10-17-13 Arlington Enterprise

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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Serving the Communities of Arlington and Green Isle, Minnesota
www.arlingtonmnnews.com Volume 130 • Number 15 • Thursday, October 17, 2013 • Arlington, MN 55307
Single copy $1.00
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington City Coun-
cil, at its regular meeting on
Monday evening, Oct. 7,
unanimously approved a mo-
tion to act upon four requests
from Arli-Dazzle Committee
Chairperson Kim Schneider
in connection with the winter
celebration.
The first move included a
parade route permit and no
parking signs for the parade.
The second move included
closure of a portion of Main
Street for pre-parade activi-
ties.
The third move included
the placement of fire pits on a
public right-of-way during
the parade.
The fourth move included
the use of the Main Street
parking lot as a Fish House
Camp.
The City Council, during a
future meeting, discussed the
City of Arlington’s involve-
ment in the winter celebra-
tion.
Schneider explained a few
changes to the Arli-Dazzle
festivities which are sched-
uled for Saturday, Dec. 7.
The staging area has been
changed from the parking lot
at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church
to East Main Street, accord-
ing to Schneider. The new
staging area will start just
east of the railroad tracks and
run down to the city shop.
The parade route has been
changed to start just east of
the railroad tracks and run
west across Highway 5 to
Sixth Avenue Southwest, said
Schneider.
Adams Street has been des-
ignated as a route for units to
use to return to the staging
area after the parade, accord-
ing to Schneider.
A Dashing Through The
Snow 5K walk/run has been
added to the list of events.
The event will start at 12:30
p.m.
A Vintage Snowmobile
Show will be held on the for-
mer elevator property.
In addition, there will be
another team of horses for
wagon rides, more fire pits
and additional vendors.
There are a lot of people
behind the scenes who make
the Arli-Dazzle a successful
event, according to Schnei-
der. She estimated that 100-
plus volunteers are involved
in all of the Arli-Dazzle fes-
tivities.
Individuals, businesses and
organizations who wish to
participate in the parade or
want more information are
encouraged to contact Kim
Schneider at 1-507-964-2809.
Other Business
The City Council, in other
business, voted 4-1 to ap-
prove the second reading of
Ordinance 283 which is “An
Ordinance To Regulate The
Keeping Of Animals Within
The City Of Arlington.”
This document is basically
the same as the previous ordi-
nance. However, the para-
graph referring to the Arling-
ton Animal Clinic as the im-
poundment site has been
deleted. In addition, the City
of Arlington will not pick up
stray animals.
Jaszewski, Nuesse, Rueh-
ling and Reetz all voted in
favor of the motion.
Wills voted against the mo-
tion.
A few moments later, the
City Council unanimously
adopted a resolution to pub-
lish a summary publication of
the ordinance in the Arlington
Enterprise.
In other action, the City
Council unanimously adopted
three separate resolutions in
connection with a construc-
tion and maintenance ease-
ment along the south side of
County Road 166 for the
Prairie Line Trail out to the
Arlington Sportsmen’s Park.
In other news, the City
Council unanimously ap-
proved a motion to accept a
donation from Kreft Cabi-
nets, Arlington, to construct
upper and lower cabinets
with a countertop and be in-
stalled/used in the meeting
room at the Emergency Serv-
ices Building in Arlington.
The City Council, in other
business, unanimously ap-
proved a motion to authorize
the signature and entering
into a 60-month lease with
U.S. Bank Equipment Fi-
nances for a Toshiba e-Studio
355C copier from Copier
Business Solutions at
$138.65 per month.
Arlington City Council acts upon
requests for Arli-Dazzle festivities
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
Sibley County Commis-
sioners put the brakes on a
job classification and com-
pensation study at their regu-
lar meeting on Tuesday, Oct.
8.
After the low bid for the
study was received at
$32,950, County Commis-
sioner Bill Pinske moved to
table the project until after a
new Human Resources direc-
tor is in place and can study
the issue. Current Human Re-
sources Director Roseann
Nagel had announced her re-
tirement.
“After talking to other
counties I learned we are not
out of loop, ” said Pinske
about how Sibley County last
did the job re-classification in
2001, while another has not
done it in 20 years. Pinske
added that another county
keeps up by offering periodic
raises.
“It is good to get the num-
bers to know where we are at,
but since we will be without
an HR director, I think we
should wait,” said Pinske.
County Administrator Matt
Jaunich said since it has been
more than 10 years since the
county looked into classifica-
tion, the question needs to be
asked: “Are employees prop-
erly classified for the job they
are doing? It is more than
about dollars.”
Jaunich said when he first
got on board as the adminis-
trator he was concerned about
the amount of job movement
and wondered why the coun-
ty is losing employees.
Pinske said the board has
continually looked at the
classifications, and then times
got tough.
Other Business
• In other business, the
board did approve new job
descriptions and classifica-
tions for a jail
administrator/lieutenant with-
in the sheriff’s office and GIS
coordinator/highway asset
manager within the Public
Works Department.
Sheriff Bruce Ponath want-
ed to change a job description
so two people can perform
similar responsibilities at the
jail, offering more flexibility.
“What it will do for us, is if
we need extra hands, we can
bring the jail administrator
along,” said Ponath.
Tim Becker, Public Works
Director, said the duties of
the GIS coordinator have ex-
panded and a person who
would fill the job will need
more ability. The position
will move from grade 9 to 11
with a pay increase of about
$3 per hour at the minimum.
Becker said this will not
have an effect on the property
tax levy because 75 percent
of the pay will come from
public works funds compared
to the current rate of 60 per-
cent.
• The board approved the
hiring of Nicholas Bancks as
Watershed Grants Coordina-
tor.
• Jaunich gave the quarterly
financial report for Sibley Es-
tates. Total current assets are
$143, 182.31, putting the
county on pace for a net prof-
it of around $36,000.
Sibley County
Continued on page 5
County tables job compensation study
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Sibley East teacher and for-
mer head coach Doug Flieth,
39, Gaylord, pleaded guilty to
one count of interference with
privacy in Sibley County Dis-
trict Court on Thursday
morning, Oct. 10.
Flieth was sentenced to 365
days in the Sibley County Jail
with 335 days stayed. Flieth
was placed on probation for
two years. The conditions of
probation include that Flieth
must serve 30 days in the Sib-
ley County Jail and report
within 30 days. He is eligible
for work release and sentence
to service. He was ordered to
perform 40 hours of sentence
to service within an indeter-
minate period of time. Flieth
must also remain in contact
with his probation officer,
follow all conditions set forth
in the probation agreement,
follow all instructions of pro-
bation, sign probation agree-
ment, sign all releases of in-
formation, remain law abid-
ing, participate in a psycho-
logical - sexual evaluation as
approved by probation and
follow recommendations of
the evaluation, and pay a
$300 fine along with a $75
surcharge and $10 in law li-
brary fees.
Flieth was charged with
one count of interference with
privacy on Tuesday, July 9
for allegedly recording under-
neath a hair stylist’s dress
with his cell phone in Arling-
ton on Saturday, July 6, ac-
cording to the Sibley County
Attorney’s Office.
The Sibley East School
Board, during a regular meet-
ing on Monday night, Aug. 5,
adopted a resolution to au-
thorize the district to suspend
Flieth from his teaching con-
tract duties with pay pending
the investigations of the
school district, Sibley County
and Minnesota Department of
Education.
The School Board, during a
regular meeting on Monday
night, Sept. 16, approved a
motion to not renew Flieth’s
coaching contracts as head
girls basketball coach and co-
head golf coach.
Sibley East Superintendent
Jim Amsden said the issue of
Flieth’s teaching contract du-
ties will be placed on the
agenda at the School Board
regular meeting in Arlington
on Monday night, Oct. 21. It
will be a non-public update to
the School Board regarding
the case.
“The board will discuss,
with school counsel, possible
actions and timelines during
the non-public session,” said
Amsden. “Doug will remain
on paid administrative leave
while the board gathers infor-
mation from school counsel.”
Flieth pleads guilty to interference with privacy
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Little Firefighters
Students from the Sibley East Elemen-
tary School and St. Paul’s Lutheran
School had the opportunity to tour the
Arlington Fire Hall during Fire Preven-
tion Week. The tours were conducted
by local firefighters Tom Pomplun and
Rick Schmidt from Tuesday, October 8
through Friday, Oct. 11. Sibley East first
grade students Quintin DeVlaeminck,
left, and Morgan Haggenmiller, right,
had the opportunity to try on the fire-
fighting gear during the tour. Their
teacher is Carrie Pioske.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The completion date for the
Highway 5 Project from Ar-
lington to Green Isle has been
pushed back once again due
to the recent rainfall, accord-
ing to a representative from
the Minnesota Department of
Transportation (Mn/DOT).
The completion date,
which was most recently set
for Monday, Oct. 21, has
been pushed back to the mid-
dle of next week.
The construction crew was
shut down due to the rain on
Tuesday, Oct. 15.
The touch up on the aggre-
gate shoulders was scheduled
to take place on Wednesday,
Oct. 16.
Sub contractors are expect-
ed to grind in the rumble
strips and stripe the highway
during the next several days.
However, problems have aris-
en with sub contractors due to
scheduling conflicts caused
by the recent rainfall.
In the meantime, the cur-
rent detours will remain in ef-
fect.
As announced in a recent
edition of the Arlington En-
terprise, there is now a short-
er detour from north of Ar-
lington to Green Isle. The
new detour is from County
Road 9 north of Arlington to
County Road 15 just west of
Green Isle.
Knife River Corporation -
North Central of Sauk Rapids
is the contractor on the proj-
ect that includes seven miles
of pavement replacement and
a mill and overlay in Green
Isle.
The cost of the project is
approximately $5 million.
Completion of Highway 5 Project
is delayed due to recent rainfall
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The City of Green Isle has
received three envelopes of
bids in conjunction with the
sale of 43 vacant lots in that
community, according to
Green Isle City Clerk Bert
Panning. The deadline was
Tuesday, Oct. 15.
It is not known how many
bids are sealed in the three
envelopes. The bids could be
for individual lots or all of
the lots.
The Green Isle Economic
Development Authority will
open and discuss the bids
during a closed meeting at 7
p.m. Monday, Oct. 21. The
Green Isle City Council will
also discuss the bids during a
closed meeting at 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 22.
History
The City Council, during a
recent regular meeting, unan-
imously adopted a resolution
to offer the sale of 43 vacant
lots to the highest bidder.
The vacant lots, about one
year ago, were forfeited to
Green Isle
Continued on page 2
G.I receives bids for vacant lots
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 17, 2013, page 2
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Questions
about Health Care?
Maybe I can help!
Call
507-358-0864
or stop by
405 West
Main Street
Arlington
*
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a
Frank’s Potato
Supplier of fresh MN potatoes will be at the
Nicollet Mart in Nicollet, MN
Fridays & Saturdays
October into November
– Weather Permitting –
or call:
507-995-1201
507-931-4572
*40-43Ea
Stock Up NOW
LOW
PRICES!
Creekside Community Church
Missions Conference
When we are “in Christ” His light shines through us.
Creekside Community Church welcomes
Rev. Harry Landaw, who has been ministering in Japan,
most recently, to the victims of the tsunami.
Come hear about his experiences and how the
Holy Spirit is using him to make disciples.
Creekside Community Church
114 Shamrock Drive Arlington
Saturday, Oct. 19 at 7 pm
Doors open at 6:30. Social time to follow.
Sunday, Oct. 20 at 10:30 am
Social time following worship.
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Arlington - Green Isle
Boy Scout Troop #140
FALL
BREAKFAST
Arlington
Community Center
Sunday, Oct. 27, 2013
8:00 am – Noon
Serving: French
Toast, Pancakes,
Regular and
Texas Style
Scrambled Eggs,
Sausage & Beverages
Free will donation
A41-42E42-43Sa
Friday, October 18: Arlington Veteran’s Organi-
zation’s Steak Fry, veteran’s building at fair-
grounds, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Monday, October 21: Arlington City Council,
council chambers, 6:30 p.m.
Sibley East School Board, room 149 at Arlington
Campus, 6:30 p.m.
VFW Post 6031 Auxiliary, veteran’s building at
fairgrounds, 7:30 p.m.
Community
Calendar
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER
MAIN BANK
Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (straight thru)
DRIVE THRU
Monday - Thursday, 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.,
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Member
FDIC
Arlington State Bank
(507) 964-2256
Fax (507) 964-5550
www.ArlingtonStateBank.com
Free Halloween
Sat, Oct 26
Hosted by
www.AGIWomenofToday.org
www.facebook.com/
agiwomenoftoday
You’re
Invited!
G
a
m
e
s &
P
rize
s!
B
e a
F
A
N
!
Party for Kids
@ SE Arlington
Small Gym
1pm-3pm
Costume Contest
at 2:00pm
oween l l Ha ee r F
Gym l Smal
ngton i rl @ SE A
d Ki for Party
B
N
agiwomenoftoday
www.facebook.com/
g or GIWomenofToday. A www.
y
F
A
N
!
B
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We would like to extend a sin-
cere thank you to all of our rela-
tives, neighbors and friends. We
appreciate the memorial gifts,
cards, flowers, phone calls and
food. Speci al thanks to
Ri dgevi ew Medi cal staff,
Chaplain Helmar, Father Keith
Salisbury, organist Mary Beth
Schwirtz, and vocalist Wendy
Bigaouette.
We also want to thank the
St. Brendan’s, St. Mary’s &
St. Michael’s area faith com-
muni ty for provi di ng and
serving lunch, and the John-
son Funeral Home.
The family of Linda Franzen *41Ea
SS. MICHAEL, MARY &
BRENDAN CATHOLIC
HEART WORK CAMP
FALL CRAFT &
VENDOR SHOW
SAT., OCT. 26
9 A.M.-2 P.M.
Sibley East High School
202 3rd Ave NW
Arlington, MN
Lunch will be available
Come shop some of your
favorite vendors &
crafters: Tastefully Simple,
Scentsy, Thirty One, Lia
Sophia plus many more!
*41-42SEa
Resource Booths
PubIic HeaIth & Human Services
Veterans Services
(1-888-LINK-VET)
MN VaIIey Action CounciI
U of M Extension
TraiIbIazer Transit
MN River Area Agency on Aging
SaIvation Army
SibIey County Food SheIf
Free Rides!
Reserve your FREE
ride by Nov. 1st to
this event!
Call 507-237-4000
PIan to Attend the
FaII FaII CARE Event
C CC County A AA Area R RR Resources for E EE Everyone
Wednesday, November 6, 2013
2:00 p.m. & 6:00 p.m.
ArIington Community Center
204 Shamrock Drive
What's New in Medicare for 2014
Robin Thompson,
Senior Outreach Specialist with
MN River Area Agency on Aging
—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-
State SoIdier Assistance Programs
MN Department of Veterans Representative
Free ViaI
of Life
P
r
iz
e
s
!
