10-3-13 Arlington Enterprise

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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Serving the Communities of Arlington and Green Isle, Minnesota
www.arlingtonmnnews.com Volume 130 • Number 13 • Thursday, October 3, 2013 • Arlington, MN 55307
Single copy $1.00
Enterprise photos by Kurt Menk
A 150th anniversary celebration was held at St. Bren-
dan’s Catholic Church in Green Isle on Sunday, Sept.
29. A Mass was held at 10 a.m. while a chicken dinner
was served at the Green Isle Community School at 11
a.m. (Top Photo) Deacon Timothy Dolan, Father Jerry
Berger and Father Keith Salisbury. (Bottom Left
Photo) Father Jerry Berger visited with Allie Weber,
middle, and Geri Weber, right, outside in front of the
church. (Bottom Right Photo) Father Jerry Berger and
Sister James Theresa Mullen, both natives of Green
Isle, posed for a picture prior to the chicken dinner at
the school.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Green Isle City Coun-
cil, during its regular meeting
on Tuesday night, Sept. 24,
unanimously adopted a reso-
lution to offer the sale of 43
vacant lots to the highest bid-
der.
The vacant lots, about one
year ago, were forfeited to
the State of Minnesota, ac-
cording to the Sibley County
Auditor’s Office and Sibley
County Assessor’s Office.
The City of Green Isle,
over a month ago, regained
the ownership of the 43 lots
originally developed by the
Rosemount Development
Corporation.
A few of the lots are locat-
ed in the Green Isle Third
Addition and Green Isle Fifth
Addition. Most of the lots are
located in the Green Isle
Sixth Addition and Green Isle
Seventh Addition, according
to the Sibley County Audi-
tor’s Office.
Mayor Dale ZumBerge and
City Council members Todd
Burg, Shawn Harms, Brian
Oelfke and Mark Wentzlaff
all voted in favor of the reso-
lution.
The bids may be for indi-
vidual lots or for all of the
lots together. The sale terms
will be cash on closing. The
City of Green Isle, however,
reserves the right to reject
any and all bids.
The sealed written bids
must be delivered to the
Green Isle City Clerk at the
City Office or mailed to the
Green Isle City Office, P.O.
Box 275, Green Isle, MN,
55338. The deadline is Tues-
day, Oct. 15.
The City Council will open
and consider the sealed bids
during a closed meeting on
Tuesday night, Oct. 22.
The City Council hopes to
recover special assessments
which average approximately
$15,000 per lot, according to
city officials. Potential buyers
will not have to pay delin-
quent property taxes to the
State of Minnesota, Sibley
County and City of Green
Isle. Although the City of
Green Isle expects to take a
loss on the sale of any lot,
city officials believe it is
more important to get the
properties back on the tax
rolls rather than have the city
own them.
The special assessments,
delinquent property taxes,
penalties and interest on the
43 lots, one year ago, was
$717,280, according to the
Sibley County Auditor’s Of-
fice.
The delinquent property
taxes and penalties have since
been waived so the new total
for the special assessment is
approximately $660,000.
The City of Green Isle
originally bonded for the de-
velopment of the seven addi-
tions. The special assess-
ments were to be used to
make the bond payments.
The Green Isle City Coun-
cil and Green Isle Economic
Development Authority were
scheduled to hold discussion
on how to handle the sealed
bids during a workshop on
Monday night, Sept. 30.
Green Isle City Council
adopts resolution to
receive bids on 43 lots
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Green Isle City
Council, during its regular
meeting on Tuesday
evening, Sept. 24, voted 4-
0 and approved a motion
to accept the low bid of
$6,725 from John Schauer,
Green Isle, for a 30’ X 50’
concrete slab for a basket-
ball court in the Lions
Park.
Mayor Dale ZumBerge
and City Council members
Todd Berg, Shawn Harms
and Brian Oelfke voted in
favor of the motion. City
Council member Mark
Wentzlaff abstained from
the vote.
The bid from Schauer
included a gravel base and
steel rebar.
The other bid of $6,750
was received from Went-
zlaff Construction, Green
Isle. That bid included a
wire mesh, but not a grav-
el base.
Under the conditions of
the motion, Schauer must
start the job by Tuesday,
Oct. 15 and complete the
task by Monday, Oct. 21.
If Schauer is unable to
meet those deadlines, the
bid will go to Wentzlaff
Construction.
The City Council did re-
ceive a less expensive bid
for asphalt, but favored
concrete and its mainte-
nance-free issues.
Other
Business
The City Council unani-
mously approved a motion
to accept two bids from
William Mueller & Sons,
Hamburg. A bid of $9,809
is to repair and blacktop a
section of Western Av-
enue. A bid of $5,512 is to
repair and blacktop a sec-
tion of Fourth Avenue.
In another move, the
City Council directed
Green Isle City Attorney
Ross Arneson to draft a
proposal which will in-
clude a set of regulations
for fencing around busi-
nesses.
Green Isle City Clerk
Bert Panning, during an
earlier meeting, informed
the City Council that a
leak test was conducted by
the Minnesota Rural Water
Association at Dale Circle.
There were no leaks de-
tected.
Chris Larson, a repre-
sentative from I & S, is-
sued a handout which esti-
mated that the short-term
cost to solve the issues at
Dale Circle are $50,000
while the long-term cost is
$85,000.
The City Council direct-
ed I &S to prepare the
necessary paper work and
send out the request for
bids to a few possible con-
tractors at their discretion.
G.I. City Council accepts
bid for basketball court
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Editor’s Note: Information
for this article was taken from
the book “A History of St.
Brendan’s Parish, The Village
of Green Isle and Minnesota’s
First Irish Settlement,” by
Father Jerry Berger.
A 150th anniversary cele-
bration was held at St. Bren-
dan’s Catholic Church in
Green Isle on Sunday, Sept.
29.
A Mass was held at 10 a.m.
while a chicken dinner fol-
lowed at the Green Isle Com-
munity School at 11 a.m.
First Church
Although there is no ab-
solute certain date or year, the
first St. Brenden’s Catholic
Church in Green Isle was
very likely built in 1863 for a
number of reasons.
“The presence of Father
Venn in Sibley County is one
reason supporting 1863 as the
date the first church was built
here, since we can be sure a
church would be built when it
was certain a priest would
visit it regularly, ” Father
Berger wrote in the book.
A second point in support
of this claim is the informa-
tion given in the Catholic Al-
manac for 1864, according to
the book. Besides listing
Jessenland, Henderson and
St. John’s, it also gives the
following information:
“Washington Lake, Sibley
County, visited from Hender-
son,” and “Springmount,
Carver County, visited from
Waconia. Springmount, ac-
cording to the book, was an
early name for Assumption.
“Hence, Washington Lake
could only refer to the present
Green Isle parish. Since this
information would have been
gathered the previous fall in
1863, we are safe in saying a
church was built at Green Isle
in 1863,” Father Berger wrote
in the book.
A third point in support of
the claim is that the oldest
tombstone in the St. Bren-
dan’s Catholic Cemetery
bears the date 1863, accord-
ing to the book. Prior to this,
all funerals were held at the
church in Jessenland and
burials were made in the
cemetery there. If there was
no church in Green Isle in
1863, there would have been
no burials in Green Isle ei-
ther.
The fourth point in support
of the claim is that there is
also a record of a wedding in
Green Isle in 1863, according
to the book. “Again it would
seem strange that a wedding
was held here if there were no
church,” Father Berger wrote
in the book.
The land for the first
church was donated by
Phillip and Honora McGrann,
the book said.
From old photographs, the
first church was located about
100 feet directly east of the
present church, according to
the book.
“This first church was a
frame structure 31 feet by 56
feet and 25 feet from the peak
of the roof to the ground,”
Father Berger wrote in the
book. “It was quite a large
structure for its day. The logs
for this church were hauled
by ox cart to Walkers Saw
Mill in Faxon.”
It is unknown when the
first mass was said in the
church.
According to the book, Fa-
ther Venn said mass in the
church one day a week.
“That day was seldom Sun-
day since normally he was in
Henderson or at Jessenland
for Sunday and on the other
days of the week he visited
the outlaying parishes,” wrote
Father Berger in the book.
Father Berger continued,
“It should also be noted here
that the church of 1863 was
the first building in what is
now Green Isle Village. At
the time it was built the town
did not exist. Gradually the
town sprang up around it.”
Existing Church
In February of 1882, Father
Timothy Ryan was appointed
the first resident pastor of
Green Isle. The parish school,
which was built in 1870, was
converted to a rectory,
St. Brendan’s
Continued on page 11
St. Brendan’s Catholic Church
celebrates 150th anniversary
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 3, 2013, page 2
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Stu’s Rainbow Inn
Phyllis & Carolyn, Proprietors
Main Street, Arlington • 507-964-2572
Open Thursday Nights!
Starting Sept. 19 for the
Fall & Winter Season
A36-39E37-40Sa
Music Concert
by Le Grande Bande & Chorus
(a local nonprofit)
Performance to be held at
Jussi Bjorling Recital Hall
Gustavus Adolphus College
Sunday, Oct. 6 @ 7pm
Performing Handel’s “Water
Music,” Hadyn Symphony No. 87,
and Haydn Sinfonia from Armida
Admission
$
10
Order tickets by e-mailing:
legrandebandechorus@gmail.com
or send check/cash payment to:
Le Grande Bande & Chorus
PO Box 101
Gaylord, MN 55334
Limited number of tickets
available at the door.
*38-39Ea
W W W . A R L I N G TO N M N N E W S . C O M
Thursday, October 3: Arlington Ambulance
Service, 7 p.m.
Arlington Lions Club, Arlington Haus, social 6
p.m., meeting 7 p.m.
Friday, October 4: Arlington Veteran’s Organiza-
tion’s Steak Fry, veteran’s building at fairgrounds,
5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
Monday, October 7: Arlington City Council,
council chambers, 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, October 8: American Legion Post
#250, veteran’s building at fairgrounds, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, October 9: The Minnesota River
Area Agency on aging trained health insurance
counselors are available from 10:30 a.m.-11:30
a.m. at the Sibley Medical Center in Arlington. To
schedule help at a different time or location, con-
tact the Senior Linkage Line at 800-333-2433.
Thursday, October 10: Golden Age Club, senior
citizen’s building at Four Seasons Park, noon
luncheon followed by meeting and entertainment.
New members welcome!
Community
Calendar
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER
MAIN BANK
Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (straight thru)
DRIVE THRU
Monday - Thursday, 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.,
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Member
FDIC
Arlington State Bank
(507) 964-2256
Fax (507) 964-5550
www.ArlingtonStateBank.com
The Zurah Shriners
Ho-Ho Area Shrine Club
Pancakes, Potato Pancakes
Eggs & Sausage Breakfast
The 10
th
Annual Breakf ast
Sunday, October 6
8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Arlington Community Center
on Hwy 5, Arlington, MN
DRAWING FOR FREE CIRCUS TICKETS
Donations: Adults
$
7.00
Children 6-12 yrs.
$
4.00
Children under 6 yrs. FREE!
Proceeds are for the benefit
of the Ho-Ho Area Shrine Club.
Payments are not deductible
as charitable contributions.
*
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a
Harvestime Feast
Tasting Luncheon
/ Bake Sale
Tuesday, Oct. 15
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Bake Sale Starts
@ 11:00 a.m.
Arlington
Community
Center
Adults
$
7.00
Children
$
3.00
Sponsored by:
Sibley Medical Center
Auxiliary & Good
Samaritan Auxiliary
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Questions
about Health Care?
Maybe I can help!
Call
507-358-0864
or stop by
405 West
Main Street
Arlington
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In Loving Memory of
Theresa Marie
(Toots) Buesgens
Aug. 7, 1963 – Oct. 1, 2012
We thought of you
with love today,
but that is nothing new.
We thought about you
yesterday,
and days before that too.
We think of you in silence,
we often speak your name.
Now all we have is memories,
and your picture in a frame.
Your memory is our keepsake,
with which we’ll never part.
God has you in His keeping,
we have you in our heart.
Dearly missed by family and friends *
3
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In Memory
Jennifer Ellen Bates
6-4-79 ~ 10-3-98
We miss you...
Wherever we are,
we think of you;
Wherever we go,
you are there.
Your shining spirit will
always be in our hearts.
You are our sunshine.
You are our angel.
We love you, Jenni!
Mom, Dad
& Family
*39Ea
olunteer V Green Isle
ire & Rescue Relief F olunteer
14th
olunteer V Green Isle
Corn, Buns, Dessert, Coffee and Milk
indsor W MENU:
10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
y a Sund
AAALL G FFFA FA
Annual 14th
ire & Rescue Relief F olunteer
Corn, Buns, Dessert, Coffee and Milk
ork Chops, Baked P indsor
10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
, October 13, 2 yy,
GET ET OOGET ET TH O TTTO TO
Corn, Buns, Dessert, Coffee and Milk
otatoes, P
10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
, October 13, 2013
HER
dv A $10.00 in
Adults $11.00 at the door • Kids (5-10) $6.00
O GO ORDERS T
Corn, Buns, Dessert, Coffee and Milk
or Corner Stone Bank
y Green Isle n ance from a dv
5 & Under FREE
Adults $11.00 at the door • Kids (5-10) $6.00
AILABL AVVA O GO ORDERS
Corn, Buns, Dessert, Coffee and Milk
ireman F y Green Isle
Adults $11.00 at the door • Kids (5-10) $6.00
AILABLE!
Corn, Buns, Dessert, Coffee and Milk
A39-40E,40-41Sa
News Briefs
Glencoe woman hurt in crash
A Glencoe woman was seriously injured in a one-ve-
hicle accident along County Road 17 about 1 1/2 miles
south of Arlington at 4:15 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25,
according to the Sibley County Sheriff’s Department.
Silvia Sanchez, age unavailable, was driving a 2000
Dodge Durango southbound on County Road 17 when
she reportedly lost control of the vehicle, according to
the report. The vehicle entered the ditch and came to
rest on its side. It was severely damaged.
Sanchez was transported by the Arlington Ambulance
to the Sibley Medical Center in Arlington. She was later
airlifted to an unspecified hospital where she was listed
in critical condition, according to the report.
The Arlington Fire Department also assisted at the
scene.
Tire slashed on vehicle
An individual or individuals reportedly slashed a tire
on a vehicle parked near Lot A-7 along the 400 block of
East Adams Street in Arlington, according to the Arling-
ton Police Department.
Norma L. Luna, Arlington, reported the incident to
authorities on Wednesday, Sept. 25.
Minor accident in Arlington
A minor two-vehicle accident reportedly occurred at
the intersection of First Avenue Northwest and Brooks
Street in Arlington at 11:55 a.m. Monday, Sept. 23, ac-
cording to the Arlington Police Department.
Jason Meyer, 17, Gaylord, was driving a 1999 Ply-
mouth on Brooks Street and reportedly turned left onto
First Avenue Northwest, according to the report. The
Meyer vehicle then struck a 2002 Pontiac driven by
Zachary M. Weber, 16, Arlington. The Weber vehicle
was traveling on First Avenue Northwest. Meyer stated
that a truck on the corner of the intersection blocked his
view, according to the report.
Art event scheduled in October
Sibley East area elementary students and their fami-
lies are invited to attend the Family Art Outreach Octo-
ber event, “Nature Photography at the Ney,” from 1
p.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6.
Local photography artist Alan Hairspine will be lead-
ing a brief introduction to the art of photography and
then participants are free to hike, explore and take pic-
tures at the Ney Center in Henderson.
People should register for this event by contacting
Amanda Feterl at afeterl@sibley-east.k12.mn.us,
(507)964-8287 or (507)237-3364. There is free busing
available from the communities of Arlington, Gaylord
and Green Isle.
This activity is made possible by a grant provided by
the Prairie Lakes Regional Arts Council from funds ap-
propriated by the Minnesota State Legislature.
Chamber to meet next Monday
The Arlington Area Chamber of Commerce will hold
its next regular monthly meeting at the newly renovated
Emergency Services Building at noon Monday, Oct. 14,
according to Chamber Secretary Terry Klages.
Birth Announcement
Submitted Photo
Class of 1963
The Class of 1963 from the Arlington-Green Isle High
School held its 50th class reunion at the Veterans
Building at the Sibley County Fairgrounds in Arling-
ton on Friday night, Sept. 13. The following class-
mates were in attendance at the event. Front Row:
(left to right) Kit (Schwartz) Almich, Carol (Fuller) Mer-
cer, Charlotte Lampe, Charlene (Lampe) Thoemke,
Sandy (Soeffker) Berger, Ruth (Jacobson) Voight and
Don Teschendorf. Middle Row: (l to r) Vic Schwich,
Bob Dahl, Erv Savord, Jane Rischmiller, Elezibeth
(Oelfke) Guadineer, Kathy (Brazil) DeLancey, Judy
(Brazil) Rolf, Jane (Holm) Tjepkema, Margaret Scully,
Mary (Lynch) Hennies and Ray Berger. Back Row: (left
to right) Mike Noack, Jack Ryan, Delano Quast, Tom
Abram, Dave Neubarth, Rich Tuchtenhagen, Bob
Schauer, Duane Weckwerth, Larry Sommers, Ken
Ellig, Chuck Hanson and Vic Schwartz.
