Thouk (O) 16-0. In his next
match, Wentzlaff was deci-
sioned by Chase Monger
(EP) 8-3.
152-pounds: Sibley East
did not have a wrestler en-
tered in this weight class.
160-pounds: Austin Kube
(SE) was pinned by Jerry
Bilse (EP) 3:40 in the open-
ing round. In the consolation
round, Kube pinned Joel
Galvin (S) 2:34. In his next
match, Kube was decisioned
Ryan Rostamo (SM-A) 2-1.
170-pounds: Aaron Bates
(SE) pinned Mark Thompson
(A) 1:06 in the opening
round. In the semi-final
round, Bates decisioned Max
Praschek (SM) 3-1. In the
championship match, Bates
was decisioned by Teddy Er-
ickson (AN) 6-4.
182-pounds: Brandon Ash-
ton (SE) was decisioned by
Jake Briggs (SM-A) 8-2 in
the opening round. In the
consolation round, Ashton
pinned Andrew Doree (SM)
2:43. In his next match, Ash-
ton decisioned Royce Myren
(A) 3-2. In the third-place
match, Ashton lost by a major
decision to Spencer Ogden
(AN) 13-4.
195-pounds: Nathan Rose
(SE) pinned Cole Martinsen
(SM) 0:12 in the opening
round. In the semi-final
round, Rose pinned Jake
Olson (A) 1:49. In the cham-
pionship match, Rose won by
a major decision over Ricky
Briggs (SM-A) 13-2.
220-pounds: Miah DuFrane
(SE) decisioned Hunter Jirele
(O) 5-1 in the opening round.
In the semi-final round,
DuFrane pinned Randy An-
derson (SM-A) 5:20. In the
championship match,
DuFrane was decisioned by
Michael Kessler (SM-A) 5-0.
285-pounds: Clay Mogard
(SE) received a bye in the
opening round. In the semi-
final round, Mogard was
pinned by Mitchell Eull (SM-
A) 2:48. In the consolation
round, Mogard decisioned
Jon DuFrane (SE) 4-2. In the
third-place match, Mogard
was pinned by Tom Condon
(AN) 3:11.
285-pounds: Jon DuFrane
(SE) was decisioned by Zane
Vonholtum (SM) 8-1 in the
opening round. After a bye in
the consolation round,
DuFrane was decisioned by
Clay Mogard (SE) 4-2.
Dual Meets
Sibley East 52
Le Sueur-Henderson 22
106-pounds: Juan Mendoza
(SE) was pinned by Luke
Wilson (LS-H) 1:44.
113-pounds: Mitch Heibel
(SE) lost by a major decision
to Austin Anderly (LS-H) 13-
4.
120-pounds: Mason Voight
(SE) decisioned Jordan Carl-
son (LS-H) 6-4.
126-pounds: Nathan
Thomes (SE) decisioned
Caleb Radloff (LS-H) 10-6.
132-pounds: Jason Meyer
(SE) pinned Trevor Brock
(LS-H) 17-3.
138-pounds: Hunter Ret-
zlaff (SE) won by a forfeit.
145-pounds: Mitch Went-
zlaff (SE) won by a major de-
cision over Quinlan Riffen-
burg (LS-H) 11-0.
152-pounds: Jake Went-
zlaff (SE) was pinned by
Chris Pfarr (LS-H) 3:22.
160-pounds: Austin Kube
(SE) pinned John Klein (LS-
H) 1:52.
170-pounds: Andrew
Schauer (SE) was pinned by
Clayton Colling (LS-H) 0:45.
182-pounds: Brandon Ash-
ton (SE) pinned Noah Hynes
Marquette (LS-H) 3:09.
195-pounds: Miah DuFrane
(SE) pinned Connor Boettch-
er (LS-H) 1:22.
220-pounds: Nathan Rose
(SE) pinned Marcus Berg-
quist (LS-H) 0:19.
285-pounds: Clay Mogard
(SE) pinned Joe Abrahmson
(LS-H) 0:49.
Sibley East 48
Maple River 29
106-pounds: Tanner Pasvo-
gel (SE) decisioned Derek
Moore (MR) 10-8.
113-pounds: Mitch Heibel
(SE) pinned Prince Bade
(MR) 1:26.
120-pounds: Mason Voight
(SE) was pinned by Zach
Kuhns (MR) 4:29.
126-pounds: Nathan
Thomes (SE) was pinned by
Russell Caldwell (MR) 0:38.
132-pounds: Jason Meyer
(SE) won by a forfeit.
138-pounds: Hunter Ret-
zlaff (SE) pinned Bryce
Woitas (MR) 1:41.
145-pounds: Mitch Went-
zlaff (SE) was pinned by
Aaron Trio (MR) 0:57.
152-pounds: Jake Went-
zlaff (SE) decisioned Kyle
Schoneck (MR) 7-2.
160-pounds: Austin Kube
(SE) was pinned by Mitch
Stoltzman (MR) 4:40.
170-pounds: Aaron Bates
(SE) pinned Lucas Trio (MR)
1:13.
182-pounds: Nolan Os-
borne (SE) lost by a technical
fall to Tyler Olson (MR) 18-
1.
195-pounds: Miah DuFrane
(SE) won by a forfeit.
220-pounds: Nathan Rose
(SE) won by a forfeit.
285-pounds: Clay Mogard
(SE) won by a forfeit.
Sibley East places 4th in
Eden Prairie tournament
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Senior Tyler Bates
poured in 31 points to lead
the visiting Sibley East var-
sity boys basketball team
over Watertown-Mayer 67-
60 in Minnesota River Con-
ference play on Tuesday
night, Jan. 15.
Senior Sam Harrison also
hit double digits with 16
points while junior Brody
Rodning dropped in nine
points. Senior Steve Haefs
netted six points while
sophomore Zac Weber and
senior Max Grabow scored
three and two points re-
spectively.
The Wolverines hit 21 of
42 shots from two-point
range for 50 percent, but
only five of 17 shots from
three-point distance for 29
percent. Sibley East also
drained 10 of 18 free throw
attempts for 56 percent.
The Royals connected on
21 of 33 shots from two-
point range for 64 percent,
but only five of 15 long
bombs for 33 percent. Wa-
tertown-Mayer also man-
aged three of seven charity
tosses for 43 percent.
The Wolverines doubled
up the host team on the
boards by a 36-18 margin.
Tyler Bates pulled down
13 caroms while Harrison
and Grabow snared seven
rebounds each. Weber
grabbed four boards while
Rodning had three re-
bounds.
