10-24-13 Arlington Enterprise

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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Serving the Communities of Arlington and Green Isle, Minnesota
www.arlingtonmnnews.com Volume 130 • Number 16 • Thursday, October 24, 2013 • Arlington, MN 55307
Single copy $1.00
The Thirty-Ninth Man
Minnesota author Dale Swanson shared his newly re-
leased work of historical fiction, “The Thirty-Ninth
Man” at the Arlington Public Library on Sunday after-
noon, Oct. 20. The book is about the Minnesota Dako-
ta War of 1862. The Dakota Sioux uprising resulted in
the largest mass hanging in U.S. history. Thirty-nine
were sentenced and 38 died. One was pardoned at the
last minute by President Abraham Lincoln. The event
was sponsored by the Arlington Public Library
League.
Mari Lu Martens is among
61 outstanding elementary
and middle school principals
from across the nation and
abroad who have been named
as 2013 National Distin-
guished Principals by the
National Association of Ele-
mentary School Principals
(NAESP).
Martens is the Sibley East
elementary principal in Ar-
lington and Gaylord.
The National Distinguished
Principals will be honored at
an awards banquet at the
Capital Hilton Hotel in Wash-
ington, D.C., on Thursday,
Oct. 25. It will be part of a
two-day program, which for
more than 20 years has been
generously funded by
VALIC. U.S. Secretary of Ed-
ucation Arne Duncan will
provide congratulatory re-
marks.
Established in 1984, the
program recognizes public
and private school principals
who make superior contribu-
tions to their schools and
communities. The distin-
guished principals are select-
ed by NAESP state affiliates,
including the District of Co-
lumbia, and by committees
representing private and over-
seas schools.
NAESP Executive Director
Gail Connelly commended
the honorees for being exem-
plars of successful school
leadership.
“Only a principal can move
a school from good to great,
simultaneously championing
children and uplifting the
communities they serve,”
Connelly said. “We congratu-
late this class of NDPs for
their steadfast dedication to
educating our nation’s chil-
dren to their fullest poten-
tial.”
“VALIC is proud to contin-
ue its support as sole sponsor
of the National Distinguished
Principal’s Award Program,”
said Bruce Abrams, President
of VALIC. “This program al-
lows us to recognize the im-
portant role of principals on
the education and develop-
ment of our nation’s children,
our future leaders. On behalf
of VALIC, I congratulate all
61 of this year ’s National
Distinguished Principals and
extend my deepest thanks for
all that they do.”
October is a particularly fit-
ting month to acknowledge
the work of principals, as leg-
islation has been introduced
in both chambers of congress
declaring October 2013 Na-
tional Principals Month. Na-
tional Principals Month was
established to recognize and
honor the contributions of
school principals and assis-
tant principals toward the
success of the nation’s stu-
dents, and encourage aware-
ness of their significance.
Established in 1921, the
National Association of Ele-
mentary School Principals
(NAESP) serves elementary
and middle school principals
in the United States, Canada,
and overseas. NAESP leads
in the advocacy and support
for elementary and middle-
level principals and other ed-
ucation leaders in their com-
mitment to all children.
Martens is a National Distinguished Principal
Mari Lu Martens
By Karin Ramige Cornwell
Manager
The Sibley East School
Board, during a non-public
meeting on Monday, Oct. 21,
discussed further action re-
garding Sibley East teacher
and former head coach Doug
Flieth.
The School Board unani-
mously voted to place Flieth
on unpaid suspension indefi-
nitely under the recommen-
dation of the School District
Attorney Tony Nerud.
Flieth, 39, Gaylord, plead-
ed guilty to one gross misde-
meanor count of interference
with privacy in Sibley Coun-
ty District Court on Oct. 10.
As part of the sentence,
Flieth was ordered to undergo
psychological and psychosex-
ual evaluations.
In addition to the evalua-
tions, Flieth was sentenced to
365 days in the Sibley Coun-
ty Jail with 335 days stayed.
Flieth was placed on proba-
tion for two years. The condi-
tions of probation include
that he must serve 30 days in
the Sibley County Jail and re-
port within 30 days, perform
40 hours of sentence to serv-
ice within an indeterminate
period of time and pay $385
in fines and fees.
Under Nerud’s recommen-
dation, since Flieth will
spend 30 days in the county
jail, he will be physically un-
able to perform the require-
ments of his teaching contract
with Sibley East. The School
Board should then consider
changing the Flieth’s status
from paid suspension to un-
paid suspension.
After the results of the psy-
chological and psychosexual
evaluations are provided to
the school administration or
Nerud, the School Board will
again review the status of Fli-
eth’s employment with the
district.
“First priority, obviously,
of the district is to act in a
way to ensure the safety of
the students and staff and I
believe that since the court
considered that evaluation a
necessary component of his
probation and rehabilitation,
it is a necessary component
in our determination of his
fitness to return to the district
in any capacity where he
would be interacting with stu-
dents and or adults,” Nerud
said.
The Minnesota State Board
of Education has been aware
of the sentence and are con-
ducting an independent in-
vestigation.
A motion was made by
School Board member Missy
Weber and seconded by
School Board member Anne
Karl to move Flieth to unpaid
suspension. The motion was
approved by a 6-0 vote.
********
Flieth was charged with
one count of interference
with privacy on Tuesday, July
9 for allegedly recording un-
derneath a hair stylist’s dress
with his cell phone in Arling-
ton on Saturday, July 6, ac-
cording to the Sibley County
Attorney’s Office.
The Sibley East School
Board, during a regular meet-
ing on Monday night, Aug. 5,
adopted a resolution to au-
thorize the district to suspend
Flieth from his teaching con-
tract duties with pay pending
the investigations of the
school district, Sibley County
and Minnesota Department of
Education.
The School Board, during a
regular meeting on Monday
night, Sept. 16, approved a
motion to not renew Flieth’s
coaching contracts as head
girls basketball coach and co-
head golf coach.
SE School Board votes
to suspend Doug Flieth
without pay indefinitely
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
The Sibley County Board
of Commissioners passed a
resolution to consolidate the
offices of Auditor and
Treasurer to take effect Jan.
7, 2019 or earlier depending
on the circumstances.
The action was taken at
the meeting on Tuesday,
Oct. 22 to create a single of-
fice of Sibley County Audi-
tor-Treasurer “to promote
efficiency in county govern-
ment.”
It was suggested the
county wait until the refer-
endum period ends before
the board can pass another
resolution that would set a
public hearing as part of
bringing the issue to the
voters in the 2014 election.
At that point the public can
decide to have the new posi-
tion elected or appointed.
The public can file a re-
verse referendum after 90
days and within 30 days of
the second publication no-
tice if it opposes the resolu-
tion to consolidate the of-
fices.
Upon no objection, the
county can vote on a resolu-
tion on Dec. 23 providing
for the contingency if either
the current auditor or treas-
urer should vacate their of-
fice before terms expire in
2019. The board could then
assign the duties of the per-
son who left to the one re-
maining.
County Commissioner
Bill Pinske said the idea of
starting this in 2019 is so
the incumbents do not have
to run against each other.
• In other business, the
board approved extending
Aaron Scharpe’s limited
term agreement to work in
the Auditor’s office through
December of 2013.
• The voluntary furlough
policy was extended
through 2014. Andrea
Thielke was hired as full-
time income maintenance
case aid.
• Approved was the Pub-
lic Health and Human Serv-
ices contract renewal with
Greater Minnesota Family
Services for the provision of
family based services.
Also approved was the
contract renewal with the
Minnesota Valley Action
Council for the provision of
support and employment
and training Services for
SNAP and MFIP/DWP for
$98,638.
• Tim Becker, Public
Works Director, was granted
authorization to sign a pur-
chase order from Towmaster
Truck Equipment for
$221,220. The funds will
equip the two new trucks re-
cently purchased.
• The county hired B. Mc-
Namara Inc. to complete the
2014 gravel crushing for
class 1 and 5 materials.
The Sibley County Com-
missioners will hold their
next regular meeting at 9
a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 12.
Sibley County resolution combines
the auditor and treasurer positions
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Highway 5 Project
from Arlington to Green Isle
is drawing to completion.
The highway will be open for
traffic on Monday, Oct. 28,
according to a representative
from the Minnesota Depart-
ment of Transportation.
The construction crew is
expected to wrap up odds and
ends later this week.
Construction on the project
was originally scheduled to
start on Monday, July 29, but
was delayed twice to mid Au-
gust. At that time, the com-
pletion date was scheduled
for Wednesday, Sept. 25.
Knife River Corporation -
North Central of Sauk Rapids
is the contractor on the proj-
ect that includes seven miles
of pavement replacement and
a mill and overlay in Green
Isle.
The cost of the project is
approximately $5 million.
Highway 5 to open
on Monday, Oct. 28
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 24, 2013, page 2
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Questions
about Health Care?
Maybe I can help!
Call
507-358-0864
or stop by
405 West
Main Street
Arlington
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Frank’s Potato
Supplier of fresh MN potatoes will be at the
Nicollet Mart in Nicollet, MN
Fridays & Saturdays
October into November
– Weather Permitting –
or call:
507-995-1201
507-931-4572
*40-43Ea
Stock Up NOW
LOW
PRICES!
Arlington - Green Isle
Boy Scout Troop #140
FALL
BREAKFAST
Arlington
Community Center
Sunday, Oct. 27, 2013
8:00 am – Noon
Serving: French
Toast, Pancakes,
Regular and
Texas Style
Scrambled Eggs,
Sausage & Beverages
Free will donation
A41-42E42-43Sa
SS. MICHAEL, MARY &
BRENDAN CATHOLIC
HEART WORK CAMP
FALL CRAFT &
VENDOR SHOW
SAT., OCT. 26
9 A.M.-2 P.M.
Sibley East High School
202 3rd Ave NW
Arlington, MN
Lunch will be available
Come shop some of your
favorite vendors &
crafters: Tastefully Simple,
Scentsy, Thirty One, Lia
Sophia plus many more!
*41-42SEa
Resource Booths
PubIic HeaIth & Human Services
Veterans Services
(1-888-LINK-VET)
MN VaIIey Action CounciI
U of M Extension
TraiIbIazer Transit
MN River Area Agency on Aging
SaIvation Army
SibIey County Food SheIf
Free Rides!
Reserve your FREE
ride by Nov. 1st to
this event!
Call 507-237-4000
PIan to Attend the
FaII FaII CARE Event
C CC County A AA Area R RR Resources for E EE Everyone
Wednesday, November 6, 2013
2:00 p.m. & 6:00 p.m.
ArIington Community Center
204 Shamrock Drive
What's New in Medicare for 2014
Robin Thompson,
Senior Outreach Specialist with
MN River Area Agency on Aging
—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-
State SoIdier Assistance Programs
MN Department of Veterans Representative
Free ViaI
of Life
P
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iz
e
s
!
R
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fre
s
h
m
e
n
ts
S
p
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n
s
o
re
d
b
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L
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g
's
M
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a
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M
a
r
k
e
t No SoIicitation
51-3 A41-43E42-43Sa
Saturday,
Nov. 2
11 a.m.-1 p.m.
ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
814 W. Brooks St., Arlington, MN
GERMAN LUNCHEON
Pre-Sale Adults:
$
7.50 (at door
$
8.50); Children 6-10:
$
4
Dessert/Pie & Beverage:
$
3.50
MUSIC, BAKE SALE, LEFSE, GIFTS GALORE AND MORE!
Pre-Sale tickets available at: Morreim’s and Arlington State Bank.
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Marktplatz
Zion’s
Thank You
The family of Celeste Fisher expresses
their sincere, heartfelt thank you to the
doctors, nurses and staff of Sibley Med-
ical Center in Arlington and to the Mayo
Clinics and Hospitals in Rochester and
Mankato.
A continued thank you to Pastor Hinz
for his very timely visits and prayers
Mayo Clinic Health System Mankato
Hospice, Gaylord Ambulance Service,
and everyone for their kind visits, phone
calls, expressions of sympathy, condo-
lences, thoughts, and prayers.
Thank you to Egesdal-Hantge Funeral
Home, organist Jeanne Bruss, casket
bearers Chad Fisher, Corey Fisher, Todd
Fisher, Tara Fisher, Katie Rauch, and
Krista Eggersgleuss, and to the Circle
for the post-interment gathering. Thank
you also to all who sent cards memori-
als, flowers, and food.
The family of Mary C Fisher
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Green Isle American
Legion #408
Lic#02255
at Grey Fox
Tavern
350 Parnell St.,
Green Isle
Starting Sat., Nov. 2
BINGO
Every Saturday @ 1 pm
Meat Raffles
Every Friday @ 7 p.m.
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Wednesday, October 30: Arlington Fire Depart-
ment Relief Association, Arlington Fire Hall, 7:30
p.m.
Community
Calendar
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER
MAIN BANK
Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (straight thru)
DRIVE THRU
Monday - Thursday, 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.,
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Member
FDIC
Arlington State Bank
(507) 964-2256
Fax (507) 964-5550
www.ArlingtonStateBank.com
News Briefs
Accident along Highway 19
A two-vehicle accident reportedly occurred near a
private driveway along Highway 19 at 11:26 p.m. Satur-
day, Oct. 19, according to the Sibley County Sheriff’s
Department.
Marc L. Reichenbach, 55, Henderson, was driving a
2007 Pontiac G6 westbound on Highway 19 and at-
tempted to make a turn into his private driveway at
39815, according to the report. The Reichenbach vehi-
cle was then struck by an eastbound GMC Sierra driven
by Richard D. Bach, 22, Henderson. The Reichenbach
vehicle ended up in the ditch.
Reichenbach was not wearing his seatbelt, but the
airbags deployed in his vehicle, according to the report.
Bach was wearing his seatbelt and was not reportedly
injured. Henderson resident Kimberly M. Bach, 18,
who was a passenger in the GMC, was treated for a sore
neck at the scene and released.
Alcohol was not a factor in the crash, according to the
report.
The Arlington Ambulance also assisted at the scene.
Items taken from property
An individual or individuals reportedly took some
items from a parcel of land owned by John Mathwig
and located in Section 20 of Washington Lake Town-
ship sometime between Sunday, Oct. 13 and Sunday,
Oct. 20, according to the Sibley County Sheriff’s De-
partment.
The items included a deer camera, a pole and several
LED flashers, according to the report. These items were
valued at approximately $200.
The incident is still under investigation. People who
have any information about this or any other incident
are encouraged to call the Sibley County Sheriff’s De-
partment at 507-237-4330.
White receives scholarships
Jenna White, a 2012 graduate of the Sibley East Sen-
ior High School in Arlington, recently received the
Wenner/Reisinger Scholarship and Geraldine Raisler
Hedberg Endowed Scholarship at the University of
Wisconsin-Stout.
Scholarships valued at more than $600,000 were
awarded to 320 University of Wisconsin-Stout students
this year through the Stout University Foundation at a
reception on Thursday, Sept. 12. Many of the scholar-
ship donors and members of the board of directors per-
sonally presented the awards.