Leon and Jenny Weck-
werth, Mankato, announce
the birth of their son, Parker
Leon Weckwerth, who was
born on Monday, Sept. 2.
Parker weighed nine
pounds, 9.2 ounces and meas-
ured 23 inches.
Parker was welcomed
home by big sister, Charlotte,
3.
The grandparents are
Duane and Shirley Weck-
werth, Arlington, and Tim
and Rachel Dahm, Mankato.
The great grandmothers are
Milly Henke, Waconia, and
RaNita Austad, Mankato.
Parker Weckwerth
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
Changes are ahead for fed-
eral food program support in
Sibley County, reported Vicki
Stock, Public Health and
Human Services Director, at
the Board of Commissioners
meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 24.
Changes will take place in
the Supplemental Nutrition
Assistance Program (SNAP)
involving adults without de-
pendents. Stock said before
2009 there was a requirement
that people in the food sup-
port program that didn’t have
dependents (single people or
married without children) had
to take part in a work pro-
gram to receive food support
dollars unless they are work-
ing 20 hours a week.
“This changed in 2009 be-
cause of the economy and in-
creased numbers” said Stock.
“They basically waived that
rule. People again will have
to participate in the work pro-
gram to get benefits. If they
do not cooperate, they can
only get three more months
of benefits. There is a sub-
stantial penalty for not partic-
ipating.”
Also going away is the in-
crease in food support bene-
fits that took place when the
economy was poor in 2009.
“All our families and peo-
ple will be seeing a decrease
in their benefits effective
Nov. 1,” reported Stock. “A
household of one will see a
decrease of about $11. A
household of four will see a
decrease of about $36. While
this may not seem substantial
for some, it is for those folks
with low income who rely on
the food support program.”
Stock reported that starting
Jan. 1, 2014, the requirements
to obtain a GED are going to
be tightening up and chang-
ing. The education certificate
is going to be required for
continued eligibility in some
of the county programs.
“The state was offering a
small grant of $950 so we
could get some people
through before changes occur
at end of this year,” said
Stock. “We have one person
participating and hope to
have more.”
The county has developed
what is called a GED reward
card program. If someone at-
tends four GED classes and
takes a test, they get a reward
card. If they successfully
complete two or more classes
and test they get another one.
If they complete all five
classes they get one more
card. The total is $90 in
award cards.
“We hope that will give
people incentive and encour-
agement,” said Stock. “GFW
and Sibley East schools do
offer GED classes, plus some
area libraries offer English as
a second language classes.”
In other department news,
Stock gave an update on the
state MNsure health insur-
ance program. She said train-
ing of eligibility workers is
not on target. The last train-
ing module for staff to do
training is still not developed.
“We anticipate nine to 15
hours per staff to do online
training,” said Stock. “To be
certified we are told we must
finish training by the end of
the month (September). We
ask staff to be cognizant of
overtime hours. They need to
get their own regular work
done, as well as training in a
specified time period given
by the state.”
Stock said that the system
is not yet set up to track train-
ing time for staff, which will
be reimbursed at 75 percent.
Staff is asked to manually
track time spent so it can be
billed later to MNsure.
Another concern is how
child support and medical as-
sistance, plus cash assistance
go hand in hand. However,
the computer information
systems required to do a MN-
sure application are not able
to talk to each other yet.
“We found out that people
who are currently on Min-
nesotaCare will need to do a
MnSure application at their
renewal time after March 31
of next year,” said Stock.
“So, statewide we are looking
at 110,000 people next year.
We have well over 200 in
Sibley County.”
Stock also found out that
690,000 people need to re-
apply for MNsure after
March 31 at renewal time.
This will be spread out start-
ing April 1 for a six to 12-
month period. It will mean
more paperwork for families
and people using the pro-
gram.
Sibley County is affiliated
with South Country Health
Alliance, which is looking at
an increase of more than
7,000 new people in all nine
counties.
“I wish I had good news,
but there is still a lot up in the
air,” said Stock. “We know it
will be at least a year before
they get it up and running.”
Changes coming for county food support program
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 3, 2013, page 3
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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Arlington
Chiropractic Clinic
JUSTIN E. DAVIS, D.C.
607 W. Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-2850
arlingtonchiropracticmn.com
Office Hours:
Mon. 9am-6pm; Tues. 9am-5pm;
Wed. 8am-6pm; Thurs. 1-6pm;
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Large Animal
Veterinary Services
Ultrasound repro, Surgical,
Medical and Nutrition
Small Animal House Call
by Appointment
Medical, Vaccination Services
and Surgical Referral
Dr. Robert G. Ovrebo
Office 507-964-2682
Cell 507-995-0507
Miller
Law Office
RAPHAEL J. MILLER
Attorney at Law
332 Sibley Avenue, Gaylord, MN 55334
Tel. (507) 237-2954
Wills - Family Law
Taxes - Estate Planning
General Law Practice & Trials
Free consultation on personal injury claims
MESENBRING
CONSTRUCTION
(507) 964-2864
“Your local home builder and
remodeler for over 38 years”
Member: MN River Builders Assn.
MN License #4806
ROSS R. ARNESON
ATTORNEY AT LAW
302 West Main
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-5753
Real Estate, Estate Planning,
Probate and Business Law
Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Saturdays by Appointment
Farm – Residential
Commercial
Licensed - Bonded - Insured
• 24-Hour Emergency
Service
• Free Estimates
Tyler Kranz, Owner
507-964-2525
Klehr Grading
&
Excavating, Inc.
JEFF & WENDY KLEHR
Dozer, Grader, Basements,
Septic Systems, Driveways, Backhoe Work,
Hauling Gravel/Rock/Sand, Skidloader
Jeff cell: 612-756-0595
Wendy cell: 612-756-0594
640 E. BROOKS ST., ARLINGTON, MN 55307
1-507-964-5783 • FAX: 507-964-5302
Local LAWN
Enforcement
Arlington, MN
Licensed and Insured
Mowing, fertilizing and
weed control, dethatching,
garden tilling, core aeration
www.locallawnenforcement.com
Adam and David Hansen
Adam cell: 507-327-0917
507-964-5835
• 5” Seamless Gutters
• 6” Seamless Gutters
• K-Guard Leaf-Free
Gutter System
(lifetime clog free guarantee)
PHIL GOETTL
612-655-1379
888-864-5979
www.mngutter.com
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Gustafson
Family Dentistry
Dr. John D. Gustafson, D.D.S
Dr. Jared Gustafson, D.D.S
COMPREHENSIVE CARE
FOR ALL AGES
Office Hours: Monday–Friday
New Patients Welcome
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Orthodontists
106 3
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Arlington
507-964-2705
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We will contact the insurance company
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for professional glass installation.
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Local
507-964-5539
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800-664-2728
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Septic Services
Septic Pumping/Pump Repair
& Portable Restrooms
507-665-3732
or 952-873-2208
Call Shane
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Corner of Hwy. 5 & Chandler
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www.LibertyStationAutoSales.com
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Tires, Air Conditioning
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507-326-5751
MONDAY-FRIDAY 8-5
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brazilautomotive@gmail.com
Coordinated Care
In your Community
Offering you the very best in total eye care and cataract surgery
from Goldsmith Eye Care and Minnesota Eye Consultants.
Experience, technology and skill you can trust.
&
Drs. Tim and Wendy Goldsmith
www.goldsmitheye.com
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www.mneye.com
601 West Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
Goldsmith Eye Care works
closely with world
renowned surgeon
Dr. Richard Lindstrom
and Minnesota Eye
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and you can receive
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Sibley Medical Center in
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Goldsmith Eye Care.
To evaluate your need
for cataract surgery, call
Goldsmith Eye Care
at 507-237-2015.
A37-40E38-41Sa
By Kurt Menk
Editor
A theft reportedly occurred
at Jerry’s Home Quality
Foods in Arlington at 2:11
p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25, ac-
cording to the Sibley County
Sheriff’s Department.
Hunter R. Solomonson, 18,
Gaylord, allegedly walked
into the store, approached the
clerk, reached into an open
cash register drawer and took
$160 in cash, according to the
report.
Solomonson then allegedly
fled the store on foot and fled
the parking lot in a motor ve-
hicle, the sheriff’s department
said.
Solomonson was identified
as the suspect based on de-
tailed information from the
clerk and video surveillance
from within the store, accord-
ing to the report.
Solomonson was later lo-
cated and charged with mis-
demeanor theft.
Gaylord man charged with misdemeanor theft
after incident at grocery store in Arlington
By Kurt Menk
Editor
A Glencoe man was killed
in a two-vehicle accident at
the intersection of Highway
212 and Highway 22 at 7:37
a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 1, accord-
ing to the Minnesota State
Patrol.
A 2000 Ford Windstar driv-
en by Emil T. Ellis, 75, Glen-
coe, was traveling south-
bound from Highway 22 and
a 2005 Peterbuilt driven by
Troy S. Freidrichs, 39, Gib-
bon, was traveling westbound
on Highway 212 when the
two vehicles reportedly col-
lided, according to the report.
Ellis died in the crash, the
report said. Freidrichs did not
suffer any apparent injuries.
The Glencoe Police De-
partment and McLeod Coun-
ty Sheriff’s Department as-
sisted at the scene.
Highway 212 was closed
for approximately four hours
due to the crash, according to
the Minnesota State Patrol.
Glencoe man killed in crash
By Kurt Menk
Editor
There is good news and
bad news to report on the
Highway 5 Project from Ar-
lington to Green Isle.
The good news is that final
paving has been completed
on the ends of both communi-
ties, according to a represen-
tative from the Minnesota
Department of Transporta-
tion.
In Arlington, final paving
has been completed from the
Cenex Convenience Store to
County Road 12. That area is
open to all traffic. The area of
Highway 5 beyond County
Road 12 will be open to local
traffic only.
In Green Isle, final paving
has been completed from
County Road 1 and County
Road 15 through the commu-
nity. That area is open to all
traffic. The area of Highway
5 beyond County Road 1 and
County Road 15 will be open
to local traffic only.
In addition, there will be a
switch from the present de-
tour north of Arlington and
Green Isle to a much shorter
detour. The new detour will
be from County Road 9 north
of Arlington to County Road
15 just west of Green Isle.
The bad news is that the
completion date, weather per-
mitting, has been pushed
back from Friday, Oct. 4 to
Monday, Oct. 14.
The contractor will return
on Tuesday, Oct. 8 and finish
the final paving between the
two towns.
Knife River Corporation –
North Central of Sauk Rapids
is the contractor on the proj-
ect that includes seven miles
of pavement replacement and
a mill and overlay in Green
Isle.
The cost of the project is
approximately $5 million.
Completion date pushed back to
Oct. 14 for Highway 5 Project
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Construction workers applied the final
paving of Highway 5 from County Road
12 to the Cenex Convenience Store in
Arlington on Tuesday morning, Oct. 1.
A Gaylord man remains in
custody in the Sibley County
Jail after being charged with
second degree burglary, ac-
cording to the KNUJ Radio
website.
Cody J. Servin, 24, al-
legedly burglarized an apart-
ment in the Gaylord Motel.
Servin had initially called
the Gaylord Police Depart-
ment to report a break-in at
his apartment and was report-
edly heavily intoxicated.
While authorities were in-
vestigating the alleged bur-
glary in Servin’s apartment,
they received a report of bur-
glary at an adjacent apart-
ment. Upon investigation,
several of the items missing
from the other apartment
were reportedly seen lying
around in plain sight in the
Servin apartment. The door to
the other apartment had been
kicked in as well and a foot-
print on it allegedly matched
shoes found in Servin’s apart-
ment. There were also blood
splatters in the other apart-
ment and Servin allegedly
had a cut on his hand.
Servin faces up to 10 years
in prison and a $20,000 fine.
Gaylord man charged with 2nd degree burglary
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 3, 2013, page 4
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Staff
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Pub-
lishers; Kurt Menk, Editor; Karin
Rami ge, Manager; Marvi n
Bulau, Production Manager;
Barb Mathwig, Office; Ashley
Reetz, Sales; and Jean Olson,
Proof Reading.
Letters
This page is devoted to opin-
ions and commentary. Articles
appearing on this page are the
opinions of the writer. Views ex-
pressed here are not necessarily
those of the Arlington Enter-
prise, unless so designated. The
Arlington Enterprise strongly
encourages others to express
opinions on this page.
Letters from our readers are
strongly encouraged. Letters for
publ i cati on must bear the
writer’s signature and address.
The Arlington Enterprise re-
serves the right to edit letters
for purpose of clarity and space.
Ethics
The editorial staff of the Arling-
ton Enterprise strives to present
the news in a fair and accurate
manner. We appreciate errors
being brought to our attention.
Pl ease bri ng any gri evances
against the Arlington Enterprise to
the attention of the editor. Should
differences continue, readers are
encouraged to take their griev-
ances to the Mi nnesota News
Council, an organization dedicated
to protecti ng the publ i c from
press inaccuracy and unfairness.
The News Council can be contact-
ed at 12 South Sixth St., Suite
940, Minneapolis, MN 55402, or
(612) 341-9357.
Press Freedom
Freedom of the press is guar-
anteed under the First Amend-
ment to the U.S. Constitution:
“Congress shall make no law
respecting an establishment of
religion, or prohibiting the free
exercise thereof; or abridging
the freedom of speech, or the
press…”
Ben Frankl i n wrote i n the
Pennsylvania Gazette in 1731:
“If printers were determined not
to print anything till they were
sure it would offend nobody
there would be very little print-
ed.”
Deadline for the Arlington
Enterprise news is 4 p.m., Mon-
day, and advertising is noon,
Tuesday. Deadl i ne for The
Gal axy adverti si ng i s noon
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Entered as Periodicals postal matter at Arlington,
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Arlington ENTERPRISE
Opinions
County Board discusses
request from Gaylord
over Lake Titlow dam
Our View: Any contribution could
open a pandora’s box to future requests
Guest Columns
The Sibley County Board of Commissioners, during their last
regular meeting, discussed a request from the City of Gaylord to
contribute between $10,000 to $20,000 to assist in the $575,000
replacement of the current dam that is 100 years old and is no
longer effective in holding water back.
The request is a smart move by the City of Gaylord. It has
nothing to lose if the request is rejected by the County Board. It
is also a reasonable request since a county ditch and a joint
county ditch empty into Lake Titlow. In addition, the $10,000 to
$20,000 request may seem like a drop in the bucket out of the
county’s annual $4 million general budget.
The County Board, however, should kindly reject the request
for a few reasons.
First, the City of Gaylord owns the Lake Titlow dam in the
Sibley County ditch system. The Sibley County ditch system
owns four dams while the Department of Natural Resources
owns five dams.
Second, the state law states that the benefitted property own-
ers are responsible for paying 100 percent of the ditch improve-
ment costs.
Third, the Sibley County ditch system already has three dams
scheduled for replacement at an estimated cost of $210,000 next
year. The ditch system will cover those costs and not money
from the county’s general fund.
Finally, the request could open a pandora’s box to future re-
quests for improvements from other parties in the Sibley Coun-
ty ditch system.
-K.M.
Too Tall’s Tidbits
Happy Birthday and Happy An-
niversary to the following local and
area residents compliments of the
Arlington Lions Club Community
Calendar.
October 4
In Memory Of Shirley Hopkins,
Doug Solomonson, Jake Kistner,
Steve Harter, Mr. and Mrs. Darin
Karger, and Mr. and Mrs. Tony
Nerud.
October 5
Bill Lensing, Brayton Krueger, Julie
Kranz, Richard Thomes, and Mr. and
Mrs. Wayne Kube,
October 6
Brandon Raddatz, John Thomes,
John Woehler, Kelly Bartyzal, Lori
Hatlestad, Mavis Soeffker, Renee
Jaroscak, Zach Nelson, and Mr. and
Mrs. Jeff Kleist.
October 7
Kindrid Sandberg, Mr. and Mrs. Dan
Kroells, Mr. and Mrs. Jim Sommers,
and Mr. and Mrs. Mike Scharping.
October 8
Chad Dose, Chris Voigt, Dawn
Quast, Jen Carpenter, Logan Halver-
son, Matt Von Eschen, Mr. and Mrs.
Jeremy Parpart, and Mr. and Mrs.
Buzz Matz.
October 9
Chloe Bartyzal, Darin McKinnon,
Elizabeth Maki, Mike Feterl, Sam
Helms, and Mr. and Mrs. Clint
Hatlestad.
