10-10-13 Arlington Enterprise

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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Serving the Communities of Arlington and Green Isle, Minnesota
www.arlingtonmnnews.com Volume 130 • Number 14 • Thursday, October 10, 2013 • Arlington, MN 55307
Single copy $1.00
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington City Coun-
cil, during its regular meeting
on Monday night, Oct. 7,
unanimously approved a mo-
tion to accept the resignation
from maintenance worker Jeff
Paine effective Friday, Oct.
11.
City Council members Ben
Jaszewski, Jennifer Nuesse,
Jason Ruehling, Curt Reetz
and Galen Wills all voted in
favor of the motion.
“Thank you for the oppor-
tunities you have provided
me during my time with the
city,” Paine wrote in his letter
of resignation. “If I can be of
any assistance during this
transition, please let me
know.”
Paine was hired by the City
of Arlington during Septem-
ber of 2008.
In conjunction with the
move, the City Council also
agreed to advertise for the
full-time maintenance worker
in the Public Works Depart-
ment. The application dead-
line will be Friday, Oct. 25.
The plan is to interview
candidates on Tuesday, Nov.
5 and fill the position by the
end of November.
In other business, the City
Council also discussed the
transitional period.
The Streets Committee,
comprised of Ruehling and
Wills, recently met and made
an offer to Paine to assist
with setting up Christmas
lights on Main Street and
other potential duties that
may arise for $15 per hour.
Paine, according to the
Streets Committee, counter
offered with 1 1/2 times his
current hourly rate or a little
over $25 per hour.
The City Council believed
the 1 1/2 rate was too expen-
sive. After some discussion,
the City Council authorized
City Administrator Liza Don-
abauer to arrive at a plan and
ask former and current part-
time employees to assist with
various duties at a much
lower hourly rate during the
transitional period.
City Council accepts resignation from Jeff Paine
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Sibley East Homecoming King and Queen
Seniors Cordell Bates and Megan Eckberg were
crowned as Sibley East Senior High School’s Home-
coming King and Queen during a coronation ceremo-
ny in Arlington on Friday afternoon, Oct. 4. Cordell is
the son of Eric and Kris Bates, Arlington. Megan is
the daughter of Tom and Ann Eckberg, Gaylord.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The City of Green Isle
has not received a bid to
date in conjunction with
the sale of 43 vacant lots
in that community.
That was the news re-
ported by Mayor Dale
ZumBerge to the Green
Isle City Council during a
regular meeting on Tues-
day night, Oct. 8.
ZumBerge did report
that the City of Green Isle
has received one tele-
phone call and one other
inquiry in regard to the va-
cant lots.
History
The City Council, dur-
ing the previous regular
meeting, unanimously
adopted a resolution to
offer the sale of 43 vacant
lots to the highest bidder.
The vacant lots, about
one year ago, were forfeit-
ed to the State of Min-
nesota, according to the
Sibley County Auditor’s
Office and Sibley County
Assessor’s Office.
The City of Green Isle,
over two months ago, re-
gained the ownership of
the 43 lots originally de-
veloped by the Rosemount
Development Corporation.
A few of the lots are lo-
cated in the Green Isle
Third Addition and Green
Isle Fifth Addition. Most
of the lots are located in
the Green Isle Sixth Addi-
tion and Green Isle Sev-
enth Addition, according
to the Sibley County Audi-
tor’s Office.
The bids may be for in-
dividual lots or for all of
the lots together. The sale
terms will be cash on clos-
ing. The City of Green
Isle, however, reserves the
right to reject any and all
bids.
The sealed written bids
must be delivered to the
Green Isle City Clerk at
the City Office or mailed
to the Green Isle City Of-
fice, P.O. Box 275, Green
Isle, MN, 55338. The
deadline is Tuesday, Oct.
15.
The City Council will
open and consider the
sealed bids during a closed
meeting on Tuesday night,
Oct. 22.
The City Council hopes
to recover special assess-
ments which average ap-
proximately $15,000 per
lot, according to city offi-
cials. Potential buyers will
not have to pay delinquent
property taxes to the State
of Minnesota, Sibley
County and City of Green
Isle. Although the City of
Green Isle expects to take
a loss on the sale of any
lot, city officials believe it
is more important to get
the properties back on the
tax rolls rather than have
the city own them.
The special assess-
ments, delinquent property
taxes, penalties and inter-
est on the 43 lots, one year
ago, was $717,280, ac-
cording to the Sibley
County Auditor’s Office.
The delinquent property
taxes and penalties have
since been waived so the
new total for the special
assessment is approxi-
mately $660,000.
The City of Green Isle
originally bonded for the
development of the seven
additions. The special as-
sessments were to be used
to make the bond pay-
ments.
No bids received yet for
vacant lots in Green Isle
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The completion date for
the Highway 5 Project from
Arlington to Green Isle has
been pushed back once again,
according to a representative
from the Minnesota Depart-
ment of Transportation.
The completion date,
which was most recently set
at Monday, Oct. 14, has now
been pushed back to Monday,
Oct. 21.
The paving between the
two communities is expected
to be finished on Thursday,
Oct 10.
The touch up on the aggre-
gate shoulders is scheduled to
take place on Friday, Oct. 11
and Monday, Oct. 14.
The construction crew is
expected to grind in the rum-
ble strips on Tuesday, Oct. 15
and Wednesday, Oct. 16.
The highway is expected to
be striped on Wednesday,
Oct. 16 and Thursday, Oct.
17.
Although the highway
could be completely open on
Friday, Oct. 18, the goal date
is Monday, Oct. 21, weather
permitting.
In the meantime, the cur-
rent detours will remain in ef-
fect.
As announced in the Ar-
lington Enterprise last week,
there is now a shorter detour
from north of Arlington to
Green Isle. The new detour is
from County Road 9 north of
Arlington to County Road 15
just west of Green Isle.
Knife River Corporation -
North Central of Sauk Rapids
is the contractor on the proj-
ect that includes seven miles
of pavement replacement and
a mill and overlay in Green
Isle.
The cost of the project is
approximately $5 million.
Another update on the
project will be published in
next week’s edition of the Ar-
lington Enterprise.
Completion date for Highway 5
Project is pushed back again
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
Sibley County Attorney
David Schauer was directed
to write a resolution that
would combine the elected
auditor and treasurer offices
by no later than 2019.
This first step was taken at
the meeting of County Com-
missioners on Tuesday, Oct.
8. After approval of the reso-
lution, the next step is to ask
the voters at the November,
2014 election if the position
should become an appointed
position or remain as an
elected position, effective
Jan. 1, 2019.
Another question could be
should the county recorder
remain as an elected position
or changed to appointed.
Since the offices cannot be
combined until current four-
year terms are concluded at
the end of 2014, the earliest
this can take place is January,
2015.
However, to know if the
public would want this new
office to be appointed or
elected, either a referendum
vote or special legislation has
to take place prior to the 2014
general election. First notices
would have to go out by the
end of this month.
County Commissioner Jim
Swanson said he has been
often asked why Sibley
County has not combined the
offices such as in other coun-
ties. He said he likes to do
things through attrition, such
as what the county did in
combining the public health
and human services depart-
ments last year.
Swanson added that the
board can go on record to an-
nounce it will combine the
two positions on first vacan-
cy, be it by a retirement or by
the end of the terms in 2019.
“This way, if we are only
hearing a squeaky wheel,
there is the option for the
public to request a reverse
referendum,” said Swanson
about if the push for combin-
ing the offices is a minority
opinion. The consensus of the
board is to move ahead.
County Administrator Matt
Jaunich said the county board
does have the authority to
combine the offices through a
resolution which requires a
four-fifths majority vote of
the board.
If the board does not re-
quire a referendum to com-
bine the elected positions,
voters may demand a referen-
dum by filing a petition of a
number of voters equal to 10
percent of those voting in the
county at the last general
election.
Steps for an appointed
combined auditor-treasurer
include seeking special legis-
lation or a referendum with
approval.
Jaunich handed out a com-
parison listing the pros and
cons between having an ap-
pointed vs elected auditor,
treasurer and recorder system.
Jaunich noted that with
elected positions there is lim-
ited ability to expand duties
other than those that are de-
fined by law.
If the positions are appoint-
ed, it would allow the county
board to pre-determine a set
of qualifications and duties
and institute those into a job
description to be used in the
performance of the position.
It would allow for a hiring
process by the county board
based on qualifications and
experience. It also could po-
tentially allow for other col-
laborative efforts with other
offices.
“One of the things to think
about surrounds the idea of
what is our long-term goal
and vision for the structure of
our county government?”
said Jaunich in his fact-find-
ing memo. “This is some-
thing we really have not dis-
cussed in detail.”
Jaunich suggested it may
be best for the board to have
a workshop session where it
has an in-depth discussion on
the structure of the workforce
and where it would like to be
in the future. Plus, there is a
proposal to do an organiza-
tional study.
The administrator suggest-
ed the study and workshop be
concluded before taking the
route of appointment with
these positions.
Schauer said he will bring
wording for the resolution to
combine the offices to the
board meeting on Tuesday,
Oct. 22.
The County Commission-
ers will hold their next regu-
lar meeting at 9 a.m. Tuesday,
Oct. 22.
Commissioners take 1st step to combine
county treasurer and auditor positions
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 10, 2013, page 2
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Questions
about Health Care?
Maybe I can help!
Call
507-358-0864
or stop by
405 West
Main Street
Arlington
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olunteer V Green Isle
ire & Rescue Relief F olunteer
14th
olunteer V Green Isle
Corn, Buns, Dessert, Coffee and Milk
indsor W MENU:
10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
y a Sund
AAALL G FFFA FA
Annual 14th
ire & Rescue Relief F olunteer
Corn, Buns, Dessert, Coffee and Milk
ork Chops, Baked P indsor
10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
, October 13, 2 yy,
GET ET OOGET ET TH O TTTO TO
Corn, Buns, Dessert, Coffee and Milk
otatoes, P
10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
, October 13, 2013
HER
dv A $10.00 in
Adults $11.00 at the door • Kids (5-10) $6.00
O GO ORDERS T
Corn, Buns, Dessert, Coffee and Milk
or Corner Stone Bank
y Green Isle n ance from a dv
5 & Under FREE
Adults $11.00 at the door • Kids (5-10) $6.00
AILABL AVVA O GO ORDERS
Corn, Buns, Dessert, Coffee and Milk
ireman F y Green Isle
Adults $11.00 at the door • Kids (5-10) $6.00
AILABLE!
Corn, Buns, Dessert, Coffee and Milk
A39-40E,40-41Sa
Thank You
Elaine Breitkruetz
and family would like to
express thanks and grati-
tude to all the friends, rela-
tives and local community
residents who participated in
the celebration of her 100
th
birthday on September 29.
Your cards, gifts and pres-
ence were deeply appreciat-
ed. The many cards and
lovely notes will be read
over and over and mean so
much. Elaine
*40SEa
Frank’s Potato
Supplier of fresh MN potatoes will be at the
Nicollet Mart in Nicollet, MN
Fridays & Saturdays
October into November
– Weather Permitting –
or call:
507-995-1201
507-931-4572
*40-43Ea
Stock Up NOW
LOW
PRICES!
Thank you to all of our
Green Isle Community
School (GICS) Hispanic
Heritage Fair sponsors:
Doehiling Farms (Arlington),
Napa (Arlington), & Locher
Bros. Inc. (Green Isle)
and our volunteers.
A very special thank you to
MN State Representative
Glenn Gruenhagen (R) for
visiting and supporting the
GICS Hispanic Heritage Fair.
*40Ea
for 42 years
of service
for the
community.
to the Arlington AA
*40Ea
Creekside Community Church
Missions Conference
When we are “in Christ” His light shines through us.
Creekside Community Church welcomes
Rev. Harry Landaw, who has been ministering in Japan,
most recently, to the victims of the tsunami.
Come hear about his experiences and how the
Holy Spirit is using him to make disciples.
Creekside Community Church
114 Shamrock Drive Arlington
Saturday, Oct. 19 at 7 pm
Doors open at 6:30. Social time to follow.
Sunday, Oct. 20 at 10:30 am
Social time following worship.
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Green Isle American
Legion #408
Lic#02255
at Grey Fox
Tavern
350 Parnell St.,
Green Isle
Starting Sat., Nov. 2
BINGO
Every Saturday @ 1 pm
Meat Raffles
Every Friday @ 7 p.m.
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Thursday, October 10: Golden Age Club, senior
citizen’s building at Four Seasons Park, noon
luncheon followed by meeting and entertainment.
Sunday, October 13: Sibley East Booster club
meeting, Gaylord EMS building, 7 p.m.
Arlington Conquerors 4-H club, senior citizen’s
building at Four Seasons Park, 5 p.m., Clover Buds
meet at 4 p.m.
Monday, October 14: Arlington Chamber of
Commerce meeting, Emergency Services Building
(formerly the Tech Center), noon.
Arlington Township Board, Arlington Community
Center, 7:30 p.m.
Arlington VFW Post 6031 Auxiliary, veteran’s
building at fairgrounds, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, October 8: Knights of Columbus, St.
Mary’s Parish Hall, 8 p.m.
Wednesday, October 16: Sibley County DFL
meeting, 7:30 p.m. All are welcome to attend. Join
us at Lyle’s Cafe, 102 St. Hwy. 19, Winthrop.
Community
Calendar
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER
MAIN BANK
Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (straight thru)
DRIVE THRU
Monday - Thursday, 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.,
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Member
FDIC
Arlington State Bank
(507) 964-2256
Fax (507) 964-5550
www.ArlingtonStateBank.com
MUSIC
BOOSTER
FALL
BRUNCH
Sunday, Oct. 13
9 a.m.-1 p.m.
Sibley East Sr. High
School Gym, Arlington
Tickets: $8 adults,
$3 children
Proceeds used to
help
fund student
music trips.
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News Briefs
Realty signs are removed
An individual or individuals reportedly removed
about five realty signs from various yards in Arlington,
according to the Arlington Police Department.
The signs were dumped on a yard along the 300 block
of West Chandler Street in Arlington.
The incident was reported to authorities on Thursday,
Oct. 3.
Sign taken from Brau Motors
A individual or individuals reportedly took a sales
special sign from along Highway 5 in front of Brau Mo-
tors in Arlington, according to the Arlington Police De-
partment.
The incident was reported to authorities on Friday,
Oct. 4.
Crash occurs by Scenic Byway
A two-vehicle accident, without injuries, reportedly
occurred at the intersection of Scenic Byway and 315th
Avenue on Sunday, Oct. 6, according to the Sibley
County Sheriff’s Department.
Both vehicles were southbound when they collided,
according to the report. The first vehicle, driven by Jen-
nifer Montean, 50, Shakopee, had moderate damage.
The second vehicle, driven by William Ulrich, 47, rural
Le Sueur, had moderate to severe damage.
Driver is distracted by animal
A one-vehicle rollover crash reportedly occurred near
Gibbon at 2:58 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 1, according to the
Sibley County Sheriff’s Department.
