1-9-14 Arlington Enterprise

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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Serving the Communities of Arlington and Green Isle, Minnesota
www.arlingtonmnnews.com Volume 130 • Number 27 • Thursday, January 9, 2014 • Arlington, MN 55307
Single copy $1.00
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington Police De-
partment responded to 1,167
calls during 2013, according
to Arlington Police Chief
Bruce Rovinsky.
The number of calls in-
creased by 102 compared to
the 1,065 calls that the local
police department had during
2012.
The local police depart-
ment saw major increases in
civil matters from 27 in 2012
to 38 in 2013, driving com-
plaints from 20 in 2012 to 37
in 2013, DUI arrests from 11
in 2012 to 19 in 2013, mo-
torist assists from 10 in 2012
to 22 in 2013, traffic inci-
dents from 205 in 2012 to
370 in 2013, and
vandalism/property damage
from 23 in 2012 to 31 in
2013.
The local police depart-
ment also witnessed major
decreases in animal calls
from 72 in 2012 to 55 in
2013, harassment incidents
from 22 in 2012 to 16 in
2013, 911 hang up calls from
22 in 2012 to 15 in 2013,
medical/transports from 104
in 2012 to 70 in 2013, park-
ing incidents from 45 in 2012
to 32 in 2013, public assists
from 41 in 2012 to 20 in
2013, and thefts from 52 in
2012 to 43 in 2013.
The following is a list of
police calls during 2013: ani-
mals calls (55), assist other
agencies (16), assaults (12),
car thefts (2), car thefts re-
covered (2), burglar alarms
(14), burglary reports (2),
civil matters (38), criminal
sexual conduct (1), deaths
(5), domestics (30), driving
complaints (37), DUI arrests
(19), fights (7), fire assists
(15), found property (7), ha-
rassment (16), helicopter as-
sists (17), Human Services
assists (3), 911 hang up calls
(15), juvenile incidents (27),
locked cars (33), motorist as-
sists (22), medical/transports
(70), miscellaneous calls
(33), motor vehicle accidents
(39), noise complaints (12),
open doors (15), parking inci-
dents (32), public assists (20),
persons missing (2), posses-
sion of stolen property (0),
pursuits (0), search warrants
(2), suicide attempts (1), sus-
picious activity (54), theft re-
ports (43), threats (13), traffic
incidents (370), trespass com-
plaints (1), vandalism/proper-
ty damage (31), warrant ar-
rests (12) and welfare checks
(19).
The local department re-
sponded to 1, 385 calls in
2004, 1,151 calls in 2005,
1,049 calls in 2006, 865 calls
in 2007, 894 calls in 2008,
968 calls in 2009, 936 calls in
2010 and 896 in 2011.
Police department responded
to 1,167 calls during 2013
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington City Coun-
cil, during its regular meeting
on Monday night, Jan. 6,
unanimously approved a mo-
tion to accept the request
from Arlington Police Chief
Bruce Rovinsky to be reas-
signed to the open full-time
police officer position effec-
tive immediately. The posi-
tion became open when Scott
Bennett retired effective
Wednesday, Jan. 1.
City Council members
James Jaszewski, Jennifer
Nuesse, Curt Reetz, Jason
Ruehling and Galen Wills all
voted in favor of the motion.
In conjunction with the mo-
tion, the City Council also
approved a motion to accept a
request from Rovinsky to
keep his hourly wage at
$22.50.
“As Scott Bennett is retir-
ing from the police depart-
ment and the City of Arling-
ton will be making a transi-
tion with the police depart-
ment, I would like to request
a change in my responsibili-
ties with the police depart-
ment,” Rovinsky wrote in a
letter to the City Council.
Rovinsky added, “I have
enjoyed my time as police
chief, but I love being a po-
lice officer serving the com-
munity and I have gotten
away from this the past cou-
ple of years.”
Interim
Police Chief
The City Council, in other
action, unanimously ap-
proved a motion to appoint
Marvin L. Doeden as the in-
terim police chief effective
immediately.
In conjunction with the mo-
tion, the City Council ap-
proved an employment agree-
ment with Doeden who re-
cently retired as a deputy
sheriff for Sibley County. He
will be paid $1,500 per month
with no benefits.
In related business, the Po-
lice Committee recently met
to discuss the job description
and salary range for a new
police chief as well as the
timelines for the application
process and the interview
process.
The City Council will be
updated on the matter at its
next meeting at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 21.
Police chief requests reassignment to officer position
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Mayor Jim Kreft released
his mayoral goals for 2014 to
the Arlington City Council
during its annual organiza-
tional meeting on Monday
night, Jan. 6.
The first goal is to update
the comprehensive plan.
“In 2008, the Arlington
City Council approved a
Comprehensive Plan,” said
Kreft. “The plan was the
product of coordination and
cooperation between elected
officials, city committee
members, city staff and citi-
zens.”
Kreft continued, “A Com-
prehensive Plan is a docu-
ment that includes long-range
plans for land-use and zon-
ing, utilities, parks and green
space, economic development
and housing. A Comprehen-
sive Plan is a document that
also provides legal justifica-
tion for land use decisions
and ordinances, and helps en-
sure that growth will make
Arlington, not only bigger,
but better.”
Kreft added, “A Compre-
hensive Plan is only valid if it
is updated every five to six
years; the process to update
our plan will invite us to en-
vision our community in
2035, challenge us to identify
trends that will shape it, and
direct us to realize how we
can shape it ourselves. Be-
sides enabling officials to
holistically examine and pri-
oritize current and future is-
sues and projects, the final-
ized plan will act as a pliable
road map and hypothetical
timeline for completion or
implementation of projects
identified during the planning
process.”
The second goal is to plat
our Industrial Park property.
“In 2012, 22 acres of land
just southwest of the corpo-
rate city limits, adjacent to
the Minnesota Prairie Line
Railroad and Minnesota
Highway 5, were purchased
for the development of an
Economic Development Au-
thority (EDA) owned indus-
trial park,” said Kreft. “In
2013, we annexed the proper-
ty into the city, prioritized po-
tential access points to the
acreage from Highway 5, col-
laborated with representatives
from adjacent industries, ex-
amined potential funding
sources, and identified possi-
ble private industries with
whom to partner in the devel-
opment of the park.”
Kreft continued, “With this
background information gath-
ered this year, we are ready to
proceed with determining op-
timal lot lay-out, street and
infrastructure locations and
connections, and finally plat-
ting the property.”
The third goal is to prepare
for the 2015 Street and Utility
Improvement Project.
“In 2015, the City of Ar-
lington will undertake our
largest street and under-
ground utility project in more
than a quarter century,” Kreft
said. “The project will in-
volve street, curb, gutter, and
sidewalk reconstruction in the
areas north and west of Sib-
ley East Schools. Along with
these surface improvements,
corresponding water and
sewer infrastructure will be
updated. In addition, this
project will include the first
portion of an incremental,
long-range storm water col-
lection improvement of the
northwest quadrant of our
city. These types of periodic
maintenance and improve-
ment projects can be viewed
as analogous to roofing, sid-
ing and window replacement
in a home—they are under-
taken to prolong the life of
street and utility systems in
which the City invested pre-
viously.”
Kreft continued, “With the
goal of bidding the project
early in 2015, it is imperative
that, without delay, we com-
mence project design and en-
gineering, and secure advan-
tageous financing. This
process will deeply involve
our entire City Council, ad-
ministrator and engineer, and
the project will impact
dozens of property owners in
the area.”
The fourth goal is to create
a plan for the future use of
our Historic Fire Hall.
“In 2011, our staff depart-
ment heads and City Council
evaluated the condition and
uses of buildings and spaces
used by our city,” said Kreft.
“In 2012, the City Council,
with the goal of reducing re-
dundancy, concluded that our
city could increase efficiency
by relocating our police de-
partment to a remodeled Tech
Center building, thus consoli-
dating the spaces used by our
police, fire and ambulance
departments in that building
and re-christening it the
Emergency Services Build-
ing.”
Kreft continued, “The po-
lice department’s relocation
has left the Historic Fire Hall
building on Main Street
mostly vacant, and provided
our city with an opportunity
to examine re-uses of it. Pre-
liminary ideas for uses have
ranged from community or-
ganization meeting and stor-
Mayoral Goals
Continued on page 3
Jim Kreft releases mayoral goals
for Arlington City Council in 2014
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Frigid Weather
People who did not have to venture or
work outside stayed indoors as temper-
atures reached 30-plus degrees below
zero on Monday, Jan. 6. Rodney Dose,
an employee for Skelley Towing, Belle
Plaine, was one of the few people that
the Arlington Enterprise saw working
outside as he received a wrecker call
along the 500 block of East Dayton
Street in Arlington on early Monday
morning, Jan. 6.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
In anticipation of danger-
ously cold temperatures,
Governor Mark Dayton can-
celled all public school class-
es statewide on Monday, Jan.
6.
It was the first time that a
Minnesota governor had
taken that step in 17 years.
“The safety of Minnesota
school children must be our
first priority,” Governor Day-
ton said in a statement on Fri-
day, Jan. 3.
The National Weather
Service forecasted the lowest
temperatures in at least a
decade on Monday, Jan. 6.
The air temperatures reached
as low as 30 degree below
zero while the high tempera-
tures reached only in the
minus teens.
“I believe the Governor’s
decision to close school on
Monday was a good one,”
said Sibley East Superintend-
ent Jim Amsden. “We would
have closed given the temper-
atures on Monday one way or
the other.”
Tuesday, Jan. 7 was a dif-
ferent day, according to Ams-
den.
“Based on the criteria that I
have used (along with many
other superintendents), the
forecast put us in an area
where we would have school
likely with a two-hour late
start,” said Amsden. “On
Monday, the Minnesota De-
partment of Education
(MDE) and Commissioner
Cassellius issued a statement
that Tuesday was under local
control but cautioned every-
one on the severe cold. To
many superintendents, the
underlying theme was you
can have school but we are
not recommending it.”
Amsden continued, “After
the MDE statement, Min-
neapolis schools chose to
close and locally Mankato,
St. Peter, New Ulm, LeSueur,
chose to close. All superin-
tendents think about student
safety first and potential risks
to our students. As more dis-
tricts closed, no one wanted
to be the lone district that was
open and then have some-
thing go wrong either with
the forecast, equipment, road
conditions, etc. Ultimately
the dominoes began to fall for
closings.”
Amsden added, “When we
are in the five-minute and 10-
minute frostbite times I
would typically close or
delay until we are outside
those parameters. The fore-
cast for today (Tuesday) put
us in the 30 minute window,
but right on the edge of the
10-minute time frame. Thus
the original two-hour late
start. As all the other districts
surrounding us chose to close
it made the decision to re-
main open more difficult. Ul-
timately, I decided it was not
worth taking the risk that the
weather forecast might not be
correct.”
Dangerously cold temperatures
close local schools for 2 days
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington City Council
conducted its annual organi-
zational meeting on Monday
night, Jan. 6.
The City Council unani-
mously adopted a resolution
to appoint Liza Donabauer as
the city administrator.
The City Council unani-
mously and separately adopt-
ed resolutions to designate
the Arlington Enterprise as
the official newspaper and the
Arlington State Bank as the
official depository.
The City Council also
unanimously adopted a reso-
lution to ratify the mayoral
appointments and commit-
tees.