October 10
Dr. Dean Bergersen, Jacob Pichel-
mann, Mike Campa, Sandra Rezner,
Mr. and Mrs. Bob Gildea, and Mr.
and Mrs. Joe Berger.
*****
A man and his wife were having
some problems at home and were
giving each other the silent treat-
ment. The next week the man real-
ized that he would need his wife to
wake him at 5 a.m. for an early
morning business flight to Chicago.
Not wanting to be the first to break
the silence, he finally wrote on a
piece of paper, “Please wake me at 5
a.m.”
The next morning the man woke
up, only to discover it was 9 a.m.
and that he had missed his flight. Fu-
rious, he was about to go and see
why his wife hadn’t woken him
when he noticed a piece of paper by
the bed. It said, “It is 5 a.m. Wake
up.”
*****
A Republican and a Democrat
were walking down the street when
they came to a homeless person.
The Republican gave the homeless
person his business card and told
him to come to his business for a
job. He then took $20 out of his
pocket and gave it to the homeless
person.
The Democrat was very im-
pressed, and when they came to
another homeless person, he de-
cided to help. He walked over to
the homeless person and gave him
directions to the welfare office. He
then reached into the Republican’s
pocket and gave the homeless per-
son $50.
*****
Three contractors are bidding to
fix a broken fence at the White
House. One is from Chicago, anoth-
er is from Tennessee, and the third is
from Minnesota. All three go with a
White House official to examine the
fence.
The Minnesota contractor takes
out a tape measure and does some
measuring, then works some figures
with a pencil.
“Well,” he says, “I figure the job
will run about $900: $400 for mate-
rials, $400 for my crew and $100
profit for me.”
The Tennessee contractor also
does some measuring and figuring,
and then says, “I can do this job for
$700: $300 for materials, $300 for
my crew and $100 profit for me.”
The Chicago contractor doesn’t
measure or figure, but leans over to
the White House official and whis-
pers, “$2,700.”
The official, incredulous, says,
“You didn’t even measure like the
other guys! How did you come up
with such a high figure?”
The Chicago contractor whispers
back, “$1000 for me, $1000 for you,
and we hire the guy from Tennessee
to fix the fence.”
“Done!” replies the government
official.”
*****
Johnny’s mother had three chil-
dren. The first child was named
April The second child was named
May. What was the third child’s
name?
Answer: Johnny, of course.
*****
What word in the English Lan-
guage is always spelled incorrectly?
Answer: Incorrectly.
*****
By Lee H. Hamilton
Washington is beginning to debate
the proper extent of government
eavesdropping powers in the wake
of Edward Snowden’s revelations
about the NSA. It’s hardly as robust
a discussion as it should be, but it’s
a desperately needed start.
The colossal effort to monitor
Americans’ communications has
been going on for at least seven
years, under two presidents. It con-
stitutes an expansion of government
power without precedent in the
modern era. Yet while some mem-
bers of Congress were informed
about it — and all had the opportu-
nity to learn — none saw an urgent
need for public discussion. This is
astounding. It took the actions of a
leaker to spur any real airing of the
matter on Capitol Hill.
Even now, it seems unlikely that
Congress will make significant poli-
cy changes. That’s because all the
nation’s key actors and institutions
appear to approve of the surveil-
lance programs. By its silence, Con-
gress clearly supported them. Presi-
dents Bush and Obama backed
them. The intelligence community, a
powerful voice on national security
issues, has resolutely defended
them. The courts that are supposed
to keep them in line with the Consti-
tution have been deferential to na-
tional security authorities, raising a
few questions from time to time, but
in the end approving all but a hand-
ful of tens of thousands of data-
gathering requests.
And the American people, by their
lack of widespread outrage, have
signaled that in this one case, at
least, they believe the government
can be trusted to keep us safe.
In short, Congress — the forum
where issues of such national impor-
tance should be hashed out —
missed its chance to lead a reasoned
national debate over how extensive
we want surveillance over Ameri-
cans’ communications to be. It’s un-
likely that genie can ever again be
forced back into its bottle.
Yet even the director of national
intelligence, James Clapper — who
once denied point-blank to Congress
that the government collects data on
millions of Americans — now sees
the need for some sort of change.
“We can do with more oversight and
give people more confidence in
what we do,” he said in a mid-Sep-
tember speech.
Yes, indeed. Here’s the problem:
once given power, the government
rarely yields it. So you have to think
not only about its present use, but
how it will be used a decade or even
more from now. Even if you con-
cede that the current administration
and its intelligence leadership have
been responsible stewards of the
powers they’ve been given — and I
don’t — that is no guarantee that the
people who follow them, or the peo-
ple who come after that, will be
equally trustworthy.
This means that Congress has
some challenging work ahead. It
needs to restore the proper balance
between effective intelligence-gath-
ering and intrusion into Americans’
privacy. It needs to demand more
thoroughgoing accountability from
the intelligence community. It needs
to exercise greater oversight and in-
sist on more transparency, more in-
formation, and more constraint on
surveillance programs — defining
what is truly relevant to an investi-
gation, creating more stringent defi-
nitions of which communications
are fair game, and finding ways to
assure Americans that protecting
their privacy and civil liberties need
not mean the wholesale vacuuming-
up of every domestic phone and
email record in existence.
There is no place for the timidity
Congress has shown so far on these
issues.
Our system depends on a vigorous
Congress. The administration argues
that it can provide rigorous intelli-
gence-gathering oversight, but it has
yet to prove it can do so — and in
our system of checks and balances,
it’s not enough to have one branch
of government overseeing itself.
Congress, the courts, and the presi-
dentially appointed Privacy and
Civil Liberties Board all have to
step up to their responsibilities.
Americans should demand action
to strike a better balance between
privacy and security. In the past, the
congressional overseers of the intel-
ligence community have been capti-
vated, if not captured, by the people
they’re supposed to be supervising.
Same with the courts. And the ad-
ministration has hardly been forth-
coming. That means it’s up to the
American people to insist that our
leaders do their jobs. It’s no less true
today than it was at our founding:
the price of liberty is eternal vigi-
lance.
Lee Hamilton is Director of the
Center on Congress at Indiana Uni-
versity. He was a member of the
U.S. House of Representatives for
34 years.
What Congress needs to do about the NSA
By Sen. John Marty,
DFL-Roseville
Forty-eight years ago this sum-
mer, President Lyndon Johnson
signed Medicare into law, providing
health care for millions of older
Americans. As our state begins full
implementation of the Affordable
Care Act, it is appropriate to reflect
on the progress we have made on
giving health care access to Ameri-
cans, and commit to delivering
Medicare for All.
At the signing of the Medicare
law, President Johnson said, “No
longer will older Americans be de-
nied the healing miracle of modern
medicine. No longer will illness
crush and destroy the savings that
they have so carefully put away over
a lifetime so that they might enjoy
dignity in their later years.”
The Medicare program has largely
succeeded in fulfilling that promise.
Seniors get the health care they
need, when they need it. It still does-
n’t cover all medical needs, but over
the years, it has been expanded sev-
eral times to increase the number of
people covered, and the number of
services provided.
In 1972, people under age 65 who
had long-term disabilities were in-
cluded in Medicare. In 2003, pre-
scription drug coverage was added.
More recently, the Affordable
Care Act (often called ObamaCare)
added preventive care services to
Medicare, as well as mammograms
and other health screenings, and it
reduced the co-payments seniors
pay for prescription drugs.
For older Minnesotans, Medicare
has been a lifesaver.
Minnesotans under 65, however,
have been covered — or not covered
— under a fragmented and broken
system of employer-based health in-
surance, private plans, public pro-
grams, or no insurance at all.
Fortunately, during the next five
months, many previously uninsured
Minnesotans will receive health care
coverage through the MNSure insur-
ance exchange of the Affordable
Care Act (ACA). Those who were
denied coverage because of preex-
isting conditions should no longer
face that problem. Young adults
whose parents have good coverage
are now eligible for coverage
through them.
Minnesota, under Governor Day-
ton and the DFL Legislature this
year, is leading the nation in its
thoughtful and comprehensive im-
plementation of the ACA. By up-
grading MinnesotaCare and expand-
ing Medicaid, Minnesota will make
health care accessible to hundreds of
thousands of additional people.
However, the ACA is not
Medicare. It does little to eliminate
the bureaucratic waste in our current
system or reduce the overall costs of
our health care system — and it will
Marty
Continued on page 11
It is time to reflect, act on MHP
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 3, 2013, page 5
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Cancer services now at Sibley Medical Center
returns to Sibley
Birendra Kumar
returns to Sibley
, MD, marr,
actice close to home. can prra
etu to 2011. He is pleased to rre
acticed at Sible . Kumar prra Dr r.
. therapyy.
oncology care and oversees chemotherapy and infusion
where he provides hematology and , Medical Center
Kumar’ . are pleased to announce Drr.
Sibley Medical Center and Ridgeview Medical Center
e e h rre e h , wwh yy, urn to Sibleey
om 1996 y in Arlington fr eey
oncology care and oversees chemotherapy and infusion
where he provides hematology and
s return to Sibley Kumar’
Sibley Medical Center and Ridgeview Medical Center
returns to Sibley
call 507-964-2271. s, or appointment F
actice close to home. can prra
.sibleymedical.org wwww.
call 507-964-2271.
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A37-40Ea
Arlington Fire Department
is teaming up with: • Sidedish
• Arlington Haus • Cenex • Subway
• Quick Shop • Godfather’s Pizza
Place your food order with one of the above restaurants
and the Arlington Fire Department will deliver your food
and change the battery(ies) in your smoke detector.
(limit 2 batteries per household)
FREE OF CHARGE!
Wed., Oct. 9 • 5:30-7 p.m.
This offer is only good for the citizens in the AFD district.
Please have correct change or check for your food order.
Fire Prevention Week Oct. 6-12
OPEN HOUSE @ Arlington Fire Hall
Fri., Oct. 11 • 5:30-7 p.m. Hot Dogs & Pop
A39SEj
Obituaries
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Lions Donate Dictionaries
The Arlington Lions Club and Green
Isle Lions Club recently donated 113
dictionaries to third grade students in
the Sibley East School District. One of
their stops was at St. Paul’s Lutheran
School in Arlington. Front Row: (left to
right) Third graders Chris Ritari, Jenna
Wendland, Nick Ritari, Kirsten Ziegler,
Jaidynn Dietel and Alex Ritari.
Linda P. Franzen, age 67,
of Belle Plaine, passed away
peacefully with her husband
and children
at her side at
t h e
Ri dge vi e w
M e d i c a l
Center in
Waconia on
S a t u r d a y
Sept. 28.
Mass of
C h r i s t i a n
Burial was
held at St. Brendan’s Catholic
Church in Green Isle on
Wednesday, Oct. 2. Father
Keith Salisbury officiated.
Visitation was held at the
Johnson Funeral Home in
Waconia from 4 p.m. to 8
p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 1. It con-
tinued one hour prior to the
Mass at the church on
Wednesday, Oct. 2.
Casket bearers were Dale
Meierbachtol, Adam Meier-
bachtol, Alyssa Meierbachtol,
Jeff Schuetz, Tim Berg, Jon
Franzen, Larry Leuer.
Interment was in the
church cemetery.
Linda was born in Water-
town on March 30, 1946. She
was the daughter of Lambert
and Helen (Van Lith)
Bukowski. She was baptized
at St. Peter and Paul Catholic
Church in Loretto. Linda and
her husband, John, created
their home in Green Isle.  She
worked with her husband on
their dairy farm while raising
four children. Linda enjoyed
fishing, baking, reading,
music, visiting friends and
playing cards.  After the dairy
herd was sold, Linda enjoyed
working part-time at the Hill-
crest Café where she made
lifelong friendships.
Linda learned from her par-
ents the enjoyment of
fishing.  That is something
Linda and John shared and
passed onto their children.
The children remember won-
derful times of getting away
for an afternoon of fishing,
going up north for a long
weekend, and meeting their
grandfathers at the lake.  In
2010, John and Linda pur-
chased a camper and pontoon
on Rice Lake in Eden Valley.
The whole family loved
meeting there for campfires,
BBQs, cards, and especially
fishing. We would tease mom
while fishing, because we
would stop at a spot, she
would wait to see who would
catch a fish, then she would
cast out right to where that
person was fishing.  If her
line got tangled or needed
fixing, she would give it to
John to fix, and ask someone
else for their pole. We all en-
joyed fishing with mom, and
loved how she would laugh
and enjoy the banter back and
forth. 
Though Linda did not say
too much, especially when in
a group of people, she loved
hearing others joking and
poking fun. We will miss
mom for so many reasons,
and for so many things that
cannot be put into words.
She was always there,
whether we were kids getting
off the bus and needing her
comfort after a rough day of
school or needing to share the
excitement of a fun day. She
was always there to jump in
and help with a project on the
farm, or when you just want-
ed someone to talk to and lis-
ten who would not judge and
who would always be on your
side. 
Mom lives on in her chil-
dren and grandchildren. Her
knowledge of baking and
fishing has been passed down
and become a love of all of us
(the girls like to bake and the
boys like to eat it) and we all
love to fish.
We take comfort in the
wonderful family that mom
and dad have provided us.
We are surrounded by very
caring aunts, uncles, nieces,
and nephews. We were taught
how to treasure family, life,
and  everyone around us.  We
appreciate all the holidays
and birthday celebrations that
she provided and that we
were able to share with her.
We will all miss mom’s
phone calls, voicemails, and
the security she provided us. 
Linda is survived by her
loving family: husband, John
Franzen; children, Kim
(Dale) Meierbachtol of Belle
Plaine, Chris Franzen of
Belle Plaine, Michele (Tim)
Berg of Howard Lake and
Sarah (Jeff) Schuetz of Ar-
lington; grandchildren,
Adam Meierbachtol (special
friend Emily Johnson) and
Alyssa Meierbachtol; sisters
and brothers-in-law, Susan
(Dave) Pawlitschek of
Frazee, Nancy (George)
Choban of Rockford, Kath-
leen Wooland of Arizona,
Carol Faue of Albertville,
Julie (Sam) Zimmermann of
Rockford, Joellen Nelson of
Buffalo, and Connie (Larry)
Leuer of Loretto; brothers
and sister-in-law, Bill
Bukowski of Loretto, Tom
Bukowski and Judy Hoppe of
Fridley; sisters-in-law and
brothers-in-law Joan and
Arnold Nimps of Kasota,
Charlotte Blakeborough of
Wayzata, Paul and Rosemary
Franzen of Belle Plaine, Joe
Franzen of Belle Plaine;
nieces, nephews; other rela-
tives and friends.
Linda is preceded in death
by her parents, Helen and
Lambert Bukowski; father-in-
law, Adam Franzen; nephew,
Todd Ristau; and brother-in-
law Joe Faue.
Arrangements were han-
dled by the Johnson Funeral
Home in Waconia.
www.johnsonfh.com
Linda P. Franzen, 67, Belle Plaine
Linda
Franzen
History
95 Years Ago
October 3, 1918
Louis Kill, Editor
Every farmer who is within
reach of a patch of sugar beets
should make a batch of syrup
for their own use during the
coming winter. Sugar products
of all kinds are so scarce that
every quart of syrup made at
home serves the cause.
Fred Riebe and R. L. Sander
traded cars one day last week.
R. L. exchanged his roadster for
Fred’s touring car.
Gust Knapp is now back at
his old stand, having taken pos-
session of the Fisher blacksmith
shop Tuesday. Gus expects to
move his furniture and house-
hold goods to Arlington as soon
as a suitable home can be se-
cured.
The Halpin Hotel at Green
Isle had a narrow escape from
being consumed by flames a
week ago Saturday. The chim-
ney burned out and set fire to
the roof. The blaze was extin-
guished without doing much
damage.
A crew of linemen from Wa-
conia started work last week on
our electric light system. It will
be entirely overhauled and re-
paired by replacing the old
wires, brackets, insulators and
also posts where necessary. The
work will not interfere to any
extent with the service.
70 Years Ago
October 7, 1943
Louis Kill, Editor
Friends of Sgt. Clarence J.
Sylvester, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Otto Sylvester of this city, will
be pleased to hear of his mar-
riage to Miss Phyllis Ward of
Rochester, Minn. The ceremony
took place on Thursday, Sep-
tember 23rd, at the Lutheran
parsonage in Owatonna.
Ed Graupmann received first
degree burns on his face and
second degree burns on his arms
Tuesday when he made a futile
attempt to save his truck from
burning up. Mr. Graupmann was
baling straw on the Fred Tem-
plin farm, 2 miles northwest of
Hamburg, which he rents, when
sparks from a gasoline engine
used to power the baler, started
some straw burning. The fire
spread so rapidly that it was im-
possible to save the straw or the
truck.