R
e
fre
s
h
m
e
n
ts
S
p
o
n
s
o
re
d
b
y
L
a
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g
's
M
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a
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M
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t No SoIicitation
51-3 A41-43E42-43Sa
News Briefs
Highway 25 will be closed
Motorists traveling east of Green Isle will encounter
delays and a detour as both directions of Highway 25
close at noon on Thursday, Oct. 17.
Motorists should follow the signed detour using
Highway 5/25, Carver County Road 50 and Carver
County Road 31/Sibley County Road 16 in order to by-
pass the closure. The closure is necessary as crews re-
place the culvert beneath the roadway at 335th Avenue.
All lanes are scheduled to re-open by Nov. 1.
iPad reported as missing at SE
An iPad was reported as missing from the Sibley East
Senior High School in Arlington, according to the Ar-
lington Police Department. The incident was reported to
authorities on Friday, Oct. 11.
Blood drive set for Nov. 1
The American Red Cross will hold a blood drive at
the Sibley Medical Center from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday,
Nov. 1.
The American Red Cross invites eligible donors to
schedule an appointment to give blood in November in
honor of those who have served the country in the U.S.
armed forces.
Meeting for Chicago art trip
Parents of students who are interested in traveling to
Chicago with Sibley East teacher Amanda Feterl in June
2014 must attend the informational meeting.
The informational meeting will be held in the Arling-
ton art room at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 23. Topics to be
covered include chaperones, fiances and fundraising.
Parents who are unable to attend the meeting should
contact Amanda Feterl at afeterl@sibley-
east.k12.mn.us, 507-964-8287 or 507-237-3364.
SE to participate in program
To assist students in preparing and applying to col-
lege, Sibley East High School will participate in the
statewide College Knowledge Month held during Octo-
ber. As part of this initiative, Sibley East will work with
its students to explore college options, plan their future
goals, and apply to college. The goal of the program is
to get more students applying to college in their senior
year. During this event, students may apply to any two-
year or four-year college/university or training program
in which they are interested.
For more information about the Sibley East High
School, please contact Laura Zender at 507-964-8239.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Arlington High School Class of 1953
The Arlington High School Class of 1953 recently held
its 60th class reunion at the Arlington Haus Too. The
following classmates were in attendance for the
event. Front Row: (left to right) Carol (Willmsen)
Goebel, Alice (Kuznia) Benson, Muriel (Kemp) O’Neil,
Darlene (Narr) Boehne, Pat (O’Leary) Schally, Mayon-
na (Sickmann) Lind, Marlys (Panning) Roepke, Lula-
belle (Kreft) Grack, Loretta (Kill) Hasbrouck. Middle
Row: (l to r) Dorothy (Bode) Roth, Jeanette (Bluemke)
Maahs, Mavis (Voight) Kleist, Dorothy (Zeiher) Fouks,
Catherine Grimes, Ramona (Rucks) Bade, Adele
(Ehrenberg) Suttles and Charlotte (Knapp) Vevang.
Back Row: (l to r) Merlin Battcher, John Quinn, Dou-
glas Breitkreutz, Roger Wahldick, Lowell Thomas,
Paul Nagel and Ralph Soeffker. Missing from the
photo is Roger Mueller.
the State of Minnesota, ac-
cording to the Sibley County
Auditor’s Office and Sibley
County Assessor’s Office.
The City of Green Isle, over
two months ago, regained the
ownership of the 43 lots origi-
nally developed by the Rose-
mount Development Corpora-
tion.
A few of the lots are located
in the Green Isle Third Addi-
tion and Green Isle Fifth Ad-
dition. Most of the lots are lo-
cated in the Green Isle Sixth
Addition and Green Isle Sev-
enth Addition, according to
the Sibley County Auditor’s
Office.
The City Council hopes to
recover special assessments
which average approximately
$15,000 per lot, according to
city officials. Potential buyers
will not have to pay delin-
quent property taxes to the
State of Minnesota, Sibley
County and City of Green
Isle. Although the City of
Green Isle expects to take a
loss on the sale of any lot, city
officials believe it is more im-
portant to get the properties
back on the tax rolls rather
than have the city own them.
The special assessments,
delinquent property taxes,
penalties and interest on the
43 lots, one year ago, was
$717,280, according to the
Sibley County Auditor’s Of-
fice.
The delinquent property
taxes and penalties have since
been waived so the new total
for the special assessment is
approximately $660,000.
The City of Green Isle orig-
inally bonded for the develop-
ment of the seven additions.
The special assessments were
to be used to make the bond
payments.
Green Isle Continued from page 1
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your area
businesses
appreciate
it when
you do!
E-mail us at:
info@
arlingtonmnnews.com
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 17, 2013, page 3
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Business & Professional
Directory
CALL TODAY TO BE INCLUDED IN OUR
BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY!
507-964-5547
Arlington
Chiropractic Clinic
JUSTIN E. DAVIS, D.C.
607 W. Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-2850
arlingtonchiropracticmn.com
Office Hours:
Mon. 9am-6pm; Tues. 9am-5pm;
Wed. 8am-6pm; Thurs. 1-6pm;
Fri. 8am-4pm; 1
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Sat. 8am-11am
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Large Animal
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Ultrasound repro, Surgical,
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Small Animal House Call
by Appointment
Medical, Vaccination Services
and Surgical Referral
Dr. Robert G. Ovrebo
Office 507-964-2682
Cell 507-995-0507
Miller
Law Office
RAPHAEL J. MILLER
Attorney at Law
332 Sibley Avenue, Gaylord, MN 55334
Tel. (507) 237-2954
Wills - Family Law
Taxes - Estate Planning
General Law Practice & Trials
Free consultation on personal injury claims
MESENBRING
CONSTRUCTION
(507) 964-2864
“Your local home builder and
remodeler for over 38 years”
Member: MN River Builders Assn.
MN License #4806
ROSS R. ARNESON
ATTORNEY AT LAW
302 West Main
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-5753
Real Estate, Estate Planning,
Probate and Business Law
Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Saturdays by Appointment
Farm – Residential
Commercial
Licensed - Bonded - Insured
• 24-Hour Emergency
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• Free Estimates
Tyler Kranz, Owner
507-964-2525
Klehr Grading
&
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JEFF & WENDY KLEHR
Dozer, Grader, Basements,
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Hauling Gravel/Rock/Sand, Skidloader
Jeff cell: 612-756-0595
Wendy cell: 612-756-0594
640 E. BROOKS ST., ARLINGTON, MN 55307
1-507-964-5783 • FAX: 507-964-5302
Local LAWN
Enforcement
Arlington, MN
Licensed and Insured
Mowing, fertilizing and
weed control, dethatching,
garden tilling, core aeration
www.locallawnenforcement.com
Adam and David Hansen
Adam cell: 507-327-0917
507-964-5835
• 5” Seamless Gutters
• 6” Seamless Gutters
• K-Guard Leaf-Free
Gutter System
(lifetime clog free guarantee)
PHIL GOETTL
612-655-1379
888-864-5979
www.mngutter.com
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Family Dentistry
Dr. John D. Gustafson, D.D.S
Dr. Jared Gustafson, D.D.S
COMPREHENSIVE CARE
FOR ALL AGES
Office Hours: Monday–Friday
New Patients Welcome
Dr. Jason Anderson, D.D.S
Orthodontists
106 3
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Ave. NW,
Arlington
507-964-2705
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See us for factory-trained
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507-964-5539
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507-665-3732
or 952-873-2208
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507-326-5751
MONDAY-FRIDAY 8-5
BEN BRAZIL,
Owner/Technician
brazilautomotive@gmail.com
2002 BUICK LESABRE 4Dr., Gray, 125K..............................................
$
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1998 BUICK PARK AVE. 4Dr., Silver, 158K ..........................................
$
2,999
2006 CHEV. MALIBU LS 4Dr., Gold ......................................................
$
3,995
2004 CHEV. AVEO 4Dr., Silver, 97K ......................................................
$
3,995
2003 CHEV. IMPALA LS 4Dr., Gray ......................................................
$
1,995
2002 CHEV. SUBURBAN LT SUV, Gray ................................................
$
5,995
2000 CHEV. BLAZER LT SW, Red, 138K ..............................................
$
2,495
2007 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER LTD SW, Silver, 79K ..........................
$
6,499
2002 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER LTD SW, Plum, 131K..........................
$
3,300
2002 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER LTD, 4Dr., Red, 81K............................
$
5,400
1998 CHRYSLER CIRRUS 4Dr., Maroon, 127K....................................
$
2,499
1996 FORD RANGER PU, Gold ............................................................
$
2,300
1949 FORD 8N TRACTOR, Gray ..........................................................
$
3,300
2001 HONDA ACCORD LX 4Dr., Maroon, 167K ..................................
$
3,800
2002 ITASCA SUNRISE 31 RV, White, 44K ........................................
$
28,999
2002 MERCURY SABLE GS 4Dr., Tan ..................................................
$
1,600
2003 PONTIAC GRAND AM GT 4Dr., Silver, 112K ..............................
$
3,995
2010 20’ TILT TRAILER, Black ..............................................................
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2006 TOYOTA SIENNA XLE VAN, Red, Has Everything! ....................
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2006 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT 2.0 4Dr., White, 115K ..........................
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LIBERTY STATION
Corner of Hwy. 5 & Chandler, Arlington, MN
507-964-5177 or Toll-Free 866-752-9567
www.LibertyStationAutoSales.com
Jim
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eiland’s
Affordable
Used Cars
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WE ARE OPEN!
Shop Local
Your local businesses in
Arlington and
Green Isle
are open during the
road construction.
Arlington Enterprise / Sibley Shopper
402 W. Alden St. • PO Box 388
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-5547
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
In September of 2010, the
Sibley County Board of Com-
missioners showed their com-
mitment to supporting a
healthier workforce and com-
munity by passing a Sibley
County Tobacco Free Work-
site Policy in which Sibley
County worksites were de-
clared as tobacco free zones,
according to a news release
from the Sibley County Pub-
lic Health. This includes
worksite buildings, grounds
and parking lots of county
buildings.
The goal of the policy is to
improve the health of em-
ployees, clients and visitors.
It has also served as a model
policy for other worksites in
Sibley County. Reducing to-
bacco use at worksites has
shown to increase productivi-
ty, decrease absenteeism and
possibly lower medical and
health expenditures.
Sibley County continues to
build a healthy workforce in
partnership with the
Statewide Health Improve-
ment Program (SHIP). SHIP
has also been able to partner
with other worksites in Sibley
County to support their work-
site wellness efforts as well.
For more information on
how to initiate worksite well-
ness activities for your work-
site, please visit
www.mmshealthycommuni-
ties.org.
County marks 3-year anniversary
of tobacco free worksite grounds
The 23-unit assisted living
residence in Lafayette, which
has served many residents
who require this type of care,
will be closing, according to
an article in the Winthrop
News.
Residents have been given
notice that the assisted living
services at Good Samaritan
Society - Lafayette will close
after Jan. 1, 2014.
Good Samaritan Society
officials cited expensive and
extensive mechanical and
physical plant work at the fa-
cility as the reason for the
closure.
The Good Samaritan Soci-
ety has been involved with
the Community Asset Foun-
dation and the City of
Winthrop to build a new as-
sisted living facility, The
Lodge of Winthrop. This
building will be located on
the campus of the Good
Samaritan Society -
Winthrop, which already has
a rehabilitation/skilled nurs-
ing center, and the new assist-
ed living center will be physi-
cally attached. This new
building, with Good Samari-
tan providing the manage-
ment, is set to open on ap-
proximately Jan. 1, 2014.
Residents of the Good
Samaritan Society - Lafayette
will be given priority admis-
sion to The Lodge of
Winthrop. The exact timing
of the closure of the Good
Samaritan Society - Lafayette
will coincide with the open-
ing of the Lodge of Winthrop
in order to have no lapse of
services for residents.
Good Samaritan Society to close
Lafayette assisted living facility
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Foreign Exchange Students
There are three foreign exchange stu-
dents at the Sibley East Senior High
School this year. Left to right: Aaron
Bredt, Quentin Gex and Mike Schenk.
Aaron is from Germany and is living
with the Charles and Lisa Templin fami-
ly. Quentin is from Switzerland and is
living with the Jim and Julie Landaas
family. Mike is from Germany and is liv-
ing with the Mike and Elysse Piotter
family.
A free presentation on
Medicare will be held at the
Arlington Community Center
on Wednesday, Nov. 6.
People will learn how
changes in Medicare for 2014
will affect Medicare benefici-
aries.
The County Area Re-
sources for Everyone (CARE)
event is being sponsored by
Sibley County Public Health
& Human Services and Veter-
an Services.
Two sessions of this event
will be offered. The first ses-
sion will begin at 2 p. m.
while the second session will
start at 6 p.m.
There will be refreshments
and door prizes.
Free transportation will
also be available upon request
for the first session only.
Reservations for rides must
be made by Friday, Nov. 1.
Featured speakers will be
Robin Thompson from the
MN River Area Agency on
Aging and a MN Dept. of
Veterans representative re-
garding State Soldier Assis-
tance Programs. Local agen-
cies supporting the event will
share information on the serv-
ices they offer. They include
Sibley County Public Health
and Human Services, Veteran
Services, Minnesota Valley
Action Council, University of
MN Extension Service, Trail-
blazer Transit, Salvation
Army and Sibley County
Food Shelf.
For further information or
to reserve a ride, please con-
tact Sibley County Human
Services at 507-237-4000.
CARE event to focus on Medicare changes
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 17, 2013, page 4
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Improved Highway 5 from
Gaylord to Green Isle will
make for a smooth ride
Our View: Stretch from Green Isle to Highway 212
would make the project complete
Opinions
Guest Column
Letters To The Editor
Area motorists will soon have an improved Highway 5
from Gaylord to Green Isle. The stretch from Gaylord to
Arlington was completed in quick fashion in early July.
The roadway from Arlington to Green Isle, despite several
delays, will hopefully be completed by mid next week.
The stretch of Highway 5 from Green Isle to Highway
212 would complete the project. However, there does not
appear to be any money available for this six miles of road-
way. That is unfortunate because a lot of area motorists be-
lieve this stretch of highway should have been a higher pri-
ority than the roadway from Gaylord to Green Isle. High-
way 5 from Norwood Young America to Waconia is also in
desperate need of repair.
Rather than sit back and be satisfied with the stretch of
Highway 5 from Gaylord to Green Isle, city, county and
school officials, along with area state representatives and
senators, should lobby the Minnesota Department of Trans-
portation (Mn/DOT) to make these necessary repairs along
Highway 5. Mn/DOT officials need to know that continued
improvements along Highway 5 are important to the area.
In the meantime, Arlington and Green Isle are still open
for business as the Highway 5 Project nears completion.
Despite some recent inconveniences, it is the hope that
people will continue to support businesses in both commu-
nities. By shopping and keeping that money in Arlington
and Green Isle, people will benefit their friends and neigh-
bors, especially in these difficult and challenging economic
times. In addition, people should never forget that it is the
Arlington and Green Isle businesses who pay taxes which
help fund the school along with city and county services.