White is majoring in hotel, restaurant and tourism
management. She is the daughter of Alex and Slava
White, Gaylord.
Interim worker is hired
The Arlington City Council, during its regular meet-
ing on Monday night, Oct. 21, voted 4-0 and approved a
motion to hire Taylor Weber as the interim part-time
maintenance worker for the City of Arlington.
City Council members Jennifer Nuesse, Curt Reetz,
Jason Ruehling and Galen Wills all voted in favor of the
motion.
City Council member James Jaszewski had a prior
commitment and was unable to attend the meeting.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
In Memory Of Buck Thomes
In early June, family members and friends gathered to
plant a tree in memory of Dan “Buck” Thomes at the
Arlington Sportsmen’s Park. In late September, a
bench was donated by Mike Korth/Midwest
Playscapes in memory of Buck and was placed not
far from the tree. The inscription on the bench reads:
“In loving memory of Daniel “Buck” Thomes. May he
watch over this park forever.” Left to right: Buck’s
dog, Buddy; wife, Lorie Thomes; best friend, Rick
Rose; son, Jason Thomes; daughter, Lindsay
Thomes; daughter, Michelle Thomes; and son, Nathan
Thomes. Missing from the picture is daughter, Jessi-
ca Pepin.
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
Health care services pro-
vided in Sibley County could
suffer some ill affects with
the announcing of upcoming
changes that are in the works.
Informational updates were
provided by Vicki Stock,
Public Health and Human
Services Director, at the
board of commissioners
meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 22.
First of all, work is going at
a fever pitch as the county
contends with implementing
the federal affordable health
care system that is experienc-
ing glitches throughout the
country. Health insurance op-
tions for people at all income
levels became available Oct.
1, but have not been totally
accessible in some cases.
Stock was in on a confer-
ence call with the state De-
partment of Human Services
(DHS) to discuss current
changes and issues that are
being worked out. This in-
cludes Minnesota’s health in-
surance system called MN-
sure that offers four rate lev-
els called Bronze, Silver,
Gold and Platinum.
MNsure Rates
The good news is that MN-
sure individual rates are the
lowest in the country across
all levels as shown in a rate
review by the Commerce De-
partment. The Bronze plan is
said to cover 60 percent of
the expected costs for a per-
son, while Silver covers 70,
Gold 80 and Platinum 90 per-
cent.
However, rolling out the
program has hit some bumps
in the road. Stock said that
training continues to be de-
veloped for the eligibility
workers who are supposed to
be provided services.
“Some of the functionality
in the system is not working
properly,” said Stock. “One
example is if someone from
the public goes into the sys-
tem and enters information,
and then they go back in later
to change or finish the appli-
cation, a duplicate is being
created. There are many
pending cases out there that
we are not able to tell if they
are duplicated or real.”
Electronic verification of
social security and citizenship
numbers is not working. So,
those cases are going into
pending status. Plus, Stock
said there are real cases and
test cases all in one cue, so
the county is not able to tell
the difference.
“We can only see up to 100
cases at a time,” pointed out
Stock about the new comput-
er server designed for the
new program. “So we have
no idea how many cases may
be out there for us. We are re-
ceiving calls from the general
public, which are taking quite
a bit of time. The public has
many questions they don’t
understand and we don’t have
a lot of answers at this point
in time.”
Another issue involves four
staff members who are not
able to get into the system.
Stock is working with the
state security to get that fig-
ured out. It is not just Sibley
County, but it seems every
county has a certain number
of people who are unable to
access the system.
If Sibley County residents
are eligible for medical assis-
tance, they have a choice to
go with South Country
Health Alliance as an option.
MNsure plans are for the gen-
eral public, replacing the for-
mer MinnesotaCare plans.
Four insurance plans are
available in Sibley County
through MNsure. They are
Blue Cross Blue Shield,
Group Health, Medica of
Wisconsin and Preferred One.
Stock noted that four insur-
ance agencies in the county
have been approved to assist
clients in the enrollment
process. Two are located in
Winthrop, one is in Gaylord
and the other is in Gibbon.
The deadline to join a health
insurance plan is Jan. 1.
“It has been an interesting
month,” said Stock. “Staff is
frustrated, but keeping a good
attitude. It is what it is.”
Sibley County
Continued on page 3
County health care programs undergo change of heart
S
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your area
businesses
appreciate
it when
you do!
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 24, 2013, page 3
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Business & Professional
Directory
CALL TODAY TO BE INCLUDED IN OUR
BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY!
507-964-5547
Arlington
Chiropractic Clinic
JUSTIN E. DAVIS, D.C.
607 W. Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-2850
arlingtonchiropracticmn.com
Office Hours:
Mon. 9am-6pm; Tues. 9am-5pm;
Wed. 8am-6pm; Thurs. 1-6pm;
Fri. 8am-4pm; 1
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& 3
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Sat. 8am-11am
VETERINARIAN
RG OVREBO DVM LLC
Large Animal
Veterinary Services
Ultrasound repro, Surgical,
Medical and Nutrition
Small Animal House Call
by Appointment
Medical, Vaccination Services
and Surgical Referral
Dr. Robert G. Ovrebo
Office 507-964-2682
Cell 507-995-0507
Miller
Law Office
RAPHAEL J. MILLER
Attorney at Law
332 Sibley Avenue, Gaylord, MN 55334
Tel. (507) 237-2954
Wills - Family Law
Taxes - Estate Planning
General Law Practice & Trials
Free consultation on personal injury claims
MESENBRING
CONSTRUCTION
(507) 964-2864
“Your local home builder and
remodeler for over 38 years”
Member: MN River Builders Assn.
MN License #4806
ROSS R. ARNESON
ATTORNEY AT LAW
302 West Main
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-5753
Real Estate, Estate Planning,
Probate and Business Law
Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Saturdays by Appointment
Farm – Residential
Commercial
Licensed - Bonded - Insured
• 24-Hour Emergency
Service
• Free Estimates
Tyler Kranz, Owner
507-964-2525
Klehr Grading
&
Excavating, Inc.
JEFF & WENDY KLEHR
Dozer, Grader, Basements,
Septic Systems, Driveways, Backhoe Work,
Hauling Gravel/Rock/Sand, Skidloader
Jeff cell: 612-756-0595
Wendy cell: 612-756-0594
640 E. BROOKS ST., ARLINGTON, MN 55307
1-507-964-5783 • FAX: 507-964-5302
Local LAWN
Enforcement
Arlington, MN
Licensed and Insured
Mowing, fertilizing and
weed control, dethatching,
garden tilling, core aeration
www.locallawnenforcement.com
Adam and David Hansen
Adam cell: 507-327-0917
507-964-5835
• 5” Seamless Gutters
• 6” Seamless Gutters
• K-Guard Leaf-Free
Gutter System
(lifetime clog free guarantee)
PHIL GOETTL
612-655-1379
888-864-5979
www.mngutter.com
M
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Gustafson
Family Dentistry
Dr. John D. Gustafson, D.D.S
Dr. Jared Gustafson, D.D.S
COMPREHENSIVE CARE
FOR ALL AGES
Office Hours: Monday–Friday
New Patients Welcome
Dr. Jason Anderson, D.D.S
Orthodontists
106 3
rd
Ave. NW,
Arlington
507-964-2705
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BODY REPAIR
See us for factory-trained
body repair work on
your vehicle.
• Free Estimates • Glass Replacement
• Collision Repair • Rust Repair
WINDSHIELD
REPLACEMENT
We install windshields
for all vehicles
We will contact the insurance company
for you and do all paperwork. See us
for professional glass installation.
BRAU
ARL I NGTON
www.braumotors.com
Local
507-964-5539
Toll Free
800-664-2728
Buesgens
Septic Services
Septic Pumping/Pump Repair
& Portable Restrooms
507-665-3732
or 952-873-2208
Call Shane
A14El
Liberty
Station
Corner of Hwy. 5 & Chandler
Arlington, MN
507-964-5177 or
Toll-Free 866-752-9567
www.LibertyStationAutoSales.com
Jim
Heiland’s
Affordable Used Cars
BRAZIL
AUTOMOTIVE
36833 200
TH
ST.
GREEN ISLE, MN 55338
Tires, Air Conditioning
& Maintenance
507-326-5751
MONDAY-FRIDAY 8-5
BEN BRAZIL,
Owner/Technician
brazilautomotive@gmail.com
American Education Banquet
Monday, November 18
Tickets will be on sale through Thursday, November 14.
Adults
$
10.00 (Sirloin Tips in Mushroom
Sauce entree); Children’s Menu
$
5.00
(Boneless Chicken Wings and Mac & Cheese)
Tickets must be purchased in
advance and are available at both
the Sibley East school offices.
Banquet activities begin at 6 p.m. with a
social hour, featuring performances by the
Sibley East Show Choir and Jazz Band.
Banquet and program to follow.
A42-45SEa
Gaylord Police Chief Kenn
Mueller recently announced
his plans to retire from law
enforcement, according to an
article in The Gaylord Hub.
Mueller, a resident of rural
Arlington, recently an-
nounced his retirement in a
letter to the Gaylord City
Council. His intention is to
have a retirement date before
April 1, 2014.
In the letter, Mueller asked
to be included in the process
to hire his replacement.
Mueller is also willing to
continue as police chief until
the position is filled.
“I have greatly enjoyed
working for the City of Gay-
lord, said Mueller, who grad-
uated from the Arlington-
Green Isle High School in
1978. “Gaylord is a great
community and I am very
happy to have been a part of
it for the past few years.”
The Gaylord City Council,
at its next meeting, is sched-
uled to act upon the letter of
retirement and discuss the
process to fill the position.
Mueller to retire as Gaylord Police Chief
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Elaine Breitkreutz recently
celebrated her 100th birthday
with family and friends dur-
ing an open house at the
United Methodist Church in
Arlington.
Woodrow Wilson was the
U.S. President and the price
of gas was 12 cents a gallon
when Elaine (Alwin) Breit-
kreutz was born on a farm
about four miles south of
Sleepy Eye on Sept. 30,
1913. She was the sixth of
nine children.
Elaine was 12 years old
when her family moved to
Lakota, N.D.
Elaine recalled walking
two miles to school in good
weather and riding in a sleigh
pulled by a team of horses in
the winter months.
She was very smart for her
age and graduated from high
school at the young age of 15.
After graduation from high
school, Elaine remained on
the family farm.
“Dad said I had to help out
at the farm,” said Elaine. “My
Mom was not feeling well.”
Labeled as a worker, Elaine
also helped to raise her three
younger siblings. After a few
years, Elaine was also a care-
giver for a nearby farm fami-
ly.
Aside from her work on the
farm, Elaine loved to dance.
She was known to hide in the
trunk of her Dad’s car to get
to a dance.
Elaine met her future hus-
band, Le Roy Breitkreutz,
while he was on a trip to buy
horses in North Dakota.
“It was love at first sight,”
said Elaine, who was 21
years old on her wedding day.
After a long distance rela-
tionship, the couple got mar-
ried at the Ebenezer Church,
a country church located
south of Arlington, on Nov.
25, 1934.
“We were so happy that we
finally got it over with be-
cause people were anxiously
waiting for us to get mar-
ried,” Elaine said.
The couple began to live
on a farm homesteaded by
LeRoy’s grandfather and lo-
cated about four miles south-
east of Arlington. The couple
was later blessed with a son,
Douglas, and a daughter,
Donna.
There were always chores
to do on the farm, according
to Elaine. The couple had
Holstein milking cows, two
teams of Morgan horses,
sheep for a while and always
chickens. She remembered
that the couple lost four steers
in the Armistice Day Blizzard
on Nov. 11 and 12, 1940.
In addition to the livestock,
Elaine also tended to a her
garden. The garden was so
big that it could be weeded
with a field cultivator. She
would also share her produce
with friends from town.
“She was always a work-
er,” said Donna. “After the
farm chores, she would have
four loaves of bread on the
counter, clothes on the line
and be at work at Kruger’s
Dry Goods Store in Arlington
by 8 a.m.”
“That’s the way it had to be
done,” added Elaine, who
worked at Kruger’s for about
five years.
Elaine also loved her sea-
sonal job at the canning com-
pany where she worked for
several years.
“She worked on the cut-
ters,” said Donna. “She could
push corn through there faster
than anybody’s business.”
After her kids had graduat-
ed from high school, Elaine
also worked as a receptionist
at the Arlington Clinic for
three years.
Aside from her family and
the chores on the farm, Elaine
made clothes for Donna and
enjoyed various hobbies such
as quilting, embroidery and,
of course, dancing and later
square dancing.
She was also very active
and generous in the commu-
nity.
Elaine was a 4-H leader for
the Hearty Hustlers for many
years. She was also involved
in the Kelso Women Exten-
sion Group for several years.
Elaine also served as a Sun-
day School teacher and later
became the Sunday School
superintendent.
Elaine Breitkreutz celebrates her 100th birthday
Enterprise photo by Megan Bennett
Elaine Breitkreutz
It was Elaine who came up
with the idea for the Little
Red Stocking cancer
fundraiser years ago. Elaine,
a lifetime member of the
United Methodist Church in
Arlington, “was always very
active in her church,” accord-
ing to Donna. In addition,
Elaine is a member of the
Eastern Star and recently re-
ceived her 50-year pin.
Over the years, Elaine has
seen the many changes in
technology as well as the
growth of Arlington and the
decline of family farms in the
area.
Elaine, who lost her hus-
band in 1994, lived on the
Breitkreutz family farm until
she was almost 97 years
young. She has been a resi-
dent at the Good Samaritan
Society - Arlington since
March of 2010.
Elaine, who has two grand-
children and three great-
grandchildren, credits her
longevity to taking good care
of herself, staying busy and
enjoying life.
Staff Changes
Staff announced some staff
cuts by the South Central
Community Based Initiative
(SCCBI). The 10-county adult
mental health initiative has
three state staff members lo-
cated in Sibley County, whose
contracts will be terminated
effective July 1, 2015.
“This community partner-
ship as part of DHS has been
a cost savings for Sibley
County because we don’t
have to employ these people,”
said Stock. “We only provide
a desk. Mental health is the
only area where the state
mandates a certain case load
size. Our adult limit is 30
cases at most. Having state
staff in house has helped us
maintain that level.”
Directors in the 10 counties
met with the state commis-
sioner and voiced concerns.
They noted that local staff is
vital to the success of this ini-
tiative.
“They are very important to
obtain the quality of service
we have been able to provide
to that population,” said
Stock. “We were told the state
staff located in the counties
was never intended to be a
long term answer, which is
the first I ever heard of that.
Some counties already have
taken staff on as county em-
ployees. I have to figure out
what is best for this office,
agency and county.”
Special
Education
Another impact on health
services provided came in
Stock’s update on changes in
the River Bend Education
District based in New Ulm.
The cooperative is between
Sibley, Brown and Watonwan
counties.
Stock reported that after an
audit was done last spring,
Sibley County was told the
way it has been funding River
Bend is no longer acceptable.