War Ration Book Four, which
will last about two years, will be
ready for distribution in the na-
tion’s school houses late in Oc-
tober, the office of Price Admin-
istration has announced. It will
contain 384 small-size stamps,
red, blue, green and black and
will cover all foods now ra-
tioned as well as possible addi-
tional needs for ration currency.
45 Years Ago
October 3, 1968
Val Kill, Editor
Mel Koester, implement deal-
er at Green Isle, is featuring a
tremendous stock reduction sale
at Green Isle on Sunday, Octo-
ber 6th. Mr Koester has been in
business for many years and had
harvesting equipment and plow
to offer for fall work, Also a few
trucks, the sale will start
promptly at 1 p. m. , LeRoy
Pinske and Wayne Ediger will
be the auctioneers.
Tuesday October 1st, marked
the end of the largest corn pack
of the Big Stone Canning Com-
pany at Arlington, The pack
started August 10th and worked
for 21 consecutive days and
nights during the month of Au-
gust and continued for a total of
eight weeks. Weather conditions
were favorable and never halted
operations as in previous years.
Concrete was pumped for the
first time in Arlington last
Wednesday to form the base-
ment walls of the Leonard Brau
home being built on the north-
west side of town. The concrete
pumping equipment belongs to
Dennis Jasken and Lewis Blake,
former Arlington residents now
in business in the Twin Cities.
The ready mix came from Ar-
lington Concrete Products.
20 Years Ago
September 30, 1993
Kurt Menk, Editor
Dr. Michael McCarthy has re-
signed his position at the Arling-
ton Clinic effective October 13,
1993. Dr. McCarthy, a family
practice physician at the local
clinic for the past eight years,
has accepted a position in occu-
pational medicine at the Manka-
to Clinic.
The Arlington Star City Com-
mission recently selected
Fenske Funeral Home for this
year’s Business Beautification
Award. Fenske Funeral Home,
located at 310 West Adams
Street, was recognized for the
attractive and neat appearance
of its facility and grounds over
the years. The Star City Com-
mission was also impressed
with the beautiful display of
flowers again this year.
Seniors Jeff Kreger, Mike
Dose, Steve Peik dressed up like
cheerleaders during a homecom-
ing skit at coronation cere-
monies in Arlington on Monday
evening. The senior class skit,
which tied for second place,
drew loud applause and a few
whistles.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Conferences will be held at
the Sibley East Senior High
School in Arlington and Sib-
ley East Junior High School
in Gaylord from 4 p.m. to 8
p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15 and
from 8 a.m. to noon Wednes-
day, Oct. 16.
There will be no school for
all students on Wednesday,
Oct. 16. That day has been
set aside for conferences in
the morning and an in-service
for teachers in the afternoon.
Jeff Eppen will be at the
Arlington school site from 4
p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct.
15 and at the Gaylord school
site from 8 a.m. to noon
Wednesday, Oct. 16.
The following “traveling
teachers” will be at the Gay-
lord school site from 4 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15:
Jim Callahan, Lenore Strouth,
Mark Standinger, Elizabeth
Zieman, Tracie Bjorklund,
Mike Feterl and Annie
Kreger.
The following “traveling
teachers” will be at the Ar-
lington school site from 8
a.m. to noon Wednesday, Oct.
16: Jim Callahan, Lenore
Strouth, Mark Standinger,
Elizabeth Zieman, Tracie
Bjorklund, Mike Feterl and
Annie Kreger.
SE conferences set for Oct. 15 and 16
WE ARE OPEN!
Shop Local
Your local businesses in
Arlington and
Green Isle
are open during the
road construction.
Arlington Enterprise / Sibley Shopper
402 W. Alden St. • PO Box 388
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-5547
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 3, 2013, page 6
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
w w w . a r l i n g t o n
m n n e w s . c o m
SIBLEY EAST BOOSTER CLUB
FRIDAY, OCT. 4
HOMECOMING
GAME
FAN TUNNEL 6:00 PM & 6:10 PM
SELLING PORK CHOPS
BONFIRE AFTER GAME
SERVING HOT DOGS
TO THE STUDENTS
AFTER THE GAME
A
3
9
E
a
Sports
Kurt’s Korner
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
girls tennis team closed out
its regular season with one
win and one loss last week.
The Lady Wolverines con-
clude the season with a 3-5
record in the Minnesota River
Conference.
Sibley East will travel to
St. Peter for the opening
round of the Section 2A Girls
Tennis Team Tournament at 4
p.m. Thursday, Oct. 3.
If the Lady Wolverines de-
feat St. Peter, they will then
face the winner of Blue Earth
Area and Tri-City United in
the Swanson Tennis Center at
the Gustavus Adolphus Col-
lege in St. Peter at 9 a.m.
Monday, Oct. 7.
The championship will be
held at the Swanson Tennis
Center at 11 a.m. Monday,
Oct. 7.
Sibley East 6
Maple River 1
SINGLES: 1 - Breann
Walsh (SE) defeated Hannah
Proehl (MR) 6-1, 6-2; 2 -
Mariah Schrupp (SE) defeat-
ed Megan Langworthy (MR)
6-1, 6-2; 3 - Ella Lundstrom
(SE) defeated Rachel Rigden
(MR) 6-1, 6-3; 4 - Faith
Young (SE) lost by an injury
default to Cassie Barkosky
(MR) 6-7 (7-9).
DOUBLES: 1 - Alicia
Kranz & Alli Harter (SE) de-
feated Emily Spear &
Stephanie Beto (MR) 6-4, 6-
1; 2 - Ashley Mercier & Kim
Kurtzweg (SE) defeated
Haley Schultz & Sarah
Stromer (MR) 7-6 (7-5), 6-2;
3 - Lindsey Flieth & Liz Thies
(SE) defeated Mariah Proehl
& Ashley Cole (MR) 7-6 (7-
5), 7-6 (7-5).
Jordan 4
Sibley East 3
SINGLES: 1 - Breann
Walsh (SE) defeated Rachel
Menke (J) 6-3, 6-1; 2 - Mari-
ah Schrupp (SE) lost to Victo-
ria Read (J) 1-6, 3-6; 3 - Ella
Lundstrom (SE) defeated
Paige Moran (J) 6-2, 6-0; 4 -
Kim Kurtzweg (SE) lost to
Katherine Tchinssi (J) 1-6, 4-
6.
DOUBLES: 1 - Alicia
Kranz & Alli Harter (SE) lost
to Carina Larson & Julia
Fogarty (J) 3-6, 4-6; 2 - Ash-
ley Mercier & Faith Young
(SE) defeated Natalie Taylor
& Sam Kulas (J) 1-6, 6-3, 6-
1; 3 - Lindsey Flieth & Liz
Thies (SE) lost to Nicole
Samuelson & Lexie Lightfoot
(J) 6-0, 3-6, 5-7.
SE tennis team closes out regular
season with a win and loss in play
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
girls volleyball team dropped
two matches, but rebounded
with a third place finish in the
Charger Challenge.
Sibley East, 2-2 in the
MRC and 17-6 overall, will
travel to Jordan in conference
action at 7:30 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 3. The Lady Wolverines
will travel to Norwood Young
America in MRC play at 7:30
p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 8.
Jordan 3
Sibley East 2
A rally came up short as
the Sibley East varsity girls
volleyball team was edged by
visiting Jordan 3-2 on Tues-
day night, Sept. 24. This was
a non-Minnesota River Con-
ference match.
The Lady Wolverines, who
won the first and third games
25-17 and 25-23, lost the sec-
ond, fourth and fifth games
25-15, 25-15 and 15-10 re-
spectively.
Junior Autumn Dose con-
tributed 15 digs, eight kills,
three service aces and one
block. Sophomore Megan
Krentz collected eight kills
and five blocks while junior
Shelby Voight and sopho-
more McKayla Stumm
recorded 18 and 14 digs re-
spectively. Sophomore Alyssa
Weber had seven kills and
four blocks while junior Kar-
ley Lind posted 20 set assists.
Sophomore Katie Tuchten-
hagen added 15 set assists
and three service aces.
Mayer Lutheran 3
Sibley East 0
The Sibley East varsity
girls volleyball team was
blanked by visiting Mayer
Lutheran 3-0 in Minnesota
River Conference action on
Thursday evening, Sept. 26.
The Lady Wolverines lost
the three games 25-15, 25-7
and 25-18 respectively.
Senior Megan Eckberg
contributed five kills, three
service aces and one block.
Sophomore Megan Krentz
had six kills and two blocks
while junior Paige Nelson
recorded seven digs and two
service aces. Junior Karley
Lind added 12 set assists.
Charger Challenge
The Sibley East varsity
girls volleyball team com-
piled a 3-1 record and placed
third in the Charger Chal-
lenge at Dassel-Cokato on
Saturday, Sept. 28.
In pool play, the Lady
Wolverines lost to eventual
host and champion Dassel-
Cokato 25-18 and 25-23.
Junior Autumn Dose con-
tributed 11 digs and three
service aces while senior
Megan Eckberg had seven
kills. Sophomore Katie
Tuchtenhagen added 12 set
assists.
In the next round of pool
play, Sibley East defeated
Eden Valley-Watkins 26-24
and 25-9.
Junior Paige Nelson con-
tributed seven digs and five
service aces while Dose had
nine digs. Junior Karley Lind
dished out 14 set assists.
Sophomore McKayla Stumm
added seven consecutive
service points in the second
game.
In the next round of pool
play, Sibley East defeated
Kimball 25-18 and 25-21.
Nelson collected five digs
and two service aces. Dose
contributed seven kills and
three service aces while Eck-
berg added seven kills.
In the third place match,
the Lady Wolverines defeated
BOLD 25-14, 21-25 and 17-
15.
Sophomore Alyssa Weber
contributed seven kills while
Eckberg, junior Kelli Martens
and sophomore Megan
Krentz had six kills each.
Dose collected five kills
while Lind dished out 22 set
assists. Nelson had eight digs
while Stumm contributed
very strong back row play.
SE volleyball team places 3rd at Charge Challenge
Enterprise photo courtesy of Josh Randt, McLeod County Chronicle
Megan Eckberg is the lone senior on
the Sibley East varsity girls volleyball
team. Eckberg was recently chosen as
the KNUJ Radio Volleyball Player of the
Week. She is the daughter of Tom and
Ann Eckberg, Gaylord.
Joel Evenson
Joel Evenson, a graduate of
the Sibley East Senior High
School, is a teacher and coach
at the Tri-City United Public
Schools.
Evenson teaches an Eco-
nomics course at the senior
high school and an American
Studies at the junior high
school.
He is also the coach of the
eighth grade girls volleyball
team.
He is the son of Lynn and
Wendy Evenson, Green Isle.
Fireworks
Plenty of fireworks were
featured at the Sibley East
and Tri-City United football
game on Friday evening,
Sept. 27.
A short burst of fireworks
were displayed after every
TCU touchdown.
In addition, a 15-minute
fireworks show was featured
at halftime of the TCU home-
coming game.
Will there be fireworks at
the Sibley East homecoming
game next fall?
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington Greys Base
Ball Club recorded a tie and a
win during the annual Arling-
ton Greys Vintage Base Ball
Tournament on Saturday,
Sept. 14.
In addition to the Greys,
other teams represented at the
tournament included the
Mankato Baltics, Afton Red
Socks, Minneapolis Quick-
steps and St. Croix.
Kurt “Skip” Menk served
as the manager of the Greys
while Mark “No Show”
Pauly served as the assistant
manager. Dwight “Ike” Gra-
bitske was the scorekeeper
for all of the games.
The Greys, who currently
have a 7-0-1 record overall,
will host the Mankato Baltics
during the annual Arli-Dazzle
Snowball Game in Arlington
at 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 7.
Arlington Greys 3
Afton Red Socks 3
The Arlington Greys Base
Ball Club surrendered a late
lead and tied the Afton Red
Socks 3-3 in the Arlington
Greys Vintage Base Ball
Tournament.
Steve “Little Bill” Pioske,
Chad “Part-Time” Bachman,
Mike “One Way” Feterl and
Eric “Special K” Kaesermann
collected two hits apiece.
Dave “The Big Friendly”
Kreft, Jeff “The Babe” Menk,
Jake “Louie” Lucas and Dan
“Young Blood” Splettstoeser
added one hit each.
Pioske pitched the entire
eight-inning game.
Arlington Greys 5
St. Croix 0
Steve “Little Bill” Pioske
tossed a shutout as the Ar-
lington Greys Base Ball Club
blanked St. Croix 5-0 during
the Arlington Greys Vintage
Base Ball Tournament.
Chad “Part-Time” Bach-
man and Mike “One Way”
Feterl contributed three hits
apiece while Jeff “The Babe”
Menk, Dan “Young Blood”
Splettstoeser, Rob “Eye”
Brau and Mark “Billboard”
Lundstrom tallied two hits
each. Jim “Yukon” Kreft,
Eric “Special K” Kaesermann
and Dave “The Big Friendly”
Kreft added one hit apiece.
Arlington Greys post a
tie and win in tourney
SE football team falls to TCU 47-6
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The visiting Sibley East
varsity football team fell hard
to Tri-City United 47-6 in
Minnesota River Conference
action on Friday night, Sept.
27.
Sibley scored their only
touchdown on a 20-yard run
by senior Alex Pedraza with
1:49 left in the second quarter.
The extra point kick by sen-
ior Quentin Gex was no good.
The score, which was set up
by an interception by sopho-
more linebacker Logan Jor-
genson, cut the lead to 21-6.
“TCU is a very good team
that will make some noise in
the post season,” said Sibley
East head coach Chuck Hart-
man.  “They have a lot of ath-
leticism and you can tell they
are really committed to the
strength program that is
school-wide there now not
just in football.  They are also
a very  senior dominated team
and we have six or seven
starters in 8-10 grade.  I’m not
trying to make excuses be-
cause at some point we just
have to step up and play better
ball.”
The Wolverine offense
compiled only 148 yards.
Pedraza led the ground
game with 11 attempts for 44
yards and one touchdown.
Senior Erik Danielson, who
injured his knee, was limited
to 15 carries and 28 yards.
Junior Lukas Bullert had six
rushes for 24 yards while
sophomore Brody Bates
added five carries for 21
yards.
Senior quarterback Brody
Rodning, who suffered three
interceptions, completed only
three of 11 passing attempts
for just 10 yards.
Senior Beau Swenson
caught all three passes.
The Wolverine defense,
meanwhile, forced two
turnovers, but gave up several
big plays.
Senior linebacker Ben
White recorded eight solo
tackles and eight assisted
tackles and became the all
time leading tackler at Sibley
East.
“Coach Carl Bratsch has
done a great job with our line-
backers since taking over in
2011 as the lineback position
coach,” said Hartman. “He
identified Ben as a kid who
would be a great ‘Mike LB’
and he has started every game
since week one his sophomore
year.   Ben is a student of the
game and knows where his
teammates should be pre-snap
and gets them in the right po-
sition.  His eight forced fum-
bles last season is also a
school record.”
Hartman added, “Ben also
proves that stereotypes don’t
win high school football
games.  When most people
think of a middle linebacker,
they think of a 5’10,” 220-
pound kid.  Ben isn’t that.  If
you have a great work ethic
and study the game you can
be successful no matter your
size. Ben proves that.”
Jorgenson had one solo
tackle, three assisted tackles
and one interception while
sophomore Travis Schmidt
collected two solo tackles and
two assisted tackles. Senior
Austin Sadler contributed five
assisted tackles while Swen-
son added two solo tackles
and one assisted tackle.
“When we watch video, you
can tell the young kids, espe-
cially the two sophomore line-
backers (Travis Schmidt and
Logan Jorgenson) are getting
better,” Hartman said.  “They
are in the right position on
most plays and have a great
mentor in Ben White to emu-
late.   Same thing can be said
on the offensive line.   Tanner
Kurtzweg and Jaden Podratz
keep getting better and all
those young kids have shown
great resolve too.”
The Wolverines, 0-4 in the
MRC and 1-4 overall, will
host Norwood Young America
in conference action at 7 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 4.
“Norwood is 0-5 but they,
like us, should have a few
more wins,” said Hartman.
“They played Watertown
tough last week.   They’ll
probably be a traditional Nor-
wood team in the I-formation
on offense.  They have a good
triple threat in wide receiver
Casey Clemonsen, quarter-
back Issac Horman and tail-
back Noah Peterson.”
Hartman added, “This is
also the first year we will be
playing for the Wedge
Trophy. It’s a traveling trophy
that Norwood head coach
Paul Henn and I came up
with.  After slugging it out the
last couple years with hard
nosed running play called
‘Wedge,’ we decided it would
be fun to create a trophy for
the teams to battle over every
year.” 
Steve “Little Bill” Pioske, a member of the Arlington
Greys, tossed a 5-0 shutout over St. Croix during the
annual Arlington Greys Vintage Base Ball Tourna-
ment.