Rodning distributed
seven assists as Sibley East
collected 17 dishes in the
win. Haefs and Harrison
added three assists apiece.
Harrison, Rodning and
Weber also contributed
three steals each as the
Wolverines came up with a
total of 13 thefts in the vic-
tory. Tyler Bates and Haefs
added two swipes.
Sibley East played visit-
ing Norwood Young Ameri-
ca in Gaylord on Tuesday
night, Jan. 22. A complete
game summary will appear
in next week’s newspaper.
The Wolverines currently
have a 4-2 mark in the
MRC and a 7-4 record
overall. Sibley East will
travel to Mayer Lutheran in
conference action at 7:30
p.m. Friday, Jan. 25. The
Wolverines will travel to
Lake Crystal-Wellcome
Memorial at 7:30 p. m.
Monday, Jan. 28.
Bates scores 31 points in 67-60
win over host Watertown-Mayer
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
girls basketball team, after
two losses in Minnesota
River Conference action, cap-
tured a victory in non-confer-
ence play.
The Lady Wolverines, 1-8
in the MRC and 5-10 overall,
will host Jordan in confer-
ence action at 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 24. Sibley
East will travel to Belle
Plaine in MRC play at 7:30
p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 29.
Norwood Young America 65
Sibley East 39
The Sibley East varsity
girls basketball team was top-
pled by visiting Norwood
Young America 65-39 in
Minnesota River Conference
action on Tuesday evening,
Jan. 15.
The Lady Wolverines were
led by sophomore McKenzie
Sommers with 10 points.
Seniors Jordan Thomes and
Courtney Schwirtz and fresh-
man Alyssa Weber tossed in
six points each. Senior Briana
Reierson hooped five points
while sophomore Kelli
Martens netted three points.
Juniors Kimberly Kurtzweg
and Megan Eckberg and
sophomore Shelby Voight
added one point each.
Sibley East hit 14 of 37
shots from the field for 38
percent. The Lady Wolver-
ines also converted 10 of 20
free throw attempts for 50
percent.
Sibley East grabbed a total
of 29 rebounds in the setback.
Eckberg pulled down 10
boards while Sommers and
Weber snared five caroms
apiece.
Martens also dished out
three assists while Briana
Reierson added three steals.
Mayer Lutheran 54
Sibley East 34
The visiting Sibley East
varsity girls basketball team
lost to Mayer Lutheran 54-34
in Minnesota River Confer-
ence action on Friday night,
Jan. 18.
Sophomore post McKenzie
Sommers topped the Lady
Wolverines with eight points
in the loss. Senior Jordan
Thomes netted seven points
while junior Megan Eckberg
and sophomore Autumn Dose
had six points each. Fresh-
man Alyssa Weber tossed in
four points while sophomore
Shelby Voight scored two
points. Sophomore Kelli
Martens added one point.
The Lady Wolverines hit
13 of 53 shots from the field
for 24 percent and seven of
14 charity tosses for 50 per-
cent.
Sibley East, despite the
loss, collected 36 rebounds in
the contest. Eckberg and
Sommers pulled down eight
and seven caroms respective-
ly. Thomes and Weber added
five rebounds each.
Weber also contributed
four steals and two assists.
Sibley East 45
Maple River 12
The Sibley East varsity
girls basketball team re-
bounded with a 45-12 win
over visiting Maple River in
non-conference action on
Monday night, Jan. 21.
A balanced scoring attack
was led by sophomore
McKenzie Sommers with 10
points. Freshman Alyssa
Weber scored nine points
while junior Megan Eckberg
and sophomore Autumn Dose
netted eight and six points re-
spectively. Sophomore Kelli
Martens tossed in four points
while senior Jordan Thomes,
junior Maren Miner and
sophomore Shelby Voight
had two points each. Seniors
Courtney Schwirtz and Bri-
ana Reierson added one point
each.
Team and individual statis-
tics were unavailable from
this game.
Girls defeat Maple River after
losses to NYA, Mayer Lutheran
Enterprise photos by Kurt Menk
In a game that featured
throwback jerseys, the
Sibley East varsity girls
basketball team lost to
visiting Norwood Young
America 65-39 in Min-
nesota River Conference
action on Tuesday night,
Jan. 22. (Top Photo) Sib-
ley East sophomore Au-
tumn Dose, right,
grabbed a rebound
under the watchful eye
of junior Megan Eck-
berg, left. (Left Photo)
Sibley East senior Jor-
dan Thomes, left, posted
up her player on the
block and looked for the
ball. Sibley East also
lost at Mayer Lutheran
54-34 on Friday night,
Jan. 18, but rebounded
with a 45-12 victory over
visiting Maple River on
Monday evening, Jan.
21.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 24, 2013, page 7
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Legals
SIBLEY EAST
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
REGULAR SCHOOL
BOARD MINUTES
INDEPENDENT SCHOOL
DISTRICT NO. 2310
ARLINGTON GAYLORD
GREEN ISLE
ARLINGTON CAMPUS
MONDAY, DECEMBER 17,
2012
Following the Salute to the
Flag, the meeting was called to
order at 6:30 p.m. Members
present: Bri an Asmus, Bri an
Brandt, Scott Dose (7:05 pm ar-
rival), Beth DuFrane, Anne
Karl and Dan Woehler.
Absent: None
APPROVAL OF AGENDA:
Motion by Brandt, seconded by
Woehler, to approve the board
agenda. Moti on approved by
unanimous vote.
VISITOR/GUEST COM-
MENTS: None
CONSENT AGENDA:
Approval of the Minutes from
the November 13, 2012 Regular
School Board Meeting.
Bills and Payments totaling
$1,205,831.90 for December,
2012 were approved for payment.
Personnel/Hires:
Chuck Hartman, Head Boys
Track Coach. Compensati on
would be set according to the
Master Agreement.
Annie Kreger, Visual Arts Activ-
ities Coordinator. Compensation
set at $500 paid out of the After
Schools Enrichment Grant.
Dan Morton, Juni or Hi gh
Wrestling Coach. Compensation
would be set at Master Agree-
ment rate and pro-rated accord-
ing to starting date.
Resignations: Molly McGin-
ley, Assistant Volleyball Coach
Vol unteer Coach: Anni e
Kreger, Cheerleading volunteer.
Motion by Asmus, seconded by
DuFrane, to approve the consent
agenda.
Moti on approved by unani -
mous vote.
OLD/UNFINISHED BUSI-
NESS:
Brian Haley, Eide Bailly re-
viewed the final 2012 Audit report
and asked for approval.