There has been a joint process
between River Bend, the
counties and the schools.
River Bend provides educa-
tional services to those stu-
dents who can’t be in the pub-
lic schools.
“Our plan has also had very
intense mental health services
as part of that program,” said
Stock. “The reason it was
started was as a cost savings
to the county for out of home
placements. At a meeting,
River Bend has indicated to
us that what we call the team
program has been decreasing
over time. The School dis-
tricts are seeing a shifting
need to serve a larger popula-
tion of those special education
students.”
As a result of the meeting,
Stock said the counties have
decided to terminate the joint
powers agreement for the
team program. River Bend is
committed to providing the
special education services, in-
cluding socialization and
mental health. It just will not
be as intense.
“The upside in the long run
is I think this will save the
county money because we
will use more special educa-
tion dollars,” said Stock.
“This will be a major, major
change. The team and day
treatment programs have been
in existence for 20 years. The
team program provided for
more one on one attention, but
now we will be doing more in
groups.”
Home Care
Month
In other public health news,
Stock said November is Home
Care Month. The county has a
staff of 19 with a combined
98 years of experience work-
ing with home health care.
Sibley County Continued from page 2
24” x 36”
Photo Posters
$ .00
+ tax
Call 507-964-5547
for details!
Arlington Enterprise
Sibley Shopper
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 24, 2013, page 4
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Staff
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Pub-
lishers; Kurt Menk, Editor; Karin
Rami ge, Manager; Marvi n
Bulau, Production Manager;
Barb Mathwig, Office; Ashley
Reetz, Sales; and Jean Olson,
Proof Reading.
Letters
This page is devoted to opin-
ions and commentary. Articles
appearing on this page are the
opinions of the writer. Views ex-
pressed here are not necessarily
those of the Arlington Enter-
prise, unless so designated. The
Arlington Enterprise strongly
encourages others to express
opinions on this page.
Letters from our readers are
strongly encouraged. Letters for
publ i cati on must bear the
writer’s signature and address.
The Arlington Enterprise re-
serves the right to edit letters
for purpose of clarity and space.
Ethics
The editorial staff of the Arling-
ton Enterprise strives to present
the news in a fair and accurate
manner. We appreciate errors
being brought to our attention.
Pl ease bri ng any gri evances
against the Arlington Enterprise to
the attention of the editor. Should
differences continue, readers are
encouraged to take their griev-
ances to the Mi nnesota News
Council, an organization dedicated
to protecti ng the publ i c from
press inaccuracy and unfairness.
The News Council can be contact-
ed at 12 South Sixth St., Suite
940, Minneapolis, MN 55402, or
(612) 341-9357.
Press Freedom
Freedom of the press is guar-
anteed under the First Amend-
ment to the U.S. Constitution:
“Congress shall make no law
respecting an establishment of
religion, or prohibiting the free
exercise thereof; or abridging
the freedom of speech, or the
press…”
Ben Frankl i n wrote i n the
Pennsylvania Gazette in 1731:
“If printers were determined not
to print anything till they were
sure it would offend nobody
there would be very little print-
ed.”
Deadline for the Arlington
Enterprise news is 4 p.m., Mon-
day, and advertising is noon,
Tuesday. Deadl i ne for The
Gal axy adverti si ng i s noon
Wednesday.
Established in 1884.
Postmaster send address changes to:
Arlington Enterprise.
402 West Alden Street, P.O. Box 388,
Arlington, MN 55307.
Phone 507-964-5547 FAX 507-964-2423.
Hours: Monday-Wednesday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.;
Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 2 p.m.; and Friday closed.
Entered as Periodicals postal matter at Arlington,
MN post office. Postage paid at Arlington USPS No.
031-980.
Subscription Rates: Minnesota – $33.00 per year. Out-
side of state – $38.00 per year.
Arlington ENTERPRISE
Letters to the editor,
opinion columns are
always welcome
Our View: Opinion page is perfect forum
to exchange ideas and find out
what other people are thinking
Opinions
Guest Column
The opinion page is one of the most read pages in this news-
paper. Writing a letter to the editor or an opinion column is the
perfect forum for people to express a stance, exchange ideas
and find out what other people are thinking about on specific is-
sues.
Letters to the editor and opinion pieces may not change any-
one’s mind, but it might at least make people think and realize
that there is more than one way to look at an issue. It also starts
or continues the discussion and dialogue on timely and impor-
tant issues that affect people in the communities, school district,
county and beyond.
It may be difficult for some people to express their ideas and
opinions, especially on sensitive topics, in a newspaper of a
small community where everyone seems to know everyone.
Some people may also believe that others who write a letter to
the editor or an opinion piece and take a stand on these types of
issues are negative individuals. That is hardly the case at all.
These individuals have the right to exercise their freedom of
speech and, more importantly, the courage to submit their letter
or column for publication. In a lot of cases, people who write
letters to the editor or opinion columns often times share the
same opinion or ideas of readers who are reluctant to have their
views in print.
Finally, individuals who write a letter to the editor or an opin-
ion column are hardly the final voices of authority on a particu-
lar topic and readers will surely not agree with them on every
issue. When that happens, this newspaper hopes readers will ex-
ercise their right and write a letter to the editor or an opinion
column for publication.
Letters to the editor and opinion columns are always wel-
come.
-K.M.
Too Tall’s Tidbits
Happy Birthday and Happy An-
niversary to the following local and
area residents compliments of the
Arlington Lions Club Community
Calendar.
October 25
Anna LeBrun, Cassidi Bartyzal,
David Neubarth, Jennifer Schauer,
Kristin Von Eschen, Nicki Voight,
and Mr. and Mrs. Chuck Pautsch.
October 26
Brooke Voigt, Carson Schmidt,
Kathy Nerud, Peggy Kuphal, Rich
Henke, and Mr. and Mrs. Curt Erick-
son.
October 27
Allison Quast, Allison Valentine,
Cody Doetkott, Julie Warweg, Lois
Schauer, Nikki Dose, and Mr. and
Mrs. Juan Aguilera.
October 28
Cindy Gustafson, Logan Campa
Matt Scharping.
October 29
Benita Quast, Landon Fisher, Lea
Ann Post, Mr. and Mrs. Duane
Duenow, and Mr. and Mrs. Marvin
Krentz.
October 30
Charisa Hanneman, Jennifer Mc-
Cormick, Kevin Smart and Nick
Selle.
October 31
In Memory Of Linda Kleist, Mary
Creech, Kyle Schmidt, Megan Ben-
nett and Charlie Soeffker.
*****
The strong young man at the con-
struction site was bragging that he
could outdo anyone in a feat of
strength. He made a special case of
making fun of one of the older work-
ers. After several minutes, the older
worker had had enough.
“Why don’t you put your money
where your mouth is,” the older
worker said. “I will bet a week’s
wages that I can haul something in a
wheelbarrow over to that outbuild-
ing that you won’t be able to wheel
back.”
“You’re on, old man,” the braggart
replied. “Let’s see what you got.”
The old man reached out and
grabbed the wheelbarrow by the
handles. Then, nodding to the
young man, he said, “All right, get
in.”
*****
A bus carrying only ugly people
crashes into an oncoming truck, and
everyone inside dies.
They then get to meet their Maker
and because of the grief they have
experienced, He decides to grant
them one wish each, before they
enter paradise.
They’re all lined up, and God asks
the first one what the wish is. “I
want to be gorgeous,” replies the
first man. God snaps His fingers,
and it is done.
The second one in line hears this
and says, “I want to be gorgeous
too.” Another snap of His fingers
and the wish is granted.
This goes on for a while with each
one asking to be gorgeous, but when
God is halfway down the line the
last guy in the line starts laughing.
When there are only 10 people
left, this guy is rolling on the floor,
laughing his head off.
Finally, God reaches this last guy
and asks him what his wish will be.
The guy eventually calms down and
says, “Make ‘em all ugly again.”
*****
Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson
went on a camping trip. After a good
meal and a bottle of wine, they laid
down for the night, and went to
sleep. Some hours later, Holmes
awoke and nudged his faithful friend
awake. “Watson, look up at the sky
and tell me what you see.”
Watson replied, “I see millions
and millions of stars.”
“What does that tell you?” Holmes
questioned.
Watson pondered for a minute.
“Astronomically, it tells me that
there are millions of galaxies and
potentially billions of planets. Astro-
logically, I observe that Saturn is in
Leo. Horologically, I deduce that
the time is approximately a quarter
past three. Theologically, I can see
that God is all powerful and that we
are small and insignificant. Meteoro-
logically, I suspect that we will have
a beautiful day tomorrow. What does
it tell you?”
Holmes was silent for a minute,
then spoke. “Watson, you idiot.
Someone has stolen our tent.”
By Lee S. Wishing
From the moment I clicked on C-
SPAN to watch Sen. Ted Cruz’s
quasi-filibuster, I’ve been trying to
make sense of the defund Oba-
macare/government shutdown ef-
fort. It didn’t take a rocket scientist,
or a political scientist, to know it
wouldn’t work. But it might just be
the first of many skirmishes that will
save the country. After all, conserva-
tives have two powerful allies on
their side.
When Sen. Cruz began his 21-
hour talking marathon, I immediate-
ly wondered how he thought it pos-
sible that the U.S. Senate, controlled
by Democrats, would give up on
Obamacare and why he thought
President Obama would give up on
his signature accomplishment, na-
tional healthcare – a progressive
dream for a century. I share the sen-
timent of investor Stanley Drucken-
miller, who told the Wall Street
Journal, “I thought tying Obamacare
to the debt ceiling was nutty.”
The idea was quarterbacked by
former Cruz colleague, Jim DeMint,
who surprisingly resigned from the
U.S. Senate last December to run
the Heritage Foundation and link up
with its political arm, Heritage Ac-
tion for America.
While Congress vacationed last
summer, DeMint and Cruz fertilized
the grassroots by participating in
Heritage Action’s nine-city Defund
Obamacare tour. Energized by large
crowds, Cruz was ready to make his
charge against the economy-killing
healthcare program when Congress
went back to work in the fall.
But Cruz and his intrepid Repub-
lican platoon couldn’t overcome
simple math: two is greater than
one. A firm (Democrat) White
House aligned with an unyielding
(Democrat) Senate beats the (Re-
publican) House of Representatives.
After a few weeks of fighting, the
insurgency went down in flames.
Or did it? Well, yes it did but it
will kindle future fires of rebellion.
Something new and big and power-
ful is going on in the political world.
Conservative think-tank leaders
around the country aren’t content
just to create intellectual ideas to
promote the principles of freedom
any longer. They’re getting into the
fight to make sure their ideas win in
the political arena.
They’ve lost their patience be-
cause our $17-trillion federal deficit,
our $200 trillion of unfunded federal
liabilities, and our out-of-control
Federal Reserve money printing ma-
chine could send our country into
the economic abyss at any moment.
These figures don’t even count our
massive state and local government
liabilities. So, yes, our country is in
big trouble and we need leadership
to save it.
From an economic perspective,
rather than a political perspective,
linking the Defund Obamacare ef-
fort to a deal to fund the federal
government wasn’t nutty; it made a
lot of sense for the long run because
Obamacare will create massive eco-
nomic pain.
Sadly, politics and elections are
more important to politicians than
the state of the American economy.
Their aim is to get re-elected. And
DeMint, Heritage Action, Freedom-
Works and the dozens of other think
tanks-turned-political-machines
know it. This is certain – the politi-
cians who vote recklessly will be
dealing with DeMint and Matt
Kibbe of FreedomWorks and others
in a thousand skirmishes in their
backyards where they can’t run for
cover under the Capitol dome.
DeMint, Heritage Action, Cruz
and the Republican Party are bruised
for now. But, they’ll be back to bat-
tle again. They’re learning how to
fight this adversary, which includes
big spenders in both parties.
Heritage Action President
Michael Needham, the 31 year-old
brainchild of Defund Obamacare,
told the Wall Street Journal, “There
is nothing in my mission statement
that says anything about the Repub-
lican Party. Our mission is to ad-
vance the conservative agenda. We
are nonpartisan and we really mean
it.”
I anticipate that the older DeMint
and young Needham will devise
winning Fabian strategies, match
their strengths against the opposi-
tion’s weaknesses, pester them in
politically vulnerable districts, raise
lots of money, improve their mes-
saging, and link up with state-based
think tanks with political arms.
Finally and importantly, DeMint
and the gang have two powerful al-
lies on their side – economic truth
and economic reality.
Status quo Washington violates
the laws of sound economics and is
destroying the United States of
America as we’ve known it. In-
evitably, the economy will continue
to decline and Obamacare will ac-
celerate the downward spiral. As a
result, voters will increasingly look
for leadership with answers that re-
flect economic truth and reality.
The electorate will remember Ted
Cruz’s filibuster. For now, the bat-
tling conservatives may look bruised
and ugly, but they’ll keep fighting
and they’ll make incremental
progress until they get chances to
win big victories. Don’t count them
out. They’re learning to fight big
spenders on both sides of the aisle
and economic truth and reality are
on their side.
Lee S. Wishing is the administra-
tive director of The Center for Vi-
sion & Values at Grove City College
and is president of the Grove City
Christian Academy Board of Direc-
tors.
Making sense of the shutdown strategy
SHARE YOUR OPINION
THROUGH A
LETTER TO THE EDITOR.
EMAIL YOUR LETTER TO
KURTM@ARLINGTONMNNEWS.COM
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 24, 2013, page 5
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
3rd Annual F
in Arlington on
starting at 5:30 pm
, O Thursdayy,
Halloween
right Night l FFr
in Arlington on
starting at 5:30 pm
, October 31st!
Halloween
right Night
, October 31st!
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s. A n io t c e s er t e in h g t sin os s cr id e k h r t o ffo
g p losin e c l b l i w n o t g rlin f A y o tty i C Te
Free Hot Dog
ur r o o d ffo o die h e w os h et t g r o t f fo o ets n n. L o gt
es h c t i h a w t i t w s hir ur t o h yyo c uen l q l i d w n t dogs a
s hi et t e r t in S aai n M e o l b l i t w aat h s t n io t azaat in
d n d an t en s aas e E h n t t o u en o vve i g ags t b a e r r t
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&
Brew
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.arlingtonmnchamber www
Commerce. For more information go to our W
This frightful evening is sponsored by the
h side o t r o e N h n t o
d A en 3r e w et b
t a ies r a c e s h t t siit i v
o f yyo I
t the A .m. a o r ffr
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Area Chamber of Arlington This frightful evening is sponsored by the
et. e r t in SS a f M h side o
. e v d AAv . & 2n e v AAv
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t o g L in rk a k P n e Ba t ta n S o t g rlin t the A
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Brew
Hot Dog
A41-42Ea
Free Halloween
Sat, Oct 26
Hosted by
www.AGIWomenofToday.org
www.facebook.com/
agiwomenoftoday
You’re
Invited!
G
a
m
e
s &
P
rize
s!
B
e a
F
A
N
!