Sibley County Court
Arlington Raceway
Submitted Photo
Sibley East Girl Scout Swim Team
The Gaylord Area Aquatic Center was
the home pool for the 2013 Sibley East
Girl Scout Swim Team. This team is a
newly formed organization merging the
former Gaylord Girl Scout team and the
Arlington Girl Scout team. This photo
captures the team having fun at their
summer-end party to celebrate their
successful and enjoyable season. The
members of the team included the fol-
lowing swimmers. Front Row: (left to
right) Jada Messner, Emerson Schutte,
Sami Petzel and Kate Schutte. Back
Row: (l to r) Lexi Petzel, Maty Messner,
Katelyn Brinkman, Kali Messner, Jaci
Tourtellott and Sonja Sprandel. Missing
from the photo are Maddie Parrot and
Abby Tourtellott. The team was
coached by Sonja Sprandel and Abby
Tourtellott.
The following is a list of re-
sults from the Arlington Race-
way on Saturday, Sept. 28.
Appliance Race Feature
1. Adam Revier, Glencoe
2. John Polifka, Glencoe
3. Joe Pommerer, Silver Lake
Auto Cross Feature
1. Jared Mackenthun, Hamburg
2. Rylie Frauendienst, Arlington
3. Aaron Helmbrecht, Howard
Lake
4. Aaron Rose, Arlington
5. Zach Schultz, Watertown
6. Joshua Zebell, Norwood
7. Darrin Quast, Gaylord
8. Brett Scharping, Arlington
9. Gordan Anderson, Cokato
10. Brice Reierson, Arlington
11. Casey Loehrer, Hutchinson
12. Ben Brinkman, Lafayette
13. Britany Reierson, Arlington
14. Adam Wroge, Green Isle
15. Derek Wolters, Arlington
16. Peter Schwartz, Le Sueur
17. Pete Biedscheid, Le Sueur
18. Brian Reierson, Arlington
19. Kyle Frahm, Hutchinson
Dukes of Hazard
Jump Feature
1. Peter Schwartz, Le Sueur
2. Gordan Anderson, Cokato
3. Kris Stoeckman, Arlington
4. Pete Biedscheid, Le Sueur
5. Derek Wolters, Arlington
Figure 8s Feature
1. Dan Mackenthun, Hamburg
2. Adam Revier, Glencoe,
3. Kevin Stoeckman, Arlington
4. Aaron Rose, Arlington
5. John Polifka, Glencoe
6. Lenny Berens, no town
7. Chris Pearson, Norwood
Young America
8. Trevor Falk, Glencoe
IMCA Hobby Feature
1. Josh Telecky, Hutchinson
2. Ryan Grochow, New Ulm
3. Rodney Manthey, Norwood
Young America
4. Kevin LaTour, Le Sueur
5. Mike Vogt, New Auburn
6. Brian Loscheider, Cologne
7. Nate Manderfield, Mankato
8. Dakota Robinson, Arlington
9. Jason Baune, Hutchinson
10. Brady Foesch, Bird Island
11. Sarah Voss, Belle Plaine
12. Patrick Oestreich, Belle
Plaine
13. Matt Olson, Franklin
14. Kristin Voss, Belle Plaine
15. Marschall Robinson, Arling-
ton
16. Cole Robinson, Green Isle
IMCA Sport
Compact Feature
1. Kyren Porter, Madison Lake
2. Logan St. John, Arlington
3. Ashelyn Moriarty, Jordan
4. Randy Roush, New Auburn
5. Kalab Stoeckman, Arlington
6. Jed Trebelhorn, Winthrop
7. Robert Rutt, Norwood Young
America
8. Alan Lahr, Nicollet
9. Tyler Archer, Plato
IMCA SportMods
Feature
1. Matthew Looft, Swea City,
Iowa
2. Eric Larson, Madison Lake
3. Jeremy Brown, Rosemount
4. Chris Isaacson, New Ulm
5. Josh Larsen, Glencoe
6. Mark Garver, Wells
7. Joe Maas, Howard Lake
8. Travis Schurmann, Norwood
Young America
9. Dustin Engelke, Lester Prairie
10. Ben Chukuske, Sherburn
11. Wade Marshall, Chanhassen
12. Zack Malchow, Hutchinson
13. Shawn Harms, Green Isle
14. John Albrecht, Glencoe
15. Lyle Sathoff, Armstrong,
Iowa
16. Glenn Martner, Bloomington
17. Adam Revier, Glencoe
18. Paul Konakowitz, New Ulm
19. Larry Revier, Olivia
20. Jeff Schultz, Jr., Norwood
Young America
Karts Rookie Feature
1. Zoe Porter, Madison Lake
2. Logan Kotasek, Belle Plaine
3. Joey Reimers, Belle Plaine
4. Dylan Anderson, Winthrop
5. Tate Isaacson, New Ulm
6. Jackson Metzger, Jordan
7. Chaldin Wisch, Arlington
8. Emma Allen, St. Peter
9. Carter Draeger, Gaylord
10. Michael Stien, Gaylord
Karts Juniors Feature
1. Samantha Winter, Henderson
2. Derek Porter, Madison Lake
Karts Stock Feature
1. Terry Lang, St. Paul
2. Daulton Lamont, Elko
3. Nicole Hall, Mankato
4. Holli Reimers, Belle Plaine
5. Blake Schnobrich, New Ulm
Modifieds Feature
1. Brandon Beckendorf, Danube
2. Adam Voss, Arlington
3. Tim Pessek, Hutchinson
4. Bill Johnson, St. Peter
5. Nick Helmbrecht, Winsted
6. Jason Helmbrecht, Howard
Lake
7. Chad Porter, Madison Lake
8. Joe Voss, Belle Plaine
9. Roger Nielsen, Dolliver, Iowa
10. Josh Rogotzke, Sanborn
Outlaw Hobby Feature
1. Rodney Manthey, Norwood
Young America
2. Bryan Apitz, New Ulm
3. Perry Oestreich, Belle Plaine
4. Fred Heidecker, Brownton
5. Teddy Goettl, New Auburn
6. Kevin LaTour, Le Sueur
7. Jessie Johnson, Belle Plaine
8. Scott Oestreich, Belle Plaine
9. Dan Mackenthun, Hamburg
Powder Puffs Feature
1. Jamie Mathwig, Glencoe
2. Kristin Voss, Belle Plaine
3. Dayton Robinson, Green Isle
4. Robbin Wirtz, Savage
5. Tessa Falk, Plato
6. Jennifer Hall, Nicollet
7. Ashelyn Moriarty, Jordan
8. Ashley Bell, Lester Prairie
Sprint Cars Feature
1. Brett Allen, Gaylord
2. Mike Stien, Gaylord
3. Brandon Allen, St. Peter
4. Ron Guentzel, St. Peter
5. Aaron Wisch, Arlington
6. Jeremy Schultz, Hutchinson
7. Nate Laugen, Lake, Mills,
Iowa
8. Victoria Knutson , Monticello
9. Dalyn Cody, Prior Lake
Stock Cars Feature
1. Dan Mackenthun, Hamburg
2. Kenneth Tietz, Belle Plaine
3. Matt Speckman, Sleepy Eye
4. Matthew Schauer, Arlington
5. Darrell Eckblad, St. Peter
6. Kyle Roepke, Arlington
7. John Polifka, Glencoe
8. Mori Oestreich, Henderson
9. Brent Uecker, Hutchinson
10. Clay Steele, Hamburg
11. Jeff McCollum, Mankato
Trailer Racers Feature
1. Justin Schelitzche, Lester
Praire
2. Adam Revier, Glencoe,
3. Joe Pommerer, Silver Lake
4. Kris Stoeckman, Arlington
5. Dan Mackenthun, Hamburg
6. Scott Biedscheid, Le Sueur
7. John Polifka, Glencoe
8. Rylie Frauendienst, Arlington
Truck Auto Cross Feature
1. Adam Mehlhop, Arlington
2. Scott Ernsting, Le Sueur
3. John Theis, Le Center
4. Dustin Theuringer, Hutchin-
son
5. Ryan Hoff, Winthrop
6. Scott Biedscheid, Le Sueur
7. Brianna Thies, Le Center
8. Isaac Arnst, Henderson
9. Mark Chicoine, Montgomery
2013 Track Champions
IMCA Sport Compact-Alan
Lahr, Nicollet
IMCA Hobby-Ryan Grochow,
New Ulm
Outlaw Hobby-Perry Oestre-
ich, Belle Plaine
IMCA Sport Modified-Matt
Looft, Swea City, Iowa
IMCA Sprint Car-Brett Allen,
Gaylord
IMCA Stock Car-Dan Mack-
enthun, Hamburg
IMCA Modified-Brandon
Beckendorf, Danube
Auto Extravaganza
Mechanic Race Winners
AutoCross-Shawn Thiemann,
Winsted
IMCA Hobby-Bill Foesch,
Bird Island
Outlaw Mechanic-Scott Apitz,
New Ulm
Sport Compact-Kris Stoeck-
man, Arlington
Sport Modified Mechanic-
Randy Schumm, Rogers
Sprint Car Mechanic-Dustin
Sargent, St. Peter
Stock Car Mechanic-Joe Pom-
merer, Silver Lake
The following misdemeanors,
petty misdemeanors and gross
misdemeanors were heard in Dis-
trict Court September 20-27: Min-
nesota State Patrol (MSP); Sher-
iff’s Office, (SO); Department of
Natural Resources (DNR): MN
Department of Transportati on
(MNDOT):
Eric P. Brown, 46, Chaska, fail-
ure to stop at stop signs or stop
lines, $135, Arlington PD; Hugo
De La Garza, 20, Morton, speed,
$135, Arl i ngton PD; Kevi n F.
Meeds, 18, Belle Plaine, duty to
drive with due care-speed greater
than reasonable, $125, Arlington
PD; Craig A. Meyer, 18, Cokato,
drive over/through/around barri-
cade-highway, dismissed, Arling-
ton PD; Daniel J. Scharpe, 36, Ar-
lington, vehicle registration re-
quired, driving after suspension,
continued, unsupervised proba-
tion one year, pay costs, no driver
license violations, remain law-
abiding, $235, Arlington PD; Cody
A.S. Smi th, 18, Dassel , dri ve
over/through/around barricade-
highway, dismissed, Arlington PD;
Thomas G. Smi th, 53, Young
Ameri ca, dri ve over/through/
around barricade-highway, $125,
Arlington PD; Jamie C. Blahowski,
30, Hutchi nson, speed, $135,
Gaylord PD; Patrick K. Edeburn,
46, Sartell, speed, $125, Gaylord
PD; Kevin F. Meeds, 18, Belle
Plaine, vehicle registration re-
quired, seat belt required, speed,
$190, Gaylord PD; Donald E. Per-
schau, 73, Spicer, speed, $125,
Gaylord PD; Patrick A. Scharn,
43, Arlington, proof of insurance,
dismissed, Gaylord PD; Jesus A.
Velasquez, 26, Gaylord, giving
peace officer false name-of an-
other person, local confinement
45 days, credit for time served 25
days, $210, Gaylord PD; Laurel
L. Gullickson, 59, Gibbon, no dog
license, $135, Gibbon PD; William
T. Beseke, 59, Henderson,
garbage/junk ordinance, contin-
ued, unsupervised probation six
months, no same or similar, pay
costs, $135, Henderson PD;
Mi tchel l J. Meul eners, 23,
Cologne, speed, $125, Hender-
son PD; James J. Seaver, 46,
Henderson, violation refuse ordi-
nance, continued, unsupervised
probation six months, pay costs,
no same of similar, $135, Hender-
son PD; Bryan D. Arnesen, 31,
Hutchinson, speed, $125, MSP;
Diane M. Arneson, 52, Gibbon,
speed, $145, MSP; Bonnie J. Bat-
dorf, 66, Silver Lake, speed, con-
tinued, unsupervised probation
one year, remain law-abiding, pay
costs, no moving violations, $135,
MSP; Deopoldo P. Charles, 31,
Morton, speed, $135, MSP; Brye
B. Fowler, 56, Gaylord, speed,
$145, MSP; Michael T. Giroux, 49,
Wi nthrop, seat bel t requi red,
$110, MSP; Robert A. Idso, 67, St.
Peter, speed, $125, MSP; Glenn
R. Lacy. 45, Ovan, Mo., seat belt
violation in a commercial vehicle,
$110, MSP; El i zabeth M. Mc-
Caughtry, 20, Hutchinson, speed,
$145, MSP; Brandon R.-G. Meyer,
24, Gaylord, seat belt required,
dismissed, MSP; Kevin J. Otto,
47, Elk River, speed, $135, MSP;
Herbie A. Payton, 37, Concordia,
Mo., speed, $135, MSP; Harmann
S. Randall, 49, Bella Vista, Ariz.,
speed, $125, MSP; Homero
Rangel , 32, Gayl ord, l i cense
plates required front and rear of
vehicle, $115, MSP; Samantha J.
Robbins, 19, Hutchinson, speed,
$145, MSP; Li sa L. Smi th, 47,
Howard Lake, speed, $125, MSP;
Kara C. Vanbuskirk, 27, Hender-
son, speed, continued, unsuper-
vised probation one year, pay
costs, remai n l aw-abi di ng, no
moving violations, $135, MSP;
John C. Yarian, 47, Apple Valley,
speed, $145, MSP; Laurie A. Alt,
45, Evan, i ssue di shonored
check-value not more then $250,
supervised probation one year,
community work service 40 hours
for indeterminate, local confine-
ment 30 days stay 30 days for
one year, remai n l aw-abi di ng,
contact with probation, follow all
instructions of probation, sign
probation agreement, no same or
similar, $570.80, SO; Michael L.
Cardi nal , 19, Vi ctori a, dri vi ng
wrong way on one way street,
$185, SO; Andres Gonzalez, 41,
Le Sueur, speed, $145, SO;
Michael A. Savage, 25, Hender-
son, speed, $125, SO; Ohiyesa P.
Firesteel, 18, Shakopee, speed,
$225, SO.
The following felonies were
heard in District Court September
20-27:
Megan M. Dennin, 33, Gibbon,
check forgery-offer/possess with
intent to defraud, supervised pro-
bation three years, local confine-
ment 17 days, credi t for ti me
served two days, sentence to
service 10 days for indeterminate,
follow all conditions set forth in
the probation agreement, follow
all instructions of probation, sign
probati on agreement, contact
with probation, supply DNA sam-
ple, no same of similar, remain
law-abiding, no contact with vic-
tim(s), do not leave Minnesota
without written court approval,
pay restitution before fines, fees
and surcharges, $1,119, Gibbon
PD.
Governor Mark Dayton is
extending an invitation to the
general public to join him in
celebrating the third annual
Minnesota Governor’s Pheas-
ant Hunting Opener on Fri-
day, Oct. 11, and Saturday,
Oct. 12, in the south-central
Minnesota city of Madelia.
The community events on
Friday include: a sporting
clays range; “Best of the
Best” tournament, featuring
four of the top exhibition
shooting acts in the world;
and the 2013 Minnesota Gov-
ernor ’s Pheasant Hunting
Opener’s banquet and recep-
tion, which will include live
music by Minnesota-based
singer/songwriter Martin Zel-
lar and the Hardaways.
On Saturday, a pancake
breakfast will kick off a day
of pheasant hunting for the
community, state leaders, dig-
nitaries and other hunters
who will participate in the
event, among hunters across
the state.
The Governor ’s Opener
honors and promotes Min-
nesota’s longstanding hunting
tradition. This event will
showcase the many hunting,
recreational, travel and local
opportunities that the Madelia
area and south-central Min-
nesota has to offer visitors.
More information, event
details and updates can be
found at www. mn-
pheasant.com.
Dayton initiated the Gover-
nor ’s Pheasant Hunting
Opener in 2011. Previous
host communities were Mon-
tevideo and Marshall. The
2013 event is being coordi-
nated by the city of Madelia,
Madelia Chamber of Com-
merce, Explore Minnesota
Tourism and the Minnesota
Department of Natural Re-
sources (DNR).
Madelia has more than
8,600 acres of public hunting
land, within 20 miles of the
city, which is 20 minutes
west of Mankato and just
over an hour and a half south-
west of Minneapolis.
Governor’s pheasant hunting opener
to be held in Madelia on Oct. 14, 15
Three small areas of
Winona and Houston counties
that have high deer densities
will be open to an early antler-
less deer hunt Thursday, Oct.
17 through Sunday, Oct. 20,
the Minnesota Department of
Natural Resources (DNR)
said.
Two portions of deer permit
area 346 will be open as well
as one portion of permit area
345. Hunt areas are detailed
online and on the large, fold-
out deer map included in the
2013 Hunting and Trapping
Regulations Handbook.