Furthermore, they faithfully support many non-profit
groups, service organizations and various church, school
and civic fundraisers throughout the year.
-K.M.
Too Tall’s Tidbits
Happy Birthday and Happy An-
niversary to the following local and
area residents compliments of the
Arlington Lions Club Community
Calendar.
October 18
Alonzo Walker, Nathan Schmig,
Sheila Arneson, Sophia Czech, Wade
Caddell and Zoey Vos.
October 19
C.J. Saunders, Karen Arneson,
Kelsey Luepke, Mr. and Mrs. Mike
Stock, and Mr. and Mrs. Wade
Mesenbring.
October 20
Adam Gieseke, Attila Magyar, Diane
Ebersviller, Mr. and Mrs. Dan Kreft,
Mr. and Mrs. Mike Schneider, and
Mr. and Mrs. Shawn Battcher.
October 21
David Welch, and Mr. and Mrs. Jim
Farber.
October 22
Nate Morreim and Oden Hennies.
October 23
DeDe Bennett, Elias Swanson, Fran-
cis Traxler, Heather Reetz, Izak
Swanson, Mary Noack, Olivia
Strack, Seger Thomes, Tricia Ann
Thomes, Tristan Von Eschen, Mr.
and Mrs. Jarid Halverson, Mr. and
Mrs. Don Koch, and Mr. and Mrs.
Steven Post.
October 24
In Memory Of Pete Glieden, Annette
Wiemann, Jenny Vaksdal, Lisa Otto,
Megan Voigt, and Mr. and Mrs. Sean
Dietel.
*****
Friendship among Women: A
woman didn’t come home one night.
The next morning she told her hus-
band that she had slept over at a
friend’s house. The man called his
wife’s 10 best friends. None of them
knew anything about it.
Friendship among Men: A man
didn’t come home one night. The
next morning he told his wife that he
had slept over at a friend’s house.
The woman called her husband’s 10
best friends. Eight confirmed that he
had slept over, and two said he was
still there.
*****
Elvin was in a lot of trouble. He
forgot his wedding anniversary. His
wife was really upset, and started to
give him the business.
She told him, “Tomorrow morn-
ing, I expect to find a gift in the
driveway that goes from 0 to 200 in
six seconds and it better be there!”
The next morning Elvin got up
early and left for work. When his
wife woke up, she looked out the
window and sure enough there was a
box gift-wrapped in the middle of
the driveway.
Confused, the wife put on her robe
and ran out to the driveway, brought
the box back in the house.
She opened it and found a brand
new bathroom scale.
*****
Question: What’s the difference
between love and marriage?
Answer: Love is blind and mar-
riage is an eye-opener!
*****
A man owned a small farm in
South Georgia. The Wage and Hour
Department claimed he was not pay-
ing proper wages to his help and sent
an agent to interview him.
“You just give me a list of your
employees and tell me how much
you pay them,” asked the man from
the Wage and Hour Department.
“All right,” said the farmer. “I
have a hired man. Been with me for
three years. I pay him $600 a week,
plus room and board. I have a cook.
She’s been here six months. She gets
$500 a week plus room and board.”
“Anybody else?” asked the agent
as he scribbled on a note pad.
“Yeah,” the farmer said. “This guy
is none too bright. Works about 18
hours a day. I pay him 10 dollars a
week and give him chewing tobac-
co.”
“Aha!” the agent roared. “I want
to talk to that man!”
“Speaking,” said the farmer.
*****
To The Editor,
As fall gets into full swing we
send kids off to school, go to sport-
ing and other school events, farming
activities intensify, and preparations
for winter begin, your local EMS
providers would like to take the time
to remind you to stay safe now and
year round. Please buckle up, keep
your focus on the road, wear a hel-
met when riding, be safe, work and
play responsibly, and don't drink and
drive!
A significant portion of Minnesota
is covered entirely by volunteer am-
bulance, fire and first responder de-
partments. These dedicated folks
partner with local law enforcement
and dispatch centers to respond to
calls 24 hours a day, seven days a
week, 365 days a year without re-
gard to weather or time of day or
night. They work in less than ideal
surroundings with an uncanny abili-
ty to problem solve. They often put
themselves in harm’s way to help
friends, neighbors and community
members. They commit countless
hours to be on call, respond to emer-
gencies, and to train for all types of
situations to maintain their readiness
and skill level. Their ultimate goal is
to provide the best care possible to
those in need. But they would love
to have nothing to do. If you don't
text and drive, don't drive at unsafe
speeds, don't drive impaired, main-
tain safe habits, and use equipment
responsibly, we will all have less
work to do and more time to enjoy
other activities. That is an absolute
win/win situation.
Be assured that if a need arises
and you need help, local EMS agen-
cies will be there. They simply ask
you to do your part to stay safe and
remind others to do the same. Don’t
be afraid to speak up when others
aren’t being safe - the life you save
could be your own or that of a friend
or loved one.
If you have a passion to help oth-
ers and be part of a great team, con-
tact your local ambulance crew, fire
department, or first responder squad
to see about joining their mission. If
you get the opportunity, maybe you
can also thank them for their sacri-
fice and dedication to the communi-
ties they serve. Stay safe and enjoy
the beautiful fall colors!
South Central Minnesota Emer-
gency Medical Services Recruiting
and Retention Committee
Stay safe now and the entire year round
By Lee H. Hamilton
The American public has lost pa-
tience with Washington. The ques-
tion is, now what?
Congress is unable to do its job. It
displays neither competence nor re-
sponsibility. It lurches — reeling
from crisis to crisis, each one self-
manufactured in an effort to post-
pone the reckoning from some earli-
er crisis. It shut the government
down over a temporary budget. Now
it’s threatening the financial credi-
bility of the U.S. government and
the security and safety of the Ameri-
can people. Three years of last-
minute spending decisions have cul-
minated in a television standoff with
no actual negotiations.
Too many members of Congress
reject the notion that accommoda-
tion and time-honored procedures
allow them to fulfill their responsi-
bilities to the American people.
They use their legislative skill to en-
gage in brinksmanship rather than
address the country’s fundamental
problems. Economic growth? Creat-
ing jobs? Putting the federal budget
on a sustainable path? Don’t look to
Congress. They’re too busy coming
up with the next short-term tactic to
confront the other side. Every day
they dither, they keep the govern-
ment from addressing the nation’s
real problems.
Even worse, they’ve managed to
raise real questions in this country
and abroad about whether our sys-
tem of government can work. Are
we saddled with a national legisla-
ture paralyzed by unending conflict?
Are we capable of tackling our
major problems? We are on the road
to a government that cannot plan, a
country shackled by perpetual un-
certainty, and a loss of faith in our
institutions both at home and
abroad.
We do not have to continue down
that road, but we do have to con-
front a core problem. The political
center in Congress has weakened to
the point of ineffectiveness, if not
near-irrelevance.
That’s fine with some people in
Washington, who are comfortable
with gridlock and don’t think its
consequences will be dire. Our gov-
ernment’s inability to deal with
Hamilton
Continued on page 5
It’s time for an intervention
To The Editor,
Recently I’ve been seeing some
pretty creative attempts by my
friends in the majority to take credit
for the hundreds of millions of dol-
lars that was recently repaid to
schools as a part of paying down the
school shift.
Let’s be clear: Democrats prom-
ised the people of Minnesota that
they would prioritize paying back
our schools. House Democrats made
school shift payback House File 1 –
the first bill of the session – indicat-
ing they were serious about paying
back our schools to fulfill their
promise, however, they failed to
pass HF1. In fact, it was never even
brought to the floor or voted on, and
was never given a committee hear-
ing.
When push came to shove, De-
mocrats declined to use even $1
from the $2,000,000,000 in new
taxes they raised on the hardworking
people of Minnesota to make good
on that promise. They simply could-
n’t say no to their far-left special in-
terest allies who were demanding
new out-of-control spending.
Simply put, Democrats failed to
deliver on their number one priority,
and broke a promise to the people of
Minnesota.
Instead, they chose to use surplus
revenue generated from the 2011
GOP budget. Over the past two
years, the Republican budget –
which was certified last week – has
generated more than $3 billion dol-
lars in greater-than-expected rev-
enue. That's right: without raising
taxes, the Republican budget
brought in more money than the De-
mocrat budget did with their $2 bil-
lion dollar tax increase.
Democrats fought the Republican
budget tooth and nail. Governor
Dayton said back in 2011 that Re-
publicans "owned" the budget, and
were responsible for it.
So to me it’s pretty disingenuous
for Democrats to hold a press con-
ference, as they did last week, tout-
ing the school shift payback that re-
lied on revenue generated from a
budget they fought against. It’s tak-
ing credit where credit is not due.
It’s bad enough to break a promise
to Minnesotans – it's even worse
when you try to cover it up by tak-
ing credit for the work of others.
Minnesotans deserve better.
Glenn Gruenhagen
State Representative
District 18B
Glencoe
Democrats mislead on school shift payback
Staff
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Publish-
ers; Kurt Menk, Edi t or; Kari n
Ramige, Manager; Marvin Bulau,
Production Manager; Barb Math-
wig, Office; Ashley Reetz, Sales;
and Jean Olson, Proof Reading.
Letters
This page is devoted to opin-
ions and commentary. Articles ap-
pearing on this page are the opin-
ions of the writer. Views expressed
here are not necessarily those of
the Arlington Enterprise, unless so
designated. The Arlington Enter-
prise strongly encourages others
to express opinions on this page.
Letters from our readers are
strongly encouraged. Letters for
publication must bear the writer’s
signature and address. The Arling-
ton Enterprise reserves the right to
edit letters for purpose of clarity
and space.
Ethics
The editorial staff of the Arlington
Enterpri se stri ves to present the
news in a fair and accurate manner.
We appreciate errors being brought
to our attention. Please bring any
grievances against the Arlington En-
terprise to the attention of the editor.
Should differences continue, readers
are encouraged to take their griev-
ances to the Minnesota News Coun-
cil, an organization dedicated to pro-
tecting the public from press inaccu-
racy and unf ai rness. The News
Counci l can be cont act ed at 12
South Si xth St., Sui te 940, Mi n-
neapolis, MN 55402, or (612) 341-
9357.
Press Freedom
Freedom of the press is guar-
anteed under the First Amendment
to the U.S. Constitution:
“Congress shall make no law
respecting an establishment of reli-
gion, or prohibiting the free exer-
cise thereof; or abridging the free-
dom of speech, or the press…”
Ben Franklin wrote in the Penn-
sylvania Gazette in 1731: “If print-
ers were determined not to print
anything till they were sure it would
offend nobody there would be very
little printed.”
Deadline for the Arlington En-
terprise news is 4 p.m., Monday,
and advertising is noon, Tuesday.
Deadline for The Galaxy advertis-
ing is noon Wednesday.
Established in 1884.
Postmaster send address changes to:
Arlington Enterprise.
402 West Alden Street, P.O. Box 388,
Arlington, MN 55307.
Phone 507-964-5547 FAX 507-964-2423.
Hours: Monday-Wednesday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.;
Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 2 p.m.; and Friday closed.
Entered as Periodicals postal matter at Arlington,
MN post office. Postage paid at Arlington USPS No.
031-980.
Subscription Rates: Minnesota – $33.00 per year. Out-
side of state – $38.00 per year.
Arlington ENTERPRISE
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 17, 2013, page 5
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
The Arlington Area Chamber
of Commerce would like to
wish you and yours a
Stop by and sign up for a
free turkey
at these participating
businesses.
Arlington Enterprise
R&R Auto Repair
Los 3 Hermanos
Lensing Insurance
Pinske Real Estate
Kick’s Bakery
Godfathers Pizza
Arlington Haus
Jerry’s Home Quality Foods
Sibley East School
After Burner Auto Body
Arlington State Bank
Sibley Medical Center
Arlington Liquors
NAPA Auto
Thomes Bros.
Y-Not Plumbing & Heating
Liberty Station
Arlington Dugout
Arlington Animal Clinic
Steve’s Copy Shop & More
Arlington Chiropractic
Haggenmiller Lumber
Gustafson Family Dental
Hutchinson Co-op
Arlington Meat Market
Computer Restore
www.arlingtonmnchamber.com
Drawing
November 20th
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in Arlington on
starting at 5:30 pm
, October 31st!
Halloween
right Night
, October 31st!
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History
95 Years Ago
October 17, 1918
Louis Kill, Editor
Tuesday evening, at the home
of the bride, occurred the wed-
ding of two well known and
popular young people of this
vicinity when Miss Alma Ander-
sen became the wife of Eberhart
Wiemann. The bride was attend-
ed by her sister, Miss Lillie An-
dersen and Otto Wiemann, the
groom’s brother, was best man.
They will reside on the groom’s
farm in Dryden Township.
An auction sale, which will
perhaps be one of the largest
ever held in this vicinity, will
take place on the Fred Wiemann
farm, west of Arlington, next
Thursday, October 24. Mr. Wie-
mann will retire from his splen-
did farm this fall and come to
Arlington with his family to re-
side in their new home, which
was built in the Addition this
summer. The farm has been
rented to Aug. Schauer.
A hunting party composed of
Ole, Baldy, Phil and Heine
drove out to Farwell’s Lake
Sunday morning, taking two
tame dusks with them for de-
coys. Game was scarce and luck
was poor, not one of the boys
getting a shot. To make matters
worse, one of the tame ducks
disappeared. What became of it
is a mystery, although strong
suspicion rests on one of the
party who is thought to have be-
come desperate and slipped off
into the woods for a duck “fry”
all by himself.
70 Years Ago
October 21, 1943
Louis Kill, Editor
Arlington friends will be
pleased to hear of the marriage
of Miss Lucille Scheer, daughter
of Mr. & Mrs. Henry Scheer and
M/Sgt. Herbert Delzer. The
vows were spoken at the parson-
age of the First Lutheran Church
in Fort Smith, Ark. The bride
wore a brown wool suit with
dark brown accessories and a
shoulder corsage of white garde-
nias. Sgt. and Mrs. Delzer will
reside at Fort Smith, Ark., near
Camp Chaffee, where the groom
is stationed.
Marshal August Scherfer has
given the city hydrants a coat of
paint which adds a touch of
neatness to our Green Isle city
streets.
The New “Swurlskirt” with
32 graceful tuck gores in smart
shades of Rayon Crepe have
that non-curl waistband. Blue,
red, black $4.95 available at
Kruger’s Federated Store, Ar-
lington.
45 Years Ago
October 17, 1968
Val Kill, Editor
Bids for the new hospital ex-
pansion project were accepted at
a meeting of the city council,
hospital board, architects and
prospective builders. The low
bid for the remodeling and en-
larging was $545,200. The gen-
eral construction bid was award-
ed to Kratochuil Construction
Co. of New Prague, Electrical to
Wilfahrt Brothers of New Ulm
and the mechanical went to Axel
Newman Plumbing and Heat-
ing.
Wednesday morning a Beach-
craft trainer plane carrying two
Arlington men, Kenneth Steffl,
36, and Ted Mullinax, 40 for-
merly of Hutchinson now em-
ployed at Poquette Motors in
Arlington, crashed near a farm-
yard, killing both men and de-
molishing the plane. The crash
occurred a short distance from
the Earl Longhenry farmyard in
New Auburn Township.