Party for Kids
@ SE Arlington
Small Gym
1pm-3pm
Costume Contest
at 2:00pm
oween l l Ha ee r F
Gym l Smal
ngton i rl @ SE A
d Ki for Party
B
N
agiwomenoftoday
www.facebook.com/
g or GIWomenofToday. A www.
y
F
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S
E
a
Trick-or-Treat So
People Can Eat!
Members of St. Paul’s
Lutheran Church youth
group will be
trick-or-treating for
the food shelf
SAT., OCT. 26 • 10 A.M.
The youth will be knocking
on doors on the East
side of the railroad.
THANK YOU, ST. PAUL’S YOUTH GROUP
A42SEa
Trick or Treat
so People Can Eat!
Seventh Day Adventist will
be gathering non-perishable
cans & food items
Thursday
Evening, Oct. 31
We will be stopping at
homes West of the railroad
tracks in Arlington.
Thank You!
*42-43Ea
Trick-or-Treaters
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31ST
You are
invited to:
Amberfield Place
3 - 5 p.m.
Open to the public.
Amberfield Place
Arlington Senior
822 W. Main
Street
A42E43Sj
Obituary
History
By Judge Thomas McCarthy
Observed each year in Oc-
tober, Domestic Violence
Awareness Month (DVAM)
grew out of a single day, the
“Day of Unity” in October
1981 organized by the Na-
tional Coalition Against Do-
mestic Violence to connect
groups that worked to end vi-
olence against women and
children. The first observance
of Domestic Violence Aware-
ness Month took place in Oc-
tober 1987, and two years
later in 1989, Congress
passed a law designating Oc-
tober as National Domestic
Violence Awareness Month.
Even 24 years later, domes-
tic violence continues to
plague our society. Every
nine seconds in the United
States, a woman is assaulted
or beaten. Domestic violence
is the leading cause of injury
to women – more than car ac-
cidents, muggings and rapes
combined. And every day,
more than three women are
murdered by their husbands
or boyfriends in the United
States.
Since 2002 in Minnesota,
at least 197 women died from
domestic violence. 89 chil-
dren died from child abuse.
Financial costs of domestic
abuse are staggering. Do-
mestic abuse victims lose
nearly 8 million days of paid
work per year – the equiva-
lent of 32,000 full time jobs.
It is estimated that intimate
partner violence costs $4.1
billion per year for direct
medical and health care serv-
ices, plus an additional $1.8
billion for productivity loss-
es.
One in four women have
been victims of severe physi-
cal violence by an intimate
partner while one in seven
men were so victimized. One
in six women and one in 19
men have been stalked during
their life.
The National Survey on
Children’s Exposure to Vio-
lence, conducted January to
May of 2008, found that one
in nine children were exposed
to some form of family vio-
lence in the past year.
In a single day in 2007,
25,321 adults and children
found refuge in a domestic
violence emergency shelter or
transitional housing facility.
They are refugees in their
own country.
In 2011, the District Courts
in Minnesota handled 27,288
domestic violence cases. Of
these, 2,853 were felony level
criminal charges of domestic
assault, 2, 863 were gross
misdemeanor charges and
10,607 were misdemeanor
level offenses. In addition,
10,965 petitions for Domestic
Abuse Order for Protection
were filed in Minnesota.
Domestic violence does not
occur only in large metropoli-
tan centers. One of the key
aspects of the power and con-
trol an abuser has over the
victim is to isolate the victim
from family and community.
This is often simple to ac-
complish in rural areas where
there is limited public trans-
portation.
Over the past five years in
Sibley County, there have
been over 200 criminal cases
involving domestic abuse –
assaults or violations of Or-
ders for Protection. Of these,
about 50 were a felony level
offense, where the offender
could have been sent to
prison, for the seriousness of
the offense or the number of
previous cases against the de-
fendant.
In addition, 138 petitions
for domestic abuse Orders for
Protection have been filed in
the past five years in our
county.
The recent death of running
back Adrian Peterson’s son is
only the latest and most visi-
ble tragedy that has resulted
from the scourge of domestic
violence. There are several
groups in Sibley County who
are working to reduce the vi-
olence in our community.
Next week, we will describe
the work these groups do and
announce a kickoff event for
a new project – the MENding
Program – at the courthouse
in Gaylord at 4 p.m. Thurs-
day, Nov. 7.
October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month
Lorene Nuessmeier, 86, of
Fullerton, Calif., died at St.
Jude’s Hospital in Fullerton
on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2013.
Memorial Service will be
held at the Zion Lutheran
Church in Arlington at 11
a.m. Saturday, Oct. 26. Rev.
James Carlson will officiate.
Visitation will be one hour
prior to services at the
church.
Private interment will be in
the Arlington Public Ceme-
tery.
Lorene was born to Fred
and Ida (Latzke) Nuessmeier
in Sharon Township, Le
Sueur County, on July 16,
1927.
She attended rural District
19 School for eight years.
She graduated from the Le
Sueur High School in 1945.
She then attended Minneapo-
lis Business College. After
working in Minneapolis for a
while she then moved to Los
Angeles, Calif., where she
was employed by Shell Oil
Company in the Corporate
office. She took early retire-
ment and furthered her edu-
cation at Fullerton College
from which she received her
degree. She enjoyed genealo-
gy, traveling to Ladbergen,
Germany, and to New
Knoxville and New Bremen,
Ohio, to complete her ge-
nealogy work.
She is survived by her sis-
ter, Arline (von Lehe) Karels
and her husband, Bert Karels
of Henderson; brother, Don
(Gail) Nuessmeier of Arling-
ton; nieces and nephews, Sue
(Fred) Wintermantel of Ana-
cortes, Wash., Larry (Lisa)
von Lehe of Henderson, Jan
von Lehe of Seattle, Wash.,
Donna (Paul) von Lehe
Santo of Stillwater, Ken
Nuessmeier of Garden Grove,
Calif., Dan (Lucy) Nuess-
meier of Shakopee, and Lyn
Hallberg, Blomkest.
She is preceded in death by
her parents; and brother-in-
law, Donald von Lehe.
Memorials are preferred to
Arlington Public Library as
her father, Fred, had card #1
at the library when it opened.
Lorene loved to read, just like
her father.
Lorene Nuessmeier, 86, Fullerton, Calif.
95 Years Ago
October 24, 1918
Louis Kill, Editor
A huge pile, containing sever-
al hundred tons of sugar beets,
is located near the beet dump
near the railroad yards.
Thirty-six young men from
Sibley County were drafted into
the service of the national army
this week. Twenty departed on
Monday for Camp Forrest,
Georgia. Albert Schauer of this
place, Nick McMahon, Pat
McGuire and Neal Tracey of
Green Isle accompanied this
contingent. Sixteen men left for
Camp Cody, New Mexico
Wednesday, among them being
the following Arlington boys:
Wm. Paulmann, Frances Meyer,
Mert Dresser and Peter Luff.
Rev. M. F. Abraham, pastor
of St. John’s Lutheran Church of
Arlington Township, is going to
do his bit for our country’s
cause and has enlisted as an
army chaplain to administer to
the spiritual wants of the boys.
Rev. Abraham will depart this
week for Camp Sheridan, Ala-
bama. He will be accompanied
by his family and will be in
camp for a period of six months.
During his absence his duties
here will be taken care of by
Revs. R. Heidmann of this city
and K. Reuter of Green Isle
Township.
70 Years Ago
October 28, 1943
Louis Kill, Editor
Quite a number of people
from here witnessed the game
between the Arlington Indians
and the sturdy boys from Belle
Plaine. It being Arlington’s
homecoming, the Indians, by
pep-talks, the customary parade
through the village, and other
demonstrations were fired into
determination to win. Well, so
they did. They won by a score
of 25 to 0 playing one of their
best games of the season thus
far. To the regret of all fans,
however, Eldy Soeffker, one of
Arlington’s dependables, was
badly injured in the tussle and
may not be able to play for the
rest of the season.
The Minnesota Department
of Conservation tells how to
cook a pheasant when you are
lucky enough to get one: “First,
get your pheasant - be sure you
have your license and don’t take
more than your limit. Remem-
ber, keep your gun cased when
you’re in the car and don’t
under any circumstances shoot
from your car. Ask a farmer’s
permission to hunt on his land.
Don’t attempt to bring your
friend’s birds back with you un-
less he accompanies you and
don’t ship or take game outside
the state when taken on a resi-
dent licence. Pick your pheas-
ant, don’t skin it. The fat and
flavor lie under the skin. Dis-
joint the bird and dredge it in
flour. Brown it in deep fat; cover
it with cream; turn fire to low
and cook slowly until the meat
almost falls off the bones. Eat
with a clear conscience.”
45 Years Ago
October 24, 1968
Val Kill, Editor
Arlington dentist Bartholo-
mew E. Corcoran is one of
twenty dentists who will repre-
sent Minnesota at the 109th an-
nual session of the American
Dental Association, being held
October 27-31 in Miami Beach,
Fla. 15,000 dentists, dental edu-
cators, dental manufacturers and
guests from around the world
are expected to attend.
Sixty-two members of the Ar-
lington Chapter of Future
Homemakers of America attend-
ed the annual District IV con-
vention October 19, at Stewart.
The new District IV officers
elected for the coming year are
Paula Anderson, Hector, presi-
dent; Mary McCarthy, Arling-
ton, vice-president; and Marie
Niebuhr, Gibbon, secretary-trea-
surer. Sandy Trocke of Arling-
ton was a candidate for secre-
tary-treasurer.
Many acres of land are under
water in the Arlington Area a re-
sult of more than six inches of
rain in recent weeks. At press
time on Wednesday, more rain
was predicted.
20 Years Ago
October 21, 1993
Kurt Menk, Editor
The Green Isle Senior dining
site will celebrate its grand
opening on Thursday, October
28 from 11:00 am. to 1:00 p.m.
Those over 60 may donate to-
ward the cost of the meal; those
under 60 must pay the full meal
cost of $3.00.
An undetermined amount of
cash and checks were reportedly
taken from Dale’s Family Foods
between 10:30 a.m. and 12:30
p.m. Saturday, according to the
Arlington Police Department.
The incident is still under inves-
tigation. A $500 reward is being
offered by Dale’s Family Foods
for information leading to the
arrest and conviction of the indi-
vidual or individuals involved.
Pat Alsleben, a sixth grader at
the Arlington-Green Isle ele-
mentary School, was the top
sales person during a recent
candy sale at the local school.
Pat, who sold $432.50 worth of
candy, received a new bicycle
for his efforts.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Sibley County Community Coat Drive
Over 300 winter coats, 309 to be exact, were distributed to individuals and families
in Sibley County during the Sibley County Community Coat Drive in Green Isle on
Saturday, Oct. 16. The event was sponsored by The Salvation Army, Green Isle
Lions Club, Arlington Public Library, Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative and
Franklin Printing, Inc. The following people were some of the volunteers who
worked at the coat drive. Front Row: (left to right) Bailey Hoechst and Brittney
Suchy. Middle Row: (l to r) Haven Hawkins, Sue Vos, Vicki Stock, Nikki Dose,
Stacey Hoechst and Kathy Homme. Back Row: (l to r) Therese Ott, Mike Vos,
Duane Stock, Kim Schwich, Rita Edmonds and Ellie Kroells.
State Representative
Glenn Gruenhagen, State
Senator Scott Newman and
State Representative Dean
Urdahl will host a town hall
event regarding the possi-
ble unionization of child-
care providers.
The event will be held at
the Hutchinson Public Li-
brary, 50 Hassan Street
Southeast, at 7 p.m. Tues-
day, Nov. 5.
Hollee Saville, a child-
care provider from St.
Michael, who has led ef-
forts opposing the unwant-
ed unionization drive, will
be in attendance as well to
help answer questions and
receive feedback.
The event is open to the
public, but childcare
providers and parents of
children in childcare pro-
grams are especially en-
couraged to attend and par-
ticipate in the discussion.
Town hall meeting set for Tuesday, Nov. 5
W W W . A R L I N G TO N M N N E W S . C O M
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 24, 2013, page 6
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Sports
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East School
Board, during its regular
meeting on Monday evening,
Oct. 21, unanimously ap-
proved a motion to hire Todd
Warzecha as the new head
coach for the Sibley East var-
sity girls basketball team.
School Board members
Brian Brandt, Scott Dose,
Beth DuFrane, Anne Karl,
Missy Weber and Dan Woeh-
ler all voted in favor of the
motion.
Warzecha was the head
coach for the Sibley East var-
sity boys basketball team
from 2006-2007 through
2009-2010. During that span,
his teams compiled a 44-26
mark in Minnesota River
Conference action with two
titles. Overall, his teams post-
ed a 78-47 record with a sec-
tion championship and one
appearance in the state tour-
nament.
Todd Warzecha hired
as head coach of SE
girls basketball team
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Eric Thies, a 2005 graduate
of the Sibley East Senior
High School in Arlington,
won the fourth annual
Mankato Marathon in record
time on Sunday morning,
Oct. 20.
Thies, who ran cross coun-
try at the University of Ne-
braska, won the 26.2-mile
race in 2:34.55.
He ran a 5:55 mile during
the long distance race.
Two years ago, Thies ran
the same marathon and
placed second with a clock-
ing of 2:44.54.
Tim Hardy, North Manka-
to, placed second with a
showing of 2:36.06.
Jake Traxler, Le Center,
placed third with a time of
2:39:35.
Thies is a member of the
Twin Cities Track Club.
Thies, according to an arti-
cle in The Free Press, runs
several 5-kilometer races, as
well as 8Ks and 10Ks. He
competed in two half-
marathons this year, as well
as the TC 10-mile race,
which was held in conjunc-
tion with the Twin Cities
Marathon earlier this month.
He took 27th in that race. His
only other win this year was
the St. Peter Freedom Fun
Run 8K race on the Fourth of
July.
He is the son of Kevin and
Kathleen Thies, Arlington.
Eric Thies wins the
Mankato Marathon
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
The Sibley East defensive unit showed an excellent
example of gang tackling on this play against Mayer
Lutheran. Left to right: Ben Frietag (55), Colton Bates
(35), Travis Schmidt (24) and Austin Sadler (2).
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
football team concluded its
regular season with a 34-17
loss to Mayer Lutheran in
Minnesota River Conference
action on Wednesday night,
Oct. 16.
The Wolverines, who fell
behind 14-0, eventually ral-
lied for a 17-14 lead, but later
lost by 17 points.
The Crusaders, on their
first possession in the open-
ing quarter, drove 60 yards
before senior quarterback
Cole Buttenhoff tossed a 10-
yard touchdown pass to jun-
ior Taylor Otterstatter. Senior
Chad Anenson followed with
the extra point kick as Mayer
Lutheran jumped out to a 7-0
lead with 8:40 left in the first
quarter.
Mayer Lutheran, on its next
possession, marched down
the field and scored on a 27-
yard pass from Buttenhoff to
senior Joel Burfeind. Anen-
son again coverted the extra
point kick as the Crusaders
increased their lead to 14-0
with 3:33 remaining in the
opening quarter.