The following City Council
members and local residents
were appointed to the follow-
ing committees:
Appointees To
Municipal Offices
Vice Mayor: Jason
Ruehling
City Attorney: Ross Arne-
son
Health Officer: Represen-
tative from Sibley County
Public Health
Emergency Management
Director: Tim Haggenmiller
Delegates To
Extra Municipal
Agencies
Minnesota Municipal
Utility Association
(MMUA) Delegates: Jason
Ruehling and Liza Donabauer
Minnesota Municipal
Power Association (MMPA)
Delegates: Liza Donabauer
and Lisa Tesch
Cable Commission Dele-
gates: Galen Wills and Bruce
Hanneman
A-GI Wastewater Board
Delegates: Curt Reetz, Jen-
nifer Nuesse and People
Service representative
Prairie Line Trail Com-
mittee Delegate: James
Jaszewski
Sibley County Library
Board Representative:
Pauline Wiemann
Minnesota Valley Region-
al Rail Coalition (MVRRC)
Delegate: Liza Donabauer
Sibley County Economic
Development Corporation
(SEDCO): Dick Thomes
Sibley Medical Center
Foundation (SMC): James
Jaszewski
Council
Committees
Employee Relations Com-
mittee: Curt Reetz and Jen-
nifer Nuesse
Finance Committee:
Jason Ruehling and James
Jaszewski
Public Buildings Commit-
tee: Jennifer Nuesse and
James Jaszewski
Streets Committee: Jason
Ruehling and Galen Wills
Utilities Committee: Curt
Reetz and Galen Wills
Police Committee: Galen
Wills and Jason Ruehling
Miscellaneous
Committee
Firefighter Relief Com-
mittee: Jim Kreft, Liza Don-
abauer and John Zaske
Ambulance Department
Committee: James Jaszews-
ki, Curt Reetz, Liza Don-
abauer, Kevin Sullivan, Bob
Lueth and Todd Sandberg
Fire Department Com-
mittee: Galen Wills, Jason
Ruehling and Fire Depart-
ment Officer Corporation
Citizen
Committees
Cemetery Committee:
Liza Donabauer, Jason Lo-
vaas, Jennifer Nuesse and six
vacant positions
Economic Development
Authority: Cynthia Smith-
Strack, Jason Ruehling, Jen-
nifer Nuesse, Mark Lund-
strom, Dick Thomes, Tim
Kloeckl, Dean Bergersen and
Larry Sorenson
Library Committee:
Kathy Homme, Galen Wills,
Sue Morrisette, Dee Czech,
Jean Olson, Pauline Wie-
mann, Lee Zwart and Krista
Kube
Park Committee/Shade
Tree Board: Jason Lovaas,
James Jaszewski, Alan Ihrke,
Robert Thomes, Jim Peder-
son, Gary Hultgren, Karan
Pichelmann and Jerry
Ebersviller
Planning & Zoning Com-
mittee: Cynthia Smith-
Strack, Curt Reetz, Jeff
Pinske, Mike Vrklan, Richard
Nagel, Michelle Battcher and
two vacant positions.
Task Forces &
Commissions
Arlington Historical Soci-
ety: Curt Boeder, Greg Gob-
lirsch, Pauline Wiemann,
Dwight Grabitske, Ramona
Bade and Mike Noack
Community Center Com-
mittee: Liza Donabauer, Jen-
nifer Strack, James Jaszews-
ki, Jennifer Nuesse, Kurt
Menk, Bekah Lundstrom,
Amanda Feterl, Bob Pichel-
mann and Tim Haggenmiller
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 9, 2014, page 2
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Thursday, January 9: Golden Age Club, senior
citizens building at Four Seasons Park, noon
luncheon followed by meeting and entertainment.
Sunday, January 12: Arlington Conquerors 4-H
Club, senior citizens building at Four Seasons
Park, 5 p.m. Clover Buds meet at 4 p.m.
Monday, January 13: Arlington Chamber of
Commerce, Emergency Services building, noon
meeting.
Tuesday, January 14: American Legion Post
#250, veterans building at fairgrounds, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, January 15: Arl i ngton Good
Samaritan Auxiliary, Fairview Assisted Living dining
room, 9 a.m.
Community
Calendar
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER
MAIN BANK
Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (straight thru)
DRIVE THRU
Monday - Thursday, 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.,
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Member
FDIC
Arlington State Bank
(507) 964-2256
Fax (507) 964-5550
www.ArlingtonStateBank.com
Henderson Baseball Association
Ninth Annual
Dinner/Comedy Show
Saturday,
Jan. 11
Henderson RoadHaus
Event Center
Dinner 6:30 p.m.
Comedy Show 8 p.m.
***Silent Auction starts at 3 p.m.***
Proceeds go to Henderson Baseball
Association and Hilltop Park
A
5
2
E
1
S
a
Earl Wieman
will be honored with
a Card Shower
for his
90
th
Birthday
Wednesday, Jan. 8
Cards may be sent to him at:
638 3
rd
St., Apt. 23
Gaylord, MN 55334
*1E2Sa
Still a
Kid at 50
Bob
Thomes
*2Ea
News Briefs
Electrical pole catches fire
The Arlington Fire Department responded to an elec-
trical pole fire along County Road 8 just west of County
Road 9 at 3:44 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 4, according to Ar-
lington Fire Chief John Zaske.
The local fire department was on the scene for over 2
1/2 hours, Zaske said.
The BENCO Electric Cooperative and Sibley County
Sheriff’s Department assisted at the scene.
City recognizes Scott Bennett
The Arlington City Council, at its regular meeting on
Monday night, Jan. 6, unanimously adopted a resolution
to recognize Scott Bennett for his 24 years of service to
the citizens of Arlington.
Bennett, who served as a full-time officer for the Ar-
lington Police Department, retired on Wednesday, Jan.
1.
Chamber to meet on Jan. 13
The Arlington Area Chamber of Commerce will meet
at the Emergency Services Building at noon Monday,
Jan. 13, according to Chamber President Todd Sand-
burg.
The Chamber will receive committee reports from the
Arli-Dazzle Parade/Santa Day, Breakfast on the Farm
and Fright Night. The Chamber will discuss the date
and chairpersons for each event in 2014. In addition, the
Chamber will discuss the volunteers to assist with each
event and determine the budget for each event.
The Chamber will also discuss potential candidates
for the open treasurer position. Chamber dues/member-
ship renewals, Chamber Banquet and Chamber Plan-
ning Session will also be items on the agenda.
Rose named to Dean’s List
Marie Rose, a 2010 graduate of the Sibley East Sen-
ior High School, was recently named to the Dean’s List
at Bethany Lutheran College, Mankato, during the fall
2013-2014 academic year.
In order to be named to the Dean’s List, a student
must carry at least 14 academic credits and maintain at
least a 3.5 grade point average.
She is the daughter of Rick and Lorie Rose, Arling-
ton.
Council hires 2 firefighters
The Arlington City Council, during its regular meet-
ing on Monday evening, Jan. 6, separately and unani-
mously approved a motion to hire Michael D. Neiert
and Neil R. Holmquist as firefighters for the Arlington
Fire Department.
Icy road causes accident
A one-vehicle accident reportedly occurred along
County Road 13 just north of County Road 12 at 4:37
p.m. Saturday, Jan. 4, according to the Sibley County
Sheriff’s Department.
Alicia Cruz, 23, Glencoe, was driving a 2000 Jeep
Cherokee along County Road 13 when she reportedly
lost control of the vehicle on the icy roadway, according
to the report. The vehicle entered the ditch and over-
turned.
Cruz was seatbelted at the time of the crash and was
not injured, the report said.
The Arlington Fire Department also assisted at the
scene.
Accident north of Gaylord
A one-vehicle accident reportedly occurred along
County Road 10 just west and north of Gaylord at 2:28
p.m. Saturday, Jan. 4, according to the Sibley County
Sheriff’s Department.
Angel Hernandez, 28, Gaylord, was driving a 1997
Mercury van when he reportedly lost control of the ve-
hicle on the icy roadway, according to the report. The
van entered the ditch and overturned.
Hernandez was seatbelted at the time of the crash and
was not injured, the report said.
Birth Announcements
Kirby and Jamie Weck-
worth, Arlington, announce
the birth of their daughter,
Maisy Evelyn Weckworth,
who was born at the
Ridgeview Medical Center in
Waconia at 2:34 p.m. Tues-
day, Nov. 12.
Maisy weighed eight
pounds, 10 ounces and meas-
ured 19 1/2 inches.
The grandparents are Bob
and Gail Thomes, Arlington;
Wendy Weckworth, Arling-
ton; and Howard and Dar
Weckworth, Arlington. The
great grandparents are Harold
and Betty Oelfke, Arlington,
and Tess O'Neil, Arlington.
Nicholas and Karissa
(Neubarth) Rasset, Lester
Prairie, announce the birth of
their second son, Huntley
Dale, who was born on Sun-
day, Dec. 8.
Huntley weighed seven
pounds, six ounces and meas-
ured 20.5 inches. Huntley is
also welcomed home by his
big brother, Bryson, age 2.
The maternal grandparents
are Dale and Rachelle
Neubarth, Arlington. The pa-
ternal grandparents are Gary
and Robyn Rasset, Mayer.
The maternal great-grand-
mother is Berdina Petzel, Ar-
lington. The paternal great-
grandmother is Betty Housey,
Delano.
Maisy Weckworth
Huntley Rasset
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
The members of the Arlington City Council posed for
a photo moments after its annual organizational meet-
ing. Front Row: (left to right) City Council members
James Jaszewski, Galen Wills and Curt Reetz. Back
Row: (l to r) City Council member Jason Ruehling,
Mayor Jim Kreft, City Council member Jennifer
Nuesse, City Administrator Liza Donabauer and City
Attorney Ross Arneson.
Arlington City Council conducts
annual organizational meeting
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 9, 2014, page 3
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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GREEN ISLE, MN 55338
Tires, Air Conditioning
& Maintenance
507-326-5751
MONDAY-FRIDAY 8-5
BEN BRAZIL,
Owner/Technician
brazilautomotive@gmail.com
SIBLEY MEDICAL CENTER
elcome, Dr W . Carlin Dr r.
Emma Carlin, MD For appointments, call 507-964-2271.
all ages at the Arlington and Gaylord clinics.
amily medicine and sees patient ed in f tifi cer
MD Emma Carlin, welcome
Ridgeview Sibley Medical Center is pleased to
elcome, Dr
For appointments, call 507-964-2271.
all ages at the Arlington and Gaylord clinics.
s of amily medicine and sees patient
Carlin is board . Dr r . MD
Ridgeview Sibley Medical Center is pleased to
. Carlin .
AL CENTER SIBLEY MEDIC
.sibleymedical.org www
AL CENTER
A1-3Ea
History
Jared A. Reiman, 22, Hen-
derson was sentenced to five
years probation in Sibley
County District Court, ac-
cording to the KNUJ Radio
website. He admitted to driv-
ing a golf cart while intoxi-
cated and seriously injuring a
teenage girl.
Reiman, who was charged
with three felonies and four
misdemeanors for the inci-
dent in July, pleaded guilty to
criminal vehicular operation
and DWI. He was ordered to
pay over $17,000 in restitu-
tion, ordered to perform com-
munity service and submit to
home monitoring.
Reiman was reportedly
driving a golf cart on Turner
Drive in Henderson when the
16-year-old girl apparently
jumped off of the vehicle and
sustained a serious head in-
jury.
Henderson man is sentenced to 5 years probation
The Arlington Historical
Society (AHS), during the
month of December, received
a $1,700 grant from the Ar-
l i ngt on-Gayl ord-Gi bbon-
Winthrop Cable Commission
for the purchase of a comput-
er, software, projector and
microphone. The AHS will be
using this equipment to pro-
duce programs relating to the
history of Arlington and
vicinity.
Although these programs
will be aimed primarily at re-
lating stories designed to edu-
cate the public about Arling-
ton history, the recordings
will be made available to any
organization, public or pri-
vate, seeking a program about
some aspect of Arlington his-
tory. The programs, complete
with pictures and narrations,
can be shown by a teacher, a
presenter, or even public ac-
cess cable television without
further assistance.
AHS intends to have its
first program about the histo-
ry of Arlington Brick ready
by late spring 2014.
AHS receives a $1,700 grant
The Sibley County DAC
has purchased the Technical
Services for Electronics man-
ufacturing plant building
from Cathy Kamba for one
dollar. The official transfer of
ownership took place on Fri-
day, Dec. 27. The building is
located along the 200 block
of Shamrock Drive in Arling-
ton.
“This building will provide
us with the space to offer
more opportunities to the
people we serve,” said Sibley
County DAC Director Mark
Pauly. “We are grateful and
humbled by Cathy’s opinion
of the services provided by
the DAC and her commit-
ment to have us acquire this
building.”
Pauly added, “We hope to
complete retrofitting the
building and move in this
spring.”
The Sibley County DAC
and Sibley County Seconds
strive to provide vocational
opportunities (in-center and
community based work), ha-
bilitation and therapeutic
services to people with vari-
ous disabilities in order to en-
hance their self reliance, to
increase their opportunities to
make choices, and to assist
them in participating in the
most integrated environment
possible.