“While the overall deer per-
mit areas are at or near estab-
lished population goals, there
continue to be localized areas
where deer densities need to
be reduced to desired levels,”
said Leslie McInenly, the
DNR’s big game program
leader. “This year’s more lim-
ited early antlerless season
will be evaluated as an addi-
tional management tool to re-
duce deer densities on a local
level.”
Only antlerless deer may be
taken, and hunters may use up
to five early antlerless per-
mits. Deer harvested during
the special season do not con-
tribute a hunter’s statewide
limit during the regular sea-
son. Early antlerless permits
cost $7.50 for residents and
may be purchased wherever
hunting licenses are sold.
All deer harvested during
this season must be tagged
with an early antlerless per-
mit. Hunters must also have a
valid archery, firearms or
muzzleloader license and har-
vest a deer using the method
for which they are licensed.
The antlerless hunt coin-
cides with the four-day special
youth deer season.
Early antlerless deer hunting will
open in 3 southeast Minnesota areas
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 3, 2013, page 7
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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WET BASEMENT?
ANNUAL MEETING
The Sibley County Agriculture Association will hold
its annual meeting on Thursday, October 17, 2013
at 8 PM in the Sibley County Fair office at 801 West
Chandler Street, Arlington Minnesota. Association
members are eligible to vote for, President, Treas-
ure, and Directors at that time as well as any new
business pertaining to the good of the Agriculture
Association.
A39Ea
Sounds like
multiplication?
It’s newspaper
talk for a one
column by 2 inch
ad. Too small to
be effective?
You’re reading
this one!
Put your 1x2 in
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Enterprise.
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 3, 2013, page 8
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
FSA Matters
Motorists traveling on Min-
nesota highways this fall
need to be aware of large
farm equipment transporting
crops to markets, grain eleva-
tors and processing plants,
according to the Minnesota
Department of Transportation
(Mn/DOT).
“Harvest season will be in
full swing and farmers in
every corner of the state will
be using the highways,” said
Sue Groth, state traffic engi-
neer. “Motorists need to be
prepared to encounter slow-
moving farm vehicles, espe-
cially on rural, two-lane
roads.”
Farm equipment is large
and heavy, making it hard for
operators to accelerate, slow
down and stop. The machines
also make wide turns and
sometimes cross over the
center line. In addition, farm
vehicles can create large
blind spots, making it diffi-
cult for operators to see ap-
proaching vehicles. All of
these factors can cause seri-
ous crashes.
Extra care should be taken
traveling in work zones as
load widths may be restricted
and on detour routes where
there is increased traffic
mixed with farm equipment
operators.
During 2010-2012, 377
traffic crashes took place on
Minnesota roads involving at
least one farm vehicle, result-
ing in 13 fatalities and 211 in-
juries. Of the 13 fatalities, six
were farm vehicle riders; of
the 211 injuries, 53 were farm
vehicle riders.
“The biggest factors con-
tributing to farm
equipment/vehicle crashes are
inattention, speeding and un-
safe passing,” Groth said.
“When approaching farm
equipment, motorists should
always slow down and use
extreme caution.”
Motorists should:
• Watch for debris dropped
by trucks hauling sugar beets
and other crops. It is safer to
brake or drive through debris
than to veer into oncoming
cars or off the road.
• Wait for a safe place to
pass.
• Wear seatbelts.
• Drive with headlights on
at all times.
• Farm equipment opera-
tors should:
• Use lights and flashers to
make equipment more visi-
ble.
• Use slow-moving vehicle
emblems on equipment trav-
eling less than 30 mph.
• Consider using a follow
vehicle when moving equip-
ment, especially at night.
Motorists, farm equipment operators
urged to safely share the road this fall
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Jason Weber was one of the many participants in the
annual Green Isle Lions Tractor Pull, “Remembering
Richard Engelmann,” on Saturday, Sept. 21.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The eighth annual Green
Isle Lions Tractor Pull, “Re-
membering Richard Engel-
mann,” was held in the Green
Isle Industrial Park at 11 a.m.
Saturday, Sept. 2.
The following is a list of
results from the event.
4500# Antique
Hobby Stock
1st Place: Paul Hanson,
Lake Crystal
2nd Place: Don Patnode,
Oak Grove
3rd Place: Jamie Engel-
mann, Green Isle
5500# Antique
Hobby Stock
lst Place: Paul Hanson,
Lake Crystal
2nd Place: Larry Pelant, Le
Center
3rd Place: Marty Schott,
Nicollet
6500# Antique
Hobby Stock
1st Place: Marty Schott,
Nicollet
2nd Place: Scott Lefebave,
Zimmerman
3rd Place: Joe Hindersheit,
New Prague
7500# Antique
Hobby Stock
1st Place: Joe Hindersheit,
New Prague
2nd Place: Derek Huhn,
Darwin
3rd Place: Kevin Divine,
New Prague
8500# Antique
Hobby Stock
1st Place: Derek Huhn,
Darwin
2nd Place: Duane Severt-
son, North Mankato
3rd Place: Joe Hindersheit,
New Prague
9500# Antique
Hobby Stock
1st Place: Derek Huhn,
Darwin
2nd Place: Kevin Divine,
New Prague
3rd Place: Ken Latzke,
Green Isle
4500# Antique Open
1st Place: Butch Vlasak,
Montgomery
2nd Place: Robbie Hoechst,
Lake Crystal
3rd Place: Josh Wilhelm,
Milaca
5500# Antique Open
1st Place: Jim Balfe,
Kilkenny
2nd Place: Marty Sham-
bour, New Prague
3rd Place: Mike Schons,
Faribault
6500# Antique Open
1st Place: Jim Balfe,
Kilkenny
2nd Place: Dick Olson,
Hutchinson
3rd Place: Nick Gerdes,
Jordan
9500# Hot Farm Stock
1st Place: Barry Nelson, St.
James
2nd Place: Cole Lenneman,
St. Michael
3rd Place: Rod Weber,
Cannon Falls
11,000# Hot Farm Stock
1st Place: Dan Pieper, New
Prague
2nd Place: Brian Oelfke,
Green Isle
3rd Place: Nate Dammann,
Hamburg
12,500# Hot Farm Stock
1st Place: Brian Oelfke,
Green Isle
2nd Place: Marty Schm-
bour, New Prague
3rd Place: Al Engelmann,
Green Isle
11,000 Improved Farm
1st Place: Nolan Weber, Ar-
lington
2nd Place: Nick Decker,
Waverly
3rd Place: Jason Rosen-
quist, Atwater
13,000 Improved Farm
1st Place: Jason Rosen-
quist, Atwater
2nd Place: Nolan Weber,
Arlington
3rd Place Mitch Fehn, St.
Michael
16,500 Improved Farm
1st Place: Barb Miller,
Belle Plaine
2nd Place: Mitchell Ko-
hout, Jordan
3rd Place: Dale Tiede, Le
Center
20,000 Semi
1st Place: Luke Cornelius,
Arlington
2nd Place: Kevin Abraham,
Chaska
3rd Place: Ike Coursolle,
Prior Lake
King Of The Hill
Kevin Abraham, Chaska
Annual Green Isle Lions Tractor Pull
attracts many pullers and spectators
By Lori Weckwerth
Sibley FSA
2013 County
Committee Elections
The election of agricultural
producers to the Farm Service
Agency (FSA) county com-
mittees is important to all
farmers and ranchers. It is
crucial that every eligible pro-
ducer participate in these
elections because FSA county
committees are a link be-
tween the agricultural com-
munity and the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture.
County Committee (COC)
members are a critical com-
ponent of FSA operations.
The intent is to have the COC
reflect the makeup of the pro-
ducers and represent all con-
stituents. This means that mi-
norities, women or lower in-
come producers need to be on
the committee to speak for
underrepresented groups.
County Committee election
ballots will be mailed to eligi-
ble voters on Nov. 4, 2013.
The last day to return com-
pleted ballots to the USDA
Service Center is Dec. 2.
2014 NAP
Coverage Available
Our Non-insured Crop Dis-
aster Assistance Program
(NAP) is designed to offer in-
surance coverage to produc-
ers who are growing non-tra-
ditional crops that crop insur-
ance does not cover. The
coverage costs $250 per crop
per county, limited to $750
per county and $1875 per per-
son. For producers who have
NAP coverage, they are re-
minded that the CCC-576,
Notice of Loss, must be filed
at the county office within 15
days of the occurrence of the
disaster or when losses be-
come apparent.
The NAP Basic Provisions
document is available to pro-
ducers at the county office
upon request. The application
closing dates are as follows:
Sept. 30 - Perennial forage
and select fruits & vegetables;
Nov. 20 – Perennial fruits and
vegetables; Dec. 1 – honey;
Feb. 1 – Maple sap; March 15
– Spring-seeded annual crops
& perennial forage pasture;
May 1 – Ornamental nursery.
More information about
NAP may be found on the
FSA website located at
www.fsa.usda.gov/nap.
The University of Min-
nesota Extension in Sibley
County will be offering a
Soils 101 course in the Vet-
erans Building at the fair-
grounds in Arlington on
Thursday, Nov. 14.
This course is an inten-
sive, eight-hour class that
provides a hands-on teach-
ing environment for pro-
ducers who want to learn
more about the soils they
farm. The class is beneficial
for producers that have
never had a soils class and
for the soils enthusiast.
The objective of the class
is to understand soil chemi-
cal, biological and physical
characteristics, to help man-
age soil quality, improve
soil structure, decrease
tillage operations and un-
derstand nutrient cycles in
the soil.
The class size is limited
to 15 producers to ensure
interactive learning and
plenty of time to ask indi-
vidual questions. This class
will offer four CEU’s in
Soil and Water, two CEU’s
in Nutrient Management,
and two CEU’s in Crop
Management that can be
self-reported. Pre-registra-
tion is required by Nov. 4.
The instructor is Jodi De-
Jong-Hughes who has a MS
degree in Soil Fertility and
17 years of experience with
the University of Minnesota
Extension working with
producers pertaining to soil
fertility, soil quality, and
compaction issues across
Minnesota.
Class will start at 8 a.m.
and end at 5 p.m.. Since
class sizes are limited,
please register early to en-
sure availability. A class
brochure can be viewed on-
line at z.umn.edu/Soils-
Fall13.
For more information,
contact Julie Sievert, Agri-
culture Extension Educator
at schu0944@umn.edu or
by phone at 507-237-4100.
Soils 101 course will be
offered in town on Nov. 14
Farm land rent is of criti-
cal concern to landowners
and operators. The added
costs of inputs, higher mar-
kets and agricultural land
prices has greatly affected
farm land rent.
Sibley County is conduct-
ing its annual farm land rent
survey. This survey is
available to take online at
http://www.surveymonkey.c
om/s/TVHZY57. Renters
and landlords are encour-
aged to fill out this survey
to better help the Extension
office answer land rent
questions. No personal in-
formation is requested. The
information requested is the
number of acres rented, the
township farm land is locat-
ed in, 2013 rental rates, esti-
mated 2014 rental rates, and
how well the land it tiled.
Deadline to fill out the sur-
vey is Friday, Oct. 25.
People can also request a
paper copy of the survey to
fill out by calling the Sibley
County Extension office at
507-237-4100.
Results of the survey will
be available on Nov. 1.
These results will be posted
online on the county web-
site (http://www.co.sibley
.mn.us), along with being
available at the Extension
office.
County conducting its annual farm land
rent survey, deadline is Friday, Oct. 25
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 3, 2013, page 9
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Blessings
The jailer called for lights, rushed in and fell trembling before Paul and Silas.
He then brought them out and asked, “Sirs, what must I do to be saved?”
They replied, “Believe in the Lord Jesus, and you will be saved—you and
your household.” Acts 16:29-31 NIV
St. Paul’s Lutheran Church
Green Isle
Pastor Eric W. Rapp
Worship: Sunday 9:00 a.m.
Commercial and Industrial Builders
Green Isle, MN 55338
ph. 507.326.7901 fax: 507.326.3551
www.vosconstruction.com
Arlington State Bank
Serving the Community Since 1895
BANKING SERVICES
964-2256
Arlington
A & N Radiator Repair
Allen & Nicki Scharn, Owners
23228 401 Ave., Arlington
877-964-2281 or 507-964-2281 Bus.
Certified ASE Technician on Staff
Also distributor for Poxy Coat II
Industrial Grade Coatings/Paint
MID-COUNTY
CO-OP
700 W. Lake St., Box 177
Cologne, MN 55322
(952) 466-3700
or TOLL FREE: 1-888-466-3700
HUTCHINSON CO-OP
AGRONOMY
LEON DOSE,
Arlington Branch Manager
411 7
th
Ave. NW • (507) 964-2251
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
402 W. Alden, Arlington
507-964-5547
Online at
www.Arlington
MNnew.com
Arlington Haus
Your Hometown Pub & Eatery
1986-2009
Arlington • 1-507-964-2473
STATE BANK OF
HAMBURG
100 Years. 100 Reasons.
Phone 952-467-2992
statebankofhamburg.com
CONVENIENCE
STORE
Hwy. 5 N., Arlington
507-964-2920
Homestyle Pizza
Real or Soft Serve Ice Cream
Gas – Diesel – Deli – Videos
(507)
964-2212
www.
chefcraigs
.com
23180 401 Ave., Arlington Phone 507-964-2264
EQUAL
HOUSING
LENDER
CRAIG BULLERT
ARLINGTON, MN
23189 Hwy. 5 North,
Arlington, MN 55307
arlington@hutchcoop.com
Office (507) 964-2283
Cell (320) 583-4324
HC
FUNERAL SERVICE
P.O. Box 314
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-2201
Member
FDIC
Church News
“Everyone says forgiveness
is a lovely idea until they
have something to forgive…”
writes C.S. Lewis.
Forgiveness is a complicat-
ed, yet beautiful topic.
Winthrop Covenant Church
will be hosting a forgiveness
seminar centered around a
documentary entitled The
Power of Forgiveness on Sat-
urday, October 12. The movie
will be shown in two parts,
with breaks for discussion
and lunch.
This event is open to the
community. Admission is free
though offerings will be ac-
cepted to cover meal costs.
People should arrive at 9:30
a.m. The movie will begin at
10 a.m. and conclude by 3
pm. RSVPs for the meal can
be made on the church web-
site: www.wincov.org, or by
phone at (507)647-5777.
Childcare will not be provid-
ed.
Why have this conversa-
tion? Lindsay Kachelmeier
recently graduated with her
Master’s Degree in Marriage
and Family therapy and de-
cided to focus her Master’s
thesis around forgiveness.
“The issue of forgiveness
always seems to make an ap-
pearance in the therapy
room,” said Kachelmeier. “It
is an issue that people wrestle
with and think about often on
a daily basis, in both small
and large ways.”
She uncovered this docu-
mentary while doing research
for her paper and asked her
husband, Pastor Kyle
Kachelmeier, to watch the
movie with her. Both were
left stunned and wanting to
discuss the movie more.
This documentary is pow-
erful and stretches people to
think more deeply and seri-
ously about forgiveness, ac-
cording to Kachelmeier The
film goes through several ex-
amples of hurt, from the
shooting in an Amish com-
munity to the events of
9/11/2001, and explores for-
giveness in the light of these
devastating experiences.
Come spend a few hours
talking and thinking about
this life-changing topic. All
are welcome to attend
More details, including a
link to the movie trailer, can
be found at www.wincov.org.
Questions may be directed
to the church office at
507-647-5777, or win-
cov@means.net.
Winthrop Covenant Church to
host The Power of Forgiveness
SENIOR DINING
Call 326-3401 for a meal
Suggested Donation $3.85
Meals are served at Highland
Commons dining room
Monday-Friday
Monday: Swedish meatballs,
paprika potatoes, spinach, bread
with margarine, ice cream, low fat
milk.
Tuesday: Liver or pepper steak,
buttered boiled potatoes, peas,
bread with margarine, apricots,
low fat milk.
Wednesday: Roast beef,
mashed potatoes, carrots, dinner
rol l wi th margari ne, puddi ng
dessert, low fat milk.
Thursday: Chicken chow mein,
rice, chow mein noodles, Oriental
vegetables, Mandarin orange gel-
atin, brownie, low fat milk.
Fri day: Creamy vegetabl e
soup, turkey sandwich, tropical
fruit, crackers with margarine,
cookie, low fat milk.
SIBLEY EAST ELEMENTARY
BREAKFAST MENU
Arlington and Gaylord
Breakfast is served at 8:00 a.m.
daily. A 1/2 pint of milk is served
with each meal daily. Menu is sub-
ject to change.
Monday: Gripz, yogurt, juice,
milk.
Tuesday: Cereal, cheese stick,
juice, milk.
Wednesday: Mini cinnis, juice,
milk.
Thursday: Bug bites, seeds,
juice, milk.