Laverna Martin was driving a 2003 Chevy Malibu
near the intersection of County Road 2 and County
Road 8 when she became distracted by an animal on the
side of the road, according to the report. Martin report-
ed lost control of the vehicle, over-corrected her turn
and the vehicle entered the east ditch where the car
rolled on its side. The vehicle sustained severe damage.
Martin suffered non-life threatening injuries and was
transported by the Winthrop Ambulance to the New
Ulm Medical Center, according to the report.
The Gibbon Fire Department and Gibbon Police De-
partment assisted at the scene.
Pink Out School Day on Oct. 14
Pink Out School Day has been scheduled at the Sib-
ley East Public Schools on Monday, Oct. 14.
Students will have an opportunity to purchase a pink
bandana for a nominal fee. At the volleyball match on
Monday Oct. 14 and the football game on Wednesday,
Oct. 16, pink glow lights will also be sold. The pink
glow lights will be illuminated during a moment of si-
lence preceding the game. HOSA will also distribute
pink ribbon pins and stickers.
In addition, Sibley East head football coach Chuck
Hartman has purchased breast cancer awareness gear
for himself and his coaches to wear at the football
game.
Booster Club to meet Oct. 13
The Sibley East Booster Club will meet at the Emer-
gency Services Building, 220 Jefferson Avenue East,
Gaylord at 7 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13, according to Tiffany
Rodning.
Chamber to meet next Monday
The Arlington Area Chamber of Commerce will hold
its next regular monthly meeting at the newly renovated
Emergency Services Building at noon Monday, Oct. 14,
according to Chamber Secretary Terry Klages.
Pro-life update to be given
Do you have questions about the pro-life movement
in Minnesota or how to protect human life?
A speaker from Minnesota Citizens Concerned for
Life (MCCL) in Minneapolis will present a free pro-lfe
update, discussing the new health care law, successful
efforts to save lives and much more.
This engaging, vital presentation will be held at the
Winthrop City Hall at 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 14. The
event is open to the public.
MCCL is the state’s oldest and largest pro-life organi-
zation. For more information, visit www.mccl.org.
The Class of 1978 from the Arlington-Green Isle High
School recently held its 35th class reunion at the
Grey Fox Lounge in Green Isle. The following class-
mates were in attendance at the event. First Row: (left
to right) Rick Rose, Pam (Meyer) Schmidt, Merlin
Brueggemeier, Janis (Vos) O'Neill, Patty (Janke) Tolz-
mann, Brenda (Hanke) Barlage, Ruth (Giesen) Kruger,
Doug Solomonson, John Woehler and Gerald
Woehler. Second Row: (l to r) Tim Bruch, Jeff
Thomes, Bev (Bethke) Larson, Marie (O'Brien) Brau,
Carol (Moore) Hacker, Vicki (Prescher) McQuarrie,
Sue (Steffer) Glawe, Lana (Alsleben) Woehler, Rox-
anne (Scharpe) Leistiko and Tammy (Michaelis) Wolf.
Third Row: (l to r) Curtis Weckwerth, Sandy (Reetz)
Berrisford, Nancy (Buckentine) Leclerc, Lynn (Goebel)
Burwell, Todd Voigt, Dan Woehler, Sara (Wisch)
Hedtke, Mary (Vos) Rewerts and Kathleen (Scharpe)
Oelfke. Fourth Row: (l to r) Scott Brau, Tom Neubarth,
Kevin O'Brien, Dave Meyer, Brian Oelfke, Dave Zum-
Berge and Mike Stumm. Other classmates who were
in attendance, but are not pictured include Brenda
(ZumBerge) Becker, Terry Braun, Kenn Mueller, Lynn
(Sauter) Vos and Corinne (Glieden) Kubal.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Class of 1978
Sibley County finds way to support
Lake Titlow dam funding request
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
The Lake Titlow dam proj-
ect funding request by the
City of Gaylord was granted
by the Sibley County Board
of Commissioners at the
meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 8.
The County Commissioners
found a way to offer support
without setting too much of a
precedent in case other dam
projects in the county also re-
quested support.
At the Sept. 10 meeting, the
county board heard a request
from Gaylord City Adminis-
trator Kevin McCann request-
ing between $10,000 to
$20,000 contribution from the
county to assist in the
$575,000 replacement of the
existing dam that is 100 years
old and is no longer effective
in holding water back.
Due to the costs and the re-
gional impact of the dam,
Gaylord submitted a Capital
Appropriation request to the
State of Minnesota. Local leg-
islators agreed the dam is a
big need, but wanted local
groups, including Sibley
County, to come up with at
least a 10 percent funding
commitment.
The county board directed
County Attorney David
Schauer to research possible
ditch proceedings that could
be used to address this request
from Gaylord.
The board voted 4-1 to
pledge at least $10,000 conti-
nent upon Gaylord receiving
the bonding that would cover
90 percent of the cost. Sibley
County’s contribution would
be about two percent of the
cost.
Schauer reported at the
Sept. 24 meeting that there
are two ditch systems that
drain into Lake Titlow.
Schauer highlighted three po-
tential possibilities for the
county to consider including
proceeding with a ditch im-
provement project to CD 18
or JD 18.
The county also could pro-
vide for the order to construct
a dam pursuant to state
statute. The board could also
provide general funds to Gay-
lord for it to construct the
dam.
The county attorney ex-
pressed concern about how
the use of general fund dollars
on the Lake Titlow dam proj-
ect could complicate the
funding of other dam projects
within the county.
Lake Titlow
Continued on page 3
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your area
businesses
appreciate
it when
you do!
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 10, 2013, page 3
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Business & Professional
Directory
CALL TODAY TO BE INCLUDED IN OUR
BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY!
507-964-5547
Arlington
Chiropractic Clinic
JUSTIN E. DAVIS, D.C.
607 W. Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-2850
arlingtonchiropracticmn.com
Office Hours:
Mon. 9am-6pm; Tues. 9am-5pm;
Wed. 8am-6pm; Thurs. 1-6pm;
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Small Animal House Call
by Appointment
Medical, Vaccination Services
and Surgical Referral
Dr. Robert G. Ovrebo
Office 507-964-2682
Cell 507-995-0507
Miller
Law Office
RAPHAEL J. MILLER
Attorney at Law
332 Sibley Avenue, Gaylord, MN 55334
Tel. (507) 237-2954
Wills - Family Law
Taxes - Estate Planning
General Law Practice & Trials
Free consultation on personal injury claims
MESENBRING
CONSTRUCTION
(507) 964-2864
“Your local home builder and
remodeler for over 38 years”
Member: MN River Builders Assn.
MN License #4806
ROSS R. ARNESON
ATTORNEY AT LAW
302 West Main
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-5753
Real Estate, Estate Planning,
Probate and Business Law
Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Saturdays by Appointment
Farm – Residential
Commercial
Licensed - Bonded - Insured
• 24-Hour Emergency
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• Free Estimates
Tyler Kranz, Owner
507-964-2525
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JEFF & WENDY KLEHR
Dozer, Grader, Basements,
Septic Systems, Driveways, Backhoe Work,
Hauling Gravel/Rock/Sand, Skidloader
Jeff cell: 612-756-0595
Wendy cell: 612-756-0594
640 E. BROOKS ST., ARLINGTON, MN 55307
1-507-964-5783 • FAX: 507-964-5302
Local LAWN
Enforcement
Arlington, MN
Licensed and Insured
Mowing, fertilizing and
weed control, dethatching,
garden tilling, core aeration
www.locallawnenforcement.com
Adam and David Hansen
Adam cell: 507-327-0917
507-964-5835
• 5” Seamless Gutters
• 6” Seamless Gutters
• K-Guard Leaf-Free
Gutter System
(lifetime clog free guarantee)
PHIL GOETTL
612-655-1379
888-864-5979
www.mngutter.com
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Gustafson
Family Dentistry
Dr. John D. Gustafson, D.D.S
Dr. Jared Gustafson, D.D.S
COMPREHENSIVE CARE
FOR ALL AGES
Office Hours: Monday–Friday
New Patients Welcome
Dr. Jason Anderson, D.D.S
Orthodontists
106 3
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Ave. NW,
Arlington
507-964-2705
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BODY REPAIR
See us for factory-trained
body repair work on
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We will contact the insurance company
for you and do all paperwork. See us
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507-964-5539
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Septic Services
Septic Pumping/Pump Repair
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507-665-3732
or 952-873-2208
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A37-40E38-41Sa
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Nearly 600 residents in the
Nicollet area were without
power much of Saturday
morning, Oct. 5, after a car
crashed into a utility pole at
the intersection of Highway
14 and Highway 99, accord-
ing to the KNUJ Radio web-
site.
Ryan S. Ellingson, 19,
Courtland, was driving a Toy-
ota Corolla when he reported-
ly lost control of the vehicle
at 2 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 5, ac-
cording to the report. The ve-
hicle entered the ditch and
knocked over a utility pole.
Ellingson was not seriously
injured, according to the re-
port.
However, nearly 600 Xcel
Energy customers were with-
out power until after 9 a.m.
due to the damaged power
lines, the report said.
The pole was replaced, the
lines repaired and power was
fully restored, according to
the report.
Nicollet area without power after crash last Saturday
There were 2,488 car-deer
crashes reported in Minneso-
ta during 2012, according to
Sergeant Jacalyn Sticha from
the Minnesota State Patrol.
In addition, there were 230
accidents involving other ani-
mals.
Overall, eight of these
nearly 2,500 crashes were
fatal while 325 accidents re-
sulted in injuries.
“Our best defense is to ex-
pect deer, especially, at dawn
and dusk in the fall and
spring,” said Sticha. Scan the
road/horizon continually,
which we should be doing
anyway. Being alert and
scanning may buy you extra
seconds, allowing you more
time to slow down. This will
reduce the impact if you hit
the deer or allow you to avoid
it safely. We do not want
drivers to go off the roadway
or into oncoming traffic
lanes, for obvious reasons.”
Sticha added, “We have all
heard the saying, ‘if you see
one deer, there are likely
more,’ maybe at that location
or just down the road.”
Nearly 2,500 car-deer crashes
reported in Minnesota last year
Enterprise photo by Megan Bennett
Sibley East Homecoming Parade
The Sibley East Marching Band, under the direction of
Jim Callahan, made its debut in the Sibley East Home-
coming Parade in Arlington on Friday afternoon, Oct.
4.
The first edition of the
new Standard-Gazette &
Messenger was published
on Oct. 2.
The newspaper is a
combination of the Fairfax
Standard, Gibbon Gazette
and Morgan Messenger.
The newspaper will con-
tinue to cover GFW
schools, Cedar Mountain
schools, the City of Mor-
gan, City of Gibbon, and
the City of Fairfax.
First copy of the paper
hits the news stands
“Unless we want to get into
the dam business, that leaves
the two other options,” said
County Commissioner Bill
Pinske about not wanting to
take money from the general
fund.
County Commissioner Jim
Swanson said he wants to see
the county give some sort of
support to the dam project.
His first choice is to do a
ditch improvement where
viewers would determine ben-
efits.
“The problem with that is it
pushes us out six to eight
months and this goes to the
bonding committee in No-
vember,” said Swanson, who
added the county could pledge
funds now and have a ditch
improvement project ready to
go by May when bonding
funds may be available. “It
could be a win-win where
funds do not come out of our
coffers, but the ditch fund.”
County Commissioner
Harold Pettis asked if there is
a problem with two different
government entities involved,
with one owning the dam and
the other paying for it.
Schauer said the law allows
for outside contributions to be
paid to the ditch authority,
such as a grant or bond funds.
Swanson said other dam
projects are much smaller and
if the county did help based it
this precedent the cost would
be far less. For example, he
said the dam on Clear Lake is
about six feet compared to the
Lake Titlow dam of about 100
feet.
The cost estimates for three
other dams in the county are
$66,000, $70,000 and $76,000
compared to around $600,000
for the Lake Titlow dam.
County Commissioner Jim
Nytes said the county has the
obligation to help keep prop-
erty values up. Pettis was the
lone no vote.
In other business, the board
has a conflict with the board
meeting scheduled on Dec.
10, so the meeting was
changed to 9 a.m. Thursday,
Dec. 12.
The meeting on Dec. 24
was previously changed to
Dec. 23. The first meeting of
the new year will be Tuesday,
Jan. 7. By law it has to be the
first Tuesday after the first
Monday. Board meetings are
normally the second and
fourth Tuesdays each month.
Lake Titlow Continued from page 2
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 10, 2013, page 4
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Staff
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Pub-
lishers; Kurt Menk, Editor; Karin
Rami ge, Manager; Marvi n
Bulau, Production Manager;
Barb Mathwig, Office; Ashley
Reetz, Sales; and Jean Olson,
Proof Reading.
Letters
This page is devoted to opin-
ions and commentary. Articles
appearing on this page are the
opinions of the writer. Views ex-
pressed here are not necessarily
those of the Arlington Enter-
prise, unless so designated. The
Arlington Enterprise strongly
encourages others to express
opinions on this page.
Letters from our readers are
strongly encouraged. Letters for
publ i cati on must bear the
writer’s signature and address.
The Arlington Enterprise re-
serves the right to edit letters
for purpose of clarity and space.
Ethics
The editorial staff of the Arling-
ton Enterprise strives to present
the news in a fair and accurate
manner. We appreciate errors
being brought to our attention.
Pl ease bri ng any gri evances
against the Arlington Enterprise to
the attention of the editor. Should
differences continue, readers are
encouraged to take their griev-
ances to the Mi nnesota News
Council, an organization dedicated
to protecti ng the publ i c from
press inaccuracy and unfairness.
The News Council can be contact-
ed at 12 South Sixth St., Suite
940, Minneapolis, MN 55402, or
(612) 341-9357.
Press Freedom
Freedom of the press is guar-
anteed under the First Amend-
ment to the U.S. Constitution:
“Congress shall make no law
respecting an establishment of
religion, or prohibiting the free
exercise thereof; or abridging
the freedom of speech, or the
press…”
Ben Frankl i n wrote i n the
Pennsylvania Gazette in 1731:
“If printers were determined not
to print anything till they were
sure it would offend nobody
there would be very little print-
ed.”
Deadline for the Arlington
Enterprise news is 4 p.m., Mon-
day, and advertising is noon,
Tuesday. Deadl i ne for The
Gal axy adverti si ng i s noon
Wednesday.
Established in 1884.
Postmaster send address changes to:
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Arlington, MN 55307.
Phone 507-964-5547 FAX 507-964-2423.
Hours: Monday-Wednesday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.;
Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.; and Friday closed.
Entered as Periodicals postal matter at Arlington,
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side of state – $38.00 per year.
Arlington ENTERPRISE
Free items are popping
up on local boulevards
Our View: The issue has become an
eyesore in the community
Opinions
The Superintendent’s Note Pad
Letter To The Editor
In the past, local homeowners would place free items
along their boulevard for a short period of time. The hope
was that other local residents would pick up these items and
homeowners would escape the cost to discard these objects.