Sibley County DAC purchases the
TSE manufacturing plant building
85 Years Ago
January 10, 1929
Louis Kill, Editor
Our first real blizzard swept
down upon us Friday night
bringing several inches of snow
and sub-zero weather which
continued until Monday night,
with the thermometer register-
ing from 20 to 25 below zero,
according to various reports of
our citizens. Tuesday the mercu-
ry took a jump of about 40 de-
grees and spring-like weather
was with us again. Yesterday we
had cold, misty weather.
Fire destroyed the home of
Mrs. Ed Mangan of Washington
Lake on the morning of New
Year’s Day. The blaze was dis-
covered by members of the fam-
ily at about 5 o’clock and is
thought to have been caused by
a defective chimney. The entire
contents of the home were also
destroyed.
65 Years Ago
January 13, 1949
Louis Kill, Editor
The Arlington Sportsmens
Club will stage a fox hunt next
Sunday, January 16th. All
hunters who wish to take part in
the hunt are kindly requested to
meet at the Rainbow Inn at 1:30
p.m.
The Blakeley bridge is still in
the process of rebuilding but
will be completed soon. At pres-
ent traffic has been detoured
over the ice.
Melvin Dose, young Green
Isle township farmer lost his left
eye as the result of an accident
which occurred three weeks
ago. Melvin was doing some re-
pair work at his home and was
in the act of driving an 8-penny
nail when the nail flew up and
struck his eye. The head of the
nail was embedded in the eye
ball so deeply that he had diffi-
culty pulling it out. He was
rushed to a hospital, where
everything possible was done to
save the eye but it was to no
avail. In a visit to the Enterprise
office Monday Melvin stated
that the eye was removed by a
specialist and that it would be
replaced with a glass eye after it
has healed properly.
45 Years Ago
January 9, 1969
Val Kill, Editor
The first baby of the new year
at the Arlington Municipal Hos-
pital is Mary Ann Eibs, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Eibs.
Mary Ann arrived Thursday
evening, January 2, at 7:43 p.m.
She weighed seven pounds, four
and one-half ounces.
Due to the rising cost of hos-
pital material, supplies, and in-
creases in employee wages, the
hospital board has found it nec-
essary to raise the room rates.
The increase amounts to $3.00 a
day for all rooms. Room rates
will range from $22.50 per day
in a four-bed ward to $28.00 per
day for a private room with a
bath.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Schauer of
Green Isle announce the engage-
ment of their daughter, Linda
Lorene, to Glen Plieseis, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Wilbert Plieseis of
Arlington. No wedding date has
been set.
25 Years Ago
January 12, 1989
Kurt Menk, Editor
Oaths of office were adminis-
tered by City Clerk Bud Bruh-
jell to City Council Members
Dennis Van Moorlehem and
Rick Schultz during the Arling-
ton City Council meeting. Van
Moorlehen and Schultz each
began a three-year term on the
City Council.
City employees worked to re-
move snow from Main Street
this past Monday morning. Cold
temperatures, high winds and
nearly five inches of snow pro-
duced blizzard like conditions in
the area Saturday and Sunday.
age spaces to a history muse-
um to store-front rental. To
best create a viable plan for
the space, the city will visit
with representatives from our
community groups and re-
visit our needs and future de-
mands for our city staff.”
The fifth goal is to assist the
Sibley East School District in
facilities evaluation and plan-
ning, and collaborate in the
creation of a joint community
recreation program.
“Recently, Superintendent
Jim Amsden has asked the
three cities in the Sibley East
School District for assistance
in assessing community needs
and how they tie to district fa-
cilities,” said Kreft. “Meet-
ings have initiated between
representatives of the three
cities and the district and it is
the intention of the district to
meld the incipient group into
a more formal facilities task
force. Through the initial
meetings, we have been re-
minded of the crucial value
the school district lends to our
communities, and been made
aware of possible areas where
the city can help further our
symbiotic relationship with
the district.”
Kreft continued, “In the last
months of 2012, initial con-
versations between city and
district staff were held regard-
ing a joint community recre-
ation program. Many is-
sues—cost, proportion of re-
sponsibilities, staffing, and
more—need to be examined,
but this is an extremely excit-
ing proposition that could re-
sult in shared summer recre-
ation programs, expanded
recreation opportunities for all
ages, and an enhanced com-
munity education curriculum.
Our Park Committee and staff
have begun examining the
costs and benefits, and the
City Council will soon hear
recommendations from
them.”
Mayoral Goals Continued from page 1
By Kurt Menk
Editor
A pair of pop machines
were damaged in Arlington
last week, according to the
Arlington Police Department.
A pop machine was dam-
aged at the Arlington Auto &
Farm Supply along the 400
block of Fifth Avenue North-
west, according to the report.
An undisclosed amount of
money was also taken from
the pop machine.
A pop machine was dam-
aged at the E-Z Car Wash &
Storage along the 100 block
of Shamrock Drive, accord-
ing to the report. Entry was
not gained into the machine.
People who have any infor-
mation about these two inci-
dents are encouraged to con-
tact the Arlington Police De-
partment at 507-964-5200.
Pop machines damaged in Arlington
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington Fire Depart-
ment assisted the Henderson
Fire Department at a garage
fire in Henderson at 10:47
a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 1, ac-
cording to Arlington Fire
Chief John Zaske.
The fire occurred at the
Mike Chavez residence at
509 North Sixth Street, ac-
cording to the Sibley County
Sheriff’s Department.
Further details about the
fire were unavailable.
The Arlington Fire Depart-
ment, according to Zaske,
had five fire, accident and
miscellaneous calls during
the first five days of 2014.
Local fire department assists
at garage fire in Henderson
After 1 1/2 years of busi-
ness, owners of PJs Sweet
Scoops, Pauline and Jay
Wieland, closed the doors to
their ice cream shop, accord-
ing to an article in the Hen-
derson Independent.
“It’s been an uphill battle
for us and we just can’t afford
to go on,” said Pauline
Wieland. “But we will miss
the people and we have ap-
preciated all of our regular
customers, ” said Pauline
Wieland.
Purchasing the business in
May of 2012, the Wielands
leased the building and have
run the ice-cream/soda foun-
tain while serving light
lunches and offering a selec-
tion of gifts. They also sup-
plied Meals on Wheels and
the Senior Dining meals at
Sibley Estates East. As of
Jan. 1, meals will be provided
by the Prairie House Restau-
rant in Gaylord.
The doors of the building
will remain open to accom-
modate the Customers of
First Choice Pharmacy.
PJs scoops their last sweet in Henderson
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 9, 2014, page 4
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Staff
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Pub-
lishers; Kurt Menk, Editor; Karin
Rami ge, Manager; Marvi n
Bulau, Production Manager;
Barb Mathwig, Office; Ashley
Reetz, Sales; and Jean Olson,
Proof Reading.
Letters
This page is devoted to opin-
ions and commentary. Articles
appearing on this page are the
opinions of the writer. Views ex-
pressed here are not necessarily
those of the Arlington Enter-
prise, unless so designated. The
Arlington Enterprise strongly
encourages others to express
opinions on this page.
Letters from our readers are
strongly encouraged. Letters for
publ i cati on must bear the
writer’s signature and address.
The Arlington Enterprise re-
serves the right to edit letters
for purpose of clarity and space.
Ethics
The editorial staff of the Arling-
ton Enterprise strives to present
the news in a fair and accurate
manner. We appreciate errors
being brought to our attention.
Pl ease bri ng any gri evances
against the Arlington Enterprise to
the attention of the editor. Should
differences continue, readers are
encouraged to take their griev-
ances to the Mi nnesota News
Council, an organization dedicated
to protecti ng the publ i c from
press inaccuracy and unfairness.
The News Council can be contact-
ed at 12 South Sixth St., Suite
940, Minneapolis, MN 55402, or
(612) 341-9357.
Press Freedom
Freedom of the press is guar-
anteed under the First Amend-
ment to the U.S. Constitution:
“Congress shall make no law
respecting an establishment of
religion, or prohibiting the free
exercise thereof; or abridging
the freedom of speech, or the
press…”
Ben Frankl i n wrote i n the
Pennsylvania Gazette in 1731:
“If printers were determined not
to print anything till they were
sure it would offend nobody
there would be very little print-
ed.”
Deadline for the Arlington
Enterprise news is 4 p.m., Mon-
day, and advertising is noon,
Tuesday. Deadl i ne for The
Gal axy adverti si ng i s noon
Wednesday.
Established in 1884.
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Phone 507-964-5547 FAX 507-964-2423.
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Arlington ENTERPRISE
U.S. presidents often
struggle in their 2nd terms
Our View: Trend may continue with rollout of
President Obama’s health care initiative
Opinions
Guest Columns
The second term of recent U.S. presidents has often times been less
successful than the first term.
Some people refer to this tendency as the second-term curse. The leg-
end behind the second term curse is tied to President Franklin D. Roo-
sevelt who broke the de facto second term limit when he ran for third and
fourth terms. In response, some people believe that the ghost of President
George Washington might have put a curse on any president who seeks a
second term.
Curse or not, it is hard to argue with history. The second terms of sev-
eral recent presidents have been plagued by a major scandal, catastrophe
or failure.
After a landslide victory in the 1936 election, FDR announced a con-
troversial plan to expand the Supreme Court to up to 15 judges in order
to shift the political leanings of the branch to support the New Deal sup-
port. His plan was struck down in the U.S. Senate 70 to 22.
The second term of President Harry Truman was dominated by the Ko-
rean War. President Truman fired widely popular General Douglas
MacArthur for critical remarks made during the Korean War in 1951.
MacArthur returned to the United States and received a hero’s welcome.
During the second year of his second term in 1958, President Dwight
Eisenhower was hurt by the overcoat scandal. In the final year of his sec-
ond term, a U-2 spy plane was shot down over China while carrying out
espionage over the U.S.S.R. A humiliated Eisenhower was later forced to
admit that the jet belonged to the United States.
Decisions by President Lyndon B. Johnson to escalate the war in Viet-
nam during the mid 1960s inspired widespread protests in the United
States during his second term. There was so much opposition in his own
party that President Johnson did not seek a third term.
The infamous Watergate scandal led to the downfall of President
Richard Nixon during his second term. In 1974, he became the first and
only person to resign from the Oval Office.
President Ronald Reagan’s second term was rocked by the Iran-Contra
scandal in 1986. The scandal was massive and 14 people were charged
with either operational or cover-up crimes.
An extramarital affair with intern Monica Lewinsky and subsequent
perjury troubled President Bill Clinton during his second term. Although
he initially denied the affair in January of 1998, President Clinton later
admitted to his sexual relationship. The House of Representatives later
voted to impeach him on charges of perjury and obstruction of justice.
The Senate did not vote for impeachment.
President George W. Bush was dogged by public weariness over the
wars in Iraq and Afghanistan during his second term. His administra-
tion’s response to Hurricane Katrina did not help matters either. His sec-
ond term ended with the financial meltdown in 2008.
Will President Barack Obama continue the trend of the second-term
curse? He is off to a rocky start with the recent botched rollout of his Af-
fordable Care Act known as Obamacare. Only time will tell if President
Obama can overcome the second term curse of a U.S. President.
-K.M.
Too Tall’s Tidbits
Happy Birthday and Happy An-
niversary to the following local and
area residents compliments of the
Arlington Lions Club Community
Calendar.
January 10
Helen Quast, Joyce Morreim, Julie
Traxler and Nancy Krentz.
January 11
Geri Weber, Jarid Halverson, Jordan
Noel Harren and Nicholas Voigt.
January 12
Matt Schauer, Robert Thomes and
Scott Sorenson.
January 13
Danny Ross, Matt Carney and
Randy Walsh.
January 14
Colton Hahn, Dr. Michael Mc-
Carthy, Keith Herd, Mary Farniok,
Rob Brau, Samantha Zila, Mr. and
Mrs. LeRoy Leonard, and Mr. and
Mrs. Pat Nienaber.
January 15
Amber ZumBerge, Darin Karger,
Gracie St. John, Jackie Kerber Dietz
and Jen Otto.
January 16
Amy Sauter, Benjamin Arneson,
Christa Trocke, Dawson Wibstad,
Jackie Alsleben and Peggy Kroells.
*****
Although he was a qualified mete-
orologist, Hopkins ran up a terrible
record of forecasting for the TV
news program. He became some-
thing of a local joke when a newspa-
per began keeping a record of his
predictions and showed that he had
been wrong almost 300 times in a
single year.