Motion by Brandt, seconded by
DuFrane approving 2012 Finan-
cial Audit Report as presented.
Motion approved by unanimous
vote.
Motion by Asmus, seconded by
Brandt to certi fy the 2012
Payable 2013 Levy Certification
at Maximum Levy Authority in the
amount of $1,267,691.88 , 2.08%
increase.
Moti on approved by unani -
mous vote.
Ed Waltman, Superintendent
Search Consultant, reviewed the
findings of the community profile
meeting and recommended a list-
ing of New Superintendent Attrib-
utes to uti l i ze i n the hi ri ng
process.
Motion by Brandt, seconded by
Woehler to approve the New Su-
perintendent Attributes as recom-
mended. Moti on approved by
unanimous vote.
NEW BUSINESS:
Motion by DuFrane, seconded
by Dose to accept the financial
donati ons from:
United Grains Systems, Winthrop
in the amount of $1,500 to be
used for adjustable baskets for
use by PE and Community Edu-
cation.
Michael Foods, $814.95 for
Halloween 5K T-Shirts.
St. Paul’s Lutheran Church,
$300 to the Jazz band.
Motion was approved by unan-
imous vote.
PRINCIPAL REPORT:
High School Principal James
Amsden shared information relat-
ing to building activities and pro-
gramming.
OTHER INFORMATION:
1. School Board Organizational
Meeting will be held at 6:30 p.m.
on Monday, January 14, 2013 in
room # 149, Arlington Campus.
2. School Board Members and
Superintendent Langenbrunner
recogni zed outgoi ng School
Board Member Brian Asmus for
his 8 years serving the students
and community.
ADJOURNMENT:
The meeting was adjourned at
8:11 p.m.
Anne Karl, Chairperson
Scott Dose, Clerk
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Grades K-2 Wrestlers
The following youngsters in grades K-2 are partici-
pants in the Sibley East Youth Wrestling Program.
Front Row: (left to right) Hayden Mehlhop, Carlos
Arredondo, Brock Lucas, Tommy Ziegler, Oliver
Rechtzigel and Leyton Dose. Middle Row: (l to r)
Kalvin Montes, Tony Carpenter, Riley Drexler, Lucas
Luepke, Elijah Pufahl, Caden Willmsen and Nate Ten-
Eyck. Back Row: (l to r) Coach Dan Morton, Connor
Bartlette, Bryce Klancke, Owen Reid, Ryan Magnus-
son, Mason Meyer, Nick TenEyck, Parker Burdorf,
coach Donovan Steele and coach Mike Bergs.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Grades 3-6 Wrestlers
The following youngsters in grades 3-6 are partici-
pants in the Sibley East Youth Wrestling Program.
Front Row: (left to right) Logan Steele, Matthew
Ziegler, Kadin Montes, Zach Pazdernik, Jake Lucas,
Drayden Morton and Derek Steele. Middle Row: (l to r)
Dylan Rasmussen, Gannon Rosenfeld, Lincoln Car-
penter, Keegen Effertz, Tucker Hendrycks, Hunter
Stearns and Aaron Ehrich. Back Row: (l to r) Coach
Dan Morton, Dakota Roehler, Brandon O’Hara, Lucas
Tesch, Jagger Borgmann, BoGarett Rechtzigel, Matt
Messner, Beauen Harbarth, coach Donovan Steele
and coach Mike Bergs.
The Arlington
Enterprise
402 W. Alden St.
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-5547
52 Weeks
a Year!
IS
S
U
E
S
!
w
E
ha
e
v
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 24, 2013, page 8
A3-4SEa
As farm land prices
around the state of Min-
nesota have continued to in-
crease over the past 20
years, it has left many farm-
ers wondering if and when
the farmland bubble may
burst.
According to Steve Taff,
economist with University
of Minnesota Extension,
farmland prices have been
rising steadily since 1990,
and have peaked at a state
average of over $3,500 per
acre in 2010. Since 1992,
Taff has conducted an annu-
al farmland appraisal in co-
ordination with the 100-year
study organized by the Uni-
versity of Minnesota.
“There are two ‘drivers’
for high land prices,” Taff
says, “high corn prices and
low interest rates.”
If crop prices, especially
corn, remain high and inter-
est rates on treasury bills re-
main low, Taff foresees the
potential for land prices to
continue to appreciate.
As a result of these two
factors, buying high-priced
land may be attractive to
many people. People may
view high corn prices as an
incentive because of the po-
tential for increased rev-
enue, while low interest
rates make it much easier
for producers to get loans
and make the payments.
“No one knows —that’s
the short answer as to
whether these record farm-
land prices will soon drop,”
Taff says.
“One main issue associat-
ed with high prices is that
fewer farmers possess the
capital necessary to be will-
ing to bid on land,” Taff
says. “This has caused ex-
isting member participation
in many rural communities
to be lower, and makes it
difficult for new farm mem-
bership to be established.
It's very hard for young peo-
ple to get started. Many
banks won't finance new,
young adult farmers.”
Taff noted that in the past
three years these factors
have contributed to there
being only about one-half as
much farmland sold com-
pared to the preceding
years. As a result of high
prices, only one percent of
Minnesota' s farmland is
sold in a given year, leading
to 50 percent of the farm-
land being leased. “While
some land is listed, it may
be pulled off the market
when sellers don't get the
price they're looking for,”
says Taff.
With prices expected to
continue to rise, Taff cau-
tions prospective land buy-
ers to be careful and take
necessary precautions.
“Consider your financial
situation, get some good ad-
vice from creditors, and
think of your family,” says
Taff. “I worry that there are
a few farmers out there on
the verge of getting overex-
tended when looking to fi-
nance their farm."
For more information
visit www.extension-
.umn.edu/AgBusiness or
www.cffm.umn.edu.
Farm land prices are on the rise
across the state of Minnesota
History
80 Years Ago
January 26, 1933
Louis Kill, Editor
A party of Gaylord young
folks, who attended the basket-
ball game here last Friday night
and went to Winthrop later in the
evening, met with an unfortunate
accident on their return home
from the later place. The driver
of the car did not see a freight
train which stood on the crossing
at Gaylord and drove right into it,
according to reports, and several
of the youngsters were severely
cut and bruised. The car was
badly damaged.
The Arlington High School
basketball team won its 6th con-
secutive game of the season by
squeezing out a 20 to 19 victory
in the first game of the “Goat”
series with Gaylord on the local
floor. Arlington showed a decid-
ed slump in the playing form,
which carried it through other
games. Poor ball handling and in-
ability to connect from the free
shot line held down Arlington’s
chances of running up a better
score.