These innocent gestures never seemed to cause any prob-
lems.
This popular trend, however, has recently escalated to a
whole new level where some local homeowners now place
these free items out on their boulevard for a much longer pe-
riod of time. Some of these items have also become an eye-
sore and have created dangerous situations.
In one case, a refrigerator was placed near a curb where a
child could have easily climbed inside and closed the door.
In another circumstance, a couch remained out on the boule-
vard in the rain. Who wants a couch that has sat out in the
rain for a couple of days?
Although there is a junk ordinance, the City of Arlington
has no specific ordinance on the books to deal with these
free item situations. The problem is every situation is differ-
ent. A couple of free items out on the boulevard for a few
days can be innocent while other objects along the curb for a
long period of time can become an eyesore and even danger-
ous.
A move by the City Council to bring back the annual clean
up day in April might help solve part of the problem. How-
ever, a move by the local police department to keep an eye
out for junky and dangerous items along boulevards would
have more of an immediate impact and hopefully reduce
most of the issues in question.
In the end though, it comes down to local homeowners. In-
nocent gestures by a majority of local homeowners can be
ruined by reckless and dangerous moves by a small group of
people. The last thing Arlington needs is another ordinance
on the books for local residents.
-K.M.
Too Tall’s Tidbits
Happy Birthday and Happy An-
niversary to the following local and
area residents compliments of the
Arlington Lions Club Community
Calendar.
October 11
Ashley “Baseline” Thomes, Bekah
Lundstrom, Bev Breyer, Donna Eibs
and Marge Kloeckl.
October 12
Anne Magyar, Jason Eckert, Kelly
Hildebrandt and Logan Huso.
October 13
Allen Kistner, Barb Becker, James
Maki, Joseph Maki, Susan Brau, Mr.
and Mrs. Frank Schwope, and Mr.
and Mrs. Tony Voigt.
October 14
Marlene Gildea, Kolten Scharping,
Michele Halverson-Partpart, and Mr.
and Mrs. Troy Breyer.
October 15
Mary Piotter, Mr. and Mrs. Damian
Krumwiede, and Mr. and Mrs.
Lawrence Godwin.
October 16
Brendan Hebeisen, Doug Oelfke,
Kale Peterson, Lauren Bode, Mr.
and Mrs. Brad Krueger, Mr. and
Mrs. Dale Meyer, Mr. and Mrs. Leon
Dose, and Mr. and Mrs. Richard
Rose, Jr.
October 17
Bill Haggenmiler, Cindy Wiemann,
Keith Eggersgluess, Lesley Kaeser-
mann, Lindsay Thomes, Royla
Borchert, and Mr. and Mrs. David
Hansen.
*****
A young boy had just gotten his
driving permit. He asked his father,
who was a minister, if they could
discuss the use of the car. His father
took him to his study and said to
him, “I’ll make a deal with you. You
bring your grades up, study your
Bible a little and get your hair cut
and we’ll talk about it.”
After about a month, the boy came
back and again asked his father if
they could discuss use of the car.
They again went to the father’s study
where his father said, “Son, I’ve
been real proud of you. You have
brought your grades up, you’ve stud-
ied your Bible diligently, but you
didn’t get your hair cut!”
The young man waited a moment
and replied, “You know Dad, I’ve
been thinking about that. You know,
Samson had long hair, Moses had
long hair, Noah had long hair, and
even Jesus had long hair.”
To which his father replied,
“Yes, and they walked everywhere
they went!”
*****
Feeling edgy, a man took a hot
bath. Just as he’d become comfort-
able, the front doorbell rang. The
man got out of the tub, put on terry
cloth slippers and a large towel,
wrapped his head in a smaller towel,
and went to the door. A salesman at
the door wanted to know if he need-
ed any magazines. Slamming the
door, the man returned to the bath.
The doorbell rang again. On went
the slippers and towels, and the man
started for the door again. He took
one step, slipped on a wet spot, fell,
and hit his back against the hard
porcelain of the tub.
Cursing under his breath, the man
struggled into his street clothes and,
with every move a stab of pain,
drove to the doctor.
After examining him, the doctor
said, “You know, you’ve been
lucky. Nothing is broken. But you
need to relax. Why don’t you go
home and take a long hot bath?”
*****
After a young couple brought their
new baby home, the wife suggested
that her husband should try his hand
at changing diapers.
“I’m busy,” he said. “I’ll do the
next one.”
The next time came around and
she asked again.
The husband narrowed his eyes
as he looked at his wife. “I didn’t
mean the next diaper. I meant the
next baby.”
*****
Question: What did the police of-
ficer say to the midget complaining
that someone picked his pocket?
Answer: I can’t believe someone
would stoop so low.
*****
By Jim Amsden
Sibley East Superintendent
September has flown by and the
start of the school year greeted our
students and staff with some ex-
tremely hot weather and difficult
classroom conditions due to the heat
and humidity. Now, students and
staff are being greeted with crisp
mornings and cooler fall breezes.
During the last month the Min-
nesota Department of Education re-
leased scores for the 2013 Minneso-
ta Comprehensive Assessments
(MCA). These tests are the most
commonly referred to measures of
how our students are performing ac-
ademically. It should be noted that
the results are not always consistent
for a variety of reasons. Each year a
different set of students are meas-
ured and different exams may be
given. This was the case with the
implementation of the MCA III for
reading in the spring of 2013. This
test was aligned to more challenging
career and college readiness stan-
dards and was more rigorous than
the previous MCA test.
Sibley East Schools use the MCA
testing results from grades 3-11 in
several ways. First, it allows us to
monitor the progress of every stu-
dent who has taken the exam. In-
struction can be individualized to
help students become more profi-
cient and strive to meet and exceed
the standards. The results of entire
grade levels allow us to assess cur-
riculum and ensure that it is aligned
with standards preK-12 and improve
programming for all students. Final-
ly, professional development can be
linked to helping staff members
hone their teaching craft, embed
standards in their class curriculum
and help all their students grow aca-
demically. Most importantly, using
and recognizing the data, both good
and not so good, helps make our
school system stronger and increas-
es our students’ opportunities for
success.
Finally, I would like to recognize
and say congratulations to senior
Ben White who was named a Com-
mended Student through the Nation-
al Merit Scholarship program, Amy
Sell and the ECFE program for
gaining a four star rating in the Par-
ent Aware Program and receiving
$25,000 in Early Learning Scholar-
ships Pathway II from MDE to ex-
tend the number of days offered to 4
year olds and improve ECFE pro-
gramming and Amanda Feterl who
was recognized in the Minnesota
Educator Magazine for her use of
technology in art education.
If you have questions, concerns,
or comments regarding Sibley East
Schools please feel free to contact
me at the district office 507-964-
8224 or email jamsden@sibley-
east.k12.mn.us.
Superintendent explains use of test results at SE
To The Editor,
Recently the USS Minnesota
Stealth Nuclear Attack Submarine
was commissioned. It is a high tech
marvel and wizardry, powered by an
ultra-efficient nuclear reactor. The
nuclear material that powers the
submarine is about the size of a
human fist. It will power the sub-
marine for over 35 years. Yes, you
read that correctly, 35 years.
Many people are unaware of the
tremendous technological advance-
ments in efficiency for nuclear ener-
gy. In addition, the nuclear waste
currently stored in the U.S. can now
be reprocessed under current tech-
nology to utilize more than 90 per-
cent, leaving less than 10 percent of
the nuclear waste to remain.
Unfortunately, our nation has laws
against reprocessing nuclear waste.
President Carter passed this law in
the late 1970’s. Republicans gener-
ally support building new nuclear
power plants because they recognize
the advancements in technology for
nuclear power and waste. Generally
the Democrats in our State and Na-
tion have failed to recognize techno-
logical advancements in dealing
with nuclear power waste and have
refused to support the repeal of
these laws. Instead, Democrats con-
trolled by the radical extremist envi-
ronmentalist movement, have sup-
ported the expensive agenda of wind
turbines and solar power, which are
only being built as a result of gov-
ernment mandates and huge subsi-
dies per megawatt hour. As an ex-
ample, natural gas receives a sub-
sidy of 25 cents per megawatt hour.
In contrast, wind turbines receive a
government subsidy of over $23.37
per megawatt hour (source: Min-
nesota REA).
New proposals by the Federal
EPA and recently passed Minnesota
solar mandates under Democrat
leadership will raise the cost of elec-
tricity even higher. The radical en-
vironmentalists have also influenced
some in the Republican Party, but
the majority opposes these energy
boondoggles, as does the Republi-
can platform.
Modern nuclear power is environ-
mentally safe and soon we will be
able to reprocess 99 percent or all of
our nuclear waste. American ingenu-
ity has always solved environmental
problems when not encumbered by
government ignorance.
Informed and activated citizens
can be influential, as they demand
that legislators vote to repeal the nu-
clear power plant ban in Minnesota
and the federal ban on reprocessing
nuclear waste.
Many readers will fondly remem-
ber the advertising jingle; “Electrici-
ty is penny cheap from NSP to you”.
With the advancements of modern
technology, electricity could once
again be penny cheap and this could
fuel an economic recovery that
would create a prosperous future for
our children and grandchildren.
Remember, our country was
founded on limited government be-
cause our founding fathers realized
that whenever government becomes
overly involved in almost any thing,
it creates waste, fraud, abuse and
higher costs.
Glenn Gruenhagen
State Representative
Glencoe
Nuclear power in the 21st century
SHARE YOUR OPINION
THROUGH A
LETTER TO THE EDITOR.
EMAIL YOUR LETTER TO
KURTM@ARLINGTONMNNEWS.COM
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 10, 2013, page 5
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Cancer services now at Sibley Medical Center
returns to Sibley
Birendra Kumar
returns to Sibley
, MD, marr,
actice close to home. can prra
etu to 2011. He is pleased to rre
acticed at Sible . Kumar prra Drr.
. therapyy.
oncology care and oversees chemotherapy and infusion
where he provides hematology and , Medical Center
Kumar’ . are pleased to announce Drr.
Sibley Medical Center and Ridgeview Medical Center
e e h rre e h , wwh yy, urn to Sibleey
om 1996 y in Arlington fr eey
oncology care and oversees chemotherapy and infusion
where he provides hematology and
s return to Sibley Kumar’
Sibley Medical Center and Ridgeview Medical Center
returns to Sibley
call 507-964-2271. s, or appointment F
actice close to home. can prra
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A37-40Ea
Obituaries
History
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Conferences will be held at
the Sibley East Senior High
School in Arlington and Sib-
ley East Junior High School
in Gaylord from 4 p.m. to 8
p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15 and
from 8 a.m. to noon Wednes-
day, Oct. 16.
There will be no school for
all students on Wednesday,
Oct. 16. That day has been
set aside for conferences in
the morning and an in-service
for teachers in the afternoon.
Jeff Eppen will be at the
Arlington school site from 4
p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct.
15 and at the Gaylord school
site from 8 a. m. to noon
Wednesday, Oct. 16.
The following “traveling
teachers” will be at the Gay-
lord school site from 4 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15:
Jim Callahan, Lenore Strouth,
Mark Standinger, Elizabeth
Zieman, Tracie Bjorklund,
Mike Feterl and Annie
Kreger.
The following “traveling
teachers” will be at the Ar-
lington school site from 8
a.m. to noon Wednesday, Oct.
16: Jim Callahan, Lenore
Strouth, Mark Standinger,
Elizabeth Zieman, Tracie
Bjorklund, Mike Feterl and
Annie Kreger.
SE conferences set for Oct. 15 and 16
Evangeline Kramer, age
81, of Gaylord, passed away
at the Oak Terrace Health
Care Center in Gaylord on
Wednesday,
Oct. 2.
A Memo-
rial Service
was held at
St. Paul’s
L u t h e r a n
Church in
Gaylord at
11 a. m.
Wednesday,
Oct. 9. Pastor Jim Snyder of-
ficiated.
The organist was Curt
Kahle. The congregational
hymns were “How Great
Thou Art,” “What A Friend
We Have In Jesus” and “Just
A Closer Walk With Thee.”
A Gathering of Family and
Friends was held from 9 a.m.
until the time of the service at
the church on Wednesday,
Oct. 9.
Interment was in the
church cemetery.
Urn bearers were grand-
children, Kyle Swinford, Sara
Swinford and Jodi Johnson.
An honorary urn bearer
was great-grandchild, Kaylee
Miklas.
Evangeline Elizabeth (So-
effker) Kramer was born in
Arlington on Sept. 26, 1932.
She was the daughter of
Ralph Sr. and Ella (Fenske)
Soeffker. Evangeline was
baptized as an infant and was
later confirmed in her faith as
a youth. She received her ed-
ucation in Arlington.
On Sept. 21, 1957, Evange-
line was united in marriage to
Erwin Kramer at St. Paul’s
Lutheran Church in Arling-
ton. After their marriage, the
couple farmed in Sibley
Township. She was a loving
mother and homemaker.
Evangeline and Erwin shared
56 years of marriage and
were blessed with four chil-
dren.
Evangeline was a member
of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church
in Gaylord.
Evangeline enjoyed cook-
ing, baking, sewing, garden-
ing, canning, quilting, play-
ing cards and bingo, and ani-
mals. She loved spending
time with her friends and
family, especially her chil-
dren and grandchildren.
When she needed assis-
tance with her daily care,
Evangeline became a resident
of Oak Terrace Health Care
Center on March 24, 2008,
Evangeline is survived by
her husband, Erwin Kramer
of Gaylord; daughters,
Kari Swinford of New Ulm,
and Janet (Don) Johnson of
St. Louis Park; son, Steve
Kramer of New Ulm;
grandchildren, Kyle Swinford
of New Ulm, Sara Swinford
of New Ulm, and Jodi John-
son of St. Louis Park; great-
grandchild, Kaylee Miklas;
siblings, Mavis Lange of
Hutchinson, and Ralph
(Ruth) Soeffker, Jr., of Ar-
lington; sister-in-law, Mavis
Soeffker of Arlington; nieces,
nephews, other relatives and
friends.
Evangeline was preceded
in death by her parents, Ralph
Sr. and Ella Soeffker; son,
Jeffrey Kramer; brother,
Ronald Soeffker; brother-in-
law, Orlin Lange; sister,
Donna (Vern) Ohland; and
nephew, Jon Soeffker.
Arrangements by Egesdal
Funeral Home in Gaylord.
Online obituaries and guest
book available at
www. hantge. com. Please
click on obituaries and guest
book.
Evangeline Kramer, 81, Gaylord
Evangeline
Kramer
Marilyn Boerner, age 71, of
Gaylord, passed away at the
Abbott Northwestern Hospi-
tal in Minneapolis on Sunday,
Oct. 6.
F u n e r a l
service will
be held at the
I mma n u e l
L u t h e r a n
Church in
Gaylord at
10:30 a.m.