That kind of notoriety was enough
to get him fired.
He moved to another part of the
country and applied for a similar job.
One blank on the job application
called for the reason for leaving his
previous position.
Hopkins wrote, “The climate
didn’t agree with me.
The boss joined a group of his
workers at the coffee urn and told a
series of jokes he had heard recently.
Everybody laughed loudly. Every-
one, that is, except Mike.
When he noticed that he was get-
ting no reaction from Mike, the boss
said, “What’s the matter, Mike? No
sense of humor?”
“My sense of humor is fine,” he
said. “But I don’t have to laugh.
I’m quitting tomorrow.”
There was a captain sailing on the
sea during a battle. His servant came
up to him and the captain said,
“Bring me my red shirt.”
So, the servant did as the captain
said.
After that the servant came up to
the captain and said, “Why did you
say bring me my red shirt?”
The captain said, “Well, if I get
shot they won’t see the blood.”
The next dy the servant came up
to the captain and said, “There are
50 ships on the horizon.”
The captain said, “Bring me my
brown pants.”
*****
“Nothing sucks more than that
moment during an argument when
you realize you’re wrong.” - Un-
known
*****
A young and foolish pilot wanted
to sound cool on the aviation fre-
quencies. This was his first time ap-
proaching a runway at night.
Instead of making any official re-
quests to the tower, he said: “Guess
who?”
The controller switched the run-
way lights off and replied: “Guess
where?”
*****
By Amy Klobuchar
U.S. Senator
From opening our first E15 sta-
tion, to blending higher amounts of
biodiesel, to developing processes to
make renewable fuel out of new
feed stocks, Minnesota is leading
the way and driving the next genera-
tion of renewable fuels. We are uti-
lizing our resources and developing
new energy technologies that are
creating jobs, increasing domestic
energy production, and decreasing
our dependence on foreign oil.
Unfortunately, a recent proposal
from the Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) to lower the biofuel
targets for 2014 threatens the
progress we have made.
The EPA’s proposed Renewable
Fuel Standard rule would for the
first time allow oil companies to
blend incrementally less—not
more—renewable fuel into the gaso-
line and diesel supply. It would cre-
ate a disincentive for fuel retailers to
install the blender pumps which are
needed to continue to increase our
use of biofuels. Without that infra-
structure in place, we will never be
able to develop the next generation
of biofuels.
This comes at the same time when
the industry has already been chal-
lenged by the uneven playing field
created by the fact that oil compa-
nies continue to receive billions of
dollars in subsidies while the
ethanol subsidy has been eliminated.
In Minnesota, the damages would
be felt in communities across our
state. The Minnesota Department of
Agriculture estimates the proposed
rule would lead to 1,500 lost jobs
and cost the state $600 million in
lost economic activity.
The rule change would create un-
certainty around a program that has
proven to be successful. Because six
years into a 15 year policy, the Re-
newable Fuel Standard is working.
It’s the equivalent of a football
coach benching the quarterback
midway through a winning season.
With so much progress, now is not
the time for drastic changes.
Our economy is in a better place
as a result of the Renewable Fuel
Standard. Nationally, the biofuels
industry supports over 350,000 jobs.
These are jobs that have been grown
right here in Minnesota in communi-
ties across our state.
With ten percent of our fuel sup-
ply now coming from biofuels, this
policy has also played a major role
in reducing our dependence on for-
eign oil. Since 2005, our depend-
ence on foreign fuels has fallen from
60 to 40 percent as we continue to
move towards homegrown energy
sources.
Finally, consumers are benefiting
from competition at the pump. In
Minnesota, sales of E85 have dou-
bled since the beginning of the year
because the Renewable Fuel Stan-
dard was helping consumers save at
the pump when they were filling up
with renewable fuels. It’s also worth
noting that at the same time we are
seeing an expansion in biofuels, gas
prices, while not as low as we would
like, are currently down, and corn
prices have gone down by 45%.
All these benefits are why I re-
cently organized a bipartisan meet-
ing in my office with 15 other sena-
tors and the EPA Administrator to
highlight just how important a
strong Renewable Fuel Standard is
to rural economies and to urge
changes to the proposed rule. It was
a constructive conversation, with
Democratic and Republican Sena-
tors from states as diverse as
Hawaii, North Dakota, and Michi-
gan making the argument for a
strong Renewable Fuel Standard.
I believe that legislative policy
works best when it is stable, pre-
dictable and provides businesses the
ability to make long term invest-
ments. We need to provide the cer-
tainty farmers and biofuel producers
need to make plans and investments,
and that is why I will continue to
fight to get a long term Farm Bill
done, and why we must work to-
gether to fix the proposed rule and
preserve the integrity of the Renew-
able Fuel Standard.
Preserving innovation in rural Minnesota
Catholic priests have rights, too,
and the Catholic Defense League of
Minnesota is pushing back against
recent attacks on the Catholic
Church, according to a news release
from the Catholic Defense League
of Minnesota.
“It’s been open season on priests,
and that isn' t right,” said David
Strom, spokesman for the League.
Accusations of abuse by priests
have dominated the news lately, and
in some of those cases it appears
that genuine wrongdoing has oc-
curred. In those cases, the League
believes that justice needs to be
served, and victims protected.
Now, Ramsey County Judge John
Van de North is being asked to en-
force an order that the Archdiocese
of St. Paul and Minneapolis reveal
the names of all priests accused of
abuse, even in cases where the accu-
sations were found to be not credi-
ble. That is a step too far, says the
League.
“Requiring the Church to reveal
names of priests who have not been
credibly accused of abuse is going
way too far,” said Strom. “In no
other profession would a judge re-
quire the disclosure of the names of
people who have been wrongly ac-
cused of a crime, especially such a
heinous crime.”
The Church has been publicly bat-
tered in recent months for its han-
dling of the abuse scandals, and
Archbishop Neinstadt has apolo-
gized for the Church's mishandling
of certain cases.
“If the Church is required to re-
lease the names of innocent priests
who have been wrongly accused of
abuse, then it only makes sense that
every business and government
agency be required to do the same
thing,” said Strom. “Perhaps the
media should publish every com-
plaint as well. The reason they don't
is that a false accusation can ruin
lives.”
The Lawyers Professional Re-
sponsibility Board adjudicates accu-
sations against lawyers for profes-
sional misconduct in private. Only
in cases where misconduct is found
are the names of the accused re-
leased. Teachers accused of abuse
are represented by the union and
given due process until the accusa-
tions are credibly substantiated.
“Accusations of abuse need to be
taken with the utmost seriousness,”
said Strom. “If the person is guilty,
they should be punished; if not, their
lives should not be ruined. Forcing
the Archdiocese to reveal the names
of people not credibly accused helps
nobody but the lawyers who benefit
from creating a climate hostile to the
Church.”
The Catholic Defense League of
Minnesota was formed in 1976. It is
dedicated to protecting religious
and civil rights.
Open season on priests?
SHARE YOUR OPINION THROUGH A
LETTER TO THE EDITOR.
EMAIL YOUR LETTER TO
KURTM@ARLINGTONMNNEWS.COM
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 9, 2014, page 5
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
You are cordially invited to attend our
Arlington Fire Department’s Annual
FIRE FIGHTER’S
DINNER & DANCE
SATURDAY, JAN. 25, 2014
Dinner 5:30-7 p.m. • Dance 7-11 p.m.
ARLINGTON COMMUNITY CENTER
Dinner & Dance Tickets:
Adult:
$
15.00 donation; Child 12 & under:
$
10.00 donation
(Dinner tickets must be purchased by Jan. 21, 2014)
Pork chop, potato, salad & dessert before the dance
Dance Only Ticket:
$
5.00 donation
Tickets for the dinner must be purchased
no later than January 21
st
and are available from
Haggenmiller Lumber, Y-Not Plumbing & Heating,
Thomes Bros., Quast Amoco, Arlington Chiropractic
Clinic and any active fire fighter.
Note: No dinner tickets sold thru the mail or at the door.
Music by:
DEEP
FRIED
TWEETERS
A
1
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2
E
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2
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3
S
a
Notice of 19
th
Annual Meeting
The 19
th
Annual Meeting of the United Farmers Cooperative will be held on Monday,
January 13, 2014 at 7:00 p.m. at the Winthrop Offices Berdan Event Center (705 E
4
th
Street, Winthrop, MN) for the following purposes:
1. To receive audited reports of the Cooperative for the period of September 1, 2012
through August 31, 2013.
2. To elect three directors for three year terms.
3. To consider and vote on amendments of Article V Distribution of Patronage Sav-
ings in the Bylaws of United Farmers Cooperative. If adopted, these bylaw amend-
ments will enable the Board of Directors to distribute patronage refunds with both
qualified written notices and nonqualified written notices of allocation. Please attend
the annual meeting for the explanation and discussion of these amendments.
4. To transact any other business, which may properly be presented or brought be-
fore the meeting.
We will begin the meeting promptly at 7:00 p.m. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m.
We ask that you come early so that registration can be completed and ballots can be
issued. To be eligible to vote, you need to be an active farmer producer, using prod-
ucts and services in excess of $5,000.00 per year.
After the business meeting, lunch will be served.
Yours truly,
Directors and Management
/s/ Todd Kettner, Secretary
Main Office, Winthrop
507-647-6600 or 866-998-3266
A50,1Ej
Obituaries
Donna Schmidt, age 81, of
Blakeley, passed away peace-
fully at her home surrounded
by her family
on Monday,
Dec. 30.
Memor i al
service was
held at the
Trinity Evan-
g e l i c a l
L u t h e r a n
Church in
Belle Plaine
at noon Sat-
urday, Jan. 4. Rev. John
Meyer officiated.
Visitation was held at the
church from 9 a.m. to noon
Saturday, Jan. 4.
A private interment was
held in Oakwood Cemetery.
Donna was born to Albert
and Sylvia (Dahlke) Lucht in
Arlington on May 11, 1932.
She grew up and attended
school in Arlington. She was
confirmed at St. Paul’s
Lutheran Church in Arlington
on April 14, 1946. On April
9, 1955, she married Leo
“Skip” Schmidt at St. Paul’s
Lutheran Church in Arling-
ton. They farmed and raised
their six children near Blake-
ley. They moved back to
Blakeley Village in 1987
where they spent their retire-
ment years.
She was employed at the
Belle Plaine Lutheran Home
for over 30 years in house-
keeping. She was involved in
the Hospitality Committee at
the Trinity Lutheran Church
and also belonged to the
VFW Auxiliary. She loved
cooking, baking, bargain
shopping, reading, bird
watching, flowers and watch-
ing Wheel of Fortune. She es-
pecially enjoyed spending
time with her children, grand-
children and great grandchil-
dren.
Donna is survived by her
sons, Lee Schmidt (special
friend, Gloria Brandt), Wayne
(Sandra) Schmidt, Scott
Schmidt (special friend
Tammy Lange) and Daniel
(Kristin) Schmidt; daughters:
Debra (Ralph) Malz and
Diane (Mark) Kes; grandchil-
dren, Jeanne (Jeff) Mediger,
Matthew (Heather) Kes and
Angela Kes, Gregory
(Kristin), Jeffrey and Karl
Schmidt, Ryan, Nicholas (fi-
ancee, Kelsey Hoisington)
and Luke Schmidt; great
grandchildren, Preston, Bai-
ley and Carter Kes; many rel-
atives and friends including
special friend, Arlene Al-
brecht.
She was preceded in death
by her parents; husband, Skip
in December of 2012; grand-
son, Peter Malz; brother, Har-
lan Lucht and his wife Eve-
lyn.
Donna Schmidt, 81, Blakeley
Donna
Schmidt
Wayne F. Feil, age 89, of
Arlington, died at the Sibley
Medical Center in Arlington
on Friday morning, Jan. 3.
Mass of Christian Burial
was held at St. Mary’s
C a t h o l i c
Church in
Arlington at
11 a.m.
T u e s d a y ,
Jan. 7. Fa-
ther Keith
Salisbury of-
ficiated the
Mass.
Visitation
was one hour prior to the
Mass at the church on Tues-
day, Jan. 7.
Interment was in St.
Mary’s Catholic Cemetery in
Arlington.