Friday and Saturday specials
at Wolff ’s Meat Market: Pork
chops, 3 lbs. 25c; boiling beef
ribs, 3 lbs. 25c; bologna, 2 lbs.
25c; smoked pork sausage, 2 lbs.
25c; salt herring, 3 lbs. 27c;
spiced herring, 3 lbs. 40c.
60 Years Ago
January 22, 1953
Louis Kill, Editor
The pupils of both the Arling-
ton public school and St. Paul’s
Lutheran school here were able
to watch the presidential inaugu-
ration on television Tuesday. Sets
were installed through the cour-
tesy of Pinske Motor Sales for
the occasion.
Representative August B.
Mueller of Sibley County has
again been named chairman of
the Committee of Dairy Prod-
ucts and Livestock this week by
Speaker John Hartle of the Min-
nesota House of Represen-
tatives. This is one of the impor-
tant committees of the House, as
it deals with all legislation affect-
ing dairying and livestock. Other
committees that Mueller was
named to serve on are transporta-
tion, highways, municipal affairs,
temperance and liquor control.
One of the most unusual acci-
dents ever to occur near here
took place last Monday morning
near Gaylord when a car driven
by Bernice Rewitzer, 24, Gay-
lord, was completely demolished
by a train at a crossing, but she
escaped with minor injuries.
Miss Rewitzer left Gaylord at
6:00 a.m. Monday morning,
bound for Elmore, where she
teaches school. She turned to
cross the M. & St. L. tracks at the
point east of Gaylord where T. H.
5 connects with Highway 5. The
train hit between the back door
and the trunk, flipping the car off
the track and throwing the driver
a distance of 85 feet. She suf-
fered several broken ribs and was
badly bruised. Her 1950 Chevro-
let was completely demolished.
40 Years Ago
January 25, 1973
Val Kill, Editor
About 500 farmers from the
Arlington and surrounding areas
heard specialists in the field of
marketing discuss promotion and
market development at the 11th
Annual Farm Institute here Janu-
ary 18, according to John Peter-
son, Extension Agent.
Adult Education classes will
be at a minimum this year ac-
cording to Principal Stanley
Cina. Outside of the Vocational
Agriculture courses which are
held each year only one other
course (Dog trimming) has a
chance of being held. There was-
n’t sufficient interest in any of
the areas suggested to warrant
holding a class.
Sharon Wieman, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Wieman of
rural Arlington and a senior at
Arlington-Green Isle High
School, has been named A-GI’s
Betty Crocker Homemaker of
Tomorrow for 1973. Sharon re-
ceived the award on the basis of
her score on a written test taken
by senior boys and girls through-
out the nation. Her score was the
highest of the 30 boys and girls
who participated in the test at A-
GI.
20 Years Ago
January 28, 1993
Kurt Menk, Editor
The Arlington-Green Isle
School Board, during its regular
monthly meeting last Thursday
night, accepted two resignations
for purposes of retirement. The
School Board accepted resigna-
tions from Senior High School
Principal Dennis Bergner and
business teacher and computer
audio video coordinator Robert
Schrupp.
A merger of Arlington and
Gaylord snowmobile clubs and a
state grant has allowed area
snowmobile enthusiasts to ex-
pand their trail from Nicollet to
Gaylord to Arlington to Green
Isle and then to the McLeod
County line a few miles south of
Plato, according to Club Pres-
ident Cory Danielson. The new,
larger group, to be known as
Drift Dodgers, Inc., has pur-
chased a snowcat and a groomer
to make the trail a snowmobiler’s
delight.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Another Demolition
M.J. Neisen Construction, Arlington, began to demol-
ish this block storage building near the intersection
of East Main Street and First Avenue South in down-
town Arlington last week. The block storage building,
which was located just north of the old electrical sub
station, was approximately 60 years old. Less than a
month before that, M.J. Neisen demolished a brick
building located at 130 Grove Street South in Green
Isle. In July, the same company demolished a huge
grain bin in downtown Arlington.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 24, 2013, page 9
McGraw Monument
Works, Inc., LeSueur
Local Representative
Leah Schrupp
Arlington, MN 55307
612-308-8169
3 miles North of LeSueur
on Highway 169
30945 Forest Prairie Road
(507) 665-3126
HOURS: M-F 8-5
Weekends by appointment.
Visit our
INDOOR AND OUTDOOR
DISPLAYS
M31-30Ea
Blessings
“If any of you lacks wisdom, you should ask God, who
gives generously to all without finding fault, and it will be
given to you.” James 1:5 NIV
Seventh Day Adventist
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
507-304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
Church Service: Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Commercial and Industrial Builders
Green Isle, MN 55338
ph. 507.326.7901 fax: 507.326.3551
www.vosconstruction.com
Arlington State Bank
Serving the Community Since 1895
BANKING SERVICES
964-2256
Arlington
A & N Radiator Repair
Allen & Nicki Scharn, Owners
23228 401 Ave., Arlington
877-964-2281 or 507-964-2281 Bus.
Certified ASE Technician on Staff
Also distributor for Poxy Coat II
Industrial Grade Coatings/Paint
MID-COUNTY
CO-OP
700 W. Lake St., Box 177
Cologne, MN 55322
(952) 466-3700
or TOLL FREE: 1-888-466-3700
HUTCHINSON CO-OP
AGRONOMY
LEON DOSE,
Arlington Branch Manager
411 7
th
Ave. NW • (507) 964-2251
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
402 W. Alden, Arlington
507-964-5547
Online at
www.Arlington
MNnew.com
Arlington Haus
Your Hometown Pub & Eatery
1986-2009
Arlington • 1-507-964-2473
STATE BANK OF
HAMBURG
100 Years. 100 Reasons.
Phone 952-467-2992
statebankofhamburg.com
CONVENIENCE
STORE
Hwy. 5 N., Arlington
507-964-2920
Homestyle Pizza
Real or Soft Serve Ice Cream
Gas – Diesel – Deli – Videos
(507)
964-2212
www.
chefcraigs
.com
23180 401 Ave., Arlington Phone 507-964-2264
EQUAL
HOUSING
LENDER
CRAIG BULLERT
ARLINGTON, MN
23189 Hwy. 5 North,
Arlington, MN 55307
arlington@hutchcoop.com
Office (507) 964-2283
Cell (320) 583-4324
HC
FUNERAL SERVICE
P.O. Box 314
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-2201
Member
FDIC
Church News
Menus
Submitted Photo
Dorian Vocal Festival
Four choir students from the Sibley East Senior High School participated in the
63rd Annual Dorian Vocal Festival at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa, on Sunday,
Jan. 13 and Monday, Jan. 14. Left to right: Sam Bullert, Samantha Lane, Marissa
Eckberg and Katelyn Reid. The honor choir consisted of over 1,200 students from
schools throughout the states of Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, South Dakota and
Nebraska. The students rehearsed for two days under the direction of Luther Col-
lege choral directors Allen Hightower, Sandra Peter, and Andrew Last. Partici-
pants were given the opportunity to hear the Luther College Norsemen, Aurora,
and Nordic Choirs, as well as the Roseville High School Concert Choir. The event
concluded with all participants performing in a concert on Monday evening, Jan.