Friday: Waffle, juice, milk.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Arlington
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: Burrito, rice, refried
beans, fixings, salsa, slushie, milk.
Tuesday: Chow mein, rice, noo-
dles, pineapple, fortune cookie,
milk.
Wednesday: Toasted cheese
sandwich, tomato soup, crackers,
fresh broccoli, fruit, milk.
Thursday: Sloppy Joe, hash
brown potato, pickles, cole slaw,
fresh fruit, milk.
Friday: Hot dog, french fries,
brown beans, fruit, milk.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Gaylord
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: Chicken fajitas, fajita
vegetables, refried beans, corn,
fruit slushie or fresh fruit, milk.
Alternate: Tator tot hotdish.
Tuesday: Breaded pork on
whole grain bun, sweet potatoes,
Romaine salad, fruit, milk.
Alternate: Sliced turkey wrap on
whole grain tortilla.
Wednesday: Toasted cheese
sandwi ch, tomato soup, fresh
broccoli, green beans, fruit, milk.
Alternate: Baked chicken.
Thursday: Sloppy Joe on whole
grain bun, hash brown potato,
cole slaw, fruit, milk.
Alternate: Fish burger.
Friday: Hot dog on whole grain
bun, oven potatoes, baked beans,
fruit, milk.
Alternate: Cheese stuffed sticks
with dipping sauce.
Menus
CREEKSIDE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Christian & Missionary
Alliance
Dr. Bill Kuhn,
Interim Pastor
114 Shamrock Drive
Arlington – 507-964-2872
email: creeksidecc@media-
combb.net.
Sunday, October 6: 10:30 a.m.
Worship service, Lord’s Supper,
followed by potluck.
Wednesday, October 9: 7:00-
8:30 p.m. R.E.A. C.H. Youth
Group at Terry and Becky
Shogren’s home, 6th through
12th grade.
Thursday, October 10: 6:30
p.m. Men’s Bible study at Chuck
Peik’s home. 7:00 p.m. Women’s
Bible study, “Revelation” at Jean
Olson’s home.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
(507) 304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
507-234-6770
Saturday: Church services at
9:30 a.m. Bible study at 11:00
a.m. Fellowship dinner at 12:00
p.m. All are welcome.
UNITED METHODIST
Arlington
Rodney J. Stemme, Pastor
www.arlingtonunited
methodist.org
Saturday, October 5: 8:00 a.m.
A-Men men’s group.
Sunday, October 6: 9:00 &
11:00 a.m. Worship with com-
munion. 10:15 a. m. Sunday
school.
Tuesday, October 8: 6:30 p.m.
Education/Outreach. 7:30 p.m.
Trustees.
Wednesday, October 9: 7:00
p.m. Choir and Confirmation
class.
Thursday, October 10: 10:00
a.m., 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. Worship
on cable TV. 1:00 and 7:00 p.m.
Women’s Bible study at Jean
Olson’s.
ST. PAUL LUTHERAN
(WELS),
Arlington
Bruce Hannemann, Pastor
WEBSITE:
www.stpaularlington.com
EMAIL:
Bruce.Hannemann@stpaul
arlington.com
Friday, October 4: 8:30 a.m.
School Marathon day @ Baylor
Park.
Sunday, October 6: 8:45 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:00 a.m. Family
Bible study. 10:00 a.m. Worship
with Communion, children sing.
Bethlehem Express meeting after
church.
Monday, October 7: 7:00 p.m.
Elders’ meeting.
Tuesday, October 8: 6:00 p.m.
Counting committee.
Wednesday, October 9; 2:00
p.m. Bible study. 3:45 p.m. Pub-
lic School Confirmation class.
7:30 p.m. Choir practice.
Thursday, October 10: 10:00
a.m. Bulletin information due.
11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. services
on cable TV channel 8.
GAYLORD ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
Gaylord
Bob Holmbeck, Pastor
Sunday, October 6: 9:00 a.m.
Sunday school. 10:00 a.m. Sun-
day worship service.
Wednesday, October 9: 6:30
p.m. Evening Bible classes and
Youth Focused. 8:00 p.m. Supper
welcome!
ST. PAUL’S UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Henderson
(507) 248-3594 (Office)
Rev. Brigit Stevens, Pastor
Find us on Facebook:
St. Paul’s UCC - Henderson
Sunday, October 6: 9:00-9:50
a.m. Sunday school. 10:00 a.m.
Worship with communion.
ST. PAUL’S EV.
REFORMED CHURCH
15470 Co. Rd. 31, Hamburg
Dan Schnabel, Pastor
952-467-3878
www.stpaulsrcus.org
Sunday, October 6: 8:30 a.m.
Sunday school and Bible study.
9:30 a.m. Worship service.
Wednesday, October 9: 6:30
p.m. Catechism class.
Thursday, October 10: 7:00
p.m. Consistory meeting.
ORATORY OF
ST. THOMAS
THE APOSTLE
Jessenland
507-248-3550
Fr. Sam Perez
Thursday: Weekly Mass at
5:00 p.m.
ST. MARY, MICHAEL
AND BRENDAN AREA
FAITH COMMUNITY
Fr. Keith Salisbury, Pastor
Friday, October 4: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar).
Saturday, October 5: 5:00 p.m.
Mass (Mar).
Sunday, October 6: 7:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre). No Elementary reli-
gious education (Mar). 9:00 a.m.
Mass (Mic). 10:30 a.m. Confir-
mation (Mar).
Monday, October 7: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar). 8:00 p.m.
AA and AlaNon (Mar).
Tuesday, October 8: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar).
Wednesday, October 9: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m. Word
and Communion (Oak Terrace).
5:00 p.m. Mass (Mar). 7:00-8:00
p.m. Jr./Sr. High religious educa-
tion (Mar).
Thursday, October 10: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre and Mic). 7:30
p. m. Narcotics Anonymous
(Mic).
TRINITY LUTHERAN
32234 431st Ave., Gaylord
Rev. James Snyder,
Interim Pastor
Sunday, October 6: 10:00 a.m.
Worship with Holy Communion.
Wednesday, October 9: 6:00
p.m. Confirmation class at St.
Paul’s.
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Pastor William Postel
Phone 507-964-2400
Sunday, October 6: 9:00 a.m.
Bible class. 10:00 a.m. Worship
Thursday, October 10: 5:30
p.m. Deadline for bulletin infor-
mation.
EVANGELICAL
COVENANT CHURCH
107 W. Third St., Winthrop
Pastor Kyle Kachelmeier
(507) 647- 5777
Parsonage (507) 647-3739
www.wincov.org
Sunday, October 6: 9:30 a.m.
Worship with communion. 10:45
a.m. Sunday school.
Tuesday, October 8: 7:00 p.m.
Executive board. 7:30 p.m. All
boards.
Wednesday, October 9: 9:00
a.m. Prayer coffee. 6:00 p.m.
AWANA.
Thursday, October 10: 9:30
a.m. Women’s Bible study. 7:00
p.m. Men’s group meeting.
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN
Green Isle
Pastor Eric W. Rapp
Friday, October 4: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, October 6: 9:00 a.m.
Worship. 10:00 a.m. Sunday
school.
Wednesday, October 9: 6:30
p.m. Confirmation class. 6:30-
7:30 p. m. Wed. night school
grades 1-5. 7:30 p.m. Joint Choir
practice.
PEACE LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Kurt Lehmkuhl, Pastor
Sunday, October 6: 8:15 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:30 a.m. Wor-
ship Service.
Monday, October 7: 7:00 p.m.
Worship service.
Wednesday, October 9: 3:45
p.m. Catechism.
ZION LUTHERAN
814 W. Brooks St.
Arlington – (507) 964-5454
James Carlson, Pastor
Sunday, October 6: 9:00 a.m.
Worship with Holy Communion.
10:00 a.m. Fellowship, Sunday
school and youth group meets.
Tuesday, October 8: 6:00-7:00
p.m. TOPS in church basement.
Wednesday, October 9: 7:00
p.m. ZCW Executive meeting
and church council.
Thursday, October 9: 9:00 a.m.
and 1:00 p.m. Zion service on
cable.
ZION LUTHERAN
Green Isle Township
Pastor Eric W. Rapp
Friday, October 4: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, October 6: 10:30 a.m.
Worship with Communion.
Wednesday, October 9 6:30
p.m. Confirmation class at St.
Paul’s. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Wed. night
school grades 1-5 at St. Paul’s.
7:30 p.m. Joint Choir practice at
St. Paul’s.
More than 400 hundred
people attended the recent
dedication service tor the Im-
manuel Lutheran School and
Shining Stars Learning Cen-
ter, according to The Gaylord
Hub.
The service featured spe-
cial music by the Mayer
Lutheran High School Brass
Ensemble. Immanuel Bell
Choir, Adult Choir, Immanuel
Lutheran School Bell Choir,
and Immanuel student choir.
Immanuel Lutheran School dedication
PHOTO CLASSIFIED p
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For $50 your ad will run for 5 weeks in these 11 publications:
The Glencoe Advertiser • The McLeod County Chronicle
Silver Lake Leader • Arlington Enterprise • The Sibley Shopper
Renville County Shopper • Renville County Register • The Galaxy
Western Peach • www.GlencoeNews.com • www.ArlingtonMNnews.com
($50 is for 15 words, 50¢ each additional word. $45 without a photo.)
11 PUBLICATIONS 5 WEEKS f
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716 E. 10th St., P.O. Box 188, Glencoe, MN 55336
320-864-5518 • trishak@glencoenews.com
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 3, 2013, page 10
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
LIESKE TRACTOR
Wanted: Your OLD TRACTORS,
any condition, make or model. We
also specialize in new and used
TRACTOR PARTS AND REPAIR.
Call Kyle. Located west of Hen-
derson. (612) 203-9256.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Notice
Wanted: Junk appliances, iron,
machinery, wire etc. for recycling.
Will pick up. Call (507) 317-8717
for info.
AUTOMOTIVE
Parts, Repair
$$ DOLLARS PAID $$ Junk vehi-
cles, repairable cars/trucks. FREE
TOWING. Flatbed/ wrecker serv-
ice. Immediate pick up. Monday-
Sunday, serving your area 24/7.
(952) 220-TOWS.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
CONKLIN© DEALERS NEEDED!
Lifetime career in marketing, man-
agement and applying “Green”
products made in America. Full
time/ part time. For a free catalog
call Franke’s Conklin Service now
at (320) 238-2370. www.franke-
marketing.com.
Dairy crop farm help wanted. High
school students or retired farmers
may apply, too. (507) 964-5223.
EARN EXTRA CASH $150 PLUS
PER MONTH WHILE HAVING
FUN VOLUNTEERING
Lutheran Social Service of MN is
l ooki ng for cari ng i ndi vi dual s
to serve individuals in McLeod
County. Senior Companions are
needed to provide companionship
to older adults. Volunteers earn
a tax-free stipend, travel reim-
bursement, other benefi ts.
Contact Gail Sumerfelt at 507-
337-0382 or 507-530-2295.
Immediate openings in Winsted.
RNs and LPNs for Home Care.
Part-time positions with young
adul t femal e cl i ent. Pri mari l y
weekday eveni ngs, 4 p.m.- 12
a.m.; Every third Saturday, 8 a.m.-
12 a.m. Please contact Communi-
ti es of Care (651) 482-0549,
www.communitiesofcaremn.com.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
Light typing, errands. Must have
flexible schedule and be reliable.
Computer skills necessary. Youths
may apply. (507) 964-2550.
Want to have fun while you work?
Love working with children? Our
Christ-centered daycare has im-
mediate openings for a full time
and part time provider to care for
our children. Call (952) 467-2788.
Or send letter of interest to SON-
shine House, 18175 County Road
50, Hamburg, MN or email pas-
tor@elchamburg.org.
Work Wanted
HANDYMAN: Will do remodeling
of kitchens, bathrooms, hanging
doors and wi ndows, pai nti ng,
sheet rocking, texturizing or any
minor repairs inside or outside.
Wi l l al so do cl eani ng of base-
ments/garages. Call (320) 848-
2722 or (320) 583-1278.
FOR SALE
Heating/Air Conditioning
Special-95% Goodman gas fur-
nace and programmable thermo-
stat, $2,200 installed or AC unit,
$1,900 installed. J&R Plumbing
Heating AC, Lester Prairie (320)
510-5035.
RENTAL
Apartment
Village Cooperative of Hutchinson
(320) 234-7761. 55+ Senior living.
Three units available (3-2BR, 1-
1BR.) Call for your tour! Come in
and check out the wonderful in-
centives offers and learn how you
can save over $8,000! Equal
Housing Opportunity.
Duplex, 2BR, oversized garage,
W/D on main level, AC, Arlington.
No smoking or pets. $600 rent
plus utilities and deposit. (952)
758-7622.
RENTAL
Apartment
Updated, spacious one and two
BR apartments in Renville. In-
cludes heat, water garbage. New
stove, fridge, air conditioner. Pet-
friendly. Call (320) 564-3351 for
appointment.
House
1, 2, 3 or 4 bedroom houses for
rent in Olivia. Call (320) 212-3217.
Want To Rent
Father and Son Operation look-
ing for farmland to rent. Call (320)
523-1116 or (320) 522-0272.
Wanted: Farmland to rent 2014
and beyond. Curtis Weckwerth
(507) 380-9128, Wayne Franzeen
(507) 380-2466.
Young farmer looking for land to
rent for 2014 and beyond. Com-
petitive rates and reference avail-
able. Call Austin Blad (320) 221-
3517.
SERVICES
Misc. Service
CUSTOM LOG SAWING- Cut at
your place or ours. White oak lum-
ber decking and firewood. Give
Virgil a call. Schauer Construction,
Inc. (320) 864-4453.
Classifieds
ADD ANOTHER PAPER
FOR ONLY
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(based on first week pricing)
The McLeod
County Chronicle
Silver Lake Leader
The Glencoe
Advertiser
The Sibley Shopper
Arlington Enterprise
The Galaxy
3-WEEK SPECIAL: ONE WEEK:
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For 20 words, one time in
ANY TWO PAPERS and on the internet.
30¢ per word after first 20 words.
AGRICULTURE AUTOMOTIVE EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE LIVESTOCK
& PETS
LIVESTOCK
& PETS
REAL ESTATE SERVICES RENTAL RENTAL
All ads appear online
at GlencoeNews.com
Enterprise
To place an ad: Call: 507-964-5547; Fax: 507-964-2423; E-Mail: info@ArlingtonMNnews.com; Mail: P.O. Box 388, Arlington, MN 55307
Advertising
Deadlines
The McLeod County Chronicle Mondays at Noon
The Arlington Enterprise & The Silver Lake Leader Tuesdays at Noon
The Glencoe Advertiser, The Sibley Shopper
& The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
Commercial
Building and
Business
Opportunity
Call (507) 964-2256
A22-25E,23-26Sa
Available...
1 & 2 Bedroom
Apartments Available
All utilities,
except electric
Income based
Must be 62 or older
or handicapped
Highland Commons
Arlington
507-964-5556
A
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HANDICAP
ACCESSIBLE
Independent Living
55+ Arlington Sr. Apartment ONLY
1 ~ 2BR
Garage Available
Apply NOW & Move this Fall!
FREE Application
FREE Damage Deposit
FREE 1
st
Month Rent
Lease Today!
800-873-1736 or 507-642-8701
kanderson@amberfieldplace.com
www.amberfieldplace.com
A36-39E37-40Sa
Managed by Great Lakes Management Co.
Now Hiring Full-Time Shag Driving Position
Gaylord Michaels Food Location
Rotating Schedule 4 days on, 3 days off, 12 hour position.
Pay based on experience CDL not required but must be willing
to obtain with in 6 months. Benefits available after 90 days.
If interested call Shelly Gruetzmacher @
1-800-422-1347 ext 115
or email shellyg@bartelstruckline.com
A37-38Ea
Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington
is seeking the following positions:
• Certified Nursing Assistant, evening
shifts with every other weekend, 6 shifts
per pay period.
• Certified Nursing Assistant, evening
shifts with every other weekend/holiday,
10 shifts per pay period.
• Certified Nursing Assistant, overnights 10:15pm-6:15am,
every other weekend only.
• Certified Nursing Assistant Resource/On-Call only.
• Certified Nursing Assistant, 3:30-9pm every other
weekend only.
• LPN Evening Nurse, 8 shifts per pay period,
includes every other weekend/holiday.
– Must be MN Certified –
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information,
call Tiffany Brockhoff,
Human Resource Director at
507-964-2251 or email:
tbrockof@good-sam.com
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap Drug-Free Workplace
Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life.
A
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NEEDED: EXPERIENCED
SALES AGRONOMIST
who will play a role in management.
Knowledge in plant nutrition, crop
protection and precision ag needed.
Call Colby at 605/772-5543 at the
Howard Farmers Coop in South Dakota.