Wayne was born to Frank
and Lillian (Kohlmeier) in
Madison on Jan. 25, 1924. He
graduated from the Arlington
High School in 1941. He
joined the Navy in June of
1944 and was honorably dis-
charged in 1946. He married
Kathleen “Katie” Schafer on
Nov. 18, 1968. He began
working at Big Stone Can-
ning Company when he was
16. He retired as vice presi-
dent of that company in 1988.
Wayne enjoyed traveling,
hunting, fishing and good
food.
Wayne is survived by his
brothers, David (Marion) Feil
of Park Rapids, and Francis
(Janice) Feil of Sheviln; and
many nieces and nephews.
He is preceded in death by
his parents; wife, Katie in
2012; brother, Paul Feil; sis-
ter, Doris Applen; sister-in-
law, Leona Feil; and brother-
in-law, Theron Applen.
Wayne F. Feil, 89, Arlington
Wayne Feil
TITLE AND SUMMARY OF
ORDINANCE 285
THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE
CITY OF ARLINGTON, MIN-
NESOTA, DOES ORDAIN AS
FOLLOWS:
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING
ORDINANCE 257, ESTABLISH-
ING ARLINGTON FIRE DE-
PARTMENT FIRE CALL
BILLING PROCEDURES
“On January 6, 2014, the City
Council of the City of Arlington
approved Ordinance 285 entitled
“An Ordinance Amending Ordi-
nance 257, Establishing Arlington
Fire Department Fire Call Billing
Procedures”. The Ordinance in
its entirety is available for review
and/or photocopying during regu-
lar office hours at the City of Ar-
lington, 204 Shamrock Drive, Ar-
lington, Minnesota 55307. Ordi-
nance 285, removes specific fee
amounts and allows fees related
to accident calls and false alarms
to be charged at the discretion of
the fire officer in charge and/or
Fire Chief.”
This ordinance shall become
effective after summary publica-
tion.
For the City of Arlington:
/s/ James R. Kreft
By James R. Kreft
Its Mayor
/s/ Liza M. Donabauer
By Liza M. Donabauer
Its City Administrator
First Reading: December 16,
2013
Second Reading: January 6,
2014
Adopted: January 6, 2014
Publish: January 9, 2014
Certificate of
Assumed Name
State Of Minnesota
1. Li st the exact assumed
name under which the business
is or will be conducted: Ridgeview
Sibley Home Care.
2. Principal place of business:
601 West Chandler St, Arlington,
MN 55307
3. List the name and complete
street address of all persons con-
ducting business under the above
Assumed Name: Sibley Medical
Center, 500 South Maple Street,
Waconia, MN 55387
4. I, the undersigned, certify
that I am signing this document
as the person whose signature is
required, or as agent of the per-
son whose signature would be re-
quired who has authorized me to
sign this document on his behalf.
I further certify that I have com-
pleted all required fields, and that
the information in this document
is true and correct and in compli-
ance with the applicable chapter
of Minnesota Statutes. I under-
stand that by signing this docu-
ment I am subject to the penalties
of perjury as set forth in Section
609.48 as if I had signed this doc-
ument under oath.
Dated: January 2, 2014
/s/Katherine J. Douglas
Authorized Agent,
Authorized to sign on behalf of
Todd Sandberg, President
Email address for Official No-
tices: todd.sandberg@sibleymed-
ical.org
Li st a name and dayti me
phone number of a person who
can be contacted about this form:
Jackie Bernu, 612-492-7796
Publish: January 9 and 16,
2014
Certificate of
Assumed Name
State of Minnesota
1. Li st the exact assumed
name under which the business
is or will be conducted: Ridgeview
Arlington Clinic
2. Principal place of business:
601 West Chandler St, Arlington,
MN 55307
3. List the name and complete
street address of all persons con-
ducting business under the above
Assumed Name: Sibley Medical
Center, 500 South Maple Street,
Waconia, MN 55387.
4. I, the undersigned, certify
that I am signing this document
as the person whose signature is
required, or as agent of the per-
son whose signature would be re-
quired who has authorized me to
sign this document on his behalf.
I further certify that I have com-
pleted all required fields, and that
the information in this document
is true and correct and in compli-
ance with the applicable chapter
of Minnesota Statutes. I under-
stand that by signing this docu-
ment I am subject to the penalties
of perjury as set forth in Section
609.48 as if I had signed this doc-
ument under oath.
Dated: January 2, 2014
/s/ Katherine J. Douglas
Authorized Agent,
Authorized to sign on behalf of
Todd Sandberg, President
Email address for Official No-
tices: todd.sandberg@sibleymed-
ical.org
Li st a name and dayti me
phone number of a person who
can be contacted about this form:
Jackie Bernu, 612-492-7796
Publish: January 9 and 16,
2014
Certificate of
Assumed Name
State of Minnesota
1. Li st the exact assumed
name under which the business
is or will be conducted: Ridgeview
Sibley Home Care.
2. Principal place of business:
601 West Chandler St, Arlington,
MN 55307
3. List the name and complete
street address of all persons con-
ducting business under the above
Assumed Name: Sibley Medical
Center, 500 South Maple Street,
Waconia, MN 55387
4. I, the undersigned, certify
that I am signing this document
as the person whose signature is
required, or as agent of the per-
son whose signature would be re-
quired who has authorized me to
sign this document on his behalf.
I further certify that I have com-
pleted all required fields, and that
the information in this document
is true and correct and in compli-
ance with the applicable chapter
of Minnesota Statutes. I under-
stand that by signing this docu-
ment I am subject to the penalties
of perjury as set forth in Section
609.48 as if I had signed this doc-
ument under oath.
Dated: January 2, 2014
/s/ Katherine J. Douglas
Authorized Agent,
Authorized to sign on behalf of
Todd Sandberg, President
Email address for Official No-
tices: todd.sandberg@sibleymed-
ical.org
Li st a name and dayti me
phone number of a person who
can be contacted about this form:
Jackie Bernu, 612-492-7796
Publish: January 9 and 16,
2014
NOTICE OF HEARING
Please take notice that a hear-
ing for confirmation of the View-
er’s Report, which has been filed
with the Watershed District, will
be held on January 27, 2014, at
1:30 p.m. at the Sibley County
Service Center, 111 8th Street,
Gaylord, Minnesota. The Viewer’s
Report is of a redetermination of
benefits ordered by the High Is-
land Creek Watershed District
Board of Managers for High Is-
land Project 13 which is the old
Sibley County Ditch No. 6A.
The lands affected are located
i n Secti ons 9, 10, 15 and 16,
Township 113, Range 27, Sibley
County, Minnesota, and property
owners are Ci ty of Arl i ngton,
Seneca Foods Corp., Patricia M.
Geib Revocable Trust, Esther Be-
seke, Paul W. and Naomi
Doehling, State Bank of Ham-
burg, Jonathan Suedbeck and
Becky Suedbeck Harbarth, Arling-
ton Economic Development Au-
thority, William R. and Peggy Ann
Soeffker, Vincent O. Danielson
Revocable Trust and Karilyn R.
Danielson Revocable Trust, State
of Mi nnesota Department of
Transportation, Sibley County
and Minnesota Valley Regional
Rail Authority.
The purpose of this hearing is
to determine if the Viewer’s Re-
port should be confirmed by the
Board of Managers.
Dated this 31st day of Decem-
ber, 2013.
High Island Creek Watershed
District
Board of Managers
Publish: January 9, 16 and
23, 2014
Legals
Mary Lou Hildebrandt, age
78, of Redwood Falls passed
away unexpectedly of natural
causes at her home on Mon-
day, Jan. 6 
F u n e r a l
services will
be held at
the Gloria
Dei Luther-
an Church at
1:30 p. m.
Friday, Jan.
10.
Visitation
will be held at the church
from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thurs-
day, Jan. 9 and will continue
one hour prior to the services
on Friday, Jan. 10.
Burial will be in Redwood
Falls Cemetery. 
Mary Lou (Alcox) Hilde-
brandt was born to Glen and
Annie (Moncur) Alcox in
Willmar on May 1, 1935. She
was baptized and confirmed
in the Christian faith. Mary
Lou attended school in Mag-
nolia and Olivia.  On Jan. 31,
1953, she married Rodney H.
Hildebrandt in Olivia. To-
gether the couple lived and
worked in the Olivia area for
11 years before moving to the
Redwood Falls area in 1963.
Mary Lou returned to school
and received her teaching de-
gree from Mankato. She
worked as a trainer at Control
Data/Zytec for many years.
Mary Lou was an avid care-
giver taking care of her sister,
Betty. She was a long-time,
active member of the Gloria
Dei Church where she was
part of the quilting group.
Mary Lou took great pride in
making quilts, with special
attention to detail personaliz-
ing them, for all of her grand-
children.  She enjoyed watch-
ing the Minnesota Lynx, trav-
eling, and wintering in Yuma,
Ariz.  She loved going to the
Concert Series with her spe-
cial friend, Glenn, and spend-
ing time with her family. 
Mary Lou is survived by
her children, Rodney
“Butch,” Doug (Paulette),
Jim (Barb), Dan (Deb), Mary
(Gene) Luckhardt, all of Red-
wood Falls, Deb (Greg) Price
of Wabasso, and Dawn (Rick)
Jansen of Renville; 17 grand-
children: Shannon (Seth)
Allen, Stephanie Hildebrandt,
Kristi (Jeremy) Bakeberg,
Lisa Hildebrandt (fiancé Bob
Loftus), Ryan (Pheng) Hilde-
brandt, Eric (Kristi) Hilde-
brandt, Kari (Mike) Redman,
Jeremy (Renee) Hildebrandt,
Amy (Shawn) Stelzer, Sarah
Luckhardt, Chad Luckhardt,
Mitchell (Katie) Price,
Bethany Price, Mistin Price,
Brian (Ashley) Jansen, Mark
(Jenny) Jansen, Brent Jansen,
and Amber Jansen; 20 great-
grandchildren: Jessica, Jacob,
Madsen, Eva, Summer, Gri-
fyn, Jaylin, Blake, Morgan,
Seth, Alexis, Madilynn,
Aidan, RyAnne, Ella, Kay-
dence, Jasen, Jaxon, Jameson,
and Danika.  She is also sur-
vived by her sisters, Janet
Bratsch of Renville and Vicki
(Larry) Mertens of Redwood
Falls; sister-in-law, Audrey
Serbus of Arlington, special
friend, Glenn Houtkooper of
Redwood Falls; and many
other relatives and friends. 
She is preceded in death by
her parents; husband, Rodney
in 2010; granddaughter
Samantha Price in 2003;
grandson, Jeff Hildebrandt in
2010; brothers. John and
Rawliegh Alcox; and sister,
Betty Alcox.
Online condolences may be
sent at www.stephensfuner-
alservice.com. Stephens Fu-
neral Service - Redwood Val-
ley Funeral Home is assisting
the family with arrangements.
Mary Lou Hildebrandt, 78, Redwood Falls
Mary Lou
Hildebrandt
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
One reason the total
number of items checked
out of Sibley County li-
braries in 2012 was down a
little from the previous year
was because there are more
users registered to check
out e-books than the num-
ber of books that are avail-
able.
The concept was said by
Linda Kramer, who gave
her final report of activities
as head of the library board
to Sibley County Commis-
sioners at the meeting on
Dec. 12.
In 2012, the circulation
of items was 182,653 com-
pared to 188,217 in 2011.
Kramer said students now
have iPads and the libraries
are used differently from in
the past.
The major change is in
the use of online books.
Some 6,000 people are
signed up for e-books, but
there are 4,000 selections.
“The libraries are still
very much viable in Sibley
County with more than a
third of the residents having
library cards,” said Kramer.
“Libraries are being used in
a multiple of ways. You can
create an account for maga-
zines to be sent on line.
Some magazines are only
on line. You can do every-
thing from home, all you
need is a number.”
Compared to checking
out e-books, with maga-
zines there is no limit. All
you need is a number. If the
e-book people want is not
available they go on a wait-
ing list. Classrooms can
read Newsweek, for exam-
ple, at no cost to the school
district.
Subscriptions are avail-
able system-wide with no
cost to buy into something.
It costs the county $3,000 a
year for e-books. The year-
ly fee is based on popula-
tion.
E-books are trending higher
at libraries in Sibley County
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 9, 2014, page 6
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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WET BASEMENT?