The Wolverines, two pos-
sessions later, countered with
a 58-yard drive capped off by
a 12-yard touchdown run by
senior running back Erik
Danielson.
Senior Francisco Guzman
booted the extra point kick as
Sibley East drew within 14-7
with 5:55 left in the second
quarter.
Sibley East, on the ensuing
kickoff, recovered a pooch
kick on the Mayer Lutheran
43-yard line.
The drive eventually stalled
inside the 10-yard line, but
Guzman kicked a 25-yard
field goal as the Wolverines
drew within 14-10 with 3:34
left in the second quarter.
An interception by Sibley
East senior linebacker Ben
White stopped a Crusader
drive deep in Wolverine terri-
tory late in the second quar-
ter.
Sibley East, at its own 25-
yard line, scored a few plays
later when Danielson raced
60 yards for a touchdown.
The extra point kick by
Guzman was no good as the
Wolverines had to settle for a
17-14 lead with 1:50 left in
the second frame.
Sibley East had another
drive late in the first half, but
time expired as the Wolver-
ines took a 17-14 advantage
into halftime.
The Wolverines, on their
first possession in the third
quarter, drove down to the
Mayer Lutheran 17-yard line,
but a run on a fourth-and-
three play came up short.
It was all Mayer Lutheran
after that point.
The Crusaders marched 43
yards before Buttenhoff
hooked up with Burfeind on a
40-yard touchdown pass.
Anenson followed with the
extra point kick as Mayer
Lutheran regained the lead at
21-17 late in the third quarter.
Mayer Lutheran, on the en-
suing kickoff, executed a suc-
cessful onsides kick and re-
covered the ball on the Sibley
East 40-yard line.
Burfeind, a few plays later,
found the end zone on a 23-
yard run. The Wolverines
blocked the extra point kick,
but not before the Crusaders
opened its lead to 27-17 with
11:48 left in the fourth quar-
ter.
The Wolverines could not
mount a serious drive after
that point and even came up a
pick-six interception to Anen-
son late in the game. Anenson
also booted the extra point
kick as the Crusaders cruised
to a 34-17 lead and eventual
win.
The Wolverine offense
compiled a total of 335 yards
in the loss.
Danielson sparked the
ground game with 19 carries
for 198 yards and two touch-
downs. The effort put Daniel-
son over 1,000 yards for the
second consecutive season.
Danielson and Sibley East
graduate Logan Reid are the
only two Sibley East running
backs to rush for more than
1,000 yards in consecutive
seasons, according to Sibley
East head coach Chuck Hart-
man.
Senior running back Alex
Pedraza had 16 rushes for 62
yards while senior Brody
Rodning added two attempts
for 33 yards.
The Wolverine defense,
meanwhile, created two
turnovers, but gave up some
big plays.
White led the defense with
nine solo tackles, six assisted
tackles, one tackle for a loss,
one quarterback sack, one
forced fumble and one inter-
ception. Senior Cordell Bates
contributed two solo tackles,
four assisted tackles and one
quarterback sack while junior
Ben Frietag had one solo
tackle, two assisted tackles
and one tackle for a loss.
Guzman, senior Austin Sadler
and sophomore Travis
Schmidt collected three solo
tackles apiece while senior
Darian Schulte and Colton
Bates added five and four as-
sisted tackles respectively.
“It was a tough loss, but
there are lessons to be learned
and applied in the playoffs
and in the careers for many of
our young inexperienced
starters,”   said Hartman.
“Football has a long learning
curve if you want to be really
good.   There are so many
moving parts, it is like no
other game.
The Wolverines conclude
the season with a 2-5 mark in
the MRC and a 3-5 record
overall.
SE falls to Mayer Lutheran 34-17
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The visiting and sixth
seeded Sibley East varsity
football team upset third
seeded St. Peter 21-6 during
the opening round of the
Section 2AAA Football
Playoffs on Tuesday night,
Oct. 22.
The Wolverine defense
came up with the first big
play of the game when sen-
ior safety Francisco Guz-
man hit St. Peter senior
quarterback Tom Steidler
and caused a fumble. Sibley
East senior Colton Bates
scooped up the ball and
raced about 80 yards for a
touchdown.
Guzman followed with
the extra point kick as the
Wolverines jumped out to a
7-0 lead with 1:27 left in the
first quarter.
Sibley East, after a num-
ber of punt exchanges,
scored its next touchdown
late in the first half.
The Wolverine offense
marched 49 yards before
senior running back Erik
Danielson hit paydirt on a
2-yard run.
Guzman again booted the
extra point kick as Sibley
East grabbed a 14-0 half-
time advantage.
St. Peter, on its first pos-
session in the third quarter
and after a long kickoff re-
turn to midfield, marched
down the field and scored
on a 1-yard plunge by sen-
ior running back Derek
Meyer. The extra point kick
by senior Valterri Korki-
akoski was wide right as the
Saints pulled within 14-6
with 8:52 remaining in the
third quarter.
Interceptions by seniors
Beau Swenson and Austin
Sadler stopped St. Peter
drives late in the third quar-
ter and early in the fourth
frame.
The Sibley East special
teams then came up with
another big play when
Swenson recovered a fum-
bled punt on the St. Peter
23-yard line.
The Wolverine offense,
which later faced a fourth-
and-12 on the Saints 12-
yard line, scored when Sib-
ley East senior quarterback
Brody Rodning fired a 12-
yard touchdown pass to
Danielson in the left corner
of the end zone.
Guzman converted the
extra point kick as the
Wolverines pulled ahead 21-
6 with 3:14 left in the fourth
quarter.
Sibley East linebacker
Travis Schmidt sealed the
victory with an interception
less than one minute later.
Team and individual sta-
tistics were unavailable
when this edition of the Ar-
lington Enterprise went to
press.
The Wolverines, 4-5 over-
all, will now travel to Fair-
mont at 2 p.m. Saturday,
Oct. 26.
Wolverines upset St. Peter 21-6 in playoffs
The Sibley East varsity
girls volleyball team received
the third seed and will host
Watertown-Mayer in the
opening round of the district
playoffs at Gaylord at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 24.
The seeding meeting was
held on Wednesday morning,
Oct. 16, according to Sibley
East head coach Chip
Wolverton.
Belle Plaine received the
top seed followed by Jordan,
Sibley East, Holy Family
Catholic, Norwood Young
America, Watertown-Mayer,
Glencoe-Silver Lake and Le
Sueur-Henderson.
The Lady Wolverines cur-
rently have a 20-8 record.
SE volleyball team will host
Watertown-Mayer in playoffs
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity boys
and girls cross country teams
closed out their respective sea-
sons with a meet at the Shore-
land Country Club in St. Peter
on Monday, Oct. 15.
Sibley East will compete in
the Section 2A Boys and Girls
Cross Country Meet at the
Montgomery Golf Course on
Thursday afternoon, Oct. 24.
The varsity girls race will start
at 4 p.m. while the varsity
boys race will follow at 4:45
p.m.
Boys
In the varsity boys race,
sophomore Jack Ballalatak
placed 23rd with a time of
19:09 while sophomore Justin
Bennett finished 26th with a
clocking of 19:34. Junior Sam
Thies followed in 27th place
with a showing of 19:35 while
eighth grader Kristian Schow
finished 30th with a time of
20:30. Senior Ben Ahlstrand
placed 31st with a clocking of
20:36 while eighth grader
Logan Tesch finished 32nd
with a clocking of 20:46. Jun-
ior Jonah Butler placed 36th
with a recording of 22:04.
In the junior varsity boys
race, sophomore Jack Rosen-
feld placed 23rd with a time of
21:04 while junior Chase Ell-
wood finished 28th with a
clocking of 21:54. Junior Kor-
ban Strand placed 30th with a
recording of 21:59 while soph-
omore Ian Holmes finished
41st with a time of 26:51. Sen-
ior Mike Schenck placed 42nd
with a clocking of 31:19.
In the shorter junior high
boys race, eighth grader
Cameron Thurn placed 17th
with a time of 10:31.
Girls
In the varsity girls race,
freshman Alison Eibs placed
13th with a time of 18:22. Sen-
ior Maren Miner finished 26th
with a clocking of 19:51 while
freshman Abigail Butler placed
28th with a showing of 20:02.
In the junior varsity girls
race, junior Karina Robeck fin-
ished with a time of 22:19
while seventh grader Breanna
Fahning finished with a clock-
ing of 21 minutes. Eighth
grader Tamara Ehrich had a
time of 22:45 while senior
Heidi Milczark produced a
time of 24:52.
In the short junior high girls
race, seventh grader Ariel But-
ler placed ninth with a time of
12:26 while seventh grader
Taylor Strand finished 10th
with a clocking of 14:21.
Sibley East cross country teams close out regular season
952-934-1525 800-362-3515
Extended through
February 22!
Back for the first time
in 20 years!
Relive the
Tradition!
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 24, 2013, page 7
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Legals
NOTICE OF MORTGAGE
FORECLOSURE SALE
THE RIGHT OF VERIFICA-
TION OF THE DEBT AND IDEN-
TITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDI-
TOR WITHIN THE TIME PROVID-
ED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECTED
BY THIS ACTION.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
that default has occurred in condi-
tions of the following described
mortgage:
DATE OF MORTGAGE: No-
vember 28, 2007
MORTGAGOR: Eric D. Hen-
drickson and Michelle M. Hen-
drickson, husband and wife.
MORTGAGEE: Washi ngton
Mutual Bank, FA.
DATE AND PLACE OF
RECORDING: Filed December
20, 2007, Sibley County Registrar
of Titles, Document No. T-20099
on Certificate of Title No. 6813.0
ASSIGNMENTS OF MORT-
GAGE: Assigned to: JPMorgan
Chase Bank, National Association.
Dated July 16, 2013 Filed August
5, 2013, as Document No.
T22892.
Said Mortgage being upon Reg-
istered Land.
TRANSACTION AGENT:
NONE
TRANSACTION AGENT’S
MORTGAGE IDENTIFICATION
NUMBER ON MORTGAGE:
NONE
LENDER OR BROKER AND
MORTGAGE ORIGINATOR
STATED ON MORTGAGE: Wash-
ington Mutual Bank, FA
RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE
SERVICER: JPMorgan Chase
Bank, Ntional Association
MORTGAGE PROPERTY AD-
DRESS: 318 10th Street, Gaylord,
MN 55334
TAX PARCEL I.D. #:
320507000
LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
Lot 13 and the South 25 feet of
Lot 14, in Block 50, in Second
West Addition to the City of Gay-
lord, Sibley County, Minnesota
COUNTY IN WHICH PROPER-
TY IS LOCATED: Sibley
ORIGINAL PRINCIPAL
AMOUNT OF MORTGAGE:
$129,600.00
AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED
TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF
NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF
ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE:
$125,441.71
That prior to the commence-
ment of this mortgage foreclosure
proceeding Mortgagee/Assignee
of Mortgagee complied with all no-
tice requirements as required by
statute; That no action or proceed-
ing has been instituted at law or
otherwise to recover the debt se-
cured by said mortgage, or any
part thereof;
PURSUANT to the power of
sale contained in said mortgage,
the above described property will
be sol d by the Sheri ff of sai d
county as follows:
DATE AND TIME OF SALE:
November 15, 2013 at 10:00 AM
PLACE OF SALE: Sheriff’s Of-
fice, Sheriff’s Department, 310
Park Avenue, Gaylord, MN
to pay the debt then secured by
said Mortgage, and taxes, if any,
on said premises, and the costs
and disbursements, including at-
torneys’ fees allowed by law sub-
ject to redemption within six (6)
months from the date of said sale
by the mortgagor(s), their personal
representatives or assigns unless
reduced to Five (5) weeks under
MN Stat. §580.07.
TIME AND DATE TO VACATE
PROPERTY: If the real estate is
an owner-occupied, single-family
dwelling, unless otherwise provid-
ed by law, the date on or before
which the mortgagor(s) must va-
cate the property if the mortgage
is not reinstated under section
580.30 or the property is not re-
deemed under section 580.23 is
11:59 p.m. on May 15, 2014, un-
less that date falls on a weekend
or legal holiday, in which case it is
the next weekday, and unless the
redemption period is reduced to 5
weeks under MN Stat. Secs.
580.07 or 582.032.
MORTGAGOR(S) RELEASED
FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGATION
ON MORTGAGE: None
“THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW
FOR REDEMPTION BY THE
MORTGAGOR, THE MORT-
GAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRE-
SENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS, MAY
BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS
IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS EN-
TERED UNDER MINNESOTA
STATUTES, SECTION 582.032,
DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER
THINGS, THAT THE MORT-
GAGED PREMISES ARE IM-
PROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL
DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE
UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY
USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRO-
DUCTION, AND ARE ABAN-
DONED.”
Dated: September 12, 2013
JPMorgan Chase Bank,
National Association
Mortgagee/Assignee of Mort-
gagee
USSET, WEINGARDEN AND
LIEBO, P.L.L.P.
Attorneys for Mortgagee/Assignee
of Mortgagee
4500 Park Glen Road #300
Minneapolis, MN 55416
(952) 925-6888
30 – 13-005754FC
THIS IS A COMMUNICATION
FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR.
Publish: September 26, Octo-
ber 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31, 2013
NOTICE OF MORTGAGE
FORECLOSURE SALE
THE RIGHT OF VERIFICA-
TION OF THE DEBT AND IDEN-
TITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDI-
TOR WITHIN THE TIME PROVID-
ED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECTED
BY THIS ACTION.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
that default has occurred in condi-
tions of the following described
mortgage:
DATE OF MORTGAGE: August
8, 2006
MORTGAGOR: Paul a R.
Cheever, a single person.
MORTGAGEE: Mortgage Elec-
tronic Registration Systems, Inc.
DATE AND PLACE OF
RECORDING: Recorded August
14, 2006, Sibley County Recorder,
Document No. A-207043
ASSIGNMENTS OF MORT-
GAGE: Assigned to: The Bank of
New York Mellon FKA The Bank of
New York, as Trustee for the Cer-
tificateholders of the CWALT, Inc.,
Alternative Loan Trust 2006-OC11
Mortgage Pass-through Certifi-
cates, Series 2006-OC11. Dated
June 14, 2012, Recorded June
28, 2012, as Document No.
A227374.
TRANSACTION AGENT: Mort-
gage Electronic Registration Sys-
tems, Inc.
TRANSACTION AGENT’S
MORTGAGE IDENTIFICATION
NUMBER ON MORTGAGE:
100077960000090655
LENDER OR BROKER AND
MORTGAGE ORIGINATOR
STATED ON MORTGAGE: Deci-
si on One Mortgage Company,
LLC
RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE
SERVICER: Select Portfolio Serv-
icing, Inc.
MORTGAGE PROPERTY AD-
DRESS: 312 East Adams Street,
Arlington, MN 55307
TAX PARCEL I.D. #:
31.0260.000
LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
Lot number One (1), and Lot
number Two (2), excepting the
West 25 feet of Lot 2, in Block
number El even (11) i n
Streissguth’s Addition to the Vil-
lage of Arlington, Sibley County,
Minnesota.