14.
ZION LUTHERAN
814 W. Brooks St.
Arlington – (507) 964-5454
James Carlson, Pastor
Sunday, January 27: 8:00 a.m.
Choir. 9:00 a.m. Worship. 10:00
a.m. Sunday school and fellow-
ship.
Tuesday, January 29: 9:00 a.m.
Quilting. 6:00 to 7:00 p.m. TOPS
in church basement.
Wednesday, January 30: 3:45
p.m. 7th and 9th grade confirma-
tion. 4:30 p.m. 8th grade confir-
mation.
Thursday, January 31: 9:00
a.m. and 1:00 p.m. Zion service
on cable TV. 9:00 a.m. Quilting.
ZION LUTHERAN
Green Isle Township
Friday, January 25: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, January 27: 10:30 a.m.
Contemporary worship.
Wednesday, January 30: 3:45
p.m. Confirmation at Peace
Lutheran, Arlington. 6:30 to 7:30
p.m. Wednesday school for
grades 1 to 5 at St. Paul’s. 8:00
p.m. Joint choir practice at St.
Paul’s.
Thursday, January 31: Private
Communions.
CREEKSIDE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Christian & Missionary
Alliance
Ben Lane, Pastor
114 Shamrock Drive
Arlington – 507-964-2872
www.creekside-church.com
email: creeksidecc@media-
combb.net.
Thursday, January 24: 1:00 or
7:00 p.m. Bible study of Eph-
esians. 6:30 p.m. Men’s Bible
study of Titus at Dave
Gustafson’s home.
Friday, January 25: 7:00 p.m.
Crazy Love study at the Lane’s.
Sunday, January 27: 10:00 a.m.
Prayer. 10:30 a.m. Worship serv-
ice.
Wednesday, January 30: 7:00
to 8:30 p.m. REACH youth group
at the Shogren’s.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
(507) 304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
507-234-6770
Saturday: Church services at
9:30 a.m. Bible study at 11:00
a.m. Fellowship dinner at 12:00
p.m. All are welcome.
UNITED METHODIST
Arlington
Wayne Swanson, Pastor
www.arlingtonunited
methodist.org
Saturday, January 26: 8:00
a.m. A-Men men’s group.
Sunday, January 27: 9:00 and
11:00 a.m. Worship. 10:10 a.m.
Sunday school.
Wednesday, January 30: 7:00
p.m. Bible study; choir. 8:00 p.m.
Worship.
Thursday, January 31: 10:00
a.m., 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. Worship
on cable TV. 1:00 and 7:00 p.m.
Bible study at Jean Olson’s.
ST. PAUL’S UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Henderson
(507) 248-3594 (Office)
Rev. Brigit Stevens, Pastor
Find us on Facebook:
St. Paul’s UCC - Henderson
Sunday, January 27: 10:00
a.m. Worship. 10:20 a.m. Sunday
school (Preschool - 6th grade).
11:00 a.m. Annual potluck lunch.
12:00 p.m. Annual congregation-
al meeting.
Tuesday, January 29: 7:00 p.m.
Finance ministry team.
Wednesday, January 30: 7:00
p.m. HS youth group (Grades 9-
12 - bring friends!).
ST. PAUL LUTHERAN
(WELS),
Arlington
Bruce Hannemann, Pastor
WEBSITE:
www.stpaularlington.com
EMAIL:
Bruce.Hannemann@stpaul
arlington.com
Saturday, January 26: 9:00
a.m. Home vs. Redwood Falls - A
and B teams.
Sunday, January 27: 8:45 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:00 a.m. Family
Bible study. 10:00 a.m. Worship
with Communion. 6:00 p.m. An-
nual meeting.
Monday, January 28: 7:30 p.m.
Mission Society. Food taken to
food shelves.
Tuesday, January 29: 7:00 p.m.
Daily Bible readers.
Wednesday, January 30: 2:00
p.m. Bible study. 3:45 p.m. Pub-
lic school confirmation class.
7:30 p.m. Choir practice.
Thursday, January 31: 10:00
a.m. Bulletin information due.
11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Service
on cable TV channel 8. 4:00 p.m.
Home basketball with Belle
Plaine. 7:00 to 8:30 p.m. Open
gym.
GAYLORD ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
Gaylord
Bob Holmbeck, Pastor
Sunday, January 27: 9:00 a.m.
Sunday school. 10:00 a.m. Sun-
day worship service and pot
blessing noon fellowship meal.
Wednesday, January 30: 6:30
p.m. Evening Bible classes. 8:00
p.m. Youth Focused.
ST. MARY, MICHAEL
AND BRENDAN AREA
FAITH COMMUNITY
Fr. Keith Salisbury, Pastor
Friday, January 25: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar).
Saturday, January 26: KC
drug/alcohol abuse awareness
poster due (Mar). 5:00 p.m. Mass
(Mar).
Sunday, January 27: 7:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre). 9:00 to 10:15 a.m.
Elementary religious education
(Mar). 9:00 a.m. Mass (Mic).
9:45 to 10:30 a.m. Elementary re-
ligious education, PreK and 1st
grade (Mic). 10:30 a.m. Mass
(Mar). 7:00 p.m. “Faith on Fire”
Bible study (Mic).
Monday, January 28: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar). 8:00 p.m.
AA and AlaNon (Mar).
Tuesday, January 29: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar).
Wednesday, January 30: 7:30
a.m. Mass (Mar). 8:30 a.m. Mass
(Bre). 9:00 a.m. Word and Com-
munion (Oak Terrace). 3:15 to
4:30 p.m. Elementary religious
education, second to fifth grade
(Mic). 7:00 to 8:00 p.m. Jr./Sr.
high religious education (Mar
and Mic).