Sports
The annual Knights of
Columbus Free Throw
Contest will be held at the
Sibley East Senior High
School in Arlington on
Sunday, Jan. 12.
The registration will
begin at 12:30 p.m. while
the contest will follow at 1
p.m. The doors to the
school will not be opened
until 12:30 p.m.
The contest is open to all
boys and girls ages 9-14.
The contest has been ex-
tended to include nine-year-
olds this year. Entry forms
have been distributed to
boys and girls at all schools
in the Sibley East School
District.
For more information on
the free throw contest,
please contact Tom Noack
at 507-237-3384.
KC Free Throw Contest is Jan. 12
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
wrestling team captured first
place honors in the Norwood
Young America Central Invi-
tational on Saturday, Jan. 4.
Sibley East took top honors
with 259.5 team points. Eden
Valley-Watkins and Saint
Michael-Albertville tied for
second place with 150 team
points each. Delano (107),
New Ulm (104.5) and Min-
nehaha Academy/DeLaSalle
(39) round out the field.
First place champions for
Sibley East included Mitch
Heibel (120), Jason Meyer
(132), Austin Brockhoff
(138), Hunter Retzlaff (152),
Mitch Wentzlaff (160), Jake
Wentzlaff (170) and Nathan
Rose (220).
Second place winners for
Sibley East were Tanner
Pasvogel (113), Quinlan Riff-
enburg (145) and Austin
Kube (182).
Sibley East will travel to
Le Sueur-Henderson on Fri-
day night, Jan. 10. The
Wolverines will also host a
duals tournament in Arlington
at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 11.
Individual
Results
106-pounds: Tommy Went-
zlaff (SE) pinned Matthew
Lehmann (MADL) 1:08 in
the opening round. In the
semi-final round, Wentzlaff
lost by a technical fall to An-
thony Hennen (NYA) 15-0. In
the wrestlebacks, Wentzlaff
decisioned Peter Barth (NYA)
12-5. In the third place
match, Wentzlaff was deci-
sioned by Patrick Mekee
(STMA) 6-3.
113-pounds: Tanner Pasvo-
gel (SE) received a bye in the
opening round. In the semi-
final round, Pasvogel won by
a major decision over Josh
Hendel (NYA) 13-4. In the
championship match, Pasvo-
gel was decisioned by Tucker
Sjomeling (DE) 8-1.
120-pounds: Mitch Heibel
(SE) received a bye in the
opening round. In the semi-
final round, Heibel pinned
Hunter Ranweller (NU) 1:29.
In the championship match,
Heibel decisioned Tyler Don-
nay (EVW) 5-1.
126-pounds: Mason Voight
(SE) received a bye in the
opening round. In the semi-
final round, Voight was deci-
sioned by Cole Paskach (DE)
5-3. In the wrestlebacks,
Voight won by a major deci-
sion over Brett Kleindl
(NYA) 8-0. In the third place
match, Voight decisioned Joel
Zachman (STMA) 5-1.
132-pounds: Jason Meyer
(SE) received a bye in the
opening round. In the semi-
final round, Meyer pinned
Sam Oeffiling (DE) 1:04. In
the championship match,
Meyer pinned Ben Barth
(NYA) 0:56.
138-pounds: Austin Brock-
hoff (SE) received a bye in
the opening round. In the
semi-final round, Brockhoff
won by a major decision over
Austin Brandes (NU) 11-1. In
the championship match,
Brockhoff won by a technical
fall over Cody Schoen
(STMA) 21-2.
145-pounds: Quinlan Riff-
enburg (SE) received a bye in
the opening round. In the
semi-final round, Riffenburg
decisioned Max Jensen
(STMA) 8-6. In the champi-
onship match, Riffenburg was
decisioned by Jared Wicken-
hauser (NYA) 5-4.
152-pounds: Hunter Ret-
zlaff (SE) received a bye in
the opening round. In the
semi-final round, Retzlaff
pinned Marty Soderberg (DE)
0:26. In the championship
match, Retzlaff pinned John
Sazle (EVW) 1:14.
160-pounds: Mitch Went-
zlaff (SE) received a bye in
the opening round. In the
semi-final round, Wentzlaff
decisioned Jake Ross
(STMA) 8-3. In the champi-
onship match, Wentzlaff
pinned Alex Meeker (NYA)
1:11.
170-pounds: Jake Went-
zlaff (SE) received a bye in
the opening round. In the
semi-final round, Wentzlaff
decisioned Sam Hoppe (NU)
3-2. In the championship
match, Wentzlaff decisioned
Luke Kuechle (EVW) 14-9.
182-pounds: Austin Kube
(SE) received a bye in the
opening round. In the semi-
final round, Kube decisioned
Cole Wilfat (NU) 4-2 in over-
time. In the championship
match, Kube was pinned by
Cain Renner (EVW) 3:08.
195-pounds: Cody Voight
(SE) received a bye in the
opening round. In the semi-
final round, Voight was deci-
sioned by Lorenzo Hernandez
(NU) 6-5. In the wrestle-
backs, Voight received a bye.
In the third place match,
Voight won by a major deci-
sion over TrelVyon Wilson
(STMA) 16-6.
220-pounds: Nathan Rose
(SE) received a bye in the
opening round. In the semi-
final round, Rose pinned
Steven Smith (NYA) 0:28. In
the championship match,
Rose pinned Kevin Kneisl
(DE) 1:02.
285-pounds: Brandon
Uecker (SE) was decisioned
by Nathan Berg (NU) 9-2 in
the opening round. After a
bye in the wrestlebacks,
Uecker was pinned by Nick
Former (NYA) 2:58.
285-pounds: Jon DuFrane
(SE) received a bye in the
opening round. In the semi-
final round, DuFrane pinned
Nick Former (NYA) 3:06. In
the championship match,
DuFrane was decisioned by
Walker Russek (DE) 5-4.
SE wins NYA Central Invite
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Sibley East 138-pounder Austin Brock-
hoff, wearing the black mask, dominat-
ed St. Michael-Albertville wrestler Cody
Schoen in the championship match.
Submitted Photo
Front Row: Hunter Retzlaff. Kneeling:
(left to right) Brandon Uecker, Hunter
Voight, Ben Klaers, Tommy Wentzlaff,
Austin Brockhoff, Mitch Heibel and
Nathan Rose. Back Row: (l to r) Paul
Schmidt, Cody Voight, Andrew Schauer,
Quinlan Riffenburg, Austin Kube,
Austin Streich, Mason Voight, Jake
Wentzlaff, Mitch Wentzlaff, Jason Meyer
and Tanner Pasvogel.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The visiting Sibley East
varsity boys basketball team
came up just short in a 57-55
loss to Glencoe-Silver Lake
in non-conference action on
Friday night, Jan. 3.
A 10-foot baseline jumper
by GSL’s Garrett Ober rolled
around the hoop twice and
fell in for the eventual game-
winning shot with about 10
seconds left in the game.
A half court shot by Sibley
East senior Brody Rodning
hit the back of the rim at the
buzzer.
Junior Zac Weber sparked
the Wolverines with 19 points
in the loss. Rodning and jun-
ior Darin Neisen also hit dou-
ble figures with 11 points
apiece. Junior Jordan Petzel
dropped in five points while
senior Cordell Bates and jun-
ior Andrew Bullert hooped
three points each. Junior Zach
Garza netted two points while
senior Ben White added one
point.
Team and individual statis-
tics were unavailable from
this game.
The Wolverines, 1-2 in the
Minnesota River Conference
and 4-8 overall, will travel to
Maple River in non-confer-
ence action at 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 9. Sibley East
will also travel to Tri-City
United in conference play at
7:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 10.
B-squad
The visiting Sibley East B-
squad boys basketball team
lost to Glencoe-Silver Lake
60-50 on Friday evening, Jan.
3.
Collin Pautsch tossed in 20
points for the Wolverines.
Dylan Pauly also hit double
digits with 12 points. Quentin
Gex and Cole Bruch scored
six and five points respective-
ly while Brody Bates netted
four points. Scott Holmquist
had two points while Nick
Doetkott added one point.
Sibley East boys come up short in
57-55 loss to Glencoe-Silver Lake
By Kurt Menk
Editor
A second half rally came
up short as the Sibley East
varsity girls basketball team
lost to visiting Glencoe-Silver
Lake 49-40 in non-confer-
ence play on Friday night,
Jan. 3.
The Lady Wolverines, who
trailed 24-12 at halftime,
outscored GSL by three
points in the second half.
“We had a slow first half,”
said Sibley East head coach
Todd Warzecha. “We had
great looks at the basket, but
the shots didn’t fall.”
Warzecha continued, “I’m
really proud of how we bat-
tled back in the second half.
We were down by 17 points
with six minutes to go and
got within six points late in
the game.”
Senior Megan Eckberg
scored 10 points in the loss.
Sophomore Katie Tuchten-
hagen tossed in eight points
while senior Jessica Garza
netted seven points. Junior
Shelby Voight hooped five
points while junior McKenzie
Sommers contributed four
points. Senior Kimberly
Kurtzweg and sophomore
McKayla Stumm added three
points each.
The Lady Wolverines hit
10 of 26 shots from two-point
range for 31 percent and just
five of 27 attempts from
three-point land for 19 per-
cent. Sibley East also canned
five of nine free throw at-
tempts for 56 percent.
GSL dominated Sibley East
on the boards by a 49-29 mar-
gin.
Sommers pulled down six
rebounds while Eckberg had
five caroms. Garza and junior
Autumn Dose contributed
four boards each.
“The story of the game was
rebounds,” said Warzecha.
“We gave up too many sec-
ond chance points to GSL
throughout the game.”
Garza also contributed
seven steals and three assists
while Kurtzweg added three
assists and two thefts.
The Lady Wolverines, 1-2
in the Minnesota River Con-
ference and 3-5 overall, will
host Le Sueur-Henderson in
conference play at 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 9. Sibley East
will travel to Watertown-
Mayer in MRC play at 7:30
p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 14.
C-squad
The Sibley East C-squad
girls basketball team was
edged by visiting Glencoe-
Silver Lake 40-39 on Friday
night, Jan. 3.
Alli Harter and Hannah
Wentzlaff sparked the Lady
Wolverines with 15 points
each. Gracie Ballalatak netted
four points while Alison Eibs
and Alyssa Stoeckman
hooped two points apiece.
Ana Zuniga added one point.
Wentzlaff also collected 16
rebounds while Stoeckman
and Perla Lopez contributed
six and three rebounds re-
spectively.
SE girls fall to GSL 49-40
Minnesotans age 16 or older
can try ice fishing or spear fish-
ing without purchasing an an-
gling or spearing license if they
take a child younger than 16
fishing during Take-A-Kid Ice
Fishing Weekend Saturday, Jan.
18 through Monday, Jan. 20,
according to the Department of
Natural Resources.
“Take-A-Kid Ice Fishing
Weekend is a great opportunity
for family and friends to get
those special kids in their life
outdoors enjoying the fun and
beauty of a Minnesota winter,”
said Roland Sigurdson, DNR
aquatic education supervisor.
“What better way to celebrate
our winter heritage than by
passing on the tradition of ice
fishing.”
Ice fishing presents some
unique challenges, but with
basic equipment, a few skills,
and good planning, ice fishing
can be easy, enjoyable and ex-
citing.
Here are key ice fishing tips
from DNR’s MinnAqua pro-
gram, which provides resources
to teach fishing skills, aquatic
ecology and conservation stew-
ardship of our lakes and rivers:
• Dressing in layers is the
best way to deal with winter’s
icy chill. Layers keep you
warm in cold conditions by cre-
ating pockets of warm air and
helping moisture evaporate.
• Portable ice shelters can in-
crease the enjoyment of the ex-
perience by keeping kids
warmer.
• Plan for a shorter, quality
experience that will make a
happier memory. Cold, bored
kids don’t ask to go again.
• Bring snacks and warm
beverages to make a comfort-
able experience.
• Bring a variety of baits to
increase chances of success.
Minnesotans age 16 or older
fish free with kids Jan. 16-20
Sounds like
multiplication?
It’s newspaper
talk for a one
column by 2 inch
ad. Too small to
be effective?
You’re reading
this one!
Put your 1x2 in
the Arlington
Enterprise.