COUNTY IN WHICH PROPER-
TY IS LOCATED: Sibley
ORIGINAL PRINCIPAL
AMOUNT OF MORTGAGE:
$109,120.00
AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED
TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF
NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF
ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE:
$128,104.67
That prior to the commence-
ment of this mortgage foreclosure
proceeding Mortgagee/Assignee
of Mortgagee complied with all no-
tice requirements as required by
statute; That no action or proceed-
ing has been instituted at law or
otherwise to recover the debt se-
cured by said mortgage, or any
part thereof;
PURSUANT to the power of
sale contained in said mortgage,
the above described property will
be sol d by the Sheri ff of sai d
county as follows:
DATE AND TIME OF SALE:
December 13, 2013 at 10:00 AM
PLACE OF SALE: Sheriff’s Of-
fice, Sheriff’s Department, 319
Park Avenue, Gaylord MN
to pay the debt then secured by
said Mortgage, and taxes, if any,
on said premises, and the costs
and disbursements, including at-
torneys’ fees allowed by law sub-
ject to redemption within six (6)
months from the date of said sale
by the mortgagor(s), their personal
representatives or assigns unless
reduced to Five (5) weeks under
MN Stat. §580.07.
TIME AND DATE TO VACATE
PROPERTY: If the real estate is
an owner-occupied, single-family
dwelling, unless otherwise provid-
ed by law, the date on or before
which the mortgagor(s) must va-
cate the property if the mortgage
is not reinstated under section
580.30 or the property is not re-
deemed under section 580.23 is
11:59 p.m. on June 13, 2014, un-
less that date falls on a weekend
or legal holiday, in which case it is
the next weekday, and unless the
redemption period is reduced to 5
weeks under MN Stat. Secs.
580.07 or 582.032.
MORTGAGOR(S) RELEASED
FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGATION
ON MORTGAGE: None
“THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW
FOR REDEMPTION BY THE
MORTGAGOR, THE MORT-
GAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRE-
SENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS, MAY
BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS
IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS EN-
TERED UNDER MINNESOTA
STATUTES, SECTION 582.032,
DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER
THINGS, THAT THE MORT-
GAGED PREMISES ARE IM-
PROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL
DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE
UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY
USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRO-
DUCTION, AND ARE ABAN-
DONED.”
Dated: October 9, 2013
The Bank of New York Mellon
f/k/a
The Bank of New York, as
Trustee
Mortgagee/Assignee of Mort-
gagee
USSET, WEINGARDEN AND
LIEBO, P.L.L.P.
Attorneys for Mortgagee/Assignee
of Mortgagee
4500 Park Glen Road #300
Minneapolis, MN 55416
(952) 925-6888
38 – 13-007006 FC
THIS IS A COMMUNICATION
FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR.
Publish: October 17, 24, 31,
November 7, 14, and 21, 2013
CITY OF ARLINGTON
PLANNING & ZONING
COMMITTEE
PUBLIC HEARING
The Arlington Planning & Zon-
ing Committee will hold a public
hearing on Thursday, November
7, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. or as soon
thereafter, in the City Hall Council
Chambers, 204 Shamrock Drive to
consider Ordinance 281, an Ordi-
nance Amending Ordinance 169
the Arlington Zoning Ordinance,
by Adding Section 13.9 Relating to
Home Occupations.
A copy of the proposed Ordi-
nance is available for inspection at
City Hall. Any person desiring to
comment on this matter is invited
to do so in writing or orally at the
ti me of the publ i c heari ng. In-
quiries should be directed to Cyn-
thia Smith-Strack, Zoning Adminis-
trator, at 507-964-2378 during nor-
mal business hours. Written com-
ments should be sent to the Zon-
ing Administrator at 204 Shamrock
Drive, Arlington MN 55307.
Publish: October 24, 2013
CITY OF ARLINGTON
PLANNING & ZONING
COMMITTEE
PUBLIC HEARING
The Arlington Planning & Zon-
ing Committee will hold a public
hearing on Thursday, November
7, 2013 at 7:05 p.m. or as soon
thereafter, in the City Hall Council
Chambers, 204 Shamrock Drive to
consider Ordinance 284, an Ordi-
nance amendi ng Secti ons 15,
15.5, and 16 of Ordinance 169 the
Arlington Zoning Ordinance, to
provide for the expiration, revoca-
tion, and discontinuance of condi-
tional use permits, interim use per-
mits, and variances.
A copy of the proposed Ordi-
nance is available for inspection at
City Hall. Any person desiring to
comment on this matter is invited
to do so in writing or orally at the
ti me of the publ i c heari ng. In-
quiries should be directed to Cyn-
thia Smith-Strack, Zoning Adminis-
trator, at 507-964-2378 during nor-
mal business hours. Written com-
ments should be sent to the Zon-
ing Administrator at 204 Shamrock
Drive, Arlington MN 55307.
Publish: October 24, 2013
Menus
SENIOR DINING
Call 326-3401 for a meal
Suggested Donation $3.85
Meals are served at Highland
Commons dining room
Monday-Friday
Monday: Turkey casserol e,
peas, tropical fruit, bread with
margarine, cookie, low fat milk.
Tuesday: Chili, pears, lettuce
sal ad wi th dressi ng, crackers,
margarine, pudding, low fat milk.
Wednesday: Baked chicken,
baked potato, squash, bread with
margarine, gelatin with fruit and
whipped topping, low fat milk.
Thursday: Meatballs with gravy,
mashed potatoes, beets, bread
with margarine, pumpkin cookie,
low fat milk.
Friday: Pub House fish, whole
potatoes, Prince William vegeta-
bles, bread with margarine, pie,
low fat milk.
SIBLEY EAST ELEMENTARY
BREAKFAST MENU
Arlington and Gaylord
Breakfast is served at 8:00 a.m.
daily. A 1/2 pint of milk is served
with each meal daily. Menu is sub-
ject to change.
Monday: Gripz, yogurt, juice,
milk.
Tuesday: Mi ni ci nni s, j ui ce,
milk.
Wednesday: Cereal bar, seeds,
juice, milk.
Thursday: Waffle, juice, milk.
Friday: Unavailable.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Arlington
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: Chicken patty, oven
potatoes, lettuce, mayo, fruit, milk.
Tuesday: Tator Tot hotdi sh,
creamy fruit, bread sticks, milk.
Wednesday: French toast
sti cks, hash brown potato,
sausage links, applesauce, milk.
Thursday: Chi cken noodl e
soup, hot ham & cheese sand-
wich, crackers, pickle spear, veg-
gie sticks, peaches, milk.
Friday: Italian Dunker cheese
bread, Romaine salad, vegetable,
fruit, milk.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Gaylord
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: Chi cken patty on
whole grain bun, oven potatoes,
black bean salad, fruit, milk.
Alternate: Tator Tot hotdish.
Tuesday: Taco, lettuce, tomato,
refried beans, milk.
Alternate: Baked chicken.
Wednesday: French toast
sticks, sausage, oven fries, cu-
cumbers, applesauce, milk.
Alternate: Sloppy Joes.
Thursday: Chi cken noodl e
soup, hot ham & cheese sand-
wich, veggie sticks, pickles, fruit,
milk.
Alternate: Fish burger.
Friday: Italian Dunker, Romaine
salad, fresh broccoli, fruit, milk.
Alternate: Hot pork sandwich.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Helicopter Heave
The Helicopter Heave fundraiser, sponsored by the
Sibley East Booster Club, was held at Stan Cina Field
in Arlington on Wednesday night, Oct. 16. The Boost-
er Club is always looking for new members and vol-
unteers. Interested people are encouraged to go the
Booster Club website at http://www.sibleyeast.org
and click on SE Boosters under the Community
Groups tab. Interested people can also contact Presi-
dent Bob Miner at 320-296-1800.
Four men recently pled
guilty and paid fines of about
$740 each following an in-
vestigation of sunfish over-
limits by conservation offi-
cers with the Minnesota De-
partment of Natural Re-
sources (DNR).
State conservation officers
Jayson Hansen of Big Fork
and Don Bozovsky of Hib-
bing checked the men and
their wives while on patrol of
Deer Lake near Effie.
Searching freezers at vari-
ous locations during the in-
vestigation, the officers found
bags of mostly frozen sunfish
from Deer, Pickerel, Battle,
Larson, and Poplar lakes.
Deer, Pickerel, and Battle
lakes have a 10 sunfish per
person daily limit. The daily
sunfish limit on most Min-
nesota lakes is 20 per person.
The sunfish were seized
and counted and the men
were charged with 84 sunfish
over the legal limit. Among
the sunfish were 18 black
crappie, 11 northern pike and
nine bass.
Those each charged with
21 sunfish over the legal limit
included George Stavish, 60,
and Roland Mammenga, 62,
both of Randall; Curt
Atkisson, 52, Staples; and
Rae Mammenga 54,
Conesville, Iowa.
Anyone witnessing a fish
or wildlife violation is en-
couraged to contact the 24-
hour, toll-free Turn In Poach-
ers (TIP) hotline at 800-652-
9093. Cell phone users can
dial #TIP.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 24, 2013, page 8
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Ag Bag Disposal at
Hutchinson Coop
in Arlington! (It’s Free!)
Sibley County - Ag Bag Collection at the
Hutchinson Coop in Arlington
(23189 State Hwy 5)
The Entire Month of October 2013!!!
For more information, contact the Sibley
County Environmental Services at 507-237-4091
Tri-County Solid Waste Office at 507-381-9196
PLEASE NOTE!
THIS IS A COLLECTION FOR
AGRICULTURE AND SEED BAG
WASTE ONLY.
NO COMMERCIAL or RESIDENTIAL
GARBAGE, CHEMICALS or BULBS.
NO HAZARDOUS WASTE
WILL BE ACCEPTED.
NO HERBICIDES OR PESTICIDES
WILL BE ACCEPTED.
ABUSE OF THIS PILOT PROJECT
WILL RESULT IN TERMINATION OF
THIS PROGRAM.
Hutchinson Coop has agreed to
keep a roll-off container at their
facility for the entire month of
October 2013 so that Sibley
County Farmer’s will have a place
to dispose of their Ag Bags at no
charge. Simply bring your old Ag
Bags to Arlington and drop them
off at no charge to you.
A40-42E,41-42Sa
Friday, Oct. 25
5-7 p.m.
Soup Supper
500 Doppy Lane • LeSueur, MN
Come meet new doctor Dr. Karen Exline
CUSTOMER
APPRECIATION
& OPEN HOUSE
ARLINGTON
ANIMAL CLINIC
318 West Main St., Arlington
Thursday, Nov. 7
5-7 p.m.
Soup Supper
A42Ea
Four anglers net nearly $3,000 in fines
Sibley County Court
The fol l owi ng mi sde-
meanors, petty misdemeanors
and gross mi sdemeanors
were heard in District Court
October 11-18: Mi nnesota
State Patrol (MSP); Sheriff’s
Office, (SO); Department of
Natural Resources (DNR): MN
Department of Transportation
(MNDOT):
Cheryl R. Anderson, 59, Ar-
lington, drive over/through/-
around barri cade-hi ghway,
di smi ssed, Arl i ngton PD;
Michelle K. Biescheid, 35, Le
Sueur, speed, $135, proof of
insurance, dismissed, Arling-
ton PD; Scott P. DeVlaeminck,
37, Winthrop, vehicle registra-
tion required, $115, proof of
insurance, dismissed, Arling-
ton PD; Kevin A. Kamps, 27,
Glencoe, vehicle registration
required, uninsured vehicle-
driver violation, dismissed,
driving after revocation, con-
tinued, unsupervised proba-
tion one year, pay costs, no
driver license violations, $500,
Arlington PD; William J. Lee,
60, Green Isle, drive over/-
through/around barri cade-
highway, $125, Arlington PD;
Jared M. Mackenthun, 28,
Hamburg, speed, $145, Arling-
ton PD; Lizbeth Y. Martinez,
25, proof of insurance, dis-
missed, Arlington PD; Mark C.
Mohlin, 19, Shakopee, proof
of insurance, dismissed, Ar-
lington PD; Christina M. Mosh-
er, 34, Anoka, disorderly con-
duct-offensive/abusive/noisy/
obscene, continued, unsuper-
vised probation six months, no
same or similar, pay costs,
$175, Arlington PD; Michael L.
Pinske, 29, Champlin, speed,
$125, Arlington PD; Maslah M.
Sheikhuna, 26, Minneapolis,
failure to obey traffic control
device, $135, Arlington PD;
Anthony T. Bergstrom, 22, St.
Paul Park, Domestic Abuse;
violate order for protection
within 10 years of previous
conviction/adj of delinq., stay
of imposition, supervised pro-
bation two years, local con-
finement 30 days, credit for
time served three days, sen-
tence to service 160 hours for
indeterminate, sign probation
agreement, follow all condi-
tions set forth in probation
agreement, sign all releases
of information, psychological
evaluation/treatment within 90
days, domestic abuse evalua-
tion within 90 days, follow rec-
ommendations of evaluation,
be current with child support,
maintain employment at least
32 hours a week. no violation
of an order for protection, re-
mai n l aw-abi di ng, no
alcohol/controlled substance
use, no possession of alcohol
or drugs, random testi ng,
$285, domestic abuse no con-
tact order-violate no contact
order-within 10 years of previ-
ous convi cti on, di smi ssed,
Gaylord PD; Jesse Garcia, 24,
Le Sueur, DWI-operate motor
vehicle under influence of al-
cohol, stay of imposition, su-
pervised probation one year,
sentence to service 40 hours
for indeterminate, contact with
probation, follow all instruc-
tions of probation, sign proba-
tion agreement, pay restitution
before fines, fees and sur-
charges, chemical dependen-
cy evaluation/treatment, follow
recommendations of evalua-
tion, no alcohol/controlled sub-
stance use without a prescrip-
tion, no possession of alcohol
or drugs, random testi ng,
restitution reserved-to be filed
within 30 days, victim impact
panel-file proof with proba-
ti on, remai n l aw-abi di ng,
$753.27, DWI-operate motor
vehicle-alcohol concentration
0.08 within two hours, driving
after revocation, careless driv-
ing, tamper with motor vehi-
cle/enter without owner per-
mission, damage to property,
di smi ssed, Gayl ord PD;
Joshua R. Messner, 31, Gay-
lord, endanger child-situation
could cause harm or death,
dismissed, disorderly conduct-
brawling or fighting, stay of im-
position, supervised probation,
90 days, local confinement 10
days, $185, Gayl ord PD;
Michael K. Eng Jr. 45, Gibbon,
no dog license, $135, Gibbon
PD; Laurel L. Gullickson, 59,
Gibbon, no dog license, $135,
Gibbon PD; Bradley J. Weiers,
23, New Prague, no federal
waterfowl stamp, $135, DNR;
Michelle R. Beckman, 40, Ar-
lington, speed, $145, MSP;
Christopher H. Bruch, 39, Ar-
lington, speed, $125, MSP;
Quentin R. Carlson, 78, White
Bear Lake, speed, $135,
MSP; Kurt A. Degner, 62,
Medford, speed, $135, MSP;
Denise M. Feriman, 59, Le
Sueur, speed, $145, MSP;
Arron J. Hoversten, 22, Waite
Park, seat belt required, $110,
MSP; Brent R. Howk, 27, Ar-
lington, speed, $125, MSP;
Wi l l i am J. Lahti , 44, Eden
Prairie, speed, $125, MSP;
Jeffrey G. Lux, 36, Sl eepy
Eye, speed, $125, MSP; Sami
S. Saad El-Dein, 30, Marshall,
window tint too dark, $135,
MSP; Gary T. Schmi tt, 46,
Gaylord, muffler required, dis-
mi ssed, MSP; Deni se A.