Thursday, January 31: 7:30
a.m. Mass (Mar). 8:30 a.m. Mass
(Bre and Mic). 9:00 a.m. Scrip-
ture study (Srs. residence in Gay-
lord). 7:30 p.m. Narcotics Anony-
mous (Mic).
TRINITY LUTHERAN
32234 431st Ave., Gaylord
Vicar John Gabrielson, Inter-
im Pastor
Sunday, January 27: 9:30 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:45 a.m. Fel-
lowship. 10:30 a.m. Worship.
Monday, January 28: 9:00 a.m.
to 3:00 p.m. Quilting.
Tuesday, January 29: 9:00 a.m.
to 3:00 p.m. Quilting.
Wednesday, January 30: 6:00
p.m. Confirmation at St. Paul’s.
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Pastor William Postel
Phone 507-964-2400
Sunday, January 27: 9:00 a.m.
Bible class. 10:00 a.m. Worship
with Holy Communion. Pot luck
dinner. Ladies Aid meeting.
Monday, January 28: 7:30 p.m.
Annual voters’ meeting.
Tuesday, January 29: 10:00
a.m. Nursing home service.
Thursday, January 31: 5:30
p.m. Deadline for bulletin infor-
mation.
ST. PAUL’S EV.
REFORMED CHURCH
15470 Co. Rd. 31, Hamburg
Dan Schnabel, Pastor
952-467-3878
www.stpaulsrcus.org
Sunday, January 27: 8:30 a.m.
Sunday school and adult Bible
study. 9:30 a.m. Worship service.
Choir practice after worship.
Wednesday, January 30: 6:30
to 8:00 p.m. Catechism class.
ORATORY OF
ST. THOMAS
THE APOSTLE
Jessenland
507-248-3550
Fr. Sam Perez
Thursday: Weekly Mass at
5:00 p.m.
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN
Green Isle
Friday, January 25: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, January 27: 7:45 a.m.
Worship with Communion. Pas-
tor Bob Hines. 9:00 a.m. Sunday
school.
Wednesday, January 30: 3:45
p. m. Confirmation at Peace
Lutheran, Arlington. 6:30 to 7:30
p. m. Wednesday school for
grades 1 to 5. 8:00 p.m. Joint
choir practice at St. Paul’s.
Thursday, January 31: Private
Communions.
PEACE LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Kurt Lehmkuhl, Pastor
Sunday, January 27: 8:15 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:30 a.m. Wor-
ship service. 10:30 a.m. Voters’
meeting. 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Annual soup and sandwich
luncheon.
Monday, January 28: 7:00 p.m.
Bible study and Guild meeting.
Wednesday, January 30: 3:45
p.m. Catechism. 5:00 p.m. Junior
bell choir.
SENIOR DINING
Call 326-3401 for a meal
Suggested Donation $385
Monday: Hamburger, oven
brown potatoes, corn, bun with
margarine, escalloped apples, low
fat milk.
Tuesday: Chi cken al a ki ng,
peas and carrots, fruit salad, rice,
cookie, low fat milk.
Wednesday: Ital i an meat
sauce, spaghetti noodles, lettuce
with dressing, mixed vegetables,
garlic bread with margarine, low
fat milk, ice cream.
Thursday: Pork l oi n, whol e
parslied potatoes, carrots, dinner
roll with margarine, poke cake,
low fat milk.
Fri day: Hot beef sandwi ch,
mashed potatoes wi th gravy,
stewed tomatoes, bread with mar-
garine, peaches, low fat milk.
SIBLEY EAST ELEMENTARY
BREAKFAST MENU
Arlington and Gaylord
Breakfast i s served at 8:00
a.m. daily. A 1/2 pint of milk is
served with each meal daily. Menu
is subject to change.
Monday: Oatmeal bar, cheese
stix, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Mini pancake, juice,
milk.
Wednesday: Crunchmani a,
juice, milk.
Thursday: Si ngl e pop tart,
cheese stix, juice, milk.
Friday: Cracker stix, seeds,
juice, milk.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Arlington
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: Mexican haystack,
lettuce, tomato, green pepper,
onion, salsa, refried beans, rice,
peach slices. Alternate entree:
Sl i ced turkey wrap wi th whol e
grain tortilla.
Tuesday: Chicken strips, tator
tots, fresh carrots, apple, whole
grain bread slice. Alternate entree:
Tuna salad sandwich.
Wednesday: Spaghetti wi th
meat sauce, cole slaw, carrot/cel-
ery stix, pear slices. Alternate en-
tree: Ham and cheese on whole
grain bun.
Thursday: Hamburger wi th
whole grain bun, fresh broccoli,
baked beans, l ettuce, pi ckl es,
tomato, orange smiles, side kicks.
Alternate entree: Fish fillet.
Friday: Cheese pizza, romaine
salad, carrot/celery stix, mixed
fruit. Alternate entree: Mini corn
dogs.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Gaylord
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: Mexican haystack,
tomatoes, lettuce, green pepper,
onion, salsa, refried beans, rice,
peach slices. Alternate entree:
Sl i ced turkey wrap wi th whol e
grain tortilla.
Tuesday: Chicken strips, tator
tots, fresh carrots, apple, whole
grain bread slice. Alternate entree:
Tuna sandwich.
Wednesday: Spaghetti wi th
meat sauce, cole slaw, carrot/cel-
ery stix, pear slices. Alternate en-
tree: Ham and cheese on whole
grain bun.
Thursday: Hamburger on
whole grain bun, fresh broccoli,
baked beans, l ettuce, pi ckl es,
tomato, orange smiles, side kicks.
Alternate entree: Fish fillet.
Friday: Cheese pizza, romaine
salad, carrot/celery stix, mixed
fruit. Alternate entree: Mini corn
dogs.
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 24, 2013, page 10
LIES KE TRAC TOR
Want ed: Your OLD TRAC TORS,
any con di tion, make or mod el. We
also spe cial ize in new and used
TRAC TOR PARTS AND RE PAIR.
Call Kyle. Lo cat ed west of Hen -
der son. (612) 203-9256.
Set of four Day to na Tim ber line A/T
tires. Tire size Lt225/75r16. Good
con di tion. Also comes with 4 Che -
vy truck rims. $250/BO. (507) 995-
0739.
1988 In ter na tion al S2500 semi
truck. 148,000 one own er miles.
Cum mings 370hp, ex cel lent con di -
tion. $10,000. Call Mark (507)
964-2327.
CON KLIN® DEAL ERS NEED ED!