The Food Stamp Program in
Cook, Le Sueur, Mille Lacs, and
Sibley counties will be initiated
as soon as administrative
arrangement are complete. This
brings to 47 the number of Min-
nesota counties which are par-
ticipating in the Food Stamp
Program. The Sibley County
Welfare Department plans to
begin the program on December
1st. Applications will be taken
in November.
Triplet calves were born on
the Gerald Trocke farm last
week. The trio were pictured
with the Trockes’ son Peter.
20 Years Ago
October 14, 1993
Kurt Menk, Editor
The Arlington-Green Isle
School Board, during a special
meeting last Friday morning, ac-
cepted three bids in connection
with improvements to be made
at the A-GI Swimming Pool.
The bids include $10,355 for re-
grouting the pool, $1,300 for re-
grouting the shower floors, and
$1,500 for switching from gas
chlorine to liquid chlorine.
These projects will be complet-
ed by the end of October and the
plan is to fill the swimming pool
the first week of November.
Sibley County has been ap-
proved to receive a total of
$6,575.50 in snowmobile grant-
in-aid trail funding for the 1993-
1994 fiscal year through the De-
partment of Natural Resources.
The money is used to maintain
and groom snowmobile trails in
the county.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Tour at Green Isle Fire Hall
Students from the Green Isle Community School had
the opportunity to tour the Green Isle Fire Hall on
Wednesday afternoon, Oct. 9. The event was held dur-
ing Fire Prevention Week. Front Row: (left to right)
Grace Schwartz, Shanise Bates, Jordan Latzke, Ari-
ana Lunow, Audrey Parrott, Cody DeVries and Dakota
Hendley. Middle Row: (l to r) Joe Roepke, Tyson
Grams, Johnny Garcia, Beau Stewart, Abby Bode,
Sam Menne, Abby Koch, Lindsey Czarnecki and
Aaron Ehrich. Back Row: (l to r) Special Education
paraprofessional Derek Longhenry, teacher Kristen
Strauss, firefighter Joe Lemke, firefighter Jeff Ehrich
and firefighter Dan Graczak.
problems, they argue, is good
— a government that’s able to
act, they believe, creates more
problems than it solves.
Likewise, some people ac-
knowledge polarization as a
problem, but blame it on an
electorate that prefers a divid-
ed government, split between
the parties. All I can say is
that divided government in
the past — think Ronald Rea-
gan and Tip O’Neill — didn’t
keep Congress from creatively
addressing national chal-
lenges. Divided government is
not easy, but it is not unusual
and it can work.
Politicians don’t deserve all
the blame. Voters share re-
sponsibility: more people
have to turn out to vote. The
more people who vote, the
better the chances to strength-
en the political center — that
is, moderates and pragmatists.
That’s because low turnout
brings out the most ideologi-
cally intense voters, who in
turn reward the most polariz-
ing candidates. A Congress
more representative of the
American people rests on ex-
panding efforts to convince
people to vote, and beating
back the barriers to voting.
The second solution lies
with members of Congress.
Contemplating a government
shutdown, a Kentucky con-
gressman recently explained
his stance by saying, “All that
really matters is what my dis-
trict wants.” This is not an un-
common view, but it’s a dis-
tressingly limited one. Our
system depends on members
who believe it’s also their re-
sponsibility to lead and in-
form voters, who are willing
to weigh the national interest
as well as parochial concerns
and who have confidence in
our system to resolve political
differences.
In other words, we need
members of Congress devoted
to making the system work.
We need men and women in
office who understand that
when the voters give us a di-
vided government, they have
no choice but to accept the
distribution of power and
work with it, regardless of
what they wish were the case.
We need legislators who real-
ize that those on the other side
feel just as passionately and
deserve their respect, and who
are committed to finding a so-
lution to our problems.
We change laws in our
democracy and solve our most
difficult issues in this country
not by bringing government to
a halt, but by fighting out the
issues before the voters in an
election. At the end of the
day, we have to move the
country forward — and we
need to elect members of
Congress who are willing and
able to do that.
Lee Hamilton is Director of
the Center on Congress at In-
diana University. He was a
member of the U.S. House of
Representatives for 34 years.
Hamilton Continued from page 4
• The county approved an
agreement between Sibley
County and Arlington Town-
ship for reconstruction of
Bridge No. L2697 on 387th
Ave.
Also approved was the co-
operative agreement between
Sibley County and the City of
Arlington for next year’s con-
struction of a section of the
Prairie Line Trail that runs
through town.
Becker said the current tim-
ber bridge in Arlington Town-
ship will be replaced with a
concrete bridge, with the cost
covered by township bridge
funds.
• A petition from High Point
Farms for an improvement of
a portion of County Ditch #55
Lat C was tabled until more
study of the situation can be
done.
The improvement has al-
ready been done, but without
a permit. The petitioner said
he asked the county environ-
mental services if he could
help prevent ditch erosion and
was told he could. It was not
understood how to go about it.
• Approval was given for a
statement of work for scan-
ning conversion services by
Mid America Business Sys-
tems at an estimated cost of
$18,307.35.
The request is from the
county auditor’s department
that will convert existing
paper records into digital im-
ages. Subject matter includes
board proceedings and agenda
work papers, county newspa-
pers, county blueprints/maps
and county ditch maps.
• County building/infra-
structure improvements were
approved. One is the upgrade
of storage for the document
imaging system. Carpeting
will be replaced in the court-
house/annex building.
Because of new staff and
reorganization in the Public
Health and Human Services
building the walls will be
painted.
There will be renovation of
the storage room/vault project.
The final stage of remodel of
the Emergency Management
Office in the annex involves
electrical work.
Sibley County Continued from page 1
Motorists and passengers in
Minnesota are buckling up at
record high rates, according
to the Minnesota Department
of Public Safety (DPS) Office
of Traffic Safety. Results
from DPS’ annual observa-
tional seat belt use survey—
conducted in June—show a
94.8 percent seat belt use
rate. This marks a more than
15 percent increase in belt
use since 2003; up from 93.6
percent in 2012.
DPS officials attribute the
continued increase in seat
belt use to awareness and en-
forcement of the state’s pri-
mary seat belt law, which be-
came effective in June 2009.
The announcement of the
new seat belt use rate comes
during a statewide Click It or
Ticket seat belt enforcement
campaign that runs through
Oct. 19.
Despite the increase in belt
use, OTS officials say there is
still room for improvement,
noting the correlation be-
tween increased belt use and
the decline of unbelted
deaths.
“Seat belts save lives, and
the increase in belt use is a
positive sign that more and
more people realize that,”
says Donna Berger, OTS di-
rector. “However, more than
100 unbelted motorists and
passengers are killed every
year on Minnesota roads. We
ask everyone to do their part
to reduce these preventable
tragedies by buckling up,
every ride, every time.”
Charting Minnesota
Seat Belt Use Rates and
Unbelted Deaths
As seat belt use has in-
creased, unbelted deaths have
dropped:
• 1986 (the year Minnesota
first passed a seat belt law):
Belt compliance was 20 per-
cent; 280 unbelted deaths.
• 2003: Belt compliance
was 79.4 percent; 257 unbelt-
ed deaths.
• 2008: Belt use was 86.7
percent; 150 unbelted deaths.
• 2012: Belt use was 93.6
percent; 116 unbelted deaths.
Seat Belt Survey Results
• Data were collected at
240 sites in 43 counties based
on where 85 percent of the
state’s road deaths occurred
on average from 2007–2009.
16,436 front seat occupants
were observed.
• Belt use rate by vehicle
type: Van — 97.3 percent;
SUV — 96.7 percent; Car —
95.8 percent; Pickup — 86.8
percent. Pickup occupant belt
use is historically low, but has
improved (up from 76 per-
cent in 2008).
• Belt use rate by gender:
Females — 97.5 percent;
Males — 92.6 percent. Both
rates are up from last year:
Females—95.6 percent;
Males—91.9 percent.
• Belt use rate by age: 0–10
— 99.4 percent; 11–15 —
99.2 percent; 16–29 — 92.8
percent; 30–64 — 95.4 per-
cent; 65 and older — 93.7
percent.
Minnesota Seat Belt Law
Drivers and passengers in
all seating positions, includ-
ing in the back seat, are re-
quired to be buckled up or
seated in the correct child re-
straint. Officers will stop and
ticket unbelted drivers or pas-
sengers. Seat belts must be
worn correctly — low and
snug across the hips; shoulder
straps should never be tucked
under an arm or behind the
back.
Seat belt compliance reaches record rate in MN
24” x 36”
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Arlington Enterprise
Sibley Shopper
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 17, 2013, page 6
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Sports
Kurt’s Korner
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Sibley East junior Breann
Walsh placed third in the sin-
gle competition during the re-
cent Section 2A Girls Indi-
vidual Tennis Tournament at
Gustavus Adolphus College.
Walsh
Breann Walsh, in the open-
ing round at the Swanson
Tennis Center, defeated jun-
ior Hannah Poehl, Maple
River, 6-1, 6-1 on Thursday,
Oct. 10.
In the quarter-final round,
Walsh defeated freshman
Rachel Huber, St. Peter, 7-5,
6-3 on Thursday, Oct. 10.
In the semi-final round,
Walsh lost to United South
Central senior and eventual
champion Claire Christian 2-
6, 3-6 on Monday, Oct. 14.
In her next match, Walsh
defeated senior Julia Stenzel,
United South Central, 3-6, 6-
0, injury default on Monday,
Oct. 14.
In the true second match,
Walsh lost to junior Karleigh
Wolff, Blue Earth Area, 4-6,
3-6 on Monday, Oct. 14.
“I could not be more proud
of the way Breann Walsh rep-
resented the Sibley East ten-
nis team at the Section 2A in-
dividual Tennis Tournament,”
said Sibley East head coach
Melissa Laumeyer. “She
came out and gave it her all
to the very last point. She had
fluid, strong strokes through-
out her three matches today
and never let up. She played
smart tennis and really made
points happen.
Laumeyer added, “She will
continue to grow in this game
and I am anxious to see what
she can do next season.”
Schrupp
Sibley East senior Mariah
Schrupp, in the opening
round at the Swanson Tennis
Center, defeated junior
Rachel Rigdon, Maple River,
6-1, 6-1 on Thursday, Oct.
10.
In the quarter-final round,
Schrupp lost to junior Kar-
leigh Wolff, Blue Earth Area,
3-6, 1-6 on Thursday, Oct.
10.
Kranz & Harter
The doubles team of Sibley
East senior Alicia Kranz and
freshman Alli Harter, in the
opening round, lost to Belle
Plaine senior Ashley Morri-
son and junior Jane Schneider
1-6, 3-6 on Thursday, Oct.
10.
Mercier &
Lundstrom
The doubles team of Sibley
East junior Ashley Mercier
and freshman Ella Lund-
strom, during a play-in
match, lost to Le Sueur-Hen-
derson juniors Kennedy
Straub and Katelyn Hank 2-6,
7-6 (15-17) 8-10.
Walsh places 3rd in section tennis tourney
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
girls volleyball team closed
out its regular season with
three wins and recorded its
20th total victory.
The Lady Wolverines con-
clude the regular season with
a 4-3 mark in Minnesota
River Conference action and
a 20-8 record overall. This is
the first time Sibley East has
had a winning record in con-
ference play since 2004.
Sibley East 3
Norwood Young America 1
The visiting Sibley East
varsity girls volleyball team
defeated Norwood Young
America 3-1. This was a non-
Minnesota River Conference
match played on Tuesday
night, Oct. 8.
The Lady Wolverines, who
lost the first game 25-22, won
the next three games 25-23,
25-20 and 25-21 respectively.
Senior Megan Eckberg led
Sibley East with nine kills
and five blocks. Junior Au-
tumn Dose recorded nine
kills, nine digs and three
service aces. Junior Shelby
Voigt, who converted 12 of
12 serves, contributed 23 digs
while junior Karley Lind
dished out 22 set assists.
Sophomore Megan Krentz
compiled seven kills and six
blocks while sophomore
Alyssa Weber had six kills
and three blocks. Junior Kelli
Martens added five kills and
three blocks.
Sibley East 3
Watertown-Mayer 0
The visiting Sibley East
varsity girls volleyball team
swept Watertown-Mayer 3-0.
This was a Minnesota River
Conference match played on
Thursday evening, Oct. 10.
The Lady Wolverines
swept the Royals 25-19, 25-
16 and 25-19 respectively.
Sibley East was paced by
sophomore Megan Krentz
with 11 kills and four blocks.
Senior Megan Eckberg had
eight kills and six blocks
while junior Shelby Voight
recorded 25 digs. Junior Au-
tumn Dose registered 11 digs,
five kills and two blocks
while junior Karley Lind had
14 of 14 serves and 20 set as-
sists. Sophomore Alyssa
Weber collected eight kills
and two blocks while sopho-
more Katie Tuchtenhagen had
21 set assists.
Sibley East 3
Le Sueur-Henderson 2
The visiting Sibley East
varsity girls volleyball team
closed out its regular season
with a 3-2 win over Le Sueur-
Henderson. This was a Min-
nesota River Conference
match played on Monday
night, Oct. 14.
The Lady Wolverines, who
dropped the second and third
games 25-23 and 28-26, cap-
tured the first, fourth and fifth
games 25-22, 25-26 and 15-8
respectively.
Junior Autumn Dose paced
Sibley East with 21 of 22
serves with four aces, 18 digs
and 10 kills. Junior Shelby
Voight had 14 of 14 serves
and 26 digs while sophomore
McKayla Stumm compiled
25 of 25 serves and nine digs.
Senior Megan Eckberg con-
tributed 11 kills and four
blocks while sophomore
Megan Krentz had 13 kills.
Junior Karley Lind and soph-
omore Katie Tuchtenhagen
dished out 26 and 24 set as-
sists respectively while junior
Kelli Martens and sophomor
Alyssa Martens added seven
kills each.
Sibley East volleyball team nets 20th win
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Sibley East junior Breann Walsh competed against
eventual section champion Claire Christian, United
South Central, at the Swanson Tennis Center in St.
Peter on Monday morning, Oct. 14.
Football
Playoffs
The Sibley East varsity
football team, prior to its final
game on Wednesday night,
Oct. 16, was ranked sixth in
the Section 3AAA Playoffs,
according to head coach
Chuck Hartman.
The Wolverines, who were
a member of Section 2AA last
year, will probably travel to
either St. Peter or Blue Earth
Area in the opening round of
the playoffs at 7 p.m. Tues-
day, Oct. 22.
Volleyball
Playoffs
The Sibley East varsity
girls volleyball team received
the third seed and will host
Watertown-Mayer in the
opening round of the district
playoffs at Gaylord at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 24.
The seeding meeting was
held on Wednesday morning,
Oct. 16, according to Sibley
East head coach Chip Wolver-
ton.