Th u r s d a y,
Oct. 10. Rev.
Fredric Hinz
will officiate.
The organist will be Jeanne
Bruss. The congregational
hymns will be “Abide With
Me,” “On Eagle’s Wings”
and “In The Garden.”
Casket bearers will be
grandsons and nephews, Jere-
my Serbus, Joshua Mans,
Tyler Holmgren, Joe Morgan,
Matthew Wieman, Patrick
Bartels, Daniel Wieman and
Jay Bartels.
Honorary casket bearers
will be granddaughters, Jessi-
ca Serbus, Pamela Pomplun-
Morgan, Ashley Pomplun and
Amanda Mans.
Visitation was held at the
Immanuel Lutheran Church
in Gaylord from 4 p.m. to 8
p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 9. Visi-
tation will continue one hour
prior to the service at the
church on Thursday, Oct. 10.
Interment will be in the
church cemetery.
Marilyn Gertrude (Tess-
mer) Boerner was born at
home in Gaylord on Dec. 15,
1941. She was the daughter
of Helbert and Mabel (Kohls)
Tessmer. Marilyn was bap-
tized as an infant on Decem-
ber 28, 1941, and was later
confirmed in her faith as a
youth on March 25, 1956,
both at Immanuel Lutheran
Church in Gaylord. She re-
ceived her education at the
Immanuel Lutheran Parochial
School and Gaylord High
School.
On April 21, 1960, Marilyn
was united in marriage to
Marvin Pomplun. This union
was blessed with four chil-
dren.
On Oct. 15, 1977, Marilyn
was united in marriage to
Donald Boerner at the Im-
manuel Lutheran Church in
Gaylord. After their marriage,
the couple resided in Gay-
lord. Marilyn was employed
at Michael Foods for more
than 30 years. Marilyn and
Donald shared 23 years of
marriage before Donald
passed away on Nov. 11,
2000.
Marilyn was a member of
the Immanuel Lutheran
Church in Gaylord and the
Ladies Aid.
Marilyn enjoyed working,
shopping, gardening and
flowers, playing cards, her
pets, listening to Daniel O’-
Donnell, and going on vaca-
tions with her sisters. She
was a very caring person.
Marilyn especially loved
spending time with her fami-
ly and friends.
Marilyn is survived by her
children, Mark (Patricia)
Pomplun of Henderson; Lisa
Mans and her special friend,
Dale Sickmann of Arlington,
and Ricky (Tammy) Pomplun
of Gaylord; step-children,
Steve (Vicki) Boerner of
Gaylord, Amy (Paul) Baake
of Lake Mary, Fla, , Sara
(Matthew) Bowers of Min-
neapolis, and Fred (Marilyn)
Boerner of Los Angeles,
Calif.; grandchildren, Jessica
Serbus and her significant
other, Dan Graczak, Pamela
(Joe) Pomplun-Morgan, Ash-
ley Pomplun, Amanda Mans
and her special friend, Tim,
Jeremy Serbus, Joshua
(Courtney) Mans and Tyler
Holmgren; great-grandchil-
dren, Leah Serbus, Kailey
Graczak, Brody Serbus, Allie
Serbus, Amara Larson, and
baby boy Morgan; son-in-
law, Craig Serbus of Hender-
son; sisters, Joleen (Allen)
Bartels of Winthrop, and
Denise (Carl) Wieman of
Owatonna; nephews, other
relatives and friends.
Marilyn was preceded in
death by her parents, Helbert
and Mabel Tessmer; daugh-
ter, Lori Serbus; and husband,
Donald Boerner.
Arrangements by Egesdal
Funeral Home in Gaylord.
Online obituaries and guest
book available at
www. hantge. com. Please
click on obituaries and guest
book.
Marilyn Boerner, 71, Gaylord
Marilyn
Boerner
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Third Graders Get New Dictionaries
The Arlington Lions Club and Green
Isle Lions Club recently distributed 113
new dictionaries to third grade stu-
dents in the Sibley East School District.
This picture was taken at the Green Isle
Community School. Front Row: (left to
right) Sami Pollack, Carter Hendley,
Jack Stewart and Rollie Spooner. Mid-
dle Row: (l to r) Maggie Foley, Skyler
Koch, Emma Hecksel, Gavin Latzke,
Trevor Parrott and Lauren Menne. Back
Row: (l to r) Green Isle Lions Club
member Ken Perschau, Green Isle
Lions Club member Maynard Rucks,
Green Isle Lions Club member Pat An-
derly and Arlington Lions Club member
Eunice Rucks.
95 Years Ago
October 10, 1918
Louis Kill, Editor
“Pickles” Moskop returned
Tuesday from North Dakota
where he was employed in the
harvest fields all fall. He says
harvest help was mighty scarce
in the Dakotas and he received
$5 a day for his services.
In response to the call issued
by the Red Cross last week for
old clothing for the Belgian Re-
lief, people from this village
contributed nearly 1,000 pounds
of serviceable clothing, which
was shipped to the headquarters.
The Arlington Cement Works
is busy fulfilling a contract to
build a large concrete bridge in
Jessenland Township, between
Sections 7 and 18, near the
Chas. Kleist farm. A petition
was circulated by Mr. K. over a
year ago to have the roof
straightened at this point. The
bridge will cost about $2,500
while the expenditure for grad-
ing the approach will also
amount to nearly $1,500.
Cash prices at Noack’s plant:
Cream, 60c; eggs, 43c; springs,
21c; hens, 19-22c; old roasters,
15c; hides, 15-22c; we sell
creamery butter, 57c.
70 Years Ago
October 14,1943
Louis Kill, Editor
The Izaak Walton League of
Minnesota has been requested
by the War Production Board,
Salvage Division to help the war
effort by inaugurating a plan
whereby duck and goose feath-
ers can be collected and shipped
to a central receiving station, to
be used for manufacture of
equipment for our armed forces.
A WPB order prohibits duck
and goose feathers for any other
than military purpose. These
feathers are vitally needed for
sleeping bags and for flight suits
for our men in the arctic. Feath-
ers should be placed in small
bags and may be deposited at
Thomes Bros. hardware store in
Arlington.
Two members of the Arling-
ton High School football team
were painfully injured while
participating in practice sessions
at the municipal play grounds,
both of the mishaps occurring in
the same scrimmage. Jimmy
Klancke, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Henry Klancke, received a bro-
ken left shoulder, and Ronald
Noack, son of Mr. and Mrs. M.
F. Noack sustained a dislocation
of the right wrist. The injury of
these two boys, together with
that sustained by other members
of the team in recent games, has
all but eliminated the squad
from active competition.
A new high in the price paid
for milk cows was set at the
auction on the Wm. Ortloff
farm, north west of Arlington,
on Tuesday of this week. One of
the animals was purchased by
Ed O’Conner of Kelso for
$235.00.
45 Years Ago
October 10, 1968
Val Kill, Editor
Freshman boys at A-GI High
school are taking a course in
safe tractor operation in order to
comply with the state law gov-
erning the operation of tractors
by anyone under 16. Eighteen
sophomore boys have also com-
pleted it. Taking the class are
Glen Klitzke, Richard Vossen,
instructor, Tim Renneke, Larry
Haag, Maynard Albers, Mike
Willmsen, Victor Quast, Mark
Gieseke, Bruce Mathwig,
Richard Engelmann and Ron
Strobel.
Construction started last
week on the new athletic park
being built by the school district
on the north side of Arlington.
The baseball and football fields
have already been leveled and
ground has been scooped out for
the grandstand.
20 Years Ago
October 7, 1993
Kurt Menk, Editor
The Arlington Municipal
Hospital was among nine of the
12 facilities that received a grant
for $50,000 in each of the next
three years. They had petitioned
for the federal funding to help
them implement their plan for
improving health care services
in this area. One of the pro-
grams to be implemented is
adult day care.
Our community has received
40 1/2 inches of rain and 25
inches of snow so far in 1993.
At this same time last year, Ar-
lington received 29 1/2 inches
of rain and 16 inches of snow.
The Sibley County Sheriffs
Department received a call at
4:26 p.m. from Mrs. Harold
Wiest of rural Le Sueur that
there was a three-year-old girl
missing from their farmstead.
Samantha Sue Wiest, daughter
of Gary and Paula Wiest of Le
Center was last seen about 3
p.m. playing outside with their
black lab dog named Nikki,
when she wandered into a corn-
field next to the farm yard. At
about 5 p. m. Samantha and
Nikki walked out of a bean field
onto the farm of Kenneth
Pioske, which is about one mile
northwest of the Wiest farm
Samantha was in good condi-
tion, but stated that she was
cold.
The Sibley County Histori-
cal Society (SCHS) will
sponsor an Antique Appraisal
at the Henderson Community
Building at 6:30 p.m. Tues-
day, Oct. 22, according to
Curator Sharon Haggen-
miller.
Saundra Schaitberger of
Pines N Tiques from Plato
will be present to share her
expertise. Because of time
constraints, she will be able
to appraise about 30 items
during the evening.
There will be a nominal fee
for each appraisal. If people
have an item too large, they
are encouraged to bring a
photo of the object.
There will be a small ad-
mission fee for non SCHS
members.
To make a reservation for
this event, please call Judy at
507-248-3345.
The Arlington Brickyard
was the topic during last
month’s SCHS meeting.
Dwight Grabitske and oth-
ers of the Arlington Historical
Society (AHS) have taken
upon themselves to find sur-
viving buildings built of Ar-
lington bricks. Members of
the AHS document and pho-
tograph the building and also
search for any other historical
information of the building.
They already have a power
point presentation of the
buildings they have found so
far, but are looking for more.
People who have additional
information about the loca-
tion of these buildings are en-
couraged to contact Dwight
Grabitske at 507-964-5878.
The Sibley County Muse-
um will be closed for the sea-
son after Sunday, Oct. 27 and
open again on Memorial Day,
2014. However, the museum
is open for group tours and
special events during the
closed season. To arrange an
appointment, people can call
the museum at 507-248-3434.
SCHS to sponsor Antique Appraisal
The teachers’ lounge and
an elementary classroom
were vandalized at the Sibley
East Public School in Gay-
lord, according to an article
in The Gaylord Hub.
According to Gaylord Po-
lice Chief Kenn Mueller, the
vandalism was discovered on
Sunday by a school custodian
who found a mess in the
teachers’ lounge and in Class-
room 147 where there was a
bottle of butter and strawber-
ry sauce all over the desk.
Nothing was reported miss-
ing. Entry was gained
through a screen of an open,
unlocked window.
Vandalism at Sibley East in Gaylord
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 10, 2013, page 6
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Sports
Kurt’s Korner
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
girls tennis team posted a win
and a loss in the recent Sec-
tion 2A Girls Tennis Team
Tournament in the Swanson
Tennis Center at Gustavus
Adolphus College.
The Lady Wolverines upset
St. Peter 5-3 in the opening
round on Thursday afternoon,
Oct. 3.
Sibley East then lost to
Blue Earth Area 5-2 during
the semi-final round on Mon-
day morning, Oct. 7.
United South Central de-
feated Blue Earth Area 4-3 in
the championship and will
now advance to the Minneso-
ta State Class A Girls Tennis
Team Tournament.
Sibley East will now com-
pete in the Section 2A Girls
Individual Tournament at
Gustavus Adolphus College
on Thursday morning, Oct.
10.
Sibley East 5
St. Peter 2
SINGLES: 1 - Breann
Walsh (SE) lost to Rachel
Huber (SP) 5-7, 5-7; 2 -
Mariah Schrupp (SE) defeat-
ed Valerie Bresnahan (SP) 2-
6, 6-4, 6-4; 3 - Ella Lund-
strom (SE) defeated Kather-
ine Sandquist (SP) 1-6, 6-3,
6-2; 4 - Kim Kurtzweg (SE)
lost to Aliza Doherty (SP) 2-
6, 5-7.
DOUBLES: 1 - Alicia
Kranz & Alli Harter (SE) de-
feated Malbry Malecek &
Kali Cummins (SP) 6-2, 6-3;
2 - Ashley Mercier & Faith
Young (SE) defeated
Michaela Meyer & Alexan-
dria Sandquist (SP) 7-6, 6-4;
3 - Lindsey Flieth & Liz Thies
(SE) defeated Natalie Weel-
borg & Johanna Dietrch (SP)
6-3, 7-6.
Blue Earth Area 5
Sibley East 2
SINGLES: 1 - Breann
Walsh (SE) defeated Karleigh
Wolff (BEA) 6-2, 6-2; 2 -
Mariah Schrupp (SE) lost to
Kaitlyn Olsen (BEA) 1-6, 0-
6; 3 - Ella Lundstrom (SE)
lost to Lindsey Prokop (BEA)
3-6, 1-6; 4 - Kim Kurtzweg
(SE) lost to Anikka Wilhelm
(BEA) 2-6, 2-6.
DOUBLES: 1 - Alicia
Kranz & Alli Harter (SE) lost
to Natalie Fellows & Karli
Olsen (BEA) 2-6, 1-6; 2 -
Ashley Mercier & Faith
Young (SE) lost to Paige Dar-
rington & Rebekah Krussow
(BEA) 3-6, 4-6; 3 - Liz Thies
& Lindsey Flieth (SE) defeat-
ed Kali Viland & Lacey Benz
(BEA) 6-4, 6-3.
Girls tennis team upsets St. Peter,
falls to BEA in section team tourney
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Sibley East senior Alicia Kranz returns a ball against
St. Peter during the Section 2A Girls Tennis Team
Tournament on Thursday afternoon.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
girls volleyball team split
with a pair of Minnesota
River Conference opponents
last week.
The Lady Wolverines, 2-3
in the MRC and 18-7 overall,
will travel to Watertown-
Mayer at 7:30 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 10. Sibley East will con-
clude its regular season
against visiting Le Sueur-
Henderson at 7:30 p.m. Mon-
day, Oct. 14.
Seeding for the district
tournament will be held on
Wednesday, Oct. 16, accord-
ing to Sibley East head coach
Chip Wolverton.
Sibley East 3
Tri-City United 0
The Sibley East varsity
girls volleyball team swept
visiting Tri-City United 3-0
on Tuesday night, Oct. 1.
This was a non-conference
match played in Gaylord.
The Lady Wolverines took
the three games 25-15, 25-12
and 25-17 respectively.
Junior Autumn Dose, who
converted 10 of 10 serves
with three aces, contributed
six kills and five digs. Junior
Karley Lind, who dished out
19 set assists, converted 14 of
15 serves with two aces. Sen-
ior Megan Eckberg and soph-
omore Megan Krentz collect-
ed six kills each and two
blocks apiece. Junior Kelli
Martens added six kills.
Jordan 3
Sibley East 1
The visiting Sibley East
varsity girls volleyball team
lost to Jordan 3-1 on Thurs-
day, Oct. 3. This was a Min-
nesota River Conference
match played in Jordan.
The Lady Wolverines, who
won the first game 25-15,
dropped the final three games
25-21, 25-17 and 25-9 re-
spectively.