Life time ca reer in mar ket ing, man -
age ment and ap ply ing “Green”
pro ducts made in Amer i ca. Full
time/ part time. For a free cat a log,
call Franke’s Con klin Serv ice now
at (320) 238-2370. www.frank e -
mar ket ing.com.
Want ed to find the per son who re -
spond ed to my ad for cook ing who
works 10 hours i n a bakery.
Please call, can’t find your num-
ber. (507) 964-2550.
Want ed: Someone pro fi cient in
com put er to help lo cal au thor with
small to med i um siz ed com put er
jobs. Must have your own com put -
er/print er. Rea son able rates. (507)
964-2550.
HAND Y MAN: Will do re mo del ing
of kitch ens, bath rooms, hang ing
doors and wi nd ows, pai nt i ng,
sheet rock ing, tex tur iz ing or any
minor re pairs in side or out side.
Wi l l al so do cl ean i ng of base -
ments/ga rag es. Call (320) 848-
2722 or (320) 583-1278.
New 95% Good man gas fur nace
with new Fo cus Pro 6000 ther mo -
stat in stalled for only $2,100. J&R
Plumb ing, Heat ing, AC, Lester
Prair ie, MN. Li censed, bond ed, in -
sured. (320) 510-5035.
Min ne so ta Twins sea son tick ets
for 2013 sea son. Sec ti on 121
seats. Pack age in cludes 2 seats.
5, 10 or 15 game pack ag es avail -
able. Con tact Rick at (952) 224-
6331 for more in for ma tion.
Scared Heart, 205 Har ri son St.
Nice 2BR, 1BA sin gle fam i ly. 1,359
sq. ft., de tached ga rage. Own er fi -
nanc ing or cash dis count. $400
down, $259/mo. (803) 978-1542.
2BR Apart ment with ga rage, wa ter/
sew er/gar bage in clud ed. $450/mo.
New Au burn (320) 327-2928.
2BR Du plex in Ar ling ton with at -
tached ga rage. Ap plianc es fur -
nished. $550/mo. plus de pos it.
(507) 766-0313.
Ap ply now. 1BR, wash/dry in apart -
ment, walk-in clos et. Am ber Field
Place, Ar ling ton. 800-873-1736.
Newly remodeled apartments for
rent i n Renvi l l e. Water, heat,
garbage i ncl uded. New appl i -
ances, air conditioners. (320) 564-
3351.
2BR Apart ment for rent in Ar ling -
ton. Avai l abl e Janu ary 1. No
smok ing, no pets. For more in for -
ma ti on cal l Dan at (507) 964-
2973.
Ar ling ton: 55+ Apart ment. 1 and
2BR. Must see! Wash/dry in apart -
ment. Cal l to see. Am ber Fi el d
Place. 800-873-1736.
Ar l i ng ton: Rent NOW. 1BR,
wash/dry in apart ment. Ga rage
avail able. Am ber Field Place. 800-
873-1736.
For rent in Oli via: 2BR apart ment.
Ca ble, in ter net, gar bage, and all
util i ties in clud ed. Also, 3BR house
for rent in Oli via. Call (320) 212-
3217.
Com mer cial Build ing avail able
now! 900 sq. ft. down town Gay -
lord. Call Sar ah at (507) 237-5339
days, (507) 237-4166 even ings.
3BR House, 2BA, porch, fin ished
base ment, 2-car ga rage, W/D, AC,
in Ar ling ton. No smok ing. No pets.
$730 plus de pos it and util i ties. Avail -
able im me diate ly. (952) 758-7622.
Green Isle: House for rent. 2BR
with ga rage. $649/mo. (612) 210-
2766 or (952) 442-5025.
Young farm er look ing for pro duc -
tive farm land for 2013 and beyond.
Com peti tive rates and ref er enc es.
Call Aus tin Blad at (320) 221-3517.
Day care in Ar ling ton has open ings
for ages 1 and old er. Please call
Lau ra (507) 964-2186 or (952)
212-3817.
CUS TOM LOG SAW ING- Cut
your place or ours. Give Vir gil a
call. Schau er Con struc tion, Inc.
(320) 864-4453.
Need trans por ta tion for your next
ev ent? We can help with our limo
bus. Wed dings, busi ness, sports,
bi rth days, etc. Check us out
www.theur ba nex press.com or call
Dina (612) 940-2184, Glen coe
busi ness. DOT 375227.
Plas tic re pair. Don’t throw it. Let
me weld it. Call Mike, Bird Is land,
an y time (320) 579-0418.
AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
AUTOMOTIVE
Parts, Repair
Trucks, Vans
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
Work Wanted
FOR SALE
Heating/Air Cond.
Miscellaneous
REAL ESTATE
Houses
RENTAL
Apartment
Business, Office
House
Want To Rent
SERVICES
Child Care
Misc. Service
EMPLOYMENT RENTAL
Apartment
RENTAL
Misc. Service
SERVICES
Classifieds
ADD ANOTHER PAPER
FOR ONLY
$
2.00 PER PAPER
(based on first week pricing)
The McLeod
County Chronicle
Silver Lake Leader
The Glencoe
Advertiser
The Sibley Shopper
Arlington Enterprise
The Galaxy
3-WEEK SPECIAL: ONE WEEK:
$
15
80
2
nd
Week 1/2 Price
3
rd
Week FREE
McLeod
Publishing
All Six Papers Reach Over 50,000 Readers Weekly in over 33 Communities
For 20 words, one time in
ANY TWO PAPERS and on the internet.
30¢ per word after first 20 words.
AGRICULTURE AUTOMOTIVE EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE LIVESTOCK
& PETS
LIVESTOCK
& PETS
REAL ESTATE SERVICES RENTAL RENTAL
All ads appear online
at GlencoeNews.com
Enterprise
To place an ad: Call: 507-964-5547; Fax: 507-964-2423; E-Mail: info@ArlingtonMNnews.com; Mail: P.O. Box 388, Arlington, MN 55307
Advertising
Deadlines
The McLeod County Chronicle Mondays at Noon
The Arlington Enterprise & The Silver Lake Leader Tuesdays at Noon
The Glencoe Advertiser, The Sibley Shopper
& The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
A2-3Ea
DRIVER
Daily or weekly pay. $0.01 in-
crease per mile after 6 months and
12 months. $0.03 quarterly bonus.
Requires 3 months recent experience.
800/414-9569 www.driveknight.com
DRIVERS/OWNER OPERATORS
wanted. Contact 540/280-0194. In-
dustry leading rates, 90% of line
haul rate. 100% of fuel surcharge.