Belle Plaine received the
top seed followed by Jordan,
Sibley East, Holy Family
Catholic, Norwood Young
America, Watertown-Mayer,
Glencoe-Silver Lake and Le
Sueur-Henderson.
DuFrane
Sibley East graduate Teddy
DuFrane is listed as a fresh-
man offensive lineman for the
men’s football team at the
University of Wisconsin at
River Falls this year. DuFrane
wears jersey number 54.
The Falcons are winless in
five games with five contests
left on the schedule.
He is the son of Joseph and
Beth DuFrane, rural Hender-
son.
Golfing
Stan went golfing with Ted.
By the ninth hole, Stan was
taking a real long time.
“Hurry up!” Ted yelled.
“No my wife is watch-
ing!”answered Stan. “I want
to make this a perfect shot!”
Ted turns to Stan and said,
“Oh you’ll never hit her from
here!”
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
boys and girls cross country
teams competed in the Min-
nesota River Conference
Meet at Baylor Park near
Norwood Young America on
Thursday afternoon, Oct. 10.
Sibley East will compete in
the section meet at the Mont-
gomery Golf Course on
Thursday afternoon, Oct. 24.
The varsity girls race will
begin at 4 p.m. while the var-
sity boys race will follow at 5
p.m.
Boys Team
In the varsity boys race,
sophomore Jack Ballalatak
placed 24th among 55 run-
ners with a time of 18:49.
Junior Sam Thies placed 27th
with a clocking of 19:08
while sophomore Justin Ben-
nett finished 38th with a
showing of 19:56. Eighth
grader Kristian Schow placed
40th with a recording of 20
minutes while senior Ben
Ahlstrand finished 41st with
a time of 20:03. Eighth grad-
er Logan Tesch placed 51st
with a clocking of 21:25
while junior Jonah Butler fin-
ished 52nd with a showing of
21:50.
In the junior varsity race,
junior Korban Strand placed
49th among 76 runners with a
time of 22:17. Junior Chase
Ellwood finished 51st with a
clocking of 22:19 while soph-
omore Jack Rosenfeld placed
55th with a showing of 22:38.
Senior Mike Schenck placed
71st with a recording of
26:49 while sophomore Ian
Holmes finished 72nd with a
time of 26:50.
In the shorter junior high
race, eighth grader Cameron
Thurn placed 37th with a
time of 7:32.
Girls Team
In the varsity girls race,
freshman Alison Eibs placed
11th among 52 runners with a
time of 17:05. Senior Maren
Miner placed 38th with a
clocking of 19:01 while
freshman Abigail Butler fin-
ished 39th with a showing of
10:02. Seventh grader Brean-
na Fahning placed 43rd with
a time of 20:02 while junior
Karina Robeck finished 46th
with a recording of 20:27.
Eighth grader Tamara Ehrich
placed 47th with a clocking
of 20:28. Senior Heidi Mil-
czark placed 51st with a
showing of 23:32.
In the shorter junior high
race, seventh grader Ariel
Butler placed 24th with a
time of 8:32 while seventh
grader Taylor Strand followed
in 25th place with a showing
of 9:24.
SE cross country teams compete in MRC meet
By Kurt Menk
Editor
In a game that was much
closer than the final score in-
dicated, the visiting Sibley
East varsity football team de-
feated Le Sueur-Henderson
36-12 during a Minnesota
River Conference contest on
Friday night, Oct. 11.
The Wolverines, on their
opening possession, drove
down field and scored on a 3-
yard run by senior running
back Alex Pedraza.
The extra point kick by
senior Quentin Gex failed as
Sibley East had to settle for a
6-0 lead with 5:34 in the
opening quarter.
The Giants, after the ensu-
ing kickoff, marched down
field and scored on a 32-yard
touchdown pass from senior
quarterback Brady Rose to
junior Riley McGraw. Senior
Elia Celoria followed with
the extra point kick as Le
Sueur-Henderson grabbed a
7-6 lead with 2:40 in the first
quarter.
Sibley East, on its next
possession, drove 77 yards
before Pedraza hit paydirt on
another 3-yard run.
Senior Erik Danielson ran
for the two-point conversion
as the Wolverines regained
the lead at 14-7 with 8:09 in
the second frame.
A failed fake punt by the
Giants set up the next Sibley
East touchdown a few min-
utes later.
The Wolverines, who took
over possession of the
pigskin on the Le Sueur-Hen-
derson 29-yard line, quickly
drove 27 yards before Pe-
draza scored on a 2-yard
touchdown run.
Senior wide receiver Beau
Swenson ran for the two-
point conversion as Sibley
East jumped to a 22-7 advan-
tage with 3:33 left in the sec-
ond quarter.
Sibley East, on its first pos-
session in the third quarter,
marched downfield and
scored on a 4-yard run by
sophomore Quin Riffenburg.
Although the two-point
conversion failed after a poor
snap from center on the extra
point kick, the Wolverines in-
creased their lead to 28-7
with 3:17 remaining in the
third quarter.
A Sibley East fumble near
midfield at the end of the
third quarter set up a Le
Sueur-Henderson touchdown
early in the fourth quarter.
The Giants touchdown
came on a 50-yard pass from
Rose to McGraw. Celoria
converted the extra point kick
as Le Sueur-Henderson
climbed within 28-14.
Le Sueur-Henderson, after
another Sibley East fumble,
scored another touchdown on
a 19-yard pass from Rose to
McGraw, but the score was
nullified due to a penalty.
Sibley East, meanwhile,
held on downs and later took
control of the ball.
The Wolverines scored
their next touchdown on a
41-yard run by Danielson.
Pedraza ran for the two-
point conversion as Sibley
East raced to a 36-14 lead
and eventual victory.
The Wolverine offense
compiled 442 yards on the
ground. Danielson had 31
carries for 235 yards and one
touchdown. Pedraza had 27
attempts for 123 yards and
three touchdowns. Swenson
contributed 40 yards on seven
rushes while Riffenburg had
two carries for 14 yards and
one score. Freshman Brody
Bates added 12 yards on two
attempts.
Senior quarterback Brody
Rodning completed one of
three passing attempts for 26
yards.
Junior Lukas Bullert had
the lone reception for 26
yards.
“Our offensive line played
great,” said Sibley East head
coach Chuck Hartman. “Our
game plan was to run the ball
and chew up clock.”
The Wolverine defense,
meanwhile, limited the Gi-
ants to a pair of touchdowns.
Senior Ben White paced
Sibley East with five solo
tackles, three assisted tackles,
two tackles for a loss and two
quarterback sacks. Sopho-
more Logan Jorgenson con-
tributed one solo tackle, three
assisted tackles and one quar-
terback sack. Senior Cordell
Bates and sophomore Travis
Schmidt collected three solo
tackles each and one assisted
tackle apiece while junior
Ben Frietag added one solo
tackle and three assisted tack-
les.
“Our defensive line also
played great,” Hartman said.
“We held them under 100
yards rushing and our front
guys were able to get an oc-
casional pass rush which
forced their quarterback to
scramble. We allowed a cou-
ple deep balls we shouldn’t
have.   We know better, but
credit LSH, their quarterback
throws a nice deep ball and
they have some good edge
players.”
The Wolverines were
scheduled to conclude their
regular season against visit-
ing Mayer Lutheran in MRC
action on Wednesday night,
Oct. 16.
Sibley East is then off to
the playoffs.
“All I can guarantee is we
will be road warriors this
year,” said Hartman. 
SE football team
beats LS-H 36-14
Governor Mark Dayton re-
cently announced that the
City of Worthington has been
chosen as the host communi-
ty for the 2014 Minnesota
Governor’s Pheasant Hunting
Opener.
The announcement was
made during the banquet at
this year’s pheasant opener
event, hosted by the city of
Madelia.
“For more than 50 years, I
have enjoyed pheasant hunt-
ing in Minnesota,” said Gov-
ernor Dayton, who began the
Governor’s Pheasant Opener
tradition in 2011. “Over the
past three years, we have en-
joyed terrific openers, thanks
to the tremendous work of
our hosts in Montevideo,
Marshall, and, now, Madelia.
I am pleased to announce that
next year, the fourth annual
Governor’s Pheasant Opener
will be held in Worthington.”
Worthington was selected
through an application
process that considered hunt-
ing land in the area, event fa-
cilities and community sup-
port.
Previous host communities
have been Montevideo, Mar-
shall and Madelia. The event
highlights the many hunting,
recreational, travel and local
opportunities that host com-
munities have to offer visi-
tors.
Explore Minnesota
Tourism and Minnesota De-
partment of Natural Re-
sources will assist local part-
ners in planning the event.
Worthington has a popula-
tion of 12,764 and is located
in southwestern Minnesota at
the intersection of Interstate
90 and state Highway 60.
Worthington named host community of 2014
MN Governor’s Pheasant Hunting Opener
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 17, 2013, page 7
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
combined
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tions of the following described
mortgage:
DATE OF MORTGAGE: No-
vember 28, 2007
MORTGAGOR: Eric D. Hen-
drickson and Michelle M. Hen-
drickson, husband and wife.
MORTGAGEE: Washi ngton
Mutual Bank, FA.
DATE AND PLACE OF
RECORDING: Filed December
20, 2007, Sibley County Registrar
of Titles, Document No. T-20099
on Certificate of Title No. 6813.0
ASSIGNMENTS OF MORT-
GAGE: Assigned to: JPMorgan
Chase Bank, National Association.
Dated July 16, 2013 Filed August
5, 2013, as Document No.
T22892.
Said Mortgage being upon Reg-
istered Land.
TRANSACTION AGENT:
NONE
TRANSACTION AGENT’S
MORTGAGE IDENTIFICATION
NUMBER ON MORTGAGE:
NONE
LENDER OR BROKER AND
MORTGAGE ORIGINATOR
STATED ON MORTGAGE: Wash-
ington Mutual Bank, FA
RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE
SERVICER: JPMorgan Chase
Bank, Ntional Association
MORTGAGE PROPERTY AD-
DRESS: 318 10th Street, Gaylord,
MN 55334
TAX PARCEL I.D. #:
320507000
LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
Lot 13 and the South 25 feet of
Lot 14, in Block 50, in Second
West Addition to the City of Gay-
lord, Sibley County, Minnesota
COUNTY IN WHICH PROPER-
TY IS LOCATED: Sibley
ORIGINAL PRINCIPAL
AMOUNT OF MORTGAGE:
$129,600.00
AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED
TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF
NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF
ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE:
$125,441.71
That prior to the commence-
ment of this mortgage foreclosure
proceeding Mortgagee/Assignee
of Mortgagee complied with all no-
tice requirements as required by
statute; That no action or proceed-
ing has been instituted at law or
otherwise to recover the debt se-
cured by said mortgage, or any
part thereof;
PURSUANT to the power of
sale contained in said mortgage,
the above described property will
be sol d by the Sheri ff of sai d
county as follows:
DATE AND TIME OF SALE:
November 15, 2013 at 10:00 AM
PLACE OF SALE: Sheriff’s Of-
fice, Sheriff’s Department, 310
Park Avenue, Gaylord, MN
to pay the debt then secured by
said Mortgage, and taxes, if any,
on said premises, and the costs
and disbursements, including at-
torneys’ fees allowed by law sub-
ject to redemption within six (6)
months from the date of said sale
by the mortgagor(s), their personal
representatives or assigns unless
reduced to Five (5) weeks under
MN Stat. §580.07.
TIME AND DATE TO VACATE
PROPERTY: If the real estate is
an owner-occupied, single-family
dwelling, unless otherwise provid-
ed by law, the date on or before
which the mortgagor(s) must va-
cate the property if the mortgage
is not reinstated under section
580.30 or the property is not re-
deemed under section 580.23 is
11:59 p.m. on May 15, 2014, un-
less that date falls on a weekend
or legal holiday, in which case it is
the next weekday, and unless the
redemption period is reduced to 5
weeks under MN Stat. Secs.
580.07 or 582.032.
MORTGAGOR(S) RELEASED
FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGATION
ON MORTGAGE: None
“THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW
FOR REDEMPTION BY THE
MORTGAGOR, THE MORT-
GAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRE-
SENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS, MAY
BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS
IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS EN-
TERED UNDER MINNESOTA
STATUTES, SECTION 582.032,
DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER
THINGS, THAT THE MORT-
GAGED PREMISES ARE IM-
PROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL
DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE
UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY
USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRO-
DUCTION, AND ARE ABAN-
DONED.”
Dated: September 12, 2013
JPMorgan Chase Bank,
National Association
Mortgagee/Assignee of Mort-
gagee
USSET, WEINGARDEN AND
LIEBO, P.L.L.P.
Attorneys for Mortgagee/Assignee
of Mortgagee
4500 Park Glen Road #300
Minneapolis, MN 55416
(952) 925-6888
30 – 13-005754FC
THIS IS A COMMUNICATION
FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR.
Publish: September 26, Octo-
ber 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31, 2013
NOTICE OF MORTGAGE
FORECLOSURE SALE
THE RIGHT OF VERIFICA-
TION OF THE DEBT AND IDEN-
TITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDI-
TOR WITHIN THE TIME PROVID-
ED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECTED
BY THIS ACTION.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
that default has occurred in condi-
tions of the following described
mortgage:
DATE OF MORTGAGE: August
8, 2006
MORTGAGOR: Paul a R.
Cheever, a single person.
MORTGAGEE: Mortgage Elec-
tronic Registration Systems, Inc.
DATE AND PLACE OF
RECORDING: Recorded August
14, 2006, Sibley County Recorder,
Document No. A-207043
ASSIGNMENTS OF MORT-
GAGE: Assigned to: The Bank of
New York Mellon FKA The Bank of
New York, as Trustee for the Cer-
tificateholders of the CWALT, Inc.,
Alternative Loan Trust 2006-OC11
Mortgage Pass-through Certifi-
cates, Series 2006-OC11. Dated
June 14, 2012, Recorded June
28, 2012, as Document No.
A227374.
TRANSACTION AGENT: Mort-
gage Electronic Registration Sys-
tems, Inc.
TRANSACTION AGENT’S
MORTGAGE IDENTIFICATION
NUMBER ON MORTGAGE:
100077960000090655
LENDER OR BROKER AND
MORTGAGE ORIGINATOR
STATED ON MORTGAGE: Deci-
si on One Mortgage Company,
LLC
RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE
SERVICER: Select Portfolio Serv-
icing, Inc.
MORTGAGE PROPERTY AD-
DRESS: 312 East Adams Street,
Arlington, MN 55307
TAX PARCEL I.D. #:
31.0260.000
LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
Lot number One (1), and Lot
number Two (2), excepting the
West 25 feet of Lot 2, in Block
number El even (11) i n
Streissguth’s Addition to the Vil-
lage of Arlington, Sibley County,
Minnesota.