Junior Autumn Dose
recorded 13 digs and five
kills while sophomore Kailey
Geib had five kills and four
digs. Junior Karley Lind and
sophomore Katie Tuchten-
hagen dished out 13 and 11
set assists respectively while
junior Shelby Voight collect-
ed 10 digs. Junior Kelli
Martens contributed five kills
and one block while fresh-
man Alyssa Weber had four
kills and two blocks. Senior
Megan Eckberg registered
four kills and one block while
sophomore Megan Krentz
added four blocks.
SE girls volleyball team splits
with 2 conference opponents
Enterprise photos by Megan Bennett
(Left Photo) Aibgail Butler is a fresh-
man on the Sibley East varsity girls
cross country team. (Right Photo) Jack
Ballalatak is a sophomore on the Sibley
East varsity boys cross country team.
Football Lights 
A section of lights located
on the northwest corner of the
football field temporarily
went out during the Sibley
East and Norwood Young
America game on Friday
night, Oct. 4.
The lights went out late in
the first quarter and came
back on very early in the sec-
ond quarter. The game, how-
ever, still continued during the
outage.
There is only one more reg-
ular season game scheduled at
home this year. That game is
Wednesday night, Oct. 16.
The Sibley East School
Board will have some difficult
decisions to make on the foot-
ball lights which are estimated
to cost $125,000.
Plus, weeds are growing in
cracks across the track.
Joke
It was a particularly tough
football game, and nerves
were on edge.
The home team had been
the victim of three or four
close calls by the officials,
and they were now trailing the
visitors by a touchdown and a
field goal.
When the official made yet
another close call in the visi-
tors’ favor, the home quarter-
back blew his top.
“How many times can you
do this to us in a single
game?” the quarterback
screamed. “You were wrong
on the out-of-bounds, you
were wrong on that last first
down, and you missed a clip
in the first quarter.”
The official just stared. The
quarterback seethed, but he
suppressed the language that
might get him tossed from the
game. “What it comes down
to,” the quarterback bellowed,
“is that you stink!”
The official stared a few
more seconds. Then he bent
down, picked up the ball,
paced off 15 yards, and put
the ball down. He turned to
face the steaming quarterback.
“And how do I smell from
here?”
Jared Allen
Minnesota Vikings defen-
sive end Jared Allen reported-
ly stopped at the Sibley East
fifth and sixth grade practice
in Arlington on Tuesday, Oct.
8.
That must have been a thrill
for the young Wolverines. It’s
a shame nobody bothered to
call the local newspaper to
take a picture.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
boys and girls cross country
team recently competed in a
series of meets.
Sibley East will compete in
the Minnesota River Confer-
ence Meet at Baylor Park
near Norwood Young Ameri-
ca at 3:30 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 10.
Sibley East competed in
the Le Sueur-Henderson Invi-
tational on Tuesday after-
noon, Oct. 1.
Boys Team
In the co-ed varsity race,
sophomore Justin Bennet fin-
ished 13th with a time of
16:18. Sophomore Jack Bal-
lalatak placed 14th with a
clocking of 16:19. Eighth
grader Kristian Schow fin-
ished 23rd with a showing of
17:21 while junior Sam Thies
placed 25th with a time of
17:32. Senior Ben Ahlstrand
finished 27th with a clocking
of 17:34.
In the co-ed junior varsity
race, eighth grader Logan
Tesch placed sixth with a
time of 17:14. Junior Jonah
Butler finished 11th with a
clocking of 18:32 while jun-
ior Chase Ellwood placed
12th with a showing of 18:34.
Sophomore Jack Rosenfeld
finished 13th with a time of
18:43. Sophomore Ian
Holmes placed 19th with a
clocking of 22:01.
In a shorter co-ed junior
high race, eighth grader
Cameron Thurn placed 32nd
with a time of 10:36.
Girls Team
In the co-ed varsity race,
freshman Alison Eibs fin-
ished 37th with a time of
19:29. Senior Maren Miner
placed 41st with a recording
of 20:55 while freshman Abi-
gail Butler finished 43rd with
a clocking of 21:08. Seventh
grader Breanna Fahning
placed 45th with a showing
of 21:16.
In the co-ed junior varsity
race, eighth grader Tamara
Ehrich placed 20th with a
clocking of 22:42 while jun-
ior Karina Robeck finished
22nd with a showing of
24:24.
In the shorter co-ed junior
high race, seventh grader
Ariel Butler placed 36th with
a time of 11:34 while seventh
grader Taylor Strand finished
37th with a recording of
11:38.
Sibley East also competed
in a meet at Sleepy Eye on
Monday afternoon, Oct. 7.
The meet was postponed due
to inclement weather on
Thursday, Oct. 4.
Boys Team
In the varsity boys race,
sophomore Justin Bennett
earned a medal and placed
10th with a time of 19:22.
Sophomore Jack Ballalatak
finished 12th with a clocking
of 19:32. Junior Sam Thies
placed 20th with a showing
of 20:39 while eighth grader
Kristian Schow finished 21st
with a time of 20:39. Senior
Ben Ahlstrand placed 25th
with a recording of 21:39
while eighth grader Logan
Tesch was 26th with a record-
ing of 21:45.
Sibley East cross country teams compete in LS-H Invitational
Girls Team
In the varsity girls race,
freshman Alison Eibs earned a
medal and placed 10th with a
time of 17:46. Senior Maren
Miner placed 21st with a
showing of 19:23 while fresh-
man Abigail Butler finished
22nd with a time of 19:32.
Seventh grader Breanna Fahn-
ing placed 29th with a show-
ing of 20:24.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
football team rallied for three
second-half touchdowns and
defeated visiting Norwood
Young America 20-14 in
Minnesota River Conference
action on Friday night, Oct.
4.
The Raiders, on their first
possession, drove 67 yards
before junior quarterback
Isaac Hormann rolled out and
ran eight yards for a touch-
down. Sophomore Zach
Schnabel followed with the
extra point kick as NYA raced
to a 7-0 lead with 3:25 left in
the opening quarter.
The Wolverines, mean-
while, ran only three offen-
sive plays during the entire
first quarter.
NYA, on its next posses-
sion, marched 36 yards be-
fore Hormann hooked up
with senior Casey Clemensen
on a 23-yard touchdown pass.
Schnabel again booted the
extra point kick as the
Raiders increased their lead
to 14-0 with 11:56 left in the
second frame.
NYA maintained that lead
into halftime and a few min-
utes into the third quarter
until the Wolverines began to
mount a long drive.
Sibley East faced a fourth-
and-five at the NYA 29-yard
line when senior running
back Erik Danielson took a
handoff and raced 29 yards
for a touchdown. The extra
point kick by senior Quentin
Gex was no good as the
Wolverines drew within 14-6
with 8:56 remaining in the
third quarter.
The Wolverines scored
their next touchdown, on a
fourth-and-two play, when
Danielson hit paydirt on a 5-
yard run. A pass for the two-
point conversion fell incom-
plete as Sibley East climbed
within 14-12 with 8:14 left in
the fourth frame.
Sibley East, one possession
later, scored the go-ahead
touchdown when Danielson
found the end zone on a 29-
yard run with just 4:33 re-
maining in the fourth quarter.
Senior Beau Swenson ran for
the two-point conversion as
the Wolverines grabbed a 20-
14 lead and eventual win.
“I thought we played very
well in all three phases of the
game in the second half, but
not so much so in the first
half,” said Sibley East head
coach Chuck Hartman.
“The  defense actually did not
play bad in the first half. We
just allowed them to make
some plays.   We knew we
had to clean those mistakes
up at halftime.  On offense,
we were not hitting the holes
with authority early on and
we also put ourselves in some
long yardage situations.  In
the second half we really got
after it.”
The Wolverine offense
compiled 248 total yards in
the victory.
Danielson sparked the
ground game with 25 carries
for 171 yards and three
touchdowns. Swenson con-
tributed eight rushes for 56
yards. Senior Alex Pedraza
added 20 yards on eight at-
tempts.
Senior quarterback Brody
Rodning did not complete a
pass in five attempts.
“The offensive line did a
nice job as did the tight ends
Colton Bates and Nick
Haupt,” said Hartman.  “Beau
Swenson ran hard and
blocked well and Alex Pe-
draza got us tough inside
yards when we needed.   Erik
Danielson made some great
runs because of those guys,
but a couple of his broken
tackles are what we call
‘weight room plays.’   He
broke the tackle and stiff-
armed the defender on the go-
ahead score because he
squats 500 pounds and cleans
300 pounds.   Beau Swenson
made a couple blocks be-
cause he was in the weight
room all summer.  It shows.”
The Sibley East defense
pitched a shutout during the
entire second half.
Senior Ben White led the
defense with seven solo tack-
les, eight assisted tackles, one
tackle for a loss, one quarter-
back sack and one forced
fumble. Senior Cordell Bates
collected two solo tackles,
three assisted tackles and one
quarterback sack while soph-
omore Logan Jorgenson had
two solo tackles and four as-
sisted tackles. Sophomore
Christian Figueroa recorded
three solo tackles and three
assisted tackles while sopho-
more Travis Schmidt added
five assisted tackles. 
“The defense really stepped
up and did their jobs,” Hart-
man said. “I thought the de-
fensive line played with bet-
ter pad leverage and the line-
backing corps was able to
flow and get into their run fits
better the second half.”
Hartman added, “Our kids
played with a lot of heart that
cannot be underestimated
how important heart is in
high school sports.”
The Wolverines will travel
to Le Sueur-Henderson at 7
p.m. Friday, Oct. 11.
SE football team rallies to
a 20-14 victory over NYA
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 10, 2013, page 7
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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Sibley County Court
Enterprise photo courtesy of Nathan Thompson
Kiss The Pig
First-year Sibley East Senior High Prin-
cipal Tim Schellhammer, left, was cho-
sen to Kiss The Pig during the Home-
coming Pepfest at the senior high
school in Arlington on Friday after-
noon, Oct. 4. Sibley East senior Nate
Frauendienst, right, held the pig during
the event.
The following misdemeanors,
petty misdemeanors and gross
misdemeanors were heard in Dis-
trict Court September 27-October
4: Minnesota State Patrol (MSP);
Sheriff’s Office, (SO); Department
of Natural Resources (DNR): MN
Department of Transportati on
(MNDOT):
Stacy A. Brossard, 39, Arling-
ton, failure to stop at stop signs or
stop lines, $135, Arlington PD;
John M. Caddell, 23, Arlington,
possess over 1.4 grams marijua-
na in motor vehicle, possession of
drug paraphernalia-use or pos-
session, $285, proof of insurance,
dismissed, Arlington PD; Jeffrey
D. Heger, 50, Buffalo, failure to
obey traffic signs on controlled
access highway, dismissed, Ar-
lington PD; Timothy R. Jahr, 52,
Arlington, speed, continued, un-
supervised probation six months,
pay costs, no moving violations,
remain law-abiding, $135, seat
belt required, dismissed, Arling-
ton PD; Aaron L. Leonard, 27,
Henderson, failure to stop at stop
signs or stop lines, $135, Arling-
ton PD; Dustin L. Meyer, 24, Ar-
lington, speed, $125, Arlington
PD; Catal i na Gonzal ez De
Jimenez, 32, Le Sueur, disorderly
conduct-brawling or fighting, stay
of imposition, supervised proba-
tion one year, sentence to service,
16 hours for indeterminate, no
contact wi th vi cti m(s), mental
health screening, follow recom-
mendations of evaluation, sign all
releases of information, no same
or similar, contact with probation,
follow all instructions of probation,
follow all conditions set forth in
the probation agreement, sign
probation agreement, remain law-
abiding, keep court/attorney in-
formed of current address, $85,
assault-inflect or attempt bodily
harm, dismissed, Gaylord PD;
David E. Kahle, 60, Le Sueur, fail
to yield right of way to driver on
right-controlled intersection, $135,
Gaylord PD; Celia Verdinez, 33,
Gaylord, proof of insurance, dis-
missed, failure to stop at stop
signs or stop lines. $135, Gaylord
PD; Daniel J. Larscheid, 39, White
Bear Lake. driving without a valid
license or vehicle class/type, con-
tinued, unsupervised probation
one year, pay costs, no driver li-
cense violations, no registration
violation, $100, failure to display
current regi strati on-expi red
plates, dismissed, Henderson PD;
Brianna L. Chose, 24, Fargo N.D.,
DWI, stay of imposition, unsuper-
vised probation one year, chemi-
cal dependency evaluation/treat-
ment within 60 days, may revert to
supervised probation if treatment
is recommended, follow recom-
mendations of evaluation, sign all
releases of information, attend
MADD impact panel, file proof
with court administration, keep
court/attorney informed of current
address, remain law-abiding, no
alcohol related traffic offenses or
controlled substances, no driver
license violations, no driving with-
out insurance, $385, DWI-alcohol
concentrati on 0.08 wi thi n two
hours, dismissed, MSP; Max V.
Doll. 60, Detroit Lakes, speed,
$125, MSP; Taylor E. Elliason, 20,
Northfield, speed, $145, MSP;
Jesse C. Gran, 22, Minnetonka,
speed, $135, MSP; Thomas B.
Hagen, 58, St. Bonifacius, speed,
$125, MSP; Michael J. Harazin,
54, Franklin, seat belt violation in
commercial vehicle, $110, MSP;
Joy A. Hoffman, 53, Redwood
Falls, speed, $135, MSP; Eugene
M. Schwarz, 79, Vernon Center,
speed, $125, MSP; Ross R.
Soukup, 38, Bird Island, seat belt
violation in commercial vehicle,
$110, MSP; Yen N. Vuong, 27,
Brooklyn Park, speed, $145, MSP;
Robert J. Weege, 42, Hutchinson,
driving after suspension, speed,
dismissed, MSP; Corey White, 32,
Carlsbad, speed, $225, MSP; An-
gela H. Vandusen-Dietrich, 39,
Henderson, animal ordinance,
$135, Henderson PD; Bradley D.
Atkins, 51, Belle Plaine, speed,
$135, SO; Anthony R. Bill, 34, St.
Paul, speed, $145, SO; Amanda
J. Eisel, 27, Cleveland, proof of in-
surance, duty to drive with due
care-speed greater than reason-
able, continued, unsupervised
probation one year, pay costs, re-
main law-abiding, no driving with-
out insurance, $225, SO; Denise
M. Hertzog, 53, Watertown, dam-
age to property-reduce val ue
$501-$1000, stay of imposition,
supervised probation two years,
sentence to service 20 days for
indeterminate, contact with pro-
bation, follow all conditions set
forth in the probation agreement,
follow all instructions of probation,
sign probation agreement, sign all
releases of information, pay resti-
tution, pay restitution before fines,
fees and surcharges, diagnostic
assessment, follow recommenda-
tion of evaluation, $800, SO; Yuri-
ana B. S. Padron, 18, Glencoe,
driving without a valid licence or
vehicle class/type, continued, un-
supervised probation one year,
pay costs, obtain driver’s license,
remain law-abiding, no driver li-
cense violations, $185, uninsured
vehicle, dismissed, SO; Cameo R.