507-964-5547
1
x
2
SENIOR DINING
Call 326-3401 for a meal
Suggested Donation $3.85
Meals are served at Highland
Commons dining room
Monday-Friday
Monday: Swedish meatballs,
paprika potatoes, spinach, bread
with margarine, ice cream, low fat
milk.
Tuesday: Liver or pepper steak,
buttered boiled potatoes, peas,
bread with margarine, scalloped
apples, low fat milk.
Wednesday: Roast beef,
mashed potatoes, carrots, dinner
rol l wi th margari ne, puddi ng
dessert, low fat milk.
Thursday: Chicken chow mein,
rice, chow mein noodles, oriental
vegetables, mandarin orange gel-
atin, brownie, low fat milk.
Fri day: Creamy vegetabl e
soup, turkey sandwich, tropical
fruit, crackers, margarine, cookie,
low fat milk.
SIBLEY EAST ELEMENTARY
BREAKFAST MENU
Arlington and Gaylord
Breakfast is served at 8:00 a.m.
daily. A 1/2 pint of milk is served
with each meal daily. Menu is sub-
ject to change.
Monday: Cereal bar, cheese
stick, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Peanut butter jam-
wich, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Mini cinnis, juice,
milk.
Thursday: Gripz, yogurt, juice,
milk.
Friday: Waffle, juice, milk.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Arlington
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each.
Menu is subject to change.
Monday: Chicken patty, oven
potato, squash, mayo, lettuce,
fruit, milk.
Tuesday: Pizza, romaine salad,
green beans, fruit, milk.
Wednesday: Shrimp poppers,
cheese plate, hash brown potato,
veggie sticks, fruit, milk.
Thursday: Soup, hot ham and
cheese sandwich, pickles, crack-
ers, veggie sticks, fruit, milk.
Friday: Mexican haystack, fix-
ings, rice, corn, refried beans,
fruit, milk.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Gaylord
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: Chi cken patty on
whole grain bun, oven potatoes,
squash, fruit, milk.
Alternate: Fajitas.
Tuesday: Pizza, romaine salad,
green beans, fruit, milk.
Alternate: Rib on whole grain
bun.
Wednesday: Shrimp poppers,
macaroni and cheese, broccoli,
fruit, milk.
Alternate: Egg sandwich.
Thursday: Chi cken noodl e
soup, hot ham and cheese sand-
wich, pickles, veggie sticks, fruit,
milk.
Alternate: Salad bar.
Friday: Mexican haystack, fix-
ings, refried beans, corn, fruit,
milk.
Alternate: Pizza burger.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 9, 2014, page 7
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Blessings
Seek good, not evil, that you may live. Then the Lord God Almighty will be with you, just as you
say he is. Hate evil, love good; maintain justice in the courts. Perhaps the Lord God Almighty
will have mercy on the remnant of Joseph. Amos 5:14-15 NIV
St. John’s Lutheran
Arlington Township
Pastor William Postel
Bible Class: 9 a.m. • Worship: 10 a.m.
Commercial and Industrial Builders
Green Isle, MN 55338
ph. 507.326.7901 fax: 507.326.3551
www.vosconstruction.com
Arlington State Bank
Serving the Community Since 1895
BANKING SERVICES
964-2256
Arlington
A & N Radiator Repair
Allen & Nicki Scharn, Owners
23228 401 Ave., Arlington
877-964-2281 or 507-964-2281 Bus.
Certified ASE Technician on Staff
Also distributor for Poxy Coat II
Industrial Grade Coatings/Paint
MID-COUNTY
CO-OP
700 W. Lake St., Box 177
Cologne, MN 55322
(952) 466-3700
or TOLL FREE: 1-888-466-3700
HUTCHINSON CO-OP
AGRONOMY
LEON DOSE,
Arlington Branch Manager
411 7
th
Ave. NW • (507) 964-2251
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
402 W. Alden, Arlington
507-964-5547
Online at
www.Arlington
MNnew.com
Arlington Haus
Your Hometown Pub & Eatery
1986-2009
Arlington • 1-507-964-2473
STATE BANK OF
HAMBURG
100 Years. 100 Reasons.
Phone 952-467-2992
statebankofhamburg.com
CONVENIENCE
STORE
Hwy. 5 N., Arlington
507-964-2920
Homestyle Pizza
Real or Soft Serve Ice Cream
Gas – Diesel – Deli – Videos
(507)
964-2212
www.
chefcraigs
.com
23180 401 Ave., Arlington Phone 507-964-2264
EQUAL
HOUSING
LENDER
CRAIG BULLERT
ARLINGTON, MN
23189 Hwy. 5 North,
Arlington, MN 55307
arlington@hutchcoop.com
Office (507) 964-2283
Cell (320) 583-4324
HC
FUNERAL SERVICE
P.O. Box 314
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-2201
Member
FDIC
19
th
Annual St. Arthur’s Council
Knights of Columbus
FISH BOIL
Friday, Jan. 17 • 4:30-8 p.m.
Arlington Community Center
Donation
$
10
.00
~
Children 1/2 Price
Under 6 Free
TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT:
Brau Motors
Lensing Insurance
Thomes Bros. Hardware
Y-NOT Plbg. & Htg.
*1-2SEa
Church News
ZION LUTHERAN
Green Isle Township
Pastor Eric W. Rapp
Friday, January 10: 10:00
a.m. Deadline for Sunday bul-
letin.
Sunday, January 12: 10:30
a.m. Worship. 3:30 p.m. Bible
study at St. Paul’s with Pastor.
Monday, January 13: 8:00
p.m. Zion annual voters meet-
ing.
Tuesday, January 14: New
Pastor orientation at district of-
fice.
Wednesday, January 15: 6:30-
7:30 p.m. Confirmation and
Wednesday night school grades
1-5 at St. Paul’s.
ZION LUTHERAN
814 W. Brooks St.
Arlington – (507) 964-5454
James Carlson, Pastor
Sunday, January 12: 9:00 a.m.
Worship with Holy Communion.
10:00 a.m. Sunday School. Fel-
lowship. 11:15 a.m. Annual
meeting.
Tuesday January 14: 6:00-
7:00 p.m. TOPS in church base-
ment.
Wednesday, January 15: 3:45
p.m. 7th & 9th Confirmation.
4:30 p.m. 8th Confirmation.
Thursday, January 16: 9:00
a.m. and 1:00 p.m. Zion service
on cable.
CREEKSIDE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Christian & Missionary
Alliance
Pastor John Cherico
114 Shamrock Drive
Arlington – 507-964-2872
email: creeksidecc@media-
combb.net
Sunday, January 12: 9:00
a.m.:Sunday school for children
age 4-6th grade and Adult Sun-
day school. 10:30 a.m. Worship
service.
Wednesday, January 15: 7:00-
8:30 p.m. R.E.A.C.H. youth
group at Terry and Becky
Shogren’s home, 6th through
12th grade.
Thursday, January 16: 6:30
p.m. Men’s community Bible
study at Chuck Peik’s home.
1:00 & 7:00 p.m. Women’s
community Bible study, “Reve-
lation” at Jean Olson’s home.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
(507) 304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
507-234-6770
Saturday: Church services at
9:30 a.m. Bible study at 11:00
a.m. Fellowship dinner at 12:00
p.m. All are welcome.
UNITED METHODIST
Arlington
Rodney J. Stemme, Pastor
www.arlingtonunited
methodist.org
Saturday, January 11: 8:00
a.m. A-Men men’s group.
Sunday, January 12: 9:00 and
11:00 a.m. Worship. 10:15 a.m.
Sunday school.
Tuesday, January 14: 10:00
a.m. Good Samaritan worship
service.
Wednesday, January 15: 7:00
p.m. Choir and Confirmation.
8:15 p.m. Bible Study.
Thursday, January 16: 10:00
a.m. 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
Worship on cable TV. 1:00 &
7:00 p.m. Women’s Bible study
at Jean Olson’s.
ST. PAUL LUTHERAN
(WELS),
Arlington
Bruce Hannemann, Pastor
WEBSITE:
www.stpaularlington.com
EMAIL:
Bruce.Hannemann@stpaul
arlington.com
Saturday, January 11: 9:00
a. m. Home vs. Sleepy Eye.
10:00 a.m. Hutch vs. Sleepy
Eye. 11:00 a. m. Home vs.
Hutch.
Sunday, January 12: 8:45 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:00 a.m. Fami-
ly Bible study, 10:00 a.m. Wor-
ship.
Monday, January 13: Reports
turned into the church office for
the annual report. 7:00 p.m.
Council meeting.
Tuesday, January 14: 3:45
p.m. 3-8 grades @ Immanuel,
Gaylord. 6:00 p.m. Counting
committee meeting.
Wednesday, January 15: 2:00
p.m. Bible Study. 3:45 p.m.
Public school Confirmation
class. 7:30 p.m. Choir.
Thursday, January 16: 10:00
a.m. Bulletin information due.
11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Servic-
es on cable TV channel 8.
GAYLORD ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
Gaylord
Friday, January 10: 7:00 p.m.
Duca Bible study at Farmington,
leave church at 5:30 p.m.
Sunday, January 12: 9:00 a.m.
Sunday school. 10:00 a.m. Sun-
day worship service.
Wednesday, January 15: 6:30
p.m. Wednesday evening Bible
classes and Youth Focused. 8:00
p.m. Supper-Welcome!
ST. PAUL’S UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Henderson
(507) 248-3594 (Office)
Deb Meyer, Pastor
Find us on Facebook:
St. Paul’s UCC - Henderson
Sunday, January 12: 9:00
a.m. Sunday School. 10:00 a.m.
Worship with Communion
ST. PAUL’S EV.
REFORMED CHURCH
15470 Co. Rd. 31, Hamburg
Dan Schnabel, Pastor
952-467-3878
www.stpaulsrcus.org
Sunday, January 12: 8:30 a.m.
Sunday school and Bible study.
9:30 a.m. Worship service.
Wednesday, January 15: 6:30
p.m. Catechism class.
ORATORY OF
ST. THOMAS
THE APOSTLE
Jessenland
507-248-3550
Fr. Sam Perez
Thursday: Weekly Mass at
5:00 p.m.
ST. MARY, MICHAEL
AND BRENDAN AREA
FAITH COMMUNITY
Fr. Keith Salisbury, Pastor
Friday, January 10: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar).
Saturday, January 11: 5:00
p.m. Mass (Mar).
Sunday, January 12: 7:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre). 9:00-10:15 a.m. El-
ementary religious
education/youth Mass (Mar).
9:00 a.m. Mass (Mic). 10:30
a.m. Mass (Mar). 1:00 p.m. KC
free throw contest (Sibley East
Sr. High School)-boys & girls.
Monday, January 13: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre and Mar). 9:00
a.m.-9:00 p.m. Eucharistic Ado-
ration (Mar). 8:00 p.m. AA and
AlaNon (Mar).
Tuesday, January 14: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre and Mar). 9:30
a. m. Mass (Arlington Good
Samaritan).
Wednesday, January 15: 8:30
a. m. Mass (Bre). 9:00 a. m.
Word and Communion (Oak
Terrace). 5:00 p.m. Mass (Mar).
7:00-8:00 p.m. Jr./Sr. High Ele-
mentary Religious Education
(Mar).
Thursday, January 16: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre and Mic). 7:00
p.m. Administrative Council
meeting (Mar). 7:30 p.m. Nar-
cotics Anonymous (Mic).
TRINITY LUTHERAN
32234 431st Ave., Gaylord
Rev. James Snyder,
Sunday, January 12: 10:00
a.m. Worship service.
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod)
Arlington
Pastor William Postel
Phone 507-964-2400
Thursday, January 9: 5:30
p.m. Deadline for bulletin infor-
mation.
Sunday, January 12: 9:00 a.m.
Bible class. 10:00 a.m. Worship.
Wednesday, January 15: 6:00
p.m. Confirmation.
EVANGELICAL
COVENANT CHURCH
107 W. Third St., Winthrop
Pastor Kyle Kachelmeier
(507) 647- 5777
Parsonage (507) 647-3739
www.wincov.org
Saturday, January 11: 9:00
a.m. Prayer gathering.
Sunday, January 12: 9:30 a.m.
Worship. 10:45 a.m. Sunday
school.
Monday, January 13: 7:00
p.m. Women’s ministry meeting
(tentative).