COUNTY IN WHICH PROPER-
TY IS LOCATED: Sibley
ORIGINAL PRINCIPAL
AMOUNT OF MORTGAGE:
$109,120.00
AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED
TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF
NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF
ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE:
$128,104.67
That prior to the commence-
ment of this mortgage foreclosure
proceeding Mortgagee/Assignee
of Mortgagee complied with all no-
tice requirements as required by
statute; That no action or proceed-
ing has been instituted at law or
otherwise to recover the debt se-
cured by said mortgage, or any
part thereof;
PURSUANT to the power of
sale contained in said mortgage,
the above described property will
be sol d by the Sheri ff of sai d
county as follows:
DATE AND TIME OF SALE:
December 13, 2013 at 10:00 AM
PLACE OF SALE: Sheriff’s Of-
fice, Sheriff’s Department, 319
Park Avenue, Gaylord MN
to pay the debt then secured by
said Mortgage, and taxes, if any,
on said premises, and the costs
and disbursements, including at-
torneys’ fees allowed by law sub-
ject to redemption within six (6)
months from the date of said sale
by the mortgagor(s), their personal
representatives or assigns unless
reduced to Five (5) weeks under
MN Stat. §580.07.
TIME AND DATE TO VACATE
PROPERTY: If the real estate is
an owner-occupied, single-family
dwelling, unless otherwise provid-
ed by law, the date on or before
which the mortgagor(s) must va-
cate the property if the mortgage
is not reinstated under section
580.30 or the property is not re-
deemed under section 580.23 is
11:59 p.m. on June 13, 2014, un-
less that date falls on a weekend
or legal holiday, in which case it is
the next weekday, and unless the
redemption period is reduced to 5
weeks under MN Stat. Secs.
580.07 or 582.032.
MORTGAGOR(S) RELEASED
FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGATION
ON MORTGAGE: None
“THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW
FOR REDEMPTION BY THE
MORTGAGOR, THE MORT-
GAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRE-
SENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS, MAY
BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS
IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS EN-
TERED UNDER MINNESOTA
STATUTES, SECTION 582.032,
DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER
THINGS, THAT THE MORT-
GAGED PREMISES ARE IM-
PROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL
DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE
UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY
USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRO-
DUCTION, AND ARE ABAN-
DONED.”
Dated: October 9, 2013
The Bank of New York Mellon
f/k/a
The Bank of New York, as
Trustee
Mortgagee/Assignee of Mort-
gagee
USSET, WEINGARDEN AND
LIEBO, P.L.L.P.
Attorneys for Mortgagee/Assignee
of Mortgagee
4500 Park Glen Road #300
Minneapolis, MN 55416
(952) 925-6888
38 – 13-007006 FC
THIS IS A COMMUNICATION
FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR.
Publish: October 17, 24, 31,
November 7, 14, and 21, 2013
Minnesota hunters con-
tribute to the economic health
of the state’s economy each
year, according to a news re-
lease from the Minnesota De-
partment of Natural Re-
sources.
More than a half-million
Minnesotans and non-resi-
dents hunt in Minnesota each
year. Collectively they spend
an estimated $725 million per
year, according to the 2011
National Survey of Fishing,
Hunting and Wildlife-Associ-
ated Recreation.
“Minnesota ranks ninth in
the nation for resident hunter
numbers,” said C.B. Bylander,
outreach chief for the Min-
nesota Department of Natural
Resources’ Fish and Wildlife
Division. “This strong tradi-
tion of hunting has long
helped fuel local economies
throughout the farmland and
forested portions of the state.”
According the 2011 nation-
al survey direct expenditures
by hunters in Minnesota in-
clude:
$400 million on equipment
such as guns, ammunition and
special clothes.
$235 million on trip related
expenses such as food, lodg-
ing and transportation.
$90 million on other ex-
penses such as land leasing,
hunting land ownership, mag-
azines, etc.
Bylander said the average
amount spent per hunter in
2011 was $1,412, up from
$889 in 2006 when the previ-
ous survey was taken. Direct
retail sales related to upland
bird hunting totaled about
$121 million. When combined
with angling, Minnesota
hunters and anglers support
nearly 48,000 Minnesota jobs.
MN hunters fuel local
economics with $724
million in spending
Now that hunting season is
underway, the Minnesota De-
partment of Natural Re-
sources (DNR) wants people
to know which public lands
remain open during the feder-
al government shutdown.
Minnesota’s wildlife man-
agement areas, Walk-In Ac-
cess areas and state forests
are open during the shut-
down. State fish and game li-
censes as well as federal duck
stamps can be purchased at
any DNR license agent, on-
line and via telephone at 888-
665-4236.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife
service announced Friday af-
ternoon that all Waterfowl
Production Areas were re-
opened effective immediately
because opening those lands
will not incur further govern-
ment expenditure or obliga-
tion.
Minnesota’s 76 state parks
and recreation areas and state
trails remain open. To check
if a particular park is a state
park, refer to the map online
or contact the DNR Informa-
tion Center at 651-296-6157,
toll-free 888-646-6367 or
info.dnr@state.mn.us.
The Superior and Chippe-
wa national forests remain
accessible and available for
hunting and fishing. U.S.
Forest Service offices and
visitor centers, including
those in Superior and
Chippewa, are closed.
National wildlife refuges,
which the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service manages,
are closed during the shut-
down, according to the feder-
al agency.
Find more information
about the status of federal
lands and waters impacted by
the shutdown on the DNR
website.
Many public lands remain open
to hunters, recreationists during
federal government shutdown
Submitted Photo
Soccer at St. Paul’s
The soccer team at St. Paul’s Lutheran School in Ar-
lington recently completed a successful season and
placed third at the Martin Luther College Tournament
in New Ulm. Front Row: (left to right) Chris Ritari,
Kirsten Ziegler, Jaidynn Dietel, Jenna Wendland, Alex
Ritari and Nick Ritari. Back Row: (left to right) Coach
Ben Petzel, coach Eric Kaesermann, Connor Johnson,
Nathaniel Ziegler, Anthony Bullert, Trystan Duck, Yli-
jah Rendon, Kadin Seeman and coach Caleb Seeman.
See what’s
brewing on
the
job
market.
See the Arlington ENTERPRISE
CLASSIFIEDS
W W W . A R L I N G TO N M N N E W S . C O M
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 17, 2013, page 8
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
A ߣ11£a WAv To ArrLv
This fall, take advantage
of Mid-County Agronomy's
EOUAPLY Anhydrous
Ammonia Application
8ystem.
8ecure Your Anhydrous
Todayl Call us at:
{952} 466-3730
www.midcountycoop.com
*/.JE$PVOUZ
"/):%3064
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8
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4
1
S
E
a
Ag Bag Disposal at
Hutchinson Coop
in Arlington! (It’s Free!)
Sibley County - Ag Bag Collection at the
Hutchinson Coop in Arlington
(23189 State Hwy 5)
The Entire Month of October 2013!!!
For more information, contact the Sibley
County Environmental Services at 507-237-4091
Tri-County Solid Waste Office at 507-381-9196
PLEASE NOTE!
THIS IS A COLLECTION FOR
AGRICULTURE AND SEED BAG
WASTE ONLY.
NO COMMERCIAL or RESIDENTIAL
GARBAGE, CHEMICALS or BULBS.
NO HAZARDOUS WASTE
WILL BE ACCEPTED.
NO HERBICIDES OR PESTICIDES
WILL BE ACCEPTED.
ABUSE OF THIS PILOT PROJECT
WILL RESULT IN TERMINATION OF
THIS PROGRAM.
Hutchinson Coop has agreed to
keep a roll-off container at their
facility for the entire month of
October 2013 so that Sibley
County Farmer’s will have a place
to dispose of their Ag Bags at no
charge. Simply bring your old Ag
Bags to Arlington and drop them
off at no charge to you.
A40-42E,41-42Sa
Sibley County Court
The fol l owi ng mi sde-
meanors, petty misdemeanors
and gross mi sdemeanors
were heard in District Court
October 4-11: Mi nnesota
State Patrol (MSP); Sheriff’s
Office, (SO); Department of
Natural Resources (DNR): MN
Department of Transportation
(MNDOT):
Douglas R. Flieth, 38, Gay-
lord, interfere with privacy-
hotel/tanning booth/other-in-
stall or use surreptitious de-
vice, supervised probation
two years, local confinement
365 days, stay 335 days for
two years, sentence to service
40 hours for indeterminate,
contact with probation, follow
all conditions set forth in pro-
bation agreement, follow all
instructions of probation, sign
probation agreement, sign all
releases of information, re-
main law-abiding, follow rec-
ommendation of evaluation,
psychological-sexual evalua-
tion as approved by proba-
tion, $385, Arlington PD; Gre-
gory R. Wi ckenhauser, 44,
Gibbon, drive over/through/
around barricade-highway,
$125, Arlington PD; Penny L.
Arrendondo, 42, Morton, driv-
ing after revocation, $85, Gay-
lord PD; Aaron M. Cruz, 27,
Gaylord, failure to display cur-
rent regi strati on-expi red
plates, $115, proof of insur-
ance, dismissed, Gaylord PD;
Joel R. Farber, 37, Gaylord,
fail to deliver title, dismissed,
proof of insurance, continued,
unsupervised probation one
year, l ocal confinement 15
days, stay 15 days for one
year, no driving without insur-
ance, or new insurance viola-
tions, pay costs, $100, Gay-
lord PD; Amanda J. Hill, 30,
Gaylord, driving after revoca-
tion, $285, Gaylord PD; Gary
R. Janckila, 48, Gaylord, dis-
orderly conduct-brawling or
fighting, dismissed, Gaylord
PD; Sebastian Sanchez, 19,
Gaylord, DWI-refuse to submit
to chemi cal test, unsuper-
vi sed probati on one year,
local confinement one year,
stay 321 days for one year,
credit for time served 44 days,
$485, DWI-operate motor ve-
hicle under influence of alco-
hol, dismissed, hunting-illegal
transport firearm in motor ve-
hicle-unloaded, uncased in
prohibited area, dismissed,
Gaylord PD; Cody J. Servin,
24, Gaylord, indecent expo-
sure-publ i c pl ace
willfully/lewdly, local confine-
ment 90 days, credit for time
served 70 days, disorderly
c o n d u c t -
offensive/abusive/noisy/ob-
scene, damage to property-
intentional damage-other cir-
cumstances, dismissed, Gay-
lord PD; Pamela J. Ruschmey-
er, 40, Gi bbon, theft-
take/use/transfer moveable
property-no consent, stay of
imposition, supervised proba-
tion two years, local confine-
ment ten days, sentence to
service five days for indeter-
minate, pay restitution before
fines, fees, and surcharges,
no same or similar, follow all
conditions set forth in the pro-
bation agreement, follow all
instructions of probation, con-
tact with probation, sign pro-
bation agreement, sign all re-
leases of information, $1,239,
Gibbon PD; Allen L. Bartels,
66, Wi nthrop, seat bel t re-
quired, $110, MSP; Aaron P.
Doehling, 24, Arlington, seat
belt required, $110, MSP; Paul
W. Doehling, 62, Arlington,
seat belt required, $110, MSP;
Scott W. Hartwig 29, Fairmont,
unregistered-certificate re-
voked, $385, MSP; Jay J. Ji-
rasek, 40, Willmar, seat belt
required, $110, MSP; Andrew
C. Johnson, 30, Mankato,
driving after revocation, con-
tinued, unsupervised proba-
tion one year, no same or sim-
ilar, pay costs, $100, MSP;
Wi l l i am J. Lahti , 44, Eden
Prairie, speed, $125, MSP;
Christopher D. Leggett, 37,
Mounds View, speed, $125,
MSP; James L. Mi l l er, 51,
Juneau, Alaska, speed, $135,
MSP; Paol a B. Moral es-
Agui l ar, 30, Buffal o Lake,
speed, $125, MSP; Andrew B.
Portner, 60, Winthrop, seat
belt required, $110, MSP; Kyle
J. Sparrow, 27, Winthrop, driv-
ing after revocation, contin-
ued, unsupervised probation
one year, pay costs, no driver
license violations, $200, MSP;
Andrew E. Tesch, 28, Hender-
son, seat belt required, $110,
MSP; Jaime I. Gallardo, 32,
Arlington, driving without a
val i d l i cense or vehi cl e
class/type, $185, MSP; John
H. Haala, 62, Gibbon, speed,
$125, MSP; Georgi a M.
Klancke, 29, Arlington, DWI-
operate motor vehicle under
i nfluence of al cohol , l ocal
confinement 45 days, $485,
DWI-operate motor vehicle-al-
cohol concentration 0.08 with-
in two hours, dismissed, SO;
Caroline S. Kutil, 70, Cham-
berlain, S.D., speed, $125,
SO; Cameo R. Wickenhauser,
20, Chaska, liquor consump-
ti on by persons under 21,
$185, SO; Lucas J. Brown, 20,
Winthrop, liquor consumption
by persons under 21, local
confinement three days, credit
for time served three days,
$85, Winthrop PD.
The following felonies were
heard in District Court Octo-
ber 4-11:
Sebasti an Sanchez, 19,
Gaylord, firearms-serial num-
ber-receive/possess with al-
tered, dismissed, Gaylord PD;
Cody J. Servin, 24, Gaylord,
Burglary-dwelling, continued,
supervi sed probati on five
years, local confinement 90
days, credit for time served 70
days, sentence to service 10
days for indeterminate, follow
all conditions set forth in the
probation agreement, follow
all instructions of probation,
si gn probati on agreement,
contact with probation, sign
all releases of information,
complete treatment, dual di-
agnostic program at project
turnabout whi ch i ncl udes
halfway house placement, fol-
low all treatment directions,
do not leave Minnesota with-
out written court approval, af-
tercare, attend AA (Alcoholics
Anonymous), no contact with
vi cti m(s), no al cohol /con-
trolled substance use, no pos-
session of alcohol or drugs,
random testing, no same or
similar, no use or possession
of firearms or dangerous
weapons, keep court/attorney
informed of current address,
$1,325, Gaylord PD; Georgia
M. Klancke, 29, Arlington, bur-
glary-steal/commit felony or
gross mi sdemeanor, di s-
missed, damage to property-
value reduced over $1,000,
continued, supervised proba-
tion three years, local con-
finement 45 days, sentence to
service 40 hours for indeter-
minate, follow all conditions
set forth i n the probati on
agreement, follow all instruc-
tions of probation, sign proba-
tion agreement, contact with
probation, sign all releases of
information, pay restitution be-
fore fines, fees, and sur-
charges, psychological evalu-
ation/treatment, take medica-
ti ons i n the prescri bed
dosage and frequency, chem-
i cal dependency
evaluation/treatment, follow
recommendations of evalua-
tion, counseling, complete in-
dividual psycho-therapy until
deemed appropriate by thera-
pi st, remai n l aw-abi di ng,
$1,063.95, SO.
Drought conditions over
the last two-plus years have
left trees and other perennial
plants visibly stressed this
fall. Tree stress symptoms in-
clude abundant seed produc-
tion, leaf scorch, early fall
colors, leaf drop, limb
dieback and yellowing or
browning of leaves and nee-
dles.
Fortunately, several meas-
ures can help enhance tree
and shrub health.