Wickenhauser, 20, Chaska, liquor
consumption by persons under
21, $185, SO.
The following felonies were
heard in District Court September
27-October 4:
Denise M. Hertzog, 53, Water-
town, burgl ary-dwel l i ng, di s-
missed, SO.
Nearly one-third of car-
deer collisions each year
occur between now and No-
vember, said the Minnesota
Department of Natural Re-
sources (DNR), citing a na-
tional report.
Minnesota is ranked eighth
when it comes to car-deer
crash totals, according to
State Farm Insurance, which
tracks the trends nationwide.
Most states, the company re-
ports, are seeing a decline in
their numbers. There are two
exceptions: Wyoming and
Minnesota.
Though most people would
expect these crashes to be
more likely in rural areas,
motorists in urban regions of
the state also need to watch
out for these dangerous —
and sometimes deadly — ac-
cidents involving deer. Min-
nesota has 3 million drivers
and 136,000 miles of road-
way.
More than 20,000 deer-ve-
hicle accidents are reported
annually, according to the
Minnesota Department of
Transportation.
While trying to predict
when and where a deer and
motorist will meet is an im-
possible task, drivers who un-
derstand how deer behave are
more likely to avoid a crash.
The DNR advises motorists
to use these driving tips to
help avoid collisions with
deer:
See the signs. Deer-cross-
ing signs are posted in high-
risk areas. Drive with cau-
tion, especially in the posted
areas.
Deer don’t roam alone.
Deer often run together. If
one deer is near or crossing
the road, expect that others
will follow.
Danger from dusk to dawn.
Watch for deer especially at
dawn and after sunset. About
20 percent of these crashes
occur in early morning, while
more than half occur between
5 p.m. and midnight.
Safety begins behind the
wheel. Always wear safety
belts and drive at safe, sensi-
ble speeds for road condi-
tions.
If a vehicle strikes a deer,
motorists should report the
crash by calling local law en-
forcement, the sheriff’s de-
partment, or the Minnesota
State Patrol. By following
these tips and maximizing
one’s situational awareness, it
becomes less likely to experi-
ence a deer-vehicle crash.
Avoid deer-vehicle crashes this fall
With Minnesota’s small
game hunting season under-
way and the firearm deer sea-
son set to begin Nov. 9, the
Minnesota Department of
Natural Resources (DNR)
says making a blaze orange
fashion statement this fall
might not get you on the best-
dressed list, but it just might
save your life.
“Wearing blaze orange
clothing is a safety require-
ment to hunt or trap during
Minnesota’s small game sea-
son or deer season,” said
Capt. Mike Hammer, DNR
enforcement education pro-
gram coordinator. “It’s im-
portant to be seen by others.”
Small Game Seasons: At
least one visible article of
clothing above the waist must
be blaze orange when taking
small game, except when
hunting wild turkeys, migra-
tory birds, raccoons, preda-
tors, when hunting by falcon-
ry, trapping or while hunting
deer by archery while station-
ary.
Deer Season: The visible
portion of a cap and outer
clothing above the waist, ex-
cluding sleeves and gloves,
must be blaze orange when
hunting or trapping during
any open season where deer
may be taken by firearms (in-
cluding special hunts, early
antlerless, youth seasons and
muzzleloader). Blaze orange
includes a camouflage pattern
of at least 50 percent blaze
orange within each square
foot. This restriction does not
apply to migratory bird
hunters on waters or in sta-
tionary shooting locations or
to trappers on waters.
“The failure to wear blaze
orange puts a hunter in jeop-
ardy of not being seen by
someone who does not take
the time to properly identify
their target and what’s be-
yond it,” Hammer said.
Hammer recommends
faded blaze orange garments
be replaced.
“Blaze orange, more than
any other color, is the most
easily seen and recognized
bright, unnatural color
against a natural back-
ground,” Hammer said. “This
shade of orange is the only
satisfactory color for hunters
to wear under all weather and
light conditions. The color of
the cap, vest, or coat should
be plainly visible from all
sides while it is being worn.”
From the standpoint of
hunter safety, the wearing of
this high-visibility color
while deer hunting and while
small game hunting in heavy
cover, such as for grouse and
pheasant, is a great communi-
cations tool.
“Blaze orange clothing is a
tremendous aid in helping
hunters maintain visual con-
tact with one another, particu-
larly when moving through
dense cover or woods,” Ham-
mer said. “Any hunter who
has ever identified someone
strictly by seeing blaze or-
ange knows its value in keep-
ing track of other hunters in
the field.”
For those that use ground
blinds, Hammer said to re-
member to place some blaze
orange on the outside of the
blind for others to see. Tent
style blinds can fully conceal
even the best dressed hunter.
Some safety tips for non-
hunters:
Wear bright clothing.
Choose colors that stand out,
like red, orange or green, and
avoid white, blacks, browns,
earth-toned greens and ani-
mal-colored clothing. Blaze
orange vests and hats are ad-
visable.
Don’t forget to protect pets.
Get an orange vest for an ac-
companying dog.
Make noise. Whistle, sing
or carry on a conversation
when walking to alert hunters
that someone is in the area.
Sound carries well across
woods and forests, and
hunters should listen for any
sounds of animal movement.
Be courteous. Don’t make
unnecessary noise to disturb
wildlife. Avoid confronta-
tions.
Make presence known. If a
nonhunter hears shooting, the
person should raise their
voice and let hunters know
they’re in vicinity.
Know the dates of hunting
seasons. Learn about where
and when hunting is taking
place.
If hunting makes a non-
hunter uneasy, the nonhunter
should choose a hike in a lo-
cation where hunting is not
allowed.
Blaze orange safety requirements
reduce hunting accidents, DNR says
For the first time since sur-
plus permits were offered in
2007, no leftover either-sex
deer permits are available for
purchase after the lottery
deadline, the Minnesota De-
partment of Natural Re-
sources (DNR) said.
The DNR offered 38,850
either-sex permits in 58 deer
permit areas this year. Every
permit area received applica-
tions for at least 100 percent
of the permits available.
In lottery deer areas,
firearm and muzzleloader li-
cense holders who intend to
take an antlerless deer must
have an either-sex permit;
otherwise, they are restricted
to hunting bucks. The total
bag limit for deer in lottery
areas is one deer per year.
Availability of leftover per-
mits has declined since the
development of the hunter
choice management designa-
tion, which was first used in
2011. Similar to lottery areas,
hunter choice-designated
areas have a bag limit of one
deer; however, no limit is
placed on the number of
available either-sex permits
and lottery applications are
not required.
No surplus either-sex deer
permits available for 2013
The results of recent fall
test netting on Leech Lake
conducted by the Minnesota
Department of Natural Re-
sources (DNR) show the
walleye population remains
strong and anglers who visit
Leech Lake should continue
to expect quality fishing.
Lake-wide, walleye counts
in DNR test nets averaged 8.9
walleye per net lift, which
was similar to results from
the past 5 years and was
above the long-term average
of 7.7 walleye per net lift.
“September gill nets
showed above-average num-
bers of all sizes of walleye,”
said Doug Schultz, DNR area
fisheries supervisor in Walk-
er. “Fishing reports have been
excellent all season, and this
survey confirms that good
walleye fishing is expected to
continue through the winter
and into next year.”
Schultz added that the
strong 2010 year class
reached harvestable sizes this
summer, which “had a lot to
do with angling success.” Ad-
ditionally, 36 percent of wall-
eye sampled were within the
current slot limit and have
provided anglers the opportu-
nity to catch larger fish.
The DNR is considering re-
laxing the current 18- to 26-
inch protected slot limit on
Leech Lake to a 20- to 26-
inch protected slot limit. If
the proposal is carried for-
ward, the relaxed slot limit
would be effective for the
2014 fishing opener.
“The proposed change in
the slot limit would allow an-
glers the opportunity to add
18 and 19-inch walleye to
their bag,” said Schultz.
“These fish comprise about
one-third of walleye currently
protected with the existing
18- to 26-inch slot limit.”
Schultz noted this regula-
tion review and potential re-
laxation of the slot limit was
programmed into the current
management plan. The man-
agement plan detailed that if
walleye population objectives
were met or exceeded and all
metrics indicated the walleye
population could sustain in-
creased harvest opportunity,
the DNR would consider re-
laxing the slot limit. Results
of this year’s survey indicate
the timing of this review is
appropriate.
Other game fish species
targeted with test nets include
yellow perch and northern
pike. Yellow perch abundance
declined for the sixth consec-
utive year, while northern
pike abundance continues to
remain stable. The primary
species of nongame fish as-
sessed with the test nets is
cisco. Fall test netting indi-
cated cisco continue to be
present at moderate levels of
abundance.
Strong walleye population continues in Leech Lake
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 10, 2013, page 8
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
A ߣ11£a WAv To ArrLv
This fall, take advantage
of Mid-County Agronomy's
EOUAPLY Anhydrous
Ammonia Application
8ystem.
8ecure Your Anhydrous
Todayl Call us at:
{952} 466-3730
www.midcountycoop.com
*/.JE$PVOUZ
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8
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1
S
E
a
Ag Bag Disposal at
Hutchinson Coop
in Arlington! (It’s Free!)
Sibley County - Ag Bag Collection at the
Hutchinson Coop in Arlington
(23189 State Hwy 5)
The Entire Month of October 2013!!!
For more information, contact the Sibley
County Environmental Services at 507-237-4091
Tri-County Solid Waste Office at 507-381-9196
PLEASE NOTE!
THIS IS A COLLECTION FOR
AGRICULTURE AND SEED BAG
WASTE ONLY.
NO COMMERCIAL or RESIDENTIAL
GARBAGE, CHEMICALS or BULBS.
NO HAZARDOUS WASTE
WILL BE ACCEPTED.
NO HERBICIDES OR PESTICIDES
WILL BE ACCEPTED.
ABUSE OF THIS PILOT PROJECT
WILL RESULT IN TERMINATION OF
THIS PROGRAM.
Hutchinson Coop has agreed to
keep a roll-off container at their
facility for the entire month of
October 2013 so that Sibley
County Farmer’s will have a place
to dispose of their Ag Bags at no
charge. Simply bring your old Ag
Bags to Arlington and drop them
off at no charge to you.
A40-42E,41-42Sa
Property Taxes Due
The second half payment of your
non-agricultural 2013 real estate tax is
due on or before October 15, 2013
Please be sure to:
Include your payment stubs.
Sign your check.
Have your payment postmarked or
presented in person by the due date.
Please check your statement for the due
date for your property. Late payments
will be assessed a penalty.
Go to www.co.sibley.mn.us for more
information.
Mary Fisher
Sibley County Treasurer
A40Ea
w w w . a r l i n g t o n
m n n e w s . c o m
Legals
NOTICE OF MORTGAGE
FORECLOSURE SALE
THE RIGHT OF VERIFICA-
TION OF THE DEBT AND IDEN-
TITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDI-
TOR WITHIN THE TIME PRO-
VIDED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECT-
ED BY THIS ACTION.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
that default has occurred in condi-
tions of the following described
mortgage:
DATE OF MORTGAGE: No-
vember 28, 2007
MORTGAGOR: Eric D. Hen-
drickson and Michelle M. Hen-
drickson, husband and wife.
MORTGAGEE: Washi ngton
Mutual Bank, FA.
DATE AND PLACE OF
RECORDING: Filed December
20, 2007, Sibley County Registrar
of Titles, Document No. T-20099
on Certificate of Title No. 6813.0
ASSIGNMENTS OF MORT-
GAGE: Assigned to: JPMorgan
Chase Bank, National Association.
Dated July 16, 2013 Filed August
5, 2013, as Document No.
T22892.
Sai d Mortgage bei ng upon
Registered Land.
TRANSACTION AGENT:
NONE
TRANSACTION AGENT’S
MORTGAGE IDENTIFICATION
NUMBER ON MORTGAGE:
NONE
LENDER OR BROKER AND
MORTGAGE ORIGINATOR
STATED ON MORTGAGE: Wash-
ington Mutual Bank, FA
RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE
SERVICER: JPMorgan Chase
Bank, National Association
MORTGAGE PROPERTY AD-
DRESS: 318 10th Street, Gaylord,
MN 55334
TAX PARCEL I.D. #:
320507000
LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
Lot 13 and the South 25 feet of
Lot 14, in Block 50, in Second
West Addition to the City of Gay-
lord, Sibley County, Minnesota
COUNTY IN WHICH PROPER-
TY IS LOCATED: Sibley
ORIGINAL PRINCIPAL
AMOUNT OF MORTGAGE:
$129,600.00
AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED
TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF
NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF
ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE:
$125,441.71
That prior to the commence-
ment of this mortgage foreclosure
proceeding Mortgagee/Assignee
of Mortgagee complied with all no-
tice requirements as required by
statute; That no action or proceed-
ing has been instituted at law or
otherwise to recover the debt se-
cured by said mortgage, or any
part thereof;
PURSUANT to the power of
sale contained in said mortgage,
the above described property will
be sol d by the Sheri ff of sai d
county as follows:
DATE AND TIME OF SALE:
November 15, 2013 at 10:00 AM
PLACE OF SALE: Sheriff’s Of-
fice, Sheriff’s Department, 310
Park Avenue, Gaylord, MN
to pay the debt then secured by
said Mortgage, and taxes, if any,
on said premises, and the costs
and disbursements, including at-
torneys’ fees allowed by law sub-
ject to redemption within six (6)
months from the date of said sale
by the mortgagor(s), their person-
al representatives or assigns un-
less reduced to Five (5) weeks
under MN Stat. §580.07.
TIME AND DATE TO VACATE
PROPERTY: If the real estate is
an owner-occupied, single-family
dwelling, unless otherwise provid-
ed by law, the date on or before
which the mortgagor(s) must va-
cate the property if the mortgage
is not reinstated under section
580.30 or the property is not re-
deemed under section 580.23 is
11:59 p.m. on May 15, 2014, un-
less that date falls on a weekend
or legal holiday, in which case it is
the next weekday, and unless the
redemption period is reduced to 5
weeks under MN Stat. Secs.
580.07 or 582.032.
MORTGAGOR(S) RELEASED
FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGATION
ON MORTGAGE: None
“THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW
FOR REDEMPTION BY THE
MORTGAGOR, THE MORT-
GAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRE-
SENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS, MAY
BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS
IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS EN-
TERED UNDER MINNESOTA
STATUTES, SECTION 582.032,
DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER
THINGS, THAT THE MORT-
GAGED PREMISES ARE IM-
PROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL
DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE
UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY
USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRO-
DUCTION, AND ARE ABAN-
DONED.”
Dated: September 12, 2013
JPMorgan Chase Bank,
National Association
Mortgagee/Assignee of Mort-
gagee
USSET, WEINGARDEN AND
LIEBO, P.L.L.P.