Tuesday, January 14: 7:00
p.m. Leadership team meeting.
Wednesday, January 15: 9:00
a.m. Prayer coffee. 6:00 p.m.
AWANA. 7:30 p.m. Youth group
meeting.
Thursday, January 16: 9:30
a.m. Women’s Bible study. 6:00
p.m. MOPS. 6:30 p.m. Men’s
group meeting at Chuck Peik’s.
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN
Green Isle
Pastor Eric W. Rapp
Friday, January 10: 10:00
a.m. Deadline for Sunday bul-
letin.
Sunday, January 12: 9:00 a.m.
Worship with Holy Communion.
10:00 a.m. Sunday school. 10:15
a.m. Bible study with Rhonda.
3:30 p.m. Bible study with Pas-
tor.
Tuesday, January 14: New
Pastor orientation at district of-
fice. 7:30 p.m. St. Paul’s annual
voters meeting.
Wednesday, January 15: 6:30-
7:30 p.m. Confirmation and
Wednesday night school grades
1-5.
PEACE LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Kurt Lehmkuhl, Pastor
www.hispeace@frontiernet.net
Saturday, January 11: 5:00
p.m Worship service with Holy
Communion.
Sunday, January 12: 8:15 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:30 a.m. Wor-
ship service with Holy Com-
munion.
Wednesday, January 15: 3:45
p.m. Catechism.
Thursday, January 16: 7:30
p.m. Church council meeting.
The January Sibley County
Extension Home Study Les-
son is a crock. A lesson on
crock pot (slow cooker)
cooking safety and the sam-
pling of a variety of recipes
that is.
The Extension Home Study
program will hold this slow
cooker class at the Sibley
County Service Center in
Gaylord at 6 p.m. Thursday,
Jan. 23.
A sampling of slow cooker
recipes at 6 p.m. will include
egg bake, lasagna, beef and
broccoli, bread pudding and
triple berry cobbler.
Slow cooker food safety in-
formation compiled by the
University of Minnesota Ex-
tension will be provided and
shared, along with a collec-
tion of recipes.
For more information on
this lesson and to sign up to
attend, call the Sibley County
Extension Office at 507-237-
4100 or e-mail
bentz002@umn.edu by Fri-
day, Jan. 17.
The Sibley County Home
Study Program is designed
for educational opportunities
for women in Sibley County.
Classes are offered in Janu-
ary, February, March, Sep-
tember, October and Novem-
ber. Other opportunities of-
fered throughout the year in-
clude tours, banquets and en-
tertainment. Lesson topics
are chosen by the group to fit
into their areas of interest and
need. Members receive dis-
counts on the cost of lessons,
tours and special events.
Slow cooker class to be held on Thursday, Jan. 23
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ARLINGTON:
401 W. Alden St.
PO Box 388
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-5547
Fax: 507-964-2423
BarbM@ArlingtonMNnews.com
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Glencoe, MN 55336
320-864-5518
Fax: 320-864-5510
advertising@glencoenews.com
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104B Lake Avenue
PO Box 343
Silver Lake, MN 55381
320-327-2216
Fax: 320-327-2530
slleader@embarqmail.com
OR OR
AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
LIESKE TRACTOR
Wanted: Your OLD TRACTORS,
any condition, make or model. We
also specialize in new and used
TRACTOR PARTS AND REPAIR.
Call Kyle. Located west of Hender-
son. (612) 203-9256.
AUTOMOTIVE
Parts, Repair
$$ DOLLARS PAID $$ Junk vehi-
cles, repairable cars/trucks. FREE
TOWING. Flatbed/ wrecker serv-
ice. Immediate pick up. Monday-
Sunday, serving your area 24/7.
(952) 220-TOWS.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
Looking for a qualified babysitter or
daycare in Arlington, with availability
for Tuesday and Thursdays for a 16-
moht old and 5 year old. Contact
Eric Selman (254) 723-7189.
Part time maintenance person for
apartment complex in Gaylord.
Must live within 10 minutes driving
time of work site. Call (507) 237-
5449 for application.
Work Wanted
HANDYMAN: Will do remodeling
of kitchens, bathrooms, hanging
doors and wi ndows, pai nti ng,
sheet rocking, texturizing or any
minor repairs inside or outside.
Wi l l al so do cl eani ng of base-
ments/garages. Call (320) 848-
2722 or (320) 583-1278.
FOR SALE
Heating/Air Conditioning
Special-95% Goodman gas fur-
nace and programmable thermo-
stat, $2,200 installed or AC unit,
$1,900 installed. J&R Plumbing
Heating AC, Lester Prairie (320)
510-5035.
RENTAL
Apartment
2BR Apartment wi th garage,
water/sewer/garbage included.
$450/mo. No pets. New Auburn
(320) 327-2928.
1BR-ARLINGTON! Smoke free
and open NOW! (507) 964-2430
or 800-676-6505.
www.l i festyl ei nc.net, tdd (507)
451-0704. Equal Housing Oppor-
tunity.
Updated, spacious one and two
BR apartments in Renville. In-
cludes heat, water garbage. New
stove, fridge, air conditioner. Pet-
friendly. Call (320) 564-3351 for
appointment.
House
2BR house with garage and 3BR
apartment-main floor of duplex.
Call (320) 212-3217.
Want To Rent
Father and Son Operation look-
ing for farmland to rent. Call (320)
523-1116 or (320) 522-0272.
Wanted: Farmland to rent 2014
and beyond. Curtis Weckwerth
(507) 380-9128, Wayne Franzeen
(507) 380-2466.
Young farmer looking for land to
rent for 2014 and beyond. Com-
petitive rates and reference avail-
able. Call Austin Blad (320) 221-
3517.
SERVICES
Misc. Service
CUSTOM LOG SAWING- Cut at
your place or ours. White oak lum-
ber decking and firewood. Give
Virgil a call. Schauer Construction,
Inc. (320) 864-4453.
Classifieds
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AGRICULTURE AUTOMOTIVE EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE LIVESTOCK
& PETS
LIVESTOCK
& PETS
REAL ESTATE SERVICES RENTAL RENTAL
All ads appear online
at GlencoeNews.com
Enterprise
To place an ad: Call: 507-964-5547; Fax: 507-964-2423; E-Mail: info@ArlingtonMNnews.com; Mail: P.O. Box 388, Arlington, MN 55307
Advertising
Deadlines
The McLeod County Chronicle Mondays at Noon
The Arlington Enterprise & The Silver Lake Leader Tuesdays at Noon
The Glencoe Advertiser, The Sibley Shopper
& The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
Available...
1 & 2 Bedroom
Apartments Available
All utilities,
except electric
Income based
Must be 62 or older
or handicapped
Highland Commons
Arlington
507-964-5556
A
1
6
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2
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7
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2
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HANDICAP
ACCESSIBLE
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, January 9, 2014, page 8
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
The Arlington
Enterprise
402 W. Alden St. • P.O. Box 388
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-5547
E-mail: info@arlingtonMNnews.com
IS
S
U
E
S
!
w
E
ha
e
v
Nuessmeier Electric Inc.
Journeyman Electricians Wanted!
Nuessmeier Electric Inc. is looking for
Journeyman Electricians.
Send Resume or Pick up application at
1427 N. Commerce Street, Le Sueur, MN
(507) 665-3781
A52-1Ea
CLEANER
Hiring FT, second shift cleaner at Central Public Schools.
We offer competitive wages and excellent benefits including:
Paid Vacation, Sick Days, 6 Paid Holidays, Retirement Plan,
Short Term Disability, Life Insurance and Health Insurance.
Requirements: detail oriented, ability to work independently,
organized.
References and background check will be required.
For more information or application, contact Todd Nelson of
Dashir Management, at: 320-808-9066 or email resume to:
tnelson@central.k12.mn.us
F52-1E,1-2ASCa
Independent Living
55+ Arlington Sr. Apartment ONLY
One-Bedrooms Available
Apply NOW
Move this Winter!
FREE Application
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FREE 1
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Month Rent
A52-4E,1-4Sa
Managed by Great Lakes Management Co.
Lease Today!
800-873-1736 or 507-642-8701
kanderson@amberfieldplace.com
www.amberfieldplace.com
CASH FOR CARS:
All cars/trucks wanted. Running or not! Top
dollar paid. We come to you! Any make/
model. Call for instant offer: 800/871-9145
OTR DRIVERS
& Owner Operators for small com-
pany in SW MN. Most runs turn-
arounds. Competitive pay & ben-
efits. Traildust Trucking 800/619-0037
COUPON CLIPPERS NEEDED!
Trade extra grocery coupons for $$$$$.
All national brands requested. Free detail.
Send stamped self-addressed envelope:
CFCO, Box 18529, Milwaukee, WI 53218
APPLIANCE REPAIR
We fix it no matter who you bought
it from! Call ServiceLive and get re-
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for your retirement. Avoid market risk
& get guaranteed income in retire-
ment! Call for free copy of our safe
money guide plus annuity quotes from
A-rated companies! 800/631-4558
DONATE YOUR CAR
truck or boat to Heritage For The Blind. Free
3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing,
all paperwork taken care of 800/439-1735
DISH TV RETAILER
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12
mos.) & High Speed Internet start-
ing at $14.95/month (where avail-
able.) Save! Ask about same day In-
stallation! Call now! 800/297-8706
CANADA DRUG CENTER
is your choice for safe and affordable med-
ications. Our licensed Canadian mail order
pharmacy will provide you with savings of
up to 75% on all your medication needs.
Call today 800/259-1096 for $10.00 off
your first prescription and free shipping.
PELVIC/TRANSVAGINAL MESH?
Did you undergo transvaginal placement
of mesh for pelvic organ prolapse or stress
urinary incontinence between 2005 and
the present? If the mesh caused complica-
tions, you may be entitled to compensation.
Call Charles H. Johnson Law and speak
with female staff members 800/535-5727
MISCELLANEOUS AUTOS WANTED MISCELLANEOUS
HELP WANTED - DRIVERS
MISCELLANEOUS
Advertise here
statewide in 270
newspapers for only
$249 per week!
Call 800-279-2979
HIRE YOUR HELP HERE!
One phone call & only $249 to reach a
statewide audience of 3 million readers!!!
1-800-279-2979
OAK TERRACE
Healthcare Center of Gaylord
has openings in the following positions:
SKILLED NURSING FACILITY
RN OR LPN:
• 40 hours a pay period, 2:15pm-10:45pm
NURSING ASSISTANT:
• 64 hours a pay period, 6:00am-2:30pm
• 64 hours a pay period, 2:15pm-10:45pm
DIETARY AIDE:
• 22.75 hours a pay period, 4:30pm-7:45pm
ASSISTED LIVING FACILITY
RN OR LPN:
• 60 hours a pay period.
Combination days and evenings.
NURSING ASSISTANT:
• 6:00am-11:30am, every other weekend.
Applications are available at:
640 Third St., Gaylord, MN
Or online at www.oakterraceliving.com
For further information, contact Human Resources
at 507-237-8703. EOE
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Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington
is seeking the following positions:
• (1) Part-Time CNA, 3:30-9pm, every
other weekend positions.
• (2) Part-Time CNA, 6:15am-2:15pm,
every other weekend positions.
• (1) Part-Time CNA, 10:15pm-6:15am,
every other weekend position.
All CNA positions have potential for
picking up more hours during the week.
• (1) Full-Time LPN evening position, 8 shifts
per pay period. Benefit eligible.
• (2) Part-Time Cook positions, 5 shifts per pay period,
5:45am-1:45pm.
• (1) Resource Housekeeping/Laundry Assistant,
on-call hours only.
• Activity Assistant needed for every other Saturday.
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information,
call Tiffany Brockhoff,
Human Resource Director at
507-964-2251 or email:
tbrockof@good-sam.com
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap Drug-Free Workplace
Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life.
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Insulation
Installer
West Metro Installation
company looking for
insulation installers.
Valid Driver’s License
Required.
Please contact Josh at
952-240-6057
for additional details.
License # BC560376
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Pinske Real Estate
& Auctioneers
(507) 964-2250
Arlington
• 2 or 3 BR updated
rambler. Nicely located
on corner lot in Arling-
ton.
$
85,000
We need listings of
homes, farms and hobby
farms. If you are thinking
about selling it will pay for
you to call us.
REAL ESTATE
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