Trees and shrubs--especial-
ly conifers (such as pine,
spruce and cedar) and those
planted in the last three years-
-should be watered generous-
ly until the soil freezes.
Mulching newly planted trees
also helps reduce winter root
damage.
Young maples and thin-
barked trees may benefit
from sunscald protection to
prevent the bark from crack-
ing this winter and spring.
This usually involves plastic
tubes or tree wraps, which are
removed in spring. These
practices can also help reduce
winter animal damage. Other
fall management practices
which will help reduce winter
damage to trees and shrubs
can be found at
http://z.umn.edu/winterdam-
age
Protecting trees from rab-
bits, mice, voles and deer is
another major winter con-
cern. Mow or remove tall
grass to reduce mice and vole
damage. If the bark is re-
moved or severely damaged
around the tree, it will die.
Protective physical barriers
such as tree tubes, hardware
cloth or fencing can be done
when practical.
Odor, taste and visual re-
pellents can repel many
wildlife species, but may
have inconsistent effective-
ness. Human hair, soaps, gar-
lic oil, hot sauce and animal
repellents can be applied to
branches and foliage to dis-
courage browsing. Weather,
application frequency, animal
population and feeding pres-
sure affect the success of re-
pellents. Alternate the repel-
lents since some animals be-
come desensitized to them. A
web resource that reviews
prevention and control of
wildlife damage can be found
at http://z.umn.edu/critters
If you’re unsure about
what’s causing problems in
your landscape, University of
Minnesota Extension has a
great web site to help home-
owners diagnose tree, shrub
and plant problems or identi-
fy a weed or insect. This site
also has links to the Universi-
ty of Minnesota Plant Disease
Clinic and Soil Testing
Lab:http://z.umn.edu/diag-
nose
Fall is also a good time to
plant trees; water them until
the soil freezes. Recommend-
ed trees for all regions of
Minnesota are
at  http://z.umn.edu/rectrees.
The best time to prune trees
is during the dormant season
from January to March.
Flowering shrubs can be
pruned in the summer after
flowering.
Autumn care helps long-term tree health
Landlords, farmers and
agri-business professionals
should make plans to attend
one of the informative meet-
ings being held across Cen-
tral and Southern Minnesota.
These free meetings are being
provided by the University of
Minnesota Extension.
Farm land rental rates have
never been higher and deter-
mining a fair and profitable
farm rent agreement is a chal-
lenge in today’s economy
with recent record corn and
soybean prices and record
farm land values.
Negotiating a fair rental
agreement that satisfies the
land owner and the farmer is
a challenge. David Bau, Ex-
tension Educator in Ag Busi-
ness Management, will pro-
vide several ways; by exam-
ples, factsheets and work-
sheets to determine a fair
farm land rental rate for both
parties.
Topics covered at the meet-
ings will include local his-
toric and projected farmland
rental rate trends, current
farm land values and sales, a
worksheet that will help de-
termine a fair and profitable
rental agreement. Input costs
for 2014 will be presented
along with current 2014 corn
and soybean prices. Work-
sheets will examine 2014
costs and what is affordable
rent that a farmer will be able
to pay in 2014, the rate of re-
turn to the landlord at current
market values and examine
flexible rental agreements.
A meeting will be held at
the Gibbon Community Cen-
ter at 2 p.m. Friday, Nov. 15.
Another meeting will be
held in the Sibley Room of
the Sibley County Service
Center in Gaylord at 9:30
a.m. Thursday, Nov. 21.
Informative meeting to be held on fair
and profitable farm rental agreement
The University of Min-
nesota Extension in Sibley
County will offer a certifica-
tion course for Pork Quality
Assurance Plus, version 2.0,
from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tues-
day, Nov. 5. The class will be
held at the Sibley Room of
the Sibley County Service
Center. The Service Center is
located at 111 8th Street in
Gaylord.
Pork Quality Assurance
Plus 2.0 is a voluntary pro-
gram offered for hog produc-
ers who wish to become certi-
fied or recertified as PQA
Plus compliant. PQA Plus
provides standards for food
safety and animal health and
well-being, for current hog
producers. The Pork Quality
Assurance Plus program was
recently updated to a 2.0 ver-
sion, effective in June 2013.
Please pre-register for this
class to ensure enough mate-
rials for all participants.
For more information or to
register, please contact the
Sibley County Extension of-
fice by phone at 507-237-
4100.
Pork Quality Assurance Plus offered in Sibley County
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402 W. Alden St.
Arlington, MN
55307
507-964-5547
52 Weeks
a Year!
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REPRESENT YOUR CITY/COUNTY
in the 2014 Miss Minnesota pag-
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in the 2014 Mrs. Minnesota pageant.
For entry information call 952/432-6758
or go to www.mrsminnesota.com
CONCRETE FOREMAN
Finishers and laborers. Experience
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CASH FOR CARS:
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dollar paid. We come to you! Any make/
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SAWMILLS
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lumber any dimension. In stock ready
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CANADA DRUG CENTER
is your choice for safe and affordable med-
ications. Our licensed Canadian mail order
pharmacy will provide you with savings
of up to 75% on all your medication needs.
Call today 800/259-1096 for $10.00 off
your first prescription and free shipping.
DISH TV RETAILER
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12
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Blessings
May the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart
be pleasing to you, O Lord, my rock and my redeemer. — Psalm 19:14
Deuteronomy 13:4 NIV
St. Brendan’s Catholic Church
Green Isle
Pastor Keith Salisbury
Mass: Sunday 7:30 a.m.
Mass: Wednesday 8:30 a.m.
Commercial and Industrial Builders
Green Isle, MN 55338
ph. 507.326.7901 fax: 507.326.3551
www.vosconstruction.com
Arlington State Bank
Serving the Community Since 1895
BANKING SERVICES
964-2256
Arlington
A & N Radiator Repair
Allen & Nicki Scharn, Owners
23228 401 Ave., Arlington
877-964-2281 or 507-964-2281 Bus.
Certified ASE Technician on Staff
Also distributor for Poxy Coat II
Industrial Grade Coatings/Paint
MID-COUNTY
CO-OP
700 W. Lake St., Box 177
Cologne, MN 55322
(952) 466-3700
or TOLL FREE: 1-888-466-3700
HUTCHINSON CO-OP
AGRONOMY
LEON DOSE,
Arlington Branch Manager
411 7
th
Ave. NW • (507) 964-2251
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
402 W. Alden, Arlington
507-964-5547
Online at
www.Arlington
MNnew.com
Arlington Haus
Your Hometown Pub & Eatery
1986-2009
Arlington • 1-507-964-2473
STATE BANK OF
HAMBURG
100 Years. 100 Reasons.
Phone 952-467-2992
statebankofhamburg.com
CONVENIENCE
STORE
Hwy. 5 N., Arlington
507-964-2920
Homestyle Pizza
Real or Soft Serve Ice Cream
Gas – Diesel – Deli – Videos
(507)
964-2212
www.
chefcraigs
.com
23180 401 Ave., Arlington Phone 507-964-2264
EQUAL
HOUSING
LENDER
CRAIG BULLERT
ARLINGTON, MN
23189 Hwy. 5 North,
Arlington, MN 55307
arlington@hutchcoop.com
Office (507) 964-2283
Cell (320) 583-4324
HC
FUNERAL SERVICE
P.O. Box 314
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-2201
Member
FDIC
Church News
Menus
SENIOR DINING
Call 326-3401 for a meal
Suggested Donation $3.85
Meals are served at Highland
Commons dining room
Monday-Friday
Monday: Swiss steak, baked
potato, corn, bread with mar-
garine, pineapple, low fat milk.
Tuesday: Creamed chi cken
over pasta, broccoli, fruit cocktail,
apple cake, low fat milk.
Wednesday: Meatloaf, catsup.
whole parslied potatoes, Country
blend vegetables, bread with mar-
garine, Mandarin oranges, low fat
milk.
Thursday: Pork chop, rice, ap-
plesauce, carrots, dinner roll with
margarine, fruit crisp, low fat milk.
Friday: Chunky vegetable soup,
meat sal ad on bun, peaches,
crackers, margarine, bar, low fat
milk.
SIBLEY EAST ELEMENTARY
BREAKFAST MENU
Arlington and Gaylord
Breakfast is served at 8:00 a.m.
daily. A 1/2 pint of milk is served
with each meal daily. Menu is sub-
ject to change.
Monday: Crunchmania, juice,
milk.
Tuesday: Frudel, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Cracker sti ck,
seeds, juice, milk.
Thursday: Muffin, juice, milk.
Friday: Cereal, cheese stick,
fruit, milk.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Arlington
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is
available for 40 cents each. Menu
is subject to change.
Monday: Chicken nuggets, sea-
soned rice, green beans, fruit,
milk.
Tuesday: Spaghetti with meat
sauce, cole slaw, garlic bread,
fruit, milk.
Wednesday: Rib on bun, oven
potatoes, peas, mixed fruit, milk.
Thursday: Mexican haystack,
rice, fixings, fruit, milk.
Friday: Corn dog, hash brown
potatoes, corn, fruit, milk.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Gaylord
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is
available for 40 cents each. Menu
is subject to change.
Monday: Chicken nuggets, sea-
soned rice, glazed carrots, broc-
coli, fruit, milk.
Alternate: Pizzaburger.
Tuesday: Spaghetti with meat
sauce, cole slaw, veggie sticks,
fruit, breadsticks, milk.
Alternate: Cold cut sandwich.
Wednesday: Rib on whole grain
bun, oven potatoes, peas, fruit,
milk.
Al ternate: Soup wi th turkey
sandwich.
Thursday: Mexican Haystack,
fixings, refried beans, corn, fruit,
milk.
Alternate: Roast beef sandwich.
Friday: Mini corn dogs, oven
potatoes, baked beans, fruit, milk.
Alternate: Meatballs.
UNITED METHODIST
Arlington
Rodney J. Stemme, Pastor
www.arlingtonunited
methodist.org
Saturday, October 19: 8:00
a.m. A-Men men’s group.
Sunday, October 20: 9:00 &
11:00 a.m. Worship. 10:15 a.m.
Sunday school.
Wednesday, October 23: 7:00
p.m. Choir and Confirmation.
Thursday, October 24: 10:00
a.m., 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. Wor-
ship on cable TV. 1:00 and 7:00
p.m. Women’s Bible study at
Jean Olson’s.
ST. PAUL LUTHERAN
(WELS),
Arlington
Bruce Hannemann, Pastor
WEBSITE:
www.stpaularlington.com
EMAIL:
Bruce.Hannemann@stpaul
arlington.com
Sunday, October 20: 8:45
a.m. Sunday school. 9:00 a.m.
Family Bible study. 10:00 a.m.
Worship, fellowship. 6:30 p.m.
youth group at school.
Monday, October 21: 10:00
a.m. Calendar info due.
Tuesday, October 22: 6:00
p.m. Counting committee.
Wednesday, October 23: 2:00
p.m. Bible study. 3:45 p.m. Pub-
lic school confirmation class,
7:30 p.m. Choir Practice. 8:00
p.m. Finance board meeting.
Thursday, October 24: 10:00
a.m. Bulletin information due.
11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. servic-
es on cable TV channel 8.
GAYLORD ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
Gaylord
Bob Holmbeck, Pastor
Friday, October 18: 4:00 p.m.
Prison visitation Shakopee.
6:30 p.m. Thomas Bible study
8510 Penn Ave., Bloomington.
Sunday, October 20: 9:00
a.m. Sunday school. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday worship service.
Wednesday, October 23: 6:30
p.m. Evening Bible classes and
Youth Focused. 8:00 p.m. Sup-
per welcome!
ST. PAUL’S UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Henderson
(507) 248-3594 (Office)
Rev. Brigit Stevens, Pastor
Find us on Facebook:
St. Paul’s UCC - Henderson
Sunday, October 20: 9:00-
9:50 a.m. Sunday school. 10:00
a.m. Worship.
ST. PAUL’S EV.
REFORMED CHURCH
15470 Co. Rd. 31, Hamburg
Dan Schnabel, Pastor
952-467-3878
www.stpaulsrcus.org
Saturday, October 19: 8:00
a.m. Fall clean-up.
Sunday, October 20: Fellow-
ship Sunday. 8:30 a.m. Sunday
school and Bible study. 9:30
a.m. Worship service, Mission-
fest.
Wednesday, October 23: 6:30
p.m. Catechism class.
Thursday, October 24: 10:15
a.m. Harbor Bible study.
ORATORY OF
ST. THOMAS
THE APOSTLE
Jessenland
507-248-3550
Fr. Sam Perez
Thursday: Weekly Mass at
5:00 p.m.
ST. MARY, MICHAEL
AND BRENDAN AREA
FAITH COMMUNITY
Fr. Keith Salisbury, Pastor
Friday, October 18: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar).
Saturday, October 19: 5:00
p.m. Mass (Mar).
Sunday, October 20: 7:30
a.m. Mass (Bre). No Elemen-
tary religious education (Mar).
9:00 a.m. Mass (Mic). 10:30
a.m. Mass (Mar).
Monday, October 21: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre and Mar). 8:00
p.m. AA and AlaNon (Mar).
Tuesday, October 22: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre and Mar).
Wednesday, October 23: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m. Word
and Communion (Oak Terrace).
5:00 p.m. Mass (Mar). 7:00-8:00
p.m. Jr./Sr. High religious edu-
cation (Mar).
Thursday, October 24: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre and Mic). 7:30
p. m. Narcotics Anonymous
(Mic).
TRINITY LUTHERAN
32234 431st Ave., Gaylord
Rev. James Snyder,
Interim Pastor
Sunday, October 20: 10:00
a.m. Worship.
Wednesday, October 23: 7:15
p.m. Trinity Men’s fellowship.
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Pastor William Postel
Phone 507-964-2400
Sunday, October 20: 9:00
a.m. Bible class. 10:00 a.m.
Worship .
Thursday, October 24: 5:30
p.m. Deadline for bulletin infor-
mation.
EVANGELICAL
COVENANT CHURCH
107 W. Third St., Winthrop
Pastor Kyle Kachelmeier
(507) 647- 5777
Parsonage (507) 647-3739
www.wincov.org
Saturday, October 19: 9:00
a.m Clothes Closet. 10:00 Food
Cupboard.
Sunday, October 20: 9:30
a.m. Worship. 10:45 a.m. Sun-
day school.
Tuesday, October 22: 6:45
p.m. Prayer shawl ministry.
Wednesday, October 23: 5:45
a.m. Youth group--Praise and
Worship at Mankato Cov. 9:00
a.m. Prayer coffee. 6:00 p.m.
AWANA.
Thursday, October 24: 9:30
a.m. Women’s Bible study. 6:00
p.m. MOPS--date change
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN
Green Isle
Pastor Eric W. Rapp
Friday, October 18: 10:00
a.m. Deadline for Sunday bul-
letin.
Sunday, October 20: 9:00
a.m. Worship. 10:00 a.m. Sun-
day school. 10:15 a.m. Bible
Study. 3:30 p.m. Bible study
with pastor. 4:30 p.m Joint choir
practice.