Stone, 43, Minneapolis, proof
of insurance, continued, unsu-
pervised probation one year,
pay costs, no driving without
i nsurance, $100, MSP;
Thomas J. Vanderaarde, 57,
Savage, speed, $225, MSP;
James, C. Weatherman, 31,
Urich, Mo., seat belt required,
$110, MSP; Elizabeth A. Eibs,
43, Le Sueur, proof of insur-
ance, dismissed, SO; Kyle N.
Grams, 36, Winthrop, speed,
$125, SO; Jonathan P. May.
28, Mound, passing on right
when prohibited, $135, SO;
Eric A. Svare, 48, Prior Lake,
duty to drive with due care-
speed greater than reason-
able, continued, unsupervised
probation one year, pay costs,
no moving violations, $125,
SO; Lynn M. Wi l l ey, 48,
Bl oomi ngton, DWI-operate
motor vehicle under influence
of alcohol, stay of imposition,
unsupervised probation one
year, victim impact panel-pro-
vide proof to court administra-
ti on, chemi cal dependency
evaluation/treatment-within 60
days, provide copy of assess-
ment to court administration,
may revert to supervised pro-
bation if treatment is recom-
mended, sign all releases of
information, remain law-abid-
ing, follow recommendations
of evaluation, $385, SO; Kylie
K. Zel l mann, 18, Norwood
Young America, liquor con-
sumption by persons under
21, $185, SO; Darri s E.
Dehncke, 46, Franklin, driver
who is not owner must pro-
duce proof of insurance if re-
quired, dismissed, Winthrop
PD.
The cool and wet weather has slowed
down Minnesota’s corn and soybean
harvests in the past week. Ninety-five
percent of Minnesota’s corn crop is ma-
ture which is slightly behind the five-
year average of 96 percent, according
to the United States Department of
Agriculture. Ninety-seven percent of
the soybean crop is mature. The corn
harvest is only 19 percent complete
which is well behind the normal 49 per-
cent. The soybean harvest is 80 per-
cent complete which is slightly behind
the normal 83 percent.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Fall Harvest
The Arlington Conquerors
4-H Club is jump starting the
new year.
After installation of the
2013-2014 club officers, en-
ergetic plans for this fall were
made, including replacing the
club sign along Highway 5
and building a float for the
Arli-Dazzle Parade.
New and current members
are encouraged to enroll in 4-
H at www. 4-H. umn. edu/-
4honline.
The next meeting will be
held at the Senior Citizens
Building at 1 p.m. Sunday,
Nov. 10.
Arlington Conquerors 4-Hers to
hold meeting Sunday, Nov. 10
Fire deaths have gone
down in Minnesota over
the past 40 years — even
as the population and
number of recorded fires
each year is going up.
According to a new re-
port from the state Fire
Marshal’s office, 50 peo-
ple died from fires in Min-
nesota in 2012. That is
down from 56 in 2011.
There were 16,581 report-
ed fires in 2012, a 12 per-
cent increase over the year
before. Three people died
in fires where there were
working smoke alarms
and 10 died from careless
smoking. The report
shows cooking continued
to be the number-one
cause of structure fires in
2012.
No Minnesota firefight-
ers died in the line-of-duty
last year.
Fire deaths have decreased in
Minnesota over last 40 years
With Minnesota’s small
game, waterfowl, and archery
deer seasons underway, and
the firearm deer season set to
begin Nov. 9, conservation
officers with the Minnesota
Department of Natural Re-
sources (DNR) remind
hunters that there is one sure
way to avoid landowner con-
cerns associated with tres-
passing: “Always Ask First.”
“Trespass is the biggest
problem landowners have
with hunters,” said Col. Ken
Soring, DNR enforcement di-
rector. “It is critical for
hunters to have good relation-
ships with landowners, espe-
cially when you consider that
in some parts of the state
such as southwestern Min-
nesota about 95 percent of the
land is privately owned.”
“If hunters and other out-
door recreationists would just
make it a standard practice to
always ask for permission be-
fore entering any private
land, those relationships
would improve a lot.”
Soring encourages all
hunters and landowners to
obtain a copy of the 2013
Hunting and Trapping book-
let and review the trespass in-
formation beginning on page
6. “I can’t stress enough how
important it is to be very fa-
miliar with the trespass law.”
Trespass penalties range
from a $50 civil fine to a
criminal penalty of several
thousand dollars, confiscation
of vehicles and hunting
equipment, and revocation of
hunting privileges for 2 years.
Unlike urban law enforce-
ment agencies, conservation
officer response times to tres-
pass calls may be longer, es-
pecially during the firearms
deer season.
Callers are urged to contact
the Turn In Poachers (TIP)
hotline at 800-652-9093 to
report any alleged wildlife vi-
olation, including hunter tres-
pass. Cell phone users can
dial #TIP.
Information must include
precise time and location,
along with a full description
including a license plate
number of any vehicle be-
lieved to be involved.
DNR urges area hunters to review
trespass law, ask landowners first
McLeod County will offer
a record number – 59, in fact
- of tax-forfeited properties
for sale at a public auction
Nov. 7, according to an arti-
cle in the McLeod County
Chronicle.
County Auditor-Treasurer
Cindy Schultz said that in
typical years, the county has
eight to 10 tax-forfeited
parcels that are put up for
sale at auction. This year’s
offering is inflated by over 21
lots that the county acquired
from abandoned residential
developments. Other proper-
ties include residential
homes, commercial property
and “outlots” and abandoned
railroad property throughout
the county and its communi-
ties.
Record tax-forfeited properties to be offered at auction
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 24, 2013, page 9
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
McGraw Monument
Works, Inc., LeSueur
Local Representative
Leah Schrupp
Arlington, MN 55307
612-308-8169
3 miles North of LeSueur
on Highway 169
30945 Forest Prairie Road
(507) 665-3126
HOURS: M-F 8-5
Weekends by appointment.
Visit our
INDOOR AND OUTDOOR
DISPLAYS
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We offer traditional funeral options and cremation as well
as honoring all family wishes. Did you know that some
families have a traditional visitation and funeral and then
cremation? We also provide Irrevocable Funeral Trusts so the
monies can be sheltered in the event of an extended nursing
home stay.
Feel free to contact us for a no obligation visit. Pre-plan-
ning and possibly pre-funded final expenses can relieve fami-
ly stress and even save money.
Visit our web site at www.koldenfuneralhome.com for
more information and current obituaries.
Directors:
Karl Kolden, owner
Rosemary Kolden, owner
Darrell Kolden, Greggory Borchert, Shawn Kirby, Tonya
Borth
507-964-2201
www.koldenfuneralhome.com
FUNERAL SERVICES • ARLINGTON
A20(every4thWk)Ea
Blessings
Carry each other’s burdens, and in this way you will fulfill the law of Christ.
Galatians 6:2 NIV
St. John’s Lutheran
Arlington Township
Pastor William Postel
Bible Class: 9 a.m. • Worship: 10 a.m.
Commercial and Industrial Builders
Green Isle, MN 55338
ph. 507.326.7901 fax: 507.326.3551
www.vosconstruction.com
Arlington State Bank
Serving the Community Since 1895
BANKING SERVICES
964-2256
Arlington
A & N Radiator Repair
Allen & Nicki Scharn, Owners
23228 401 Ave., Arlington
877-964-2281 or 507-964-2281 Bus.
Certified ASE Technician on Staff
Also distributor for Poxy Coat II
Industrial Grade Coatings/Paint
MID-COUNTY
CO-OP
700 W. Lake St., Box 177
Cologne, MN 55322
(952) 466-3700
or TOLL FREE: 1-888-466-3700
HUTCHINSON CO-OP
AGRONOMY
LEON DOSE,
Arlington Branch Manager
411 7
th
Ave. NW • (507) 964-2251
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
402 W. Alden, Arlington
507-964-5547
Online at
www.Arlington
MNnew.com
Arlington Haus
Your Hometown Pub & Eatery
1986-2009
Arlington • 1-507-964-2473
STATE BANK OF
HAMBURG
100 Years. 100 Reasons.
Phone 952-467-2992
statebankofhamburg.com
CONVENIENCE
STORE
Hwy. 5 N., Arlington
507-964-2920
Homestyle Pizza
Real or Soft Serve Ice Cream
Gas – Diesel – Deli – Videos
(507)
964-2212
www.
chefcraigs
.com
23180 401 Ave., Arlington Phone 507-964-2264
EQUAL
HOUSING
LENDER
CRAIG BULLERT
ARLINGTON, MN
23189 Hwy. 5 North,
Arlington, MN 55307
arlington@hutchcoop.com
Office (507) 964-2283
Cell (320) 583-4324
HC
FUNERAL SERVICE
P.O. Box 314
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-2201
Member
FDIC
Brooke Barbknecht, Prior
Lake, and Eric Brockhoff,
Prior Lake, were united in
marriage at the Minnesota
Harvest Apple Orchard in
Jordan on Saturday, July 27.
Rev. Dr. Brent L. Parish
presided.
Parents of the couple are
David and Vicki Barbknecht,
Janesville, and Kris Willmsen
and the late Virgil Brockhoff,
Arlington.
Matron of Honor was Brid-
get Gehring. The bridesmaids
were Erin Keller, Wendy
Lund and Alisha Sylvara.
The groomsmen were
Doug Dahlke, Matt Kreger,
Tim Fielding and Jeff Car-
penter.
The ring bearers were Jay-
den Gehring, Jude Gehring,
Jaxon Gehring and William
Barbknecht.
The reception and dinner
were also held at the Min-
nesota Harvest Apple Or-
chard.
The bride is a realtor. The
groom is an area sales repre-
sentative.
After a wedding trip to
Hawaii, the couple resides in
Prior Lake.
Barbknecht - Brockhoff
Eric and Brooke Brockhoff
Erin Brockhoff and Peter
Keller were united in mar-
riage at the Stoneridge Golf
Course of Stillwater on Satur-
day, June 29. Judge Cass
presided.
Parents of the couple are
Kris Willmsen and the late
Virgil Brockhoff, Arlington,
and David and Stacy Keller,
Stillwater.
Maid of Honor was Bre-
anne Fackler. The brides-
maids were Nicole Bruch,
MacKenzie Jacobson, Jessica
Keller and Cali Smithback.
The flower girl was Isabelle
Keller.
Best Man was Nick Swan-
son. The groomsmen were
Matt Keller, Zach Garvey,
Matt Fenton and Louis Iver-
son.
The reception and dinner
were also held at the Stoner-
idge Golf Course of Stillwa-
ter.
The bride is a business ana-
lyst. The groom is a staff ac-
countant.
After a wedding trip to
Playa del Carmen, the couple
resides in Woodbury.
Brockhoff - Keller
Peter and Erin Keller
Weddings
Church News
The Medicare Annual Open
Enrollment Period is Oct. 15
through Dec. 7, 2013.
People who wish to change
Medicare Part D or Medicare
Advantage coverage for
2014, all changes must be
made between Oct. 15, 2013,
and Dec. 7, 2013. Coverage
will then begin Jan. 1, 2014.
For plan comparisons,
trained Senior LinkAge Line
counselors will be available
by appointment at the Gay-
lord Library, 111 8th St.,
Gaylord on Thursday, Nov.
14 and Friday, Nov. 22. To
make an appointment, call
Judy at the Senior LinkAge
Line: One Stop Shop for
Minnesota Seniors at 1-800-
333-2433 extension 82005.
When calling, people should
please have Medicare card
and prescription drug infor-
mation ready.
The Senior LinkAge Line:
One Stop Shop for Minnesota
Seniors is a free service of
the Minnesota Board on
Aging, as well as the federal-
ly designated State Health In-
surance Assistance Program
(SHIP). Specialists provide
one-to-one assistance with all
Medicare and health insur-
ance issues and also provide
in-depth long-term care op-
tions counseling.
Call 1-800-333-2433 for
assistance or go to www.Min-
nesotaHelp.info to chat live
with a Senior LinkAge Line®
specialist.
Medicare annual open enrollment is Oct. 15 to Dec. 7
ST. PAUL LUTHERAN
(WELS),
Arlington
Bruce Hannemann, Pastor
WEBSITE:
www.stpaularlington.com
EMAIL:
Bruce.Hannemann@stpaul
arlington.com
Saturday, October 26: 6:30
p.m. School harvest party.
Sunday, October 27: 8:45 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:00 a.m. Family
Bible study. 10:00 a.m. Worship
with Communion.
Monday, October 28: 7:30
p.m. Mission Society.
Wednesday, October 30: 2:00
p.m. Bible study. 3:45 p.m. Pub-
lic school confirmation class,
7:30 p.m. Choir practice.
Thursday, October 31: 10:00
a.m. Bulletin information due.
11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. servic-
es on cable TV channel 8.
GAYLORD ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
Gaylord
Sunday, October 27: 9:00
a.m. Sunday school. 9:30 a.m.
Sunday worship service. Be
done at 10:45 a.m. for Ukrainian
Jesus Christ Church harvest fes-
tival, Burnsville.
Wednesday, October 30: 6:30
p.m. Evening Bible classes and
Youth Focused. 8:00 p.m. Sup-
per welcome!
ST. PAUL’S UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Henderson
(507) 248-3594 (Office)
Rev. Brigit Stevens, Pastor
Find us on Facebook:
St. Paul’s UCC - Henderson
Sunday, October 27: 9:00-
9:50 a.m. Sunday school. 10:00
a.m. Worship.
ST. PAUL’S EV.
REFORMED CHURCH
15470 Co. Rd. 31, Hamburg
Dan Schnabel, Pastor
952-467-3878
www.stpaulsrcus.org
Sunday, October 27: 8:30 a.m.
Sunday school and Bible study.
9:30 a.m. Worship service.
Wednesday, October 30: 6:30
p.m. Catechism class.
ORATORY OF
ST. THOMAS
THE APOSTLE
Jessenland
507-248-3550
Fr. Sam Perez
Thursday: Weekly Mass at
5:00 p.m.
ST. MARY, MICHAEL
AND BRENDAN AREA
FAITH COMMUNITY
Fr. Keith Salisbury, Pastor
Friday, October 25: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar).