Attorneys for Mortgagee/Assignee
of Mortgagee
4500 Park Glen Road #300
Minneapolis, MN 55416
(952) 925-6888
30 – 13-005754FC
THIS IS A COMMUNICATION
FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR.
Publish: September 26, Octo-
ber 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31, 2013
Certificate of Assumed Name
State Of Minnesota
1. List the exact assumed name
under which the business will be
conducted: Simply Divine Design
& Photography
2. Principal place of business:
20784 425th Ave., Arlington, MN
55307
3. List the name and complete
street address of all persons con-
ducting business under the above
Assumed Name: Kel l i Berger,
20784 425th Ave., Arlington, MN
55307
4. I, the undersigned, certify
that I am signing this document as
the person whose signature is re-
quired. I understand that by sign-
ing this document I am subject to
the penalties of perjury as set
forth in Section 609.48 as if I had
signed this document under oath.
Dated: August 22, 2013
/s/ Kelli Berger
Owner
(952) 200-2008
Publish: October 3 and 10,
2013
TITLE AND SUMMARY OF
ORDINANCE 283
THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE
CITY OF ARLINGTON, MIN-
NESOTA, DOES ORDAIN AS
FOLLOWS:
AN ORDINANCE TO REGU-
LATE THE KEEPING OF ANI-
MALS WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS
OF ARLINGTON. THIS ORDI-
NANCE SUPERSEDES ORDI-
NANCES 172, 185, 186 AND 206
IN THEIR ENTIRETY
“On October 7, 2013, the City
Council of the City of Arlington ap-
proved Ordinance 283 entitled ‘An
Ordinance to Regulate the Keep-
ing of Animals within the City Lim-
its of Arlington. This Ordinance
Supersedes Ordinances 172, 185,
186 and 206 in their Entirety’. The
Ordinance in its entirety is avail-
able for review and/or photocopy-
ing during regular office hours at
the City of Arlington, 204 Sham-
rock Drive, Arlington, Minnesota
55307. Ordinance 283 amends or-
dinance 206, deleting paragraph
11 referring to the Arlington Animal
Clinic as the impoundment site,
and states that the City will not
pick up stray animals. Some ref-
erences to veteri nari ans were
deleted in paragraph 12.”
This ordinance shall become
effective after summary publica-
tion.
For the City of Arlington:
/s/ James R. Kreft
By James R. Kreft
tt’s Mayor
/s/ Liza M. Donabauer
By Liza M. Donabauer
Its City Administrator
First Reading: September 16,
2013
Second Reading: October 7,
2013
Adopted: October 7, 2013
Publish: October 10, 2013
Pedal Pull Trophies
Enterprise photo by Megan Bennett
Mason Meyer, a third grade student at
the Sibley East Elementary School in
Gaylord, performed well during the re-
cent state, national and international
pedal pulls. Meyer placed third in his
age division at the State Pedal Pull in
Hutchinson. He placed fourth at the Na-
tional Pedal Pull in Mitchell, S.D. Meyer
also placed third at the International
Pedal Pull in Fairfield, Iowa. He is the
son of William and Sonya Meyer, Gay-
lord.
By Gary Wyatt
U of M Extension
Trees and other perennial
plants are visibly stressed this
fall primarily due to drought
conditions from the past two
or more years. Tree stress
symptoms include abundant
seed production, leaf scorch,
early fall colors, leaf drop,
limb die back and yellowing
or browning of leaves/nee-
dles. Trees and shrubs, espe-
cially conifer trees and trees
and shrubs planted in the last
three years should be watered
generously until the soil
freezes. Mulching newly
planted trees will help reduce
winter root damage.
Young maples and thinned
barked trees may benefit
from some kind of sunscald
protection to prevent the bark
from cracking this winter and
spring. This protection is
usually in the form of a plas-
tic tube or tree wrap (remove
in spring). These practices
can also help in reducing
winter animal damage. Other
fall management practices
which will help reduce winter
damage to trees and shrubs
can be found at
http://z.umn.edu/winterdam-
age
Protecting trees from rab-
bits, mice, voles and deer is a
major concern in some land-
scapes during the winter.
Mow or remove tall grass to
reduce mice and vole dam-
age. If the bark is removed
or severely damaged around
the tree, it will die. Protec-
tive physical barriers such as
tree tubes, hardware cloth or
fencing can be done when
practical.
Odor, taste and visual re-
pellents can be used to repel
many wildlife species, but
may have inconsistent effec-
tiveness. Human hair, soaps,
garlic oil, hot sauce and ani-
mal repellents can be applied
to branches and foliage to
discourage browsing. Weath-
er, application frequency, ani-
mal population and feeding
pressure affect the success of
repellents. Some animals be-
come desensitized to the re-
pellent, so you may want to
alternate repellents. A web
resource that reviews preven-
tion and control of wildlife
damage can be found at
http://z.umn.edu/critters
If you’re unsure what is
causing problems in your
landscape, Extension has a
great website to help home-
owners diagnose tree, shrub
and plant problems or identi-
fying a weed or insect. This
site also has links to the UM
Plant Disease Clinic and Soil
Testing Lab.
http://z.umn.edu/diagnose
Fall is also a good time to
plant trees (water till the soil
freezes). Recommended trees
for all regions of Minnesota
can be found at
http://z.umn.edu/rectrees The
best time to prune trees is
during the dormant season
from January to March.
Flowering shrubs can be
pruned in the summer after
flowering.
Water trees and perennials this fall
W W W . A R L I N G TO N M N N E W S . C O M
Sounds like
multiplication?
It’s newspaper
talk for a one
column by 4
inch ad. Too
small to be
effective?
You’re
reading
this one!
Put your 1x4
in the
Arlington
Enterprise
today.
507-964-5547
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 10, 2013, page 9
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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MISCELLANEOUS AUTOS WANTED
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McGraw Monument
Works, Inc., LeSueur
Local Representative
Leah Schrupp
Arlington, MN 55307
612-308-8169
3 miles North of LeSueur
on Highway 169
30945 Forest Prairie Road
(507) 665-3126
HOURS: M-F 8-5
Weekends by appointment.
Visit our
INDOOR AND OUTDOOR
DISPLAYS
A32-27eowEa
Blessings
It is the Lord your God you must follow, and him you must revere.
Keep his commands and obey him; serve him and hold fast to him.
Deuteronomy 13:4 NIV
Peace Lutheran (Missouri Synod)
Arlington
Pastor Kurt Lehmkuhl
Worship: Sunday 9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:15 a.m.
Commercial and Industrial Builders
Green Isle, MN 55338
ph. 507.326.7901 fax: 507.326.3551
www.vosconstruction.com
Arlington State Bank
Serving the Community Since 1895
BANKING SERVICES
964-2256
Arlington
A & N Radiator Repair
Allen & Nicki Scharn, Owners
23228 401 Ave., Arlington
877-964-2281 or 507-964-2281 Bus.
Certified ASE Technician on Staff
Also distributor for Poxy Coat II
Industrial Grade Coatings/Paint
MID-COUNTY
CO-OP
700 W. Lake St., Box 177
Cologne, MN 55322
(952) 466-3700
or TOLL FREE: 1-888-466-3700
HUTCHINSON CO-OP
AGRONOMY
LEON DOSE,
Arlington Branch Manager
411 7
th
Ave. NW • (507) 964-2251
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
402 W. Alden, Arlington
507-964-5547
Online at
www.Arlington
MNnew.com
Arlington Haus
Your Hometown Pub & Eatery
1986-2009
Arlington • 1-507-964-2473
STATE BANK OF
HAMBURG
100 Years. 100 Reasons.
Phone 952-467-2992
statebankofhamburg.com
CONVENIENCE
STORE
Hwy. 5 N., Arlington
507-964-2920
Homestyle Pizza
Real or Soft Serve Ice Cream
Gas – Diesel – Deli – Videos
(507)
964-2212
www.
chefcraigs
.com
23180 401 Ave., Arlington Phone 507-964-2264
EQUAL
HOUSING
LENDER
CRAIG BULLERT
ARLINGTON, MN
23189 Hwy. 5 North,
Arlington, MN 55307
arlington@hutchcoop.com
Office (507) 964-2283
Cell (320) 583-4324
HC
FUNERAL SERVICE
P.O. Box 314
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-2201
Member
FDIC
Church News
Menus
SENIOR DINING
Call 326-3401 for a meal
Suggested Donation $3.85
Meals are served at Highland
Commons dining room
Monday-Friday
Monday: Tator Tot casserole,
green beans, peaches, bread with
margarine, pudding, low fat milk.
Tuesday: Bratwurst, whole po-
tatoes, buttered cooked cabbage,
bun, margarine, dessert, low fat
milk.
Wednesday: Lasagna, Califor-
ni a bl end vegetabl es, l ettuce
salad with dressing, garlic bread
with margarine, bar, low fat milk.
Thursday: Oven crispy chicken,
mashed potatoes wi th gravy,
mixed vegetables, bread with mar-
garine, poke cake, low fat milk.
Friday: Meaty beef stew with
carrots and potatoes, cole slaw,
breadstick with margarine, ba-
nana, low fat milk.
SIBLEY EAST ELEMENTARY
BREAKFAST MENU
Arlington and Gaylord
Breakfast is served at 8:00 a.m.
daily. A 1/2 pint of milk is served
with each meal daily. Menu is sub-
ject to change.
Monday: Pop Tart, cheese stick,
juice, milk.
Tuesday: Mini pancakes, juice,
milk.
Wednesday: No School.
Thursday: No School.
Friday: No School.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Arlington
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: Sub sandwich, chips,
fixings, orange smiles, milk.
Tuesday: Pizza, lettuce salad,
fruit, milk.
Wednesday: No School.
Thursday: No School.
Friday: No School.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Gaylord
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: Sub sandwich, fixings,
corn, fruit, milk.
Alternate: Grilled chicken.
Tuesday: Pi zza, Romai ne
salad, green beans, fruit, milk.
Alternate: Egg omelet.
Wednesday: No School.
Thursday: No School.
Friday: No School.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
(507) 304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
507-234-6770
Saturday: Church services at
9:30 a.m. Bible study at 11:00
a.m. Fellowship dinner at 12:00
p.m. All are welcome.
UNITED METHODIST
Arlington
Rodney J. Stemme, Pastor
wwwarlingtonunited
methodist.org
Saturday, October 12: 8:00
a.m. A-Men men’s group. 10:00
a.m. Womens Bible study at
Bette Nelson’s. Pastor on mis-
sion trip October 12-20
Sunday, October 13: 9:00 &
11:00 a.m. Worship. 10:15 a.m.
Sunday school.
Tuesday, October 15: 7:30
p.m. Ad. Council.
Wednesday, October 16: 7:00
p.m. Choir.
Thursday, October 17: 10:00
a.m., 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. Wor-
ship on cable TV. 1:00 and 7:00
p.m. Women’s Bible study at
Jean Olson’s.
ST. PAUL LUTHERAN
(WELS),
Arlington
Bruce Hannemann, Pastor
WEBSITE:
www.stpaularlington.com
EMAIL:
Bruce.Hannemann@stpaul
arlington.com
Saturday, October 12: 9:00
a.m -3:00 p.m. Outreach at Red-
wood Falls.
Sunday, October 13: 8:45
a.m. Sunday school. 9:00 a.m.
Family Bible study. 10:00 a.m.
Worship.
Monday, October 14: 7:00
p.m. Council meeting.
Tuesday, October 15: Raking
day at school. 8:45 a. m.
M.O.M.’s meeting. 10:00 a.m.
Good Samaritan Services.
Wednesday, October 16: No
School. 2:00 p.m. Bible study.
Thursday, October 17: No
School. 10:00 a.m. Bulletin in-
formation due. 11:00 a.m. and
3:00 p.m. services on cable TV
channel 8.
Friday, October 18: No
School.
GAYLORD ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
Gaylord
Bob Holmbeck, Pastor
Friday, October 11: Duca
Bible study, Farmington leave
church at 5:30 p.m.
Sunday, October 13: 9:00
a.m. Sunday school. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday worship service.
Wednesday, October 16: 6:30
p.m. Evening Bible classes and
Youth Focused. 8:00 p.m. Sup-
per welcome!
ST. PAUL’S UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Henderson
(507) 248-3594 (Office)
Rev. Brigit Stevens, Pastor
Find us on Facebook:
St. Paul’s UCC - Henderson
Sunday, October 13: 9:00-
9:50 a.m. Sunday school. 10:00
a.m. Worship.
ST. PAUL’S EV.
REFORMED CHURCH
15470 Co. Rd. 31, Hamburg
Dan Schnabel, Pastor
952-467-3878
www.stpaulsrcus.org
Sunday, October 13: 8:30
a.m. Sunday school and Bible
study. 9:30 a.m. Worship serv-
ice.
Tuesday, October 15: 7:30
p.m. Men’s Brotherhood.
Wednesday, October 16: 6:30
p.m. Catechism class.
ORATORY OF
ST. THOMAS
THE APOSTLE
Jessenland
507-248-3550
Fr. Sam Perez
Thursday: Weekly Mass at
5:00 p.m.
ST. MARY, MICHAEL
AND BRENDAN AREA
FAITH COMMUNITY
Fr. Keith Salisbury, Pastor
Friday, October 11: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar).
Saturday, October 12: 5:00
p.m. Mass (Mar).
Sunday, October 13: 7:30
a.m. Mass (Bre). 9:00-10:15
a.m. Elementary religious edu-
cation/youth Mass (Mar). 9:00
a.m. Mass (Mic). 10:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar).
Monday, October 14: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre and Mar). 8:00
p.m. AA and AlaNon (Mar).
Tuesday, October 15: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre and Mar).
Wednesday, October 16: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m. Word
and Communion (Oak Terrace).
5:00 p.m. Mass (Mar). No Jr./Sr.
High religious education (Mar).
Thursday, October 17: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre and Mic). 7:30
p. m. Narcotics Anonymous
(Mic).
TRINITY LUTHERAN
32234 431st Ave., Gaylord
Rev. James Snyder,
Interim Pastor
Saturday, October 12: 8:30
a. m. Minnesota Valley Fall
Gathering at Christ Lutheran at
Glencoe.
Sunday, October 13: 10:00
a.m. Worship.
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Pastor William Postel
Phone 507-964-2400
Sunday, October 13: 9:00
a.m. Bible class. 10:00 a.m.
Worship with Holy Communion.
Thursday, October 17: 5:30
p.m. Deadline for bulletin infor-
mation.
EVANGELICAL
COVENANT CHURCH
107 W. Third St., Winthrop
Pastor Kyle Kachelmeier
(507) 647- 5777
Parsonage (507) 647-3739
www.wincov.org
Saturday, October 12: 9:30
a.m - 3:00 p.m. Seminar entitled
“The Power of Forgiveness”.
Sunday, October 13: 9:30
a.m. Worship. 10:45 a.m. Sun-
day school.