350 GUNS AT AUCTION
Sat. Jan. 26th Prairie du Chien, WI. Fine
modern & collectible arms. Kramer Auc-
tion 608/326-8108 www.kramersales.com
BECOME AN INSURANCE
CLAIM REPRESENTATIVE
This profession offers interesting work
and good compensation. Unique 9-month
online/evening program prepares you.
Ridgewater College 800/722-1151
LAND WANTED
Buying crop land, pasture and CRP
land, will lease back. Confidential
612/220-1042. Leave detailed message.
CASH FOR CARS:
All cars/trucks wanted. Running or not! Top
dollar paid. We come to you! Any make/
model. Call for instant offer: 800/871-9145
DISH NETWORK
Starting at $19.99/month Plus 30 Pre-
mium Movie Channels Free for 3
Months! Save! & Ask About same
day installation! Call – 866/785-5167
DONATE YOUR CAR
Truck or Boat to heritage for the blind. Free
3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing,
all paperwork taken care of 888/485-0398
CANADA DRUG CENTER
Canada Drug Center is your choice for
safe and affordable medications. Our li-
censed Canadian mail order pharmacy
will provide you with savings of up to
90% on all your medication needs. Call
today 800/259-1096, for $10.00 off
your first prescription and free shipping.
EVER CONSIDER A
REVERSE MORTGAGE?
At least 62 years old? Stay in your
home & increase cash flow! Safe
& effective! Call now for your free
DVD! Call now 888/610-4971
SAVE 65 PERCENT
& get 2 free gifts when you order 100
percent guaranteed, delivered–to- the-
door Omaha Steaks - Family Value
Combo now only $49.99. Order to-
day 888/740-1912 use code 45069SLD
or www.OmahaSteaks.com/fvc19
MISCELLANEOUS
AUTOS WANTED
AUCTIONS
HELP WANTED - DRIVERS
EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY
WANTED: LAND
MISCELLANEOUS
ONLY $249 to reach a statewide audience
of 3 million readers!!! 1-800-279-2979
ONLY $249 to reach a statewide audience
of 3 million readers!!! 1-800-279-2979
Pinske Real Estate
& Auctioneers
(507) 964-2250
Arlington
• 3 BR rambler, newer
windows, roof and many
updates. Full basement,
si ngl e garage, ni cel y
located on corner lot in
Arlington.
$
89,900
• 2-3 BR rambler, new
roof, finished basement,
in Arlington.
$
69,000
We need listings of
homes, farms and hobby
farms. If you are thinking
about selling it will pay for
you to call us.
Sat., Feb. 2 • 10 a.m.
Dale Kleist Estate
Excellent antiques, clean
household, coins,
2007 Chev. TrailBlazer
Arlington, MN
UPCOMING AUCTIONS
REAL ESTATE
A3E4SGa
LARGE AUCTION
Antiques–Household–Coins–Car–Collectibles
LOCATED: Arlington Community Center
Dale Kleist Estate - Owner
SAT., FEB. 2, 2013 • 10 AM
See complete ad in this week’s Golden Galaxy or go to
Midwestauctions.com and click on Pinske
Pinske Auctioneers
507-964-2250 • Arlington
A3Ej
Available...
1-Bedroom
Apartment
All utilities,
except electric
Income based
Must be 62 or older
or handicapped
Highland Commons
Arlington
507-964-5556 HANDICAP
ACCESSIBLE
A
3
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5
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1
6
S
A
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a
Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington
is seeking the following positions:
• Housekeeping Assistant
every other weekend/holiday
• Assistant Cook - Part-Time
every other weekend
• LPN/RN - evenings, with every other weekend/holiday
• Certified Nursing Assistant, evenings
with every other weekend/holiday
• Resource Dietary Position – willing to train all shifts, positions
• Resource Universal Worker – Assisted Living
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information,
call Tiffany Brockhoff,
Human Resource Director at
507-964-2251 or email:
tbrockof@good-sam.com
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap Drug-Free Workplace
Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life.
A
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S
a
Here are a few tips on writing a good classified word ad:
The
more
that
you
tell the
quicker
you
will
sell!
1. Do not use the fewest words possible.
2. Keep in mind that the more you tell, the more you
sell!
3. Remember, the classified section plays to a pa-
rade, not an audience. Each time you run an ad,
different readers come into the market...new
needs are developed between weekly editions by
readers.
4. Is the lead word or words aimed at a specific au-
dience? Let the prospect know you’re talking to
him.
5. Benefits are what make people buy things. Give
the reader a good reason to buy your merchan-
dise.
6. Make sure that your copy is complete with
enough details so that the reader can pick up the
phone and call you.
7. Make your ad read like a conversation. Read it
aloud to see how it sounds.
8. Most newspaper readers are interested in price.
Make sure that your prospect knows what your
prices are.
9. Each ad should encourage the reader to take ac-
tion. It’s the main part of closing your sale.
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Name______________________________________
Address ____________________________________
City _______________________________________
Phone _______________State ___Zip ___________
Visa MasterCard Discover American Express
Personal or Business Check Money Order Cashier’s Check
Credit Card No.
Expiration Date
Card Holder’s Name (Please Print) ___________________________
Credit Card Signature___________________________________
For your protection we thoroughly investigate the validity of credit card and check orders.
Therefore, it is necessary that all information you provide be accurate.
WRITE YOUR AD HERE
1. _____________2. ____________3.____________4. _____________5. ___________
6. _____________7. ____________8.____________9. ____________10. ___________
11. ___________12. ___________13.___________14. ____________15. ___________
16. ___________17. ___________18.___________19. ____________20. ___________
21. ___________22. ___________23.___________24. ____________25. ___________
26. ___________27. ___________28.___________29. ____________30. ________
PLEASE RUN THIS AD____WEEKS
PLEASE PLACE IN THE 2 PAPERS MARKED:
Arlington Enterprise The Sibley Shopper The Galaxy
Glencoe Advertiser McLeod County Chronicle Silver Lake Leader
PAYMENT METHOD (please check one)
Be sure to include your name and address
or telephone number in ad.
1 WEEK PRICE
$
15.80 for 20 words
one time in ANY
TWO PAPERS
and on the internet.
30¢ per word after
first 20 words.
ADD ANOTHER
PAPER FOR ONLY
$
2.00 PER PAPER
(based on first week pricing)
3-WEEK SPECIAL
Second week half price,
Third week FREE!
This document is © 2013 by admin - all rights reserved.