Saturday, October 26: 5:00
p.m. Mass (Mar).
Sunday, October 27: 7:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre). 9:00-10:15 a.m. El-
ementary religious education
(Mar). 9:00 a.m. Mass (Mic).
10:30 a.m. Mass (Mar).
Monday, October 28: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre and Mar). 8:00
p.m. AA and AlaNon (Mar).
Tuesday, October 29: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre and Mar).
Wednesday, October 30: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m. Word
and Communion (Oak Terrace).
5:00 p.m. Mass (Mar). 7:00-8:00
p.m. Jr./Sr. High religious edu-
cation (Mar).
Thursday, October 31: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre and Mic). 7:30
p. m. Narcotics Anonymous
(Mic).
TRINITY LUTHERAN
32234 431st Ave., Gaylord
Rev. James Snyder,
Interim Pastor
Sunday, October 27: 10:00
a.m. Worship.
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Pastor William Postel
Phone 507-964-2400
Sunday, October 27: 9:00 a.m.
Bible class. 10:00 a.m. Worship
with Holy Communion.
Thursday, October 31: 5:30
p.m. Deadline for bulletin & cal-
endar information.
EVANGELICAL
COVENANT CHURCH
107 W. Third St., Winthrop
Pastor Kyle Kachelmeier
(507) 647- 5777
Parsonage (507) 647-3739
www.wincov.org
Sunday, October 27: 9:30 a.m.
Worship. 10:45 a.m. Sunday
school.
Wednesday, October 30: 9:00
a.m. Prayer coffee. 6:00 p.m.
AWANA. 7:30 p.m. Youth group
meeting.
Thursday, October 31: 9:30
a.m. Women’s Bible study.
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN
Green Isle
Pastor Eric W. Rapp
Friday, October 25: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, October 27: 9:00 a.m.
Worship with Communion. 10:00
a.m. Sunday school. 10:15 a.m.
Bible Study. 3:30 p.m. Bible
study with pastor. 4:30 p.m Joint
choir practice.
Wednesday, October 30: 6:30
p.m. Confirmation class. 6:30-
7:30 p. m. Wed. night school
grades 1-5.
PEACE LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Kurt Lehmkuhl, Pastor
Saturday, October 26: 5:00
p.m Worship service.
Sunday, October 27: 8:15 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:30 a.m. Wor-
ship service. 10:30 a.m. Voters’
meeting.
Monday, October 28: 7:00
p.m. Guild meeting and Bible
study.
Wednesday, October 30: 3:45
p.m. Catechism.
ZION LUTHERAN
814 W. Brooks St.
Arlington – (507) 964-5454
James Carlson, Pastor
Sunday, October 27: 9:00 a.m.
Sunday school. 10:00 a.m. Wor-
ship/youth service.
Wednesday, October 30: 7:00
p.m. Stewardship meeting.
ZION LUTHERAN
Green Isle Township
Pastor Eric W. Rapp
Friday, October 25: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, October 27: 10:30
a.m. Contemporary worship. 3:30
p.m. Bible study at St. Paul’s
with pastor. 4:30 p.m. Joint choir
practice at St. Paul’s.
Wednesday, October 30: 6:30
p.m. Confirmation class at St.
Paul’s. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Wed. night
school grades 1-5 at St. Paul’s.
CREEKSIDE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Christian & Missionary
Alliance
Dr. Bill Kuhn,
Interim Pastor
114 Shamrock Drive
Arlington – 507-964-2872
email: creeksidecc@media-
combb.net
Sunday, October 27: 10:30
a.m. Worship service.
Wednesday, October 30: 7:00-
8:30 p.m. R.E.A.C.H. Youth
Group at Terry and Becky
Shogren’s home, 6th through
12th grade.
Thursday, October 31: 6:30
p.m. Men’s Bible study at Chuck
Peik’s home. 1:00 & 7:00 p.m.
Women’s Bible study, “Revela-
tion” at Jean Olson’s home.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
(507) 304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
507-234-6770
Saturday: Church services at
9:30 a.m. Bible study at 11:00
a.m. Fellowship dinner at 12:00
p.m. All are welcome.
UNITED METHODIST
Arlington
Rodney J. Stemme, Pastor
www.arlingtonunited
methodist.org
Saturday, October 26: 8:00
a.m. A-Men men’s group. 10:00
a.m. Women’s Bible study at
Bette Nelson’s
Sunday, October 27: 9:00 &
11:00 a.m. Worship. 10:15 a.m.
Sunday school.
Tuesday, October 29: 6:30
p.m. SPPRC.
Wednesday, October 30: 7:00
p.m. Choir and Confirmation.
Thursday, October 31: 10:00
a.m., 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. Worship
on cable TV. 1:00 and 7:00 p.m.
Women’s Bible study at Jean
Olson’s.
AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
LIESKE TRACTOR
Wanted: Your OLD TRACTORS,
any condition, make or model. We
also specialize in new and used
TRACTOR PARTS AND REPAIR.
Call Kyle. Located west of Hender-
son. (612) 203-9256.
AUTOMOTIVE
Parts, Repair
$$ DOLLARS PAID $$ Junk vehi-
cles, repairable cars/trucks. FREE
TOWING. Flatbed/ wrecker serv-
ice. Immediate pick up. Monday-
Sunday, serving your area 24/7.
(952) 220-TOWS.
Trucks, Vans, SUV’s
2007 Ford Edge SEL, black cloth
interior, full sunroof, 114,000 miles,
$11,900. Call (507) 317-7307.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
CONKLIN© DEALERS NEEDED!
Lifetime career in marketing, man-
agement and applying “Green” prod-
ucts made in America. Full time/ part
time. For a free catalog call Franke’s
Conklin Service now at (320) 238-
2370. www.frankemarketing.com.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
Part time maintenance person for
apartment complex in Gaylord.
Must live within 10 minutes driving
time of work site. Call (507) 237-
5449 for application.
Truck drivers needed with Class A
CDL for hauling in upper Midwest
area with vans or hopper-bottom
trai l ers. Must have 2 years or
more verifiable OTR experience.
(320) 523-5029.
Wanted organized and depend-
able person with good computer
skills to work with Arlington author
to meet deadlines on upcoming
book. References required. (507)
964-2550.
Work Wanted
HANDYMAN: Will do remodeling
of kitchens, bathrooms, hanging
doors and wi ndows, pai nti ng,
sheet rocking, texturizing or any
minor repairs inside or outside.
Wi l l al so do cl eani ng of base-
ments/garages. Call (320) 848-
2722 or (320) 583-1278.
FOR SALE
Heating/Air Conditioning
Special-95% Goodman gas fur-
nace and programmable thermo-
stat, $2,200 installed or AC unit,
$1,900 installed. J&R Plumbing
Heating AC, Lester Prairie (320)
510-5035.
FOR SALE
Wanted To Buy
BUYING JUNK BATTERIES
We buy used batteries. Paying
$10 for automotive batteries. We
pick up. Call 800-777-2243.
LIVESTOCK, PETS
Cattle
Miniature Hereford cattle. Cows,
heifers, steers, bulls, 218 Cattle
Company. (507) 964-2544, leave
message.
REAL ESTATE
Houses
3BR family residence, 1202 North
9th Street, Olivia. $30,600. (320)
220-0120.
One-of-a-ki nd i mmacul ate
Winthrop 4BR home, in ground
pool , 6-stal l garage. move i n
ready. $179,000. Facebook/Tre-
belhorn home. (507) 276-0655.
Mobile Homes
1993 Liberty. Glencoe. 3BR. All
appliances. New furnace. Easy fi-
nance. (612) 759-9161.
www.swsales.org.
RENTAL
Apartment
Glencoe Towns Edge Estates has
a 2BR & 3BR available soon. In-
cludes heat, water, garbage and
sewer. We accept cats and small
dogs. (320) 864-6600.
RENTAL
Apartment
Village Cooperative of Hutchinson
(320) 234-7761. 55+ Senior living.
Three units available (3-2BR, 1-
1BR.) Call for your tour! Come in
and check out the wonderful in-
centives offers and learn how you
can save over $8,000! Equal
Housing Opportunity.
Updated, spacious one and two
BR apartments in Renville. In-
cludes heat, water garbage. New
stove, fridge, air conditioner. Pet-
friendly. Call (320) 564-3351 for
appointment.
House
1, 2, 3 or 4 bedroom houses for
rent in Olivia. Call (320) 212-3217.
Want To Rent
Father and Son Operation look-
ing for farmland to rent. Call (320)
523-1116 or (320) 522-0272.
Wanted: Farmland to rent 2014
and beyond. Curtis Weckwerth
(507) 380-9128, Wayne Franzeen
(507) 380-2466.
Young farmer looking for land to
rent for 2014 and beyond. Com-
petitive rates and reference avail-
able. Call Austin Blad (320) 221-
3517.
SERVICES
Adult Care
Do you need a caregiver? Contact
michelle Furr at Advantage Care
LLC. Respite care and in-home
care avialable. (320) 522-0700.
Misc. Service
CUSTOM LOG SAWING- Cut at
your place or ours. White oak lum-
ber decking and firewood. Give
Virgil a call. Schauer Construction,
Inc. (320) 864-4453.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 24, 2013, page 10
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Classifieds
ADD ANOTHER PAPER
FOR ONLY
$
2.00 PER PAPER
(based on first week pricing)
The McLeod
County Chronicle
Silver Lake Leader
The Glencoe
Advertiser
The Sibley Shopper
Arlington Enterprise
The Galaxy
3-WEEK SPECIAL: ONE WEEK:
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15
80
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nd
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McLeod
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All Six Papers Reach Over 50,000 Readers Weekly in over 33 Communities
For 20 words, one time in
ANY TWO PAPERS and on the internet.
30¢ per word after first 20 words.
AGRICULTURE AUTOMOTIVE EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE LIVESTOCK
& PETS
LIVESTOCK
& PETS
REAL ESTATE SERVICES RENTAL RENTAL
All ads appear online
at GlencoeNews.com
Enterprise
To place an ad: Call: 507-964-5547; Fax: 507-964-2423; E-Mail: info@ArlingtonMNnews.com; Mail: P.O. Box 388, Arlington, MN 55307
Advertising
Deadlines
The McLeod County Chronicle Mondays at Noon
The Arlington Enterprise & The Silver Lake Leader Tuesdays at Noon
The Glencoe Advertiser, The Sibley Shopper
& The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
Available...
1 & 2 Bedroom
Apartments Available
All utilities,
except electric
Income based
Must be 62 or older
or handicapped
Highland Commons
Arlington
507-964-5556
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HANDICAP
ACCESSIBLE
OAK TERRACE
Healthcare Center of Gaylord
has openings in the following positions:
SKILLED NURSING HOME
NURSING ASSISTANT:
• Weekend hours 6:00am-2:30pm
and 2:15pm-10:45 pm shifts.
MAINTENANCE:
• Part-time position available for general maintenance
of building. Applicant must be able to work independ-
ently M-F 8am-2pm with some on call opportunity.
Boiler license preferred. Pay depends on experience.
ASSISTED LIVING
LPN:
• Part-Time hours, 2:30pm-11:00pm
Applications are available at:
640 Third St., Gaylord, MN
Or online at www.oakterraceliving.com
For further information, contact Human Resources
at 507-237-8703. EOE
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Independent Living
55+ Arlington Sr. Apartment ONLY
One-Bedrooms Available
Garage Available
Apply NOW & Move this Fall!
FREE Application
FREE Damage Deposit
FREE 1
st
Month Rent
Lease Today!
800-873-1736 or 507-642-8701
kanderson@amberfieldplace.com
www.amberfieldplace.com
A340-43E41-44Sa
Managed by Great Lakes Management Co.
S
ealed
B
id
S
ale
Friday, November 22, 2013
Arlington Bowling Alley
508 2
nd
Avenue NW • Arlington, MN 55307
Reserve Bid =
$
25,000
Contact Arlington State Bank for Bid Sheets (507) 964-2256
A41E42SGa
Golden Hearts
Assisted Living is now
hiring for a 10pm-6am
position. Average is 140
hours monthly.
Additional hours avail-
able. Experience in
cooking required.
For application, stop at:
Golden Hearts
602 Marion Dr.
Arlington, MN 55307
♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥
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A41-42Ea
CALL CENTER
REPRESENTATIVES!
Great job opportunities at Heartland America!
We’re conveniently located in Chaska between
Hwy. 5 and 41! Heartland America is a Direct
Marketing company offering brand name and
other quality merchandise at value prices via
catalog and internet sales. No Outbound calling!
Great pay and benefits!
Print and send application or apply in person:
Heartland America Attn: Pam
8085 Century Blvd., Chaska, MN 55318
E-mail: chaskaemployment@heartlandamerica.com
Website: www.heartlandamerica.com/application
Ph: 952-361-5671 Fax: 952-361-3656
K41-42Za
NEED CLASS A CDL TRAINING?
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CASH FOR CARS:
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dollar paid. We come to you! Any make/
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DOUBLE-HUNG WINDOWS $249
Fall special pricing. Any size, installa-
tion included. Year-around installation.
Financing available. True life-time war-
ranty product. Call 888/690-9892 or
visit www.greensourcewindows.com
ENJOY 100% GUARANTEED
delivered-to-the-door Omaha Steaks!
Save 74% plus 4 free burgers - The Fam-
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day 877/415-6938, use code 48829ALF
- or www.omahasteaks.com/mbfam99
DISH TV RETAILER
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12
mos.) & High Speed Internet start-
ing at $14.95/month (where avail-
able.) Save! Ask About same day In-
stallation! Call now! 800/297-8706
CANADA DRUG CENTER
is your choice for safe and affordable med-
ications. Our licensed Canadian mail order
pharmacy will provide you with savings of
up to 75% on all your medication needs.
Call today 800/259-1096 for $10.00 off
your first prescription and free shipping.
DONATE YOUR CAR
Truck or Boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free
3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing,
all paperwork taken care of 800/439-1735
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MISCELLANEOUS
AUTOS WANTED
HELP WANTED - DRIVERS
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FOR SALE
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED - SALES
ONLY $249 to reach a statewide audience
of 3 million readers!!! 1-800-279-2979
Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington
is seeking the following positions:
• Certified Nursing Assistant, evening
shifts with every other weekend, 6 shifts
per pay period.
• Certified Nursing Assistant, evening
shifts with every other weekend/holiday,
10 shifts per pay period.
• Certified Nursing Assistant, overnights 10:15pm-6:15am,
every other weekend only.
• LPN Evening Nurse, 8 shifts per pay period,
includes every other weekend/holiday.
• Assistant Cook every Thursday and every other
weekend/holiday - 4 shifts per pay period.
– Must be MN Certified –
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information,
call Tiffany Brockhoff,
Human Resource Director at
507-964-2251 or email:
tbrockof@good-sam.com
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap Drug-Free Workplace
Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life.
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,4
2
S
T
F
N
a
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