Tuesday, October 15: 7:00
p.m. Women’s Ministry meet-
ing.
Wednesday, October 16: 9:00
a.m. Prayer coffee. 6:00 p.m.
AWANA.
Thursday, October 17: No
MOPS this week. MOPS is on
the 24th. 9:30 a.m. Women’s
Bible study. 7:00 p.m. Men’s
Ministry--date change.
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN
Green Isle
Pastor Eric W. Rapp
Friday, October 11: 10:00
a.m. Deadline for Sunday bul-
letin.
Sunday, October 13: 9:00
a.m. LWML Sunday. Worship
with Communion. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday school. 10:15 a.m. Bible
Study. 3:30 p.m. Bible study
with pastor. 4:30 p.m Joint choir
practice.
Tuesday, October 15: 7:00
p.m. LWML meeting. 8:00 p.m.
Joint Elders meeting.
Wednesday, October 16: 6:30
p.m. Confirmation class. 6:30-
7:30 p.m. Wed. night school
grades 1-5.
PEACE LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Kurt Lehmkuhl, Pastor
Saturday, October 12: 5:00
p.m Worship service with Holy
Communion.
Sunday, October 13: 8:15
a.m. Sunday school. 9:30 a.m.
Worship service with Holy
Communion.
Wednesday, October 16: 3:45
p.m. Catechism.
Thursday, October 17: 7:30
p.m. Church Council meeting.
ZION LUTHERAN
814 W. Brooks St.
Arlington – (507) 964-5454
James Carlson, Pastor
Sunday, October 13: 9:00
a.m. Worship with Holy Com-
munion. 10:00 a.m. Fellowship,
Sunday school.
Tuesday, October 15: 6:00-
7:00 p.m. TOPS in church base-
ment.
Thursday, October 17: 9:00
a.m. and 1:00 p.m. Zion service
on cable.
ZION LUTHERAN
Green Isle Township
Pastor Eric W. Rapp
Friday, October 11: 10:00
a.m. Deadline for Sunday bul-
letin.
Sunday, October 13: 10:30
a.m. Worship. 3:30 p.m. Bible
study at St. Paul’s with pastor.
4:30 p.m. Joint choir practice at
St. Paul’s.
Monday, October 14: 8:00
p.m. Zion Voters’ meeting.
Tuesday, October 15: 7:00
p.m. LWML at St. Paul’s. 8:00
p.m. Joint Elders meeting at St.
Paul’s.
Wednesday, October 16: 6:30
p.m. Confirmation class at St.
Paul’s. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Wed.
night school grades 1-5 at St.
Paul’s.
CREEKSIDE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Christian & Missionary
Alliance
Dr. Bill Kuhn,
Interim Pastor
114 Shamrock Drive
Arlington – 507-964-2872
email: creeksidecc@media-
combb.net.
Sunday, October 13: 10:30
a.m. Worship service.
Wednesday, October 16: 7:00-
8:30 p.m. R.E.A.C.H. Youth
Group at Terry and Becky
Shogren’s home, 6th through
12th grade.
Thursday, October 17: 6:30
p. m. Men’s Bible study at
Chuck Peik’s home. 7:00 p.m.
Women’s Bible study, “Revela-
tion” at Jean Olson’s home.
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402 W Alden St. • Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-5547
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Arlington ENTERPRISE
Your opinion is something we
always want to hear.
Contact us with feedback.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 10, 2013, page 10
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
LIESKE TRACTOR
Wanted: Your OLD TRACTORS,
any condition, make or model. We
also specialize in new and used
TRACTOR PARTS AND REPAIR.
Call Kyle. Located west of Hen-
derson. (612) 203-9256.
AUTOMOTIVE
Parts, Repair
$$ DOLLARS PAID $$ Junk vehi-
cles, repairable cars/trucks. FREE
TOWING. Flatbed/ wrecker serv-
ice. Immediate pick up. Monday-
Sunday, serving your area 24/7.
(952) 220-TOWS.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
CONKLIN© DEALERS NEEDED!
Lifetime career in marketing, man-
agement and applying “Green”
products made in America. Full
time/ part time. For a free catalog
call Franke’s Conklin Service now
at (320) 238-2370. www.franke-
marketing.com.
Dairy crop farm help wanted. High
school students or retired farmers
may apply, too. (507) 964-5223.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
EARN EXTRA CASH $150 PLUS
PER MONTH WHILE HAVING
FUN VOLUNTEERING Lutheran
Social Service of MN is looking for
caring individuals to serve individ-
uals in McLeod County. Senior
Companions are needed to pro-
vi de compani onshi p to ol der
adults. Volunteers earn a tax-free
stipend, travel reimbursement,
other benefi ts. Contact Gai l
Sumerfelt at 507-337-0382 or 507-
530-2295.
Immediate openings in Winsted.
RNs and LPNs for Home Care.
Part-time positions with young
adul t femal e cl i ent. Pri mari l y
weekday eveni ngs, 4 p.m.- 12
a.m.; Every third Saturday, 8 a.m.-
12 a.m. Please contact Communi-
ti es of Care (651) 482-0549,
www.communitiesofcaremn.com.
Want to have fun while you work?
Love working with children? Our
Christ-centered daycare has im-
mediate openings for a full time
and part time provider to care for
our children. Call (952) 467-2788.
Or send letter of interest to SON-
shine House, 18175 County Road
50, Hamburg, MN or email pas-
tor@elchamburg.org.
Work Wanted
HANDYMAN: Will do remodeling
of kitchens, bathrooms, hanging
doors and wi ndows, pai nti ng,
sheet rocking, texturizing or any
minor repairs inside or outside.
Wi l l al so do cl eani ng of base-
ments/garages. Call (320) 848-
2722 or (320) 583-1278.
FOR SALE
Clothing
Genuine Harley Davidson leather
jacket, men’s size XL. Brand new
condition, $350. (507) 317-7307.
Genuine Harley Davidson leather
vest, men’s size XXL. Brand new
condition. $150. (507) 317-7307.
Heating/Air Conditioning
Special-95% Goodman gas fur-
nace and programmable thermo-
stat, $2,200 installed or AC unit,
$1,900 installed. J&R Plumbing
Heating AC, Lester Prairie (320)
510-5035.
Wanted To Buy
BUYING JUNK BATTERIES
We buy used batteries. Paying
$10 for automotive batteries. We
pick up. Call 800-777-2243.
LIVESTOCK, PETS
Cattle
Miniature Hereford cattle. Cows,
heifers, steers, bulls, 218 Cattle
Company. (507) 964-2544, leave
message.
REAL ESTATE
Mobile Homes
1993 Liberty. Glencoe. 3BR. All
appliances. New furnace. Easy fi-
nance. (612) 759-9161.
www.swsales.org.
RENTAL
Apartment
Village Cooperative of Hutchinson
(320) 234-7761. 55+ Senior living.
Three units available (3-2BR, 1-
1BR.) Call for your tour! Come in
and check out the wonderful incen-
tives offers and learn how you can
save over $8,000! Equal Housing
Opportunity.
Duplex, 2BR, oversized garage,
W/D on main level, AC, Arlington.
No smoking or pets. $600 rent plus
utilities and deposit. (952) 758-7622.
Glencoe Towns Edge Estates has
a 2BR & 3BR available soon. In-
cludes heat, water, garbage and
sewer. We accept cats and small
dogs. (320) 864-6600.
Updated, spacious one and two BR
apartments in Renville. Includes heat,
water garbage. New stove, fridge, air
conditioner. Pet-friendly. Call (320)
564-3351 for appointment.
House
1, 2, 3 or 4 bedroom houses for
rent in Olivia. Call (320) 212-3217.
Want To Rent
Father and Son Operation look-
ing for farmland to rent. Call (320)
523-1116 or (320) 522-0272.
Wanted: Farmland to rent 2014
and beyond. Curtis Weckwerth
(507) 380-9128, Wayne Franzeen
(507) 380-2466.
Young farmer looking for land to rent
for 2014 and beyond. Competitive
rates and reference available. Call
Austin Blad (320) 221-3517.
SALES
Sales
Remember The Past Occasional
Sale. Holiday season hours Octo-
ber 16-December 24, Sunday 12
p.m.- 5 p.m.; Monday-cl osed;
Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m.- 8 p.m.;
Saturday, 10 a.m.- 6 p.m. Furni-
ture, salvaged junk, vintage, col-
lectibles, home and holiday decor
and unique treasures. Located in
the Hutchinson Mall across from
Christopher & Banks. (320) 583-
9519. Buying and selling.
Vintage Cabin Sale by TWO OLD
GOATS. Thursday, October 17,
11:00 a.m.-7 p.m.; Friday, October
18, 11 a.m.- 7 p.m. Woodsy bears,
bowls, baskets, deer mount, oak
table with chairs, sleds, skies, tob-
bagon, with a hint of Christmas.
lease join us at 317 Main Street,
Arlington.
SERVICES
Misc. Service
CUSTOM LOG SAWING- Cut at
your place or ours. White oak lum-
ber decking and firewood. Give
Virgil a call. Schauer Construction,
Inc. (320) 864-4453.
Classifieds
ADD ANOTHER PAPER
FOR ONLY
$
2.00 PER PAPER
(based on first week pricing)
The McLeod
County Chronicle
Silver Lake Leader
The Glencoe
Advertiser
The Sibley Shopper
Arlington Enterprise
The Galaxy
3-WEEK SPECIAL: ONE WEEK:
$
15
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All Six Papers Reach Over 50,000 Readers Weekly in over 33 Communities
For 20 words, one time in
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30¢ per word after first 20 words.
AGRICULTURE AUTOMOTIVE EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE LIVESTOCK
& PETS
LIVESTOCK
& PETS
REAL ESTATE SERVICES RENTAL RENTAL
All ads appear online
at GlencoeNews.com
Enterprise
To place an ad: Call: 507-964-5547; Fax: 507-964-2423; E-Mail: info@ArlingtonMNnews.com; Mail: P.O. Box 388, Arlington, MN 55307
Advertising
Deadlines
The McLeod County Chronicle Mondays at Noon
The Arlington Enterprise & The Silver Lake Leader Tuesdays at Noon
The Glencoe Advertiser, The Sibley Shopper
& The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
Commercial
Building and
Business
Opportunity
Call (507) 964-2256
A22-25E,23-26Sa
Available...
1 & 2 Bedroom
Apartments Available
All utilities,
except electric
Income based
Must be 62 or older
or handicapped
Highland Commons
Arlington
507-964-5556
A
1
6
-
2
8
E
,1
7
-
2
9
A
S
G
a
HANDICAP
ACCESSIBLE
Now Hiring Full-Time Shag Driving Position
Gaylord Michaels Food Location
Rotating Schedule 4 days on, 3 days off, 12 hour position.
Pay based on experience CDL not required but must be willing
to obtain with in 6 months. Benefits available after 90 days.
If interested call Shelly Gruetzmacher @
1-800-422-1347 ext 115
or email shellyg@bartelstruckline.com
A37-38Ea
VI EW US ONLI NE AT WWW. ARLI NGTONMNNEWS. COM
M & M
Home Contractors,
a Custom Home Builder
in Cologne, MN is now hiring
EXPERIENCED
Framing Carpenters
Applicants must be reliable,
self-motivated, hardworking and
able to work well with others.
Must also have the ability to
work outdoors in all weather
conditions. You must possess
a valid MN Driver's License,
have reliable transportation of
your own, have a valid social
security number, be drug free
and pass a background check.
Pay based on experience.
Please contact Mike at
612-554-2556
for additional information
*39-40E40-41Sa
WANTED
The Arlington Fire Department
is now taking applications for
firefighters.
Applications are available from any
firefighter or at the Arlington City Office,
and will be accepted until
October 31, 2013.
A39-40SEa
504 W. Brooks St.
Arlington
Antiques, tools, furniture,
usual household items
~ Cash Please ~
Wed., Oct. 16 • 4-8 pm
Thurs., Oct. 17 • 7 am-6 pm
Fri., Oct. 18 • 7 am-6 pm
Sat., Oct. 19 • 8 am-Noon
*
4
0
E
4
1
S
a
BIG Garage Sale
Thurs.-Sat., Oct. 17-19
8:30 am-4:30 pm
240 Church St., Green Isle
Women’s plus size
clothes, men’s clothes,
household items, crafts,
books & more!
*40E41Sa
Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington
is seeking the following positions:
• Certified Nursing Assistant, evening
shifts with every other weekend, 6 shifts
per pay period.
• Certified Nursing Assistant, evening
shifts with every other weekend/holiday,
10 shifts per pay period.
• Certified Nursing Assistant, overnights 10:15pm-6:15am,
every other weekend only.
• LPN Evening Nurse, 8 shifts per pay period,
includes every other weekend/holiday.
• Dietary Cook/Assistant Cook
hours vary, 6 shifts per pay period
includes every other weekend/holiday.
– Must be MN Certified –
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information,
call Tiffany Brockhoff,
Human Resource Director at
507-964-2251 or email:
tbrockof@good-sam.com
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap Drug-Free Workplace
Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life.
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JOB POSTING
The City of Arlington is currently accepting applications for a
full-time Maintenance Worker in the Public Works Department.
The position is primarily responsible for performing general mainte-
nance and janitorial services in all City-owned buildings. The position
also performs routine to skilled manual labor and maintenance in the
Public Works Department and performs related duties as required.
Minimum Qualifications: Must possess and maintain a valid Minnesota
Class “B” or higher CDL or the ability to obtain one in one month.
Must possess and maintain a valid Class “C” Boiler’s License or the
ability to obtain one in one year. Must be able to respond to a call-out
for snow removal or a city emergency within 30 minutes. Salary:
$13.06 - $18.29/hour plus benefits.
For required application and job description, go online at www.arling
tonmn.com or contact Arlington City Offices, 204 Shamrock Drive, Ar-
lington, MN 55307 – (507) 964-2378. Cover letters, resume and appli-
cations are due to the City Administrator no later than 4:00 p.m. on Oc-
tober 25, 2013. The City of Arlington is an Equal Opportunity Employ-
er.
A40-41Ea
1st, 2nd & 3rd Shift Positions
$9.00 - $15.00
/hr
PAY DEPENDS ON POSITION & SHIFT
Apply online: www.dohertystafng.com
Drug Free Employer
HOSTED BY DOHERT Y STAFFI NG SOLUTI ONS
Thursday, October 17, 2013 | 10AM - 3PM
120 Tower St r eet Sout h | Gayl or d, MN 55334
EOE 507-237-4692
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Independent Living
55+ Arlington Sr. Apartment ONLY
One-Bedrooms Available
Garage Available
Apply NOW & Move this Fall!
FREE Application
FREE Damage Deposit
FREE 1
st
Month Rent
Lease Today!
800-873-1736 or 507-642-8701
kanderson@amberfieldplace.com
www.amberfieldplace.com
A340-43E41-44Sa
Managed by Great Lakes Management Co.
Call us to place
your HAPPY ad.
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
964-5547
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