Wednesday, October 23: 6:30
p.m. Confirmation class. 6:30-
7:30 p.m. Wed. night school
grades 1-5.
PEACE LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Kurt Lehmkuhl, Pastor
Saturday, October 19: 5:00
p.m Worship service.
Sunday, October 20: 8:15
a.m. Sunday school. 9:30 a.m.
Worship service with Holy
Communion.
Monday, October 21: 11:30
p.m. Feeding of the 500 club.
Wednesday, October 23: 3:45
p.m. Catechism.
ZION LUTHERAN
814 W. Brooks St.
Arlington – (507) 964-5454
James Carlson, Pastor
Sunday, October 20: 9:00
a.m. Worship/reception of new
members. 10:00 a.m. Fellow-
ship, Sunday school.
Tuesday, October 22: 6:00-
7:00 p.m. TOPS in church base-
ment.
Thursday, October 24: 9:00
a.m. and 1:00 p.m. Zion service
on cable. 2:00 p.m. Newsletter
deadline.
ZION LUTHERAN
Green Isle Township
Pastor Eric W. Rapp
Friday, October 18: 10:00
a.m. Deadline for Sunday bul-
letin.
Sunday, October 20: 10:30
a.m. Worship with Communion.
3:30 p.m. Bible study at St.
Paul’s with pastor. 4:30 p.m.
Joint choir practice at St. Paul’s.
Wednesday, October 23: 6:30
p.m. Confirmation class at St.
Paul’s. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Wed.
night school grades 1-5 at St.
Paul’s.
CREEKSIDE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Christian & Missionary
Alliance
Dr. Bill Kuhn,
Interim Pastor
114 Shamrock Drive
Arlington – 507-964-2872
email: creeksidecc@media-
combb.net.
Saturday, October 19: 10:00
a.m.-12:00 p.m. HTM mobile
food shelf at Creekside. All are
welcome to receive free gro-
ceries. 7:00 p.m. Worship serv-
ice, guest missionary speaker
Rev. Harry Landaw, missionary
in Japan.
Sunday, October 20: 10:30
a.m. Worship service, guest mis-
sionary speaker Rev. Harry Lan-
daw, missionary in Japan.
Wednesday, October 23: 7:00-
8:30 p.m. R.E.A.C.H. Youth
Group at Terry and Becky
Shogren’s home, 6th through
12th grade.
Thursday, October 24: 6:30
p. m. Men’s Bible study at
Chuck Peik’s home. 7:00 p.m.
Women’s Bible study, “Revela-
tion” at Jean Olson’s home.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
(507) 304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
507-234-6770
Saturday: Church services at
9:30 a.m. Bible study at 11:00
a.m. Fellowship dinner at 12:00
p.m. All are welcome.
The Arlington VFW Aux-
iliary Post 6031 held its
regular meeting and mem-
bership dinner at the Veter-
ans Building on Monday,
Oct. 14, according to Secre-
tary Ramona Bade.
The social time began at
6 p.m. while the meal fol-
lowed at 6:30 p.m.
President Carol
Dammann presided over
the previous regular meet-
ing on Monday night, Sept.
9.
The flag pledge and roll
call were given and the re-
ports from the secretary and
treasurer were read and ap-
proved.
The following bulletins
were read: Americanism-
Janet Rowe, Cancer-
Eleanor Trocke, Legisla-
tive-Dorothy Brockhoff and
Youth & Scholarships-
Marie Kreft.
Old Business: The treas-
urer gave a report on what
is paid out of each mem-
ber’s dues. A motion was
made, seconded and carried
that the dues remain the
same for the 2013-2014
year. A final report on the
fair stand was given by the
treasurer.
New Business: The
group received a monetary
gift and a Certificate of
Merit for paying $5 per
member to the Cancer Aid
& Research and a Certifi-
cate of Recognition for par-
ticipating in Operation Up-
link.
A motion was made, sec-
onded and carried that the
group make a monetary do-
nation to the Marcella
Arnold Scholarship and the
Minnesota Soldiers Schol-
arship funds.
The door prize was won
by Mary Piotter.
VFW Auxiliary holds membership meeting
WE’RE ALL EARS
Questions? Comments?
Story Ideas?
Let us know how we're doing.
402 W Alden St. • Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-5547
info@arlingtonmnnews.com • www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Arlington ENTERPRISE
Your opinion is something we
always want to hear.
Contact us with feedback.
Get a Subscription
to the Arlington
Enterprise!
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Subscriptions
starting at
$
33.00/yr.
507-964-5547
AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
LIESKE TRACTOR
Wanted: Your OLD TRACTORS,
any condition, make or model. We
also specialize in new and used
TRACTOR PARTS AND REPAIR.
Call Kyle. Located west of Hender-
son. (612) 203-9256.
AUTOMOTIVE
Parts, Repair
$$ DOLLARS PAID $$ Junk vehi-
cles, repairable cars/trucks. FREE
TOWING. Flatbed/ wrecker serv-
ice. Immediate pick up. Monday-
Sunday, serving your area 24/7.
(952) 220-TOWS.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
CONKLIN© DEALERS NEEDED!
Lifetime career in marketing, man-
agement and applying “Green”
products made in America. Full
time/ part time. For a free catalog
call Franke’s Conklin Service now
at (320) 238-2370. www.franke-
marketing.com.
Want to have fun while you work?
Love working with children? Our
Christ-centered daycare has im-
mediate openings for a full time
and part time provider to care for
our children. Call (952) 467-2788.
Or send letter of interest to SON-
shine House, 18175 County Road
50, Hamburg, MN or email pas-
tor@elchamburg.org.
Work Wanted
HANDYMAN: Will do remodeling
of kitchens, bathrooms, hanging
doors and wi ndows, pai nti ng,
sheet rocking, texturizing or any
minor repairs inside or outside.
Wi l l al so do cl eani ng of base-
ments/garages. Call (320) 848-
2722 or (320) 583-1278.
FOR SALE
Give Aways
Free kittens, 1 female tortoise-
shel l , 1 mal e tabby/whi te, 5
months old. Very friendly, litter box
trained. (507) 964-5899.
Heating/Air Conditioning
Special-95% Goodman gas furnace
and programmable thermostat,
$2,200 installed or AC unit, $1,900
installed. J&R Plumbing Heating
AC, Lester Prairie (320) 510-5035.
FOR SALE
Wanted To Buy
BUYING JUNK BATTERIES
We buy used batteries. Paying
$10 for automotive batteries. We
pick up. Call 800-777-2243.
LIVESTOCK, PETS
Cattle
Miniature Hereford cattle. Cows,
heifers, steers, bulls, 218 Cattle
Company. (507) 964-2544, leave
message.
REAL ESTATE
Houses
3BR family residence, 1202 North
9th Street, Olivia. (320) 220-0120.
Mobile Homes
1993 Liberty. Glencoe. 3BR. All
appliances. New furnace. Easy fi-
nance. (612) 759-9161.
www.swsales.org.
RENTAL
Apartment
Village Cooperative of Hutchinson
(320) 234-7761. 55+ Senior living.
Three units available (3-2BR, 1-
1BR.) Call for your tour! Come in
and check out the wonderful in-
centives offers and learn how you
can save over $8,000! Equal
Housing Opportunity.
Updated, spacious one & two BR
apartments in Renville. Includes
heat, water garbage. New stove,
fridge, air conditioner. Pet-friendly.
Call (320) 564-3351 for appoint-
ment.
Duplex, 2BR, oversized garage,
W/D on main level, AC, Arlington.
No smoking or pets. $600 rent plus
utilities and deposit. (952) 758-7622.
Glencoe Towns Edge Estates has
a 2BR & 3BR available soon. In-
cludes heat, water, garbage and
sewer. We accept cats and small
dogs. (320) 864-6600.
House
1, 2, 3 or 4 bedroom houses for
rent in Olivia. Call (320) 212-3217.
Want To Rent
Father and Son Operation look-
ing for farmland to rent. Call (320)
523-1116 or (320) 522-0272.
Wanted: Farmland to rent 2014
and beyond. Curtis Weckwerth
(507) 380-9128, Wayne Franzeen
(507) 380-2466.
Young farmer looking for land to
rent for 2014 and beyond. Compet-
itive rates and reference available.
Call Austin Blad (320) 221-3517.
SALES
Sales
Remember The Past Occasional
Sale. Holiday season hours Oct. 16-
Dec. 24, Sun. 12-5pm; Mon.-closed;
Tues.-Fri. 10am-8pm; Sat., 10am-
6pm. Furniture, salvaged junk, vin-
tage, collectibles, home and holiday
decor & unique treasures. Located
in the Hutchinson Mall across from
Christopher & Banks. (320) 583-
9519. Buying and selling.
SERVICES
Misc. Service
CUSTOM LOG SAWING- Cut at
your place or ours. White oak lum-
ber decking and firewood. Give
Virgil a call. Schauer Construction,
Inc. (320) 864-4453.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 17, 2013, page 10
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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AGRICULTURE AUTOMOTIVE EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE LIVESTOCK
& PETS
LIVESTOCK
& PETS
REAL ESTATE SERVICES RENTAL RENTAL
All ads appear online
at GlencoeNews.com
Enterprise
To place an ad: Call: 507-964-5547; Fax: 507-964-2423; E-Mail: info@ArlingtonMNnews.com; Mail: P.O. Box 388, Arlington, MN 55307
Advertising
Deadlines
The McLeod County Chronicle Mondays at Noon
The Arlington Enterprise & The Silver Lake Leader Tuesdays at Noon
The Glencoe Advertiser, The Sibley Shopper
& The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
Available...
1 & 2 Bedroom
Apartments Available
All utilities,
except electric
Income based
Must be 62 or older
or handicapped
Highland Commons
Arlington
507-964-5556
A
1
6
-
2
8
E
,1
7
-
2
9
A
S
G
a
HANDICAP
ACCESSIBLE
JOB POSTING
The City of Arlington is currently accepting applications for a
full-time Maintenance Worker in the Public Works Department.
The position is primarily responsible for performing general mainte-
nance and janitorial services in all City-owned buildings. The position
also performs routine to skilled manual labor and maintenance in the
Public Works Department and performs related duties as required.
Minimum Qualifications: Must possess and maintain a valid Minnesota
Class “B” or higher CDL or the ability to obtain one in one month.
Must possess and maintain a valid Class “C” Boiler’s License or the
ability to obtain one in one year. Must be able to respond to a call-out
for snow removal or a city emergency within 30 minutes. Salary:
$13.06 - $18.29/hour plus benefits.
For required application and job description, go online at www.arling
tonmn.com or contact Arlington City Offices, 204 Shamrock Drive, Ar-
lington, MN 55307 – (507) 964-2378. Cover letters, resume and appli-
cations are due to the City Administrator no later than 4:00 p.m. on Oc-
tober 25, 2013. The City of Arlington is an Equal Opportunity Employ-
er.
A40-41Ea
OAK TERRACE
Healthcare Center of Gaylord
has openings in the following positions:
SKILLED NURSING HOME
NURSING ASSISTANT:
• Weekend hours 6:00am-2:30pm
and 2:15pm-10:45 pm shifts.
MAINTENANCE:
• Part-time position available for general maintenance
of building. Applicant must be able to work independ-
ently M-F 8am-2pm with some on call opportunity.
Boiler license preferred. Pay depends on experience.
ASSISTED LIVING
LPN:
• Part-Time hours, 2:30pm-11:00pm
Applications are available at:
640 Third St., Gaylord, MN
Or online at www.oakterraceliving.com
For further information, contact Human Resources
at 507-237-8703. EOE
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Independent Living
55+ Arlington Sr. Apartment ONLY
One-Bedrooms Available
Garage Available
Apply NOW & Move this Fall!
FREE Application
FREE Damage Deposit
FREE 1
st
Month Rent
Lease Today!
800-873-1736 or 507-642-8701
kanderson@amberfieldplace.com
www.amberfieldplace.com
A340-43E41-44Sa
Managed by Great Lakes Management Co.
S
ealed
B
id
S
ale
Friday, November 22, 2013
Arlington Bowling Alley
508 2
nd
Avenue NW • Arlington, MN 55307
Reserve Bid =
$
25,000
Contact Arlington State Bank for Bid Sheets (507) 964-2256
A41E42SGa
Golden Hearts
Assisted Living is now
hiring for a 10pm-6am
position. Average is 140
hours monthly.
Additional hours avail-
able. Experience in
cooking required.
For application, stop at:
Golden Hearts
602 Marion Dr.
Arlington, MN 55307
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Pinske Real Estate
& Auctioneers
(507) 964-2250
Arlington
• 2 or 3 BR updated
rambler. Nicely located
on corner lot in Arling-
ton.
$
85,000
We need listings of
homes, farms and hobby
farms. If you are thinking
about selling it will pay for
you to call us.
REAL ESTATE
A41E42SGj
CALL CENTER
REPRESENTATIVES!
Great job opportunities at Heartland America!
We’re conveniently located in Chaska between
Hwy. 5 and 41! Heartland America is a Direct
Marketing company offering brand name and
other quality merchandise at value prices via
catalog and internet sales. No Outbound calling!
Great pay and benefits!
Print and send application or apply in person:
Heartland America Attn: Pam
8085 Century Blvd., Chaska, MN 55318
E-mail: chaskaemployment@heartlandamerica.com
Website: www.heartlandamerica.com/application
Ph: 952-361-5671 Fax: 952-361-3656
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Call for Bids/Proposals
The Sibley County Agricultural Association (Fair Board) is calling for pro-
posals for the new Sibley County Fairgrounds Heritage Center All-purpose
Building site work and construction to be completed by June 15, 2014.
Project to include:
80’ X 110’ steel structure building to be constructed according to
design specifications. Bids/proposals may include any and all of
the following bid packages:
1. Site Preparation
2. Building Construction
3. Concrete
4. Stage and Rooms
All Bids/Proposals must be returned by 4:00 p.m. October 28,
2013 to:
Dennis Van Moorlehem
507-964-5733
dvan1@frontiernet.net
507 West Elgin Street
Arlington, Minnesota 55307
Bid Packages and specifications may be obtained by calling
or emailing:
Dennis Van Moorlehem
507-964-5733
dvan1@frontiernet.net
or
Doug Thomas
612-290-1708
dougthomas3738@gmail.com
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Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington
is seeking the following positions:
• Certified Nursing Assistant, evening
shifts with every other weekend, 6 shifts
per pay period.
• Certified Nursing Assistant, evening
shifts with every other weekend/holiday,
10 shifts per pay period.
• Certified Nursing Assistant, overnights 10:15pm-6:15am,
every other weekend only.
• LPN Evening Nurse, 8 shifts per pay period,
includes every other weekend/holiday.
• Assistant Cook every Thursday and every other
weekend/holiday - 4 shifts per pay period.
– Must be MN Certified –
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information,
call Tiffany Brockhoff,
Human Resource Director at
507-964-2251 or email:
tbrockof@good-sam.com
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap Drug-Free Workplace
Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life.
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This document is © 2013 by admin - all rights reserved.