OTR DRIVERS NEEDED
above avg. mileage pay. Avg. 2,500-
3,500 miles/wk. 100% no touch.
Full benefits w/401K. 12 months
CDL/A experience. 888/545-9351
ext 13 www.doublejtransport.com
HUGE 400 GUN AUCTION
Sat. Oct. 5th @ 9AM Prairie du Chien, WI.
Military, Western & modern hunting arms
608/326-8108 -www.kramersales.com
CASH FOR CARS:
All cars/trucks wanted. Running or not! Top
dollar paid. We come to you! Any make/
model. Call for instant offer: 800/871-9145
NORTHEASTERN, MN
Motivated seller of private lakeshore par-
cels, wilderness parcels & hunting land
between Duluth, Ely & Grand Rapids.
Multi-parcel online auction ends Oct 14.
More info: Shelly Weinzetl, Broker/Auc-
tioneer: 763/300-5055 or AllianceBid.com
or Roger Hansen, Realtor/Auctioneer:
715/781-7172 or HansenAndYoung.com
DISH TV RETAILER
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12
mos.) & High Speed Internet start-
ing at $14.95/month (where avail-
able.) Save! Ask About same day In-
stallation! Call now! 800/297-8706
GUARANTEED INCOME
for your retirement. Avoid market risk
& get guaranteed income in retire-
ment! Call for free copy of our safe
money guide plus annuity quotes from
A-rated companies! 800/631-4558
CANADA DRUG CENTER
is your choice for safe and affordable med-
ications. Our licensed Canadian mail order
pharmacy will provide you with savings of
up to 75% on all your medication needs.
Call today 800/259-1096 for $10.00 off
your first prescription and free shipping.
DONATE YOUR CAR
Truck or Boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free
3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing,
all paperwork taken care of 800/439-1735
SAWMILLS
from only $4,897.00 - Make & save
money with your own bandmill - cut
lumber any dimension. In stock ready
to ship. Free info/DVD: 800/578-1363
Ext. 300N www.NorwoodSawmills.com
ENJOY 100% GUARANTEED
delivered-to-the-door Omaha Steaks!
Save 74% plus 4 free burgers - The Fam-
ily Value Combo - only $39.99. Order
today 877/415-6938, use code 48829ALF
- or www.omahasteaks.com/mbfam99
MISCELLANEOUS AUTOS WANTED
HELP WANTED - DRIVERS
MISCELLANEOUS
REAL ESTATE
EMPLOYMENT
Your ad here!
Only $249 to reach a statewide audience of
3 million readers!!! 1-800-279-2979
AUCTION
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Call your local newspaper
or MNA 800-279-2979
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advertisement here!
HELP
WANTED
Busy
chiropractic
office seeks
energetic and
personable
assistant.
15-20 hours
per week.
Call
507-964-2850 or
email resume to
arlingtonchiro
clinic@live.com
A39E40Sa
M & M
Home Contractors,
a Custom Home Builder
in Cologne, MN is now hiring
EXPERIENCED
Framing Carpenters
Applicants must be reliable,
self-motivated, hardworking and
able to work well with others.
Must also have the ability to
work outdoors in all weather
conditions. You must possess
a valid MN Driver's License,
have reliable transportation of
your own, have a valid social
security number, be drug free
and pass a background check.
Pay based on experience.
Please contact Mike at
612-554-2556
for additional information
*39-40E40-41Sa
Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington
is seeking the following positions:
• Dietary Assistant – 6:30am-1:30pm
every other weekend/holiday.
• Dietary Cook/Assistant Cook
hours vary, 6 shifts per pay period
includes every other weekend/holiday.
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information,
call Tiffany Brockhoff,
Human Resource Director at
507-964-2251 or email:
tbrockof@good-sam.com
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap Drug-Free Workplace
Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life. A
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WANTED
The Arlington Fire Department
is now taking applications for
firefighters.
Applications are available from any
firefighter or at the Arlington City Office,
and will be accepted until
October 31, 2013.
A39-40SEa
Pinske Real Estate
& Auctioneers
(507) 964-2250
Arlington
• 2 or 3 BR updated
rambler. Nicely located
on corner lot in Arling-
ton.
$
85,000
We need listings of
homes, farms and hobby
farms. If you are thinking
about selling it will pay for
you to call us.
REAL ESTATE
A39E40SGa
The Arlington
Enterprise
402 W. Alden St.
P.O. Box 388
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-5547
info@arlingtonMNnews.com
52 Weeks a Year!
IS
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 3, 2013, page 11
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Minnesotans will now be
able to apply online to regis-
ter to vote, or update their ex-
isting registration, thanks to
an application developed by
the Office of the Minnesota
Secretary of State and ac-
cessed at mnvotes.org. The
online process will deliver
convenience to voters, reduce
errors in voter rosters, and de-
liver significant cost- and
time-savings for local election
officials.
“Today we join many states
that have already demonstrat-
ed that online registration is
secure and that it saves tax-
payers money,” said Minneso-
ta Secretary of State Mark
Ritchie.
In addition to launching on-
line voter registration during
National Voter Registration
Month, the office is making
absentee ballot applications
available online for military
and overseas voters. This will
allow those voters to apply
for an absentee ballot quickly
and easily without the need to
print, scan forms, and return
by mail, fax or email. In the
2012 general election, there
were 10,506 absentee ballots
successfully cast by military
and overseas Minnesota vot-
ers.
“This is a great improve-
ment in voting absentee for
our men and women overseas
or at U.S. military bases far
from home,” said retired Lt.
Col. John Kingrey, judge ad-
vocate general officer, Army
Reserve. “Those defending
our freedoms should be able
to exercise their right to vote
in a simple, straightforward
manner.”
Ritchie noted that applying
for voter registration online
provides another delivery
method for the application but
will not replace paper appli-
cations, which will still be
available.
The online tool was built to
ensure that only persons pro-
viding verifiable identifica-
tion numbers will be able to
register, and online applica-
tions will go through the same
verification process as paper
registrations. Information pro-
vided on the application will
be verified with data from the
state’s Driver and Vehicle
Services or Social Security
Administration. County elec-
tion officials will continue to
review applications in the
Statewide Voter Registration
System and be responsible for
approving an application or
otherwise. If approved, the
applicant will be added to the
voter roster, and a postcard
will be mailed to the voter to
verify their address and pro-
vide the location of their
polling place.
According to Ritchie, on-
line registration will reduce
the primary costs of current
registration: paper, printing,
postage and manual data
entry. The Office of the Sec-
retary of State estimates the
time required by counties to
process an online application
will be one-third to one-half
of that needed to process a
paper application.
In addition to reducing the
workload and cost of process-
ing registrations, online regis-
tration minimizes inaccurate
records that arise from pro-
cessing handwritten paper
forms, such as data entry
error, illegible handwriting
and incomplete forms. More
accurate registration rolls will
lead to fewer problems and
shorter lines on Election Days
as voters will have updated
and accurate records when
they arrive at the polling
place.
“I expect that all county
election officials will greatly
appreciate online registra-
tion,” said Debby Erickson,
deputy auditor and elections
coordinator for Crow Wing
County, and chair of the Elec-
tions Committee for the Min-
nesota Association of County
Officers. “It’s going to signif-
icantly reduce the time and
associated costs of manual
data entry and processing.
We’ll have more accurate
voter rosters at the polling
place.”
Minnesota is the 15th state
to offer online voter registra-
tion, joining California, Col-
orado, Indiana, Kansas,
Louisiana, Maryland, Nevada,
New York, Oregon, South
Carolina, Utah, Virginia and
Washington. Arizona first in-
troduced online registration in
2002. Six other states, Con-
necticut, Delaware, Georgia,
Hawaii, Illinois and West Vir-
ginia, plan to implement on-
line registration in the near
future. According to projec-
tions by the Pew Charitable
Trusts at least half of the
states will employ online reg-
istration by 2016.
“In a world where people
bank, renew their license, and
pay taxes online, citizens ex-
pect that online voter registra-
tion will be available, as
well,” said David Becker, di-
rector of The Pew Charitable
Trusts’ election initiatives
project. “With online voter
registration, states and coun-
ties save taxpayer dollars
while reducing workload and
errors in their voter rolls.”
Ritchie encourages Min-
nesotans to check their regis-
tration online to ensure it is
up-to-date. In Minnesota, a
person must re-register to
vote if their address has
changed, if they have changed
names, or if they have not
voted in the previous four
years.
More than 35 municipali-
ties across the state will hold
elections on November 5 for
various city officers, and 113
school districts will hold elec-
tions for school board mem-
bers and/or have ballot ques-
tions. Eligible voters will be
able to register online up until
5 p.m. on October 15. Pre-
registration is not required,
and eligible voters may regis-
ter at their polling place on
Election Day.
Online voter registration now available
NOTICE OF MORTGAGE
FORECLOSURE SALE
THE RIGHT OF VERIFICA-
TION OF THE DEBT AND IDEN-
TITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDI-
TOR WITHIN THE TIME PRO-
VIDED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECT-
ED BY THIS ACTION.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
that default has occurred in condi-
tions of the following described
mortgage:
DATE OF MORTGAGE: No-
vember 28, 2007
MORTGAGOR: Eric D. Hen-
drickson and Michelle M. Hen-
drickson, husband and wife.
MORTGAGEE: Washi ngton
Mutual Bank, FA.
DATE AND PLACE OF
RECORDING: Filed December
20, 2007, Sibley County Registrar
of Titles, Document No. T-20099
on Certificate of Title No. 6813.0
ASSIGNMENTS OF MORT-
GAGE: Assigned to: JPMorgan
Chase Bank, National Association.
Dated July 16, 2013 Filed August
5, 2013, as Document No.
T22892.
Sai d Mortgage bei ng upon
Registered Land.
TRANSACTION AGENT:
NONE
TRANSACTION AGENT’S
MORTGAGE IDENTIFICATION
NUMBER ON MORTGAGE:
NONE
LENDER OR BROKER AND
MORTGAGE ORIGINATOR
STATED ON MORTGAGE: Wash-
ington Mutual Bank, FA
RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE
SERVICER: JPMorgan Chase
Bank, National Association
MORTGAGE PROPERTY AD-
DRESS: 318 10th Street, Gaylord,
MN 55334
TAX PARCEL I.D. #:
320507000
LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
Lot 13 and the South 25 feet of
Lot 14, in Block 50, in Second
West Addition to the City of Gay-
lord, Sibley County, Minnesota
COUNTY IN WHICH PROPER-
TY IS LOCATED: Sibley
ORIGINAL PRINCIPAL
AMOUNT OF MORTGAGE:
$129,600.00
AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED
TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF
NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF
ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE:
$125,441.71
That prior to the commence-
ment of this mortgage foreclosure
proceeding Mortgagee/Assignee
of Mortgagee complied with all no-
tice requirements as required by
statute; That no action or proceed-
ing has been instituted at law or
otherwise to recover the debt se-
cured by said mortgage, or any
part thereof;
PURSUANT to the power of
sale contained in said mortgage,
the above described property will
be sol d by the Sheri ff of sai d
county as follows:
DATE AND TIME OF SALE:
November 15, 2013 at 10:00 AM
PLACE OF SALE: Sheriff’s Of-
fice, Sheriff’s Department, 310
Park Avenue, Gaylord, MN
to pay the debt then secured by
said Mortgage, and taxes, if any,
on said premises, and the costs
and disbursements, including at-
torneys’ fees allowed by law sub-
ject to redemption within six (6)
months from the date of said sale
by the mortgagor(s), their person-
al representatives or assigns un-
less reduced to Five (5) weeks
under MN Stat. §580.07.
TIME AND DATE TO VACATE
PROPERTY: If the real estate is
an owner-occupied, single-family
dwelling, unless otherwise provid-
ed by law, the date on or before
which the mortgagor(s) must va-
cate the property if the mortgage
is not reinstated under section
580.30 or the property is not re-
deemed under section 580.23 is
11:59 p.m. on May 15, 2014, un-
less that date falls on a weekend
or legal holiday, in which case it is
the next weekday, and unless the
redemption period is reduced to 5
weeks under MN Stat. Secs.
580.07 or 582.032.
MORTGAGOR(S) RELEASED
FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGATION
ON MORTGAGE: None
“THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW
FOR REDEMPTION BY THE
MORTGAGOR, THE MORT-
GAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRE-
SENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS, MAY
BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS
IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS EN-
TERED UNDER MINNESOTA
STATUTES, SECTION 582.032,
DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER
THINGS, THAT THE MORT-
GAGED PREMISES ARE IM-
PROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL
DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE
UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY
USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRO-
DUCTION, AND ARE ABAN-
DONED.”
Dated: September 12, 2013
JPMorgan Chase Bank,
National Association
Mortgagee/Assignee of Mort-
gagee
USSET, WEINGARDEN AND
LIEBO, P.L.L.P.
Attorneys for Mortgagee/Assignee
of Mortgagee
4500 Park Glen Road #300
Minneapolis, MN 55416
(952) 925-6888
30 – 13-005754FC
THIS IS A COMMUNICATION
FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR.
Publish: September 26, Octo-
ber 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31, 2013
Certificate of Assumed Name
State Of Minnesota
1. List the exact assumed name
under which the business will be
conducted: Simply Divine Design
& Photography
2. Principal place of business:
20784 425th Ave., Arlington, MN
55307
3. List the name and complete
street address of all persons con-
ducting business under the above
Assumed Name: Kel l i Berger,
20784 425th Ave., Arlington, MN
55307
4. I, the undersigned, certify
that I am signing this document as
the person whose signature is re-
quired. I understand that by sign-
ing this document I am subject to
the penalties of perjury as set
forth in Section 609.48 as if I had
signed this document under oath.
Dated: August 22, 2013
/s/ Kelli Berger
Owner
(952) 200-2008
Publish: October 3 and 10,
2013
Legals
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Lions Donate New Bed
The Arlington Lions Club recently made
its first payment toward a new bariatric
bed at the Good Samaritan Society - Ar-
lington. The new bed will cost a total of
$2,044. The purchase will accommo-
date residents who need a bed that is a
larger size. Left to right: Campus Mar-
keting Director Theresa Bjorklund, In-
terim Administrator Donald Alexander
and Arlington Lions Club member Ray
Farniok. The Good Samaritan Campus
continues to move toward Phase Two
of its renovation project. Seven resi-
dent rooms will be reconfigured in a
way that there will be better utilization
of space with easy access which will
benefit both residents and caregivers.
Non-slip flooring, upgraded bathrooms
and new closet space will be the focus
of this upcoming phase of the renova-
tion project. Good Samaritan continues
to gratefully accept support to raise the
final $45,000 to reach its $201,000 goal.
For more information on this important
project and how people can help, con-
tact Interim Administrator Donald
Alexander or Office Manager Tiffany
Brockhoff at 507-964-2251.
not cover everyone.
Nationally, about two-thirds
of the low-income people eli-
gible for coverage under the
ACA will not be covered be-
cause their states have chosen
not to expand Medicaid.
Minnesota is doing much
better than those states, but
there will still be a couple
hundred thousand Min-
nesotans without coverage,
and many more who have
coverage will not have afford-
able access to some needed
services.
Although the ACA will
close some gaps in our dys-
functional health care system,
gaps will remain, and many
people needing care will fall
into those cracks.
As soon as the ACA is fully
implemented, it is time to turn
our attention to completing
the promise of Medicare for
all. Legislation to enact a pro-
posed Minnesota Health Plan
(MHP), a Medicare-style plan
for everyone is the only solu-
tion to rapidly rising medical
costs.
The MHP would beef up
the coverage that Medicare re-
cipients get — including nurs-
ing home care and many other
needed services — and extend
those same benefits to every-
one, regardless of age. The
Minnesota Health Plan would
cover all Minnesotans for all
of their medical needs.
Yet the MHP would save
money, eliminating the costly
bureaucratic insurance system
and delivering health care di-
rectly. And, in providing
health care to all instead of
health insurance for some, we
would leave medical decision-
making with patients and their
doctors, not subject to govern-
ment or insurance company
interference.
A growing number of Min-
nesota physicians and nurses
are supporting the MHP, be-
cause they are tired of patients
who get inferior treatment
based on insurance company
restrictions.
Two years from now, when
the nation celebrates the 50th
anniversary of Medicare, we
want to be on the verge of
passing the Minnesota Health
Plan. Five decades after
Medicare covered people over
65, it is time for Minnesota to
cover people under age 65 as
well, finally delivering
Medicare for All.
Copyright © John Marty
Marty Continued from page 4
according to the book.
On Sunday, April 30, 1882,
the cornerstone of the new
church was laid, the book
said.
The exterior of the church
was completed by Dec. 1,
1882. “The interior of the
church may have been plas-
tered by that time,” Father
Berger wrote in the book.
The new church measured
44’ X 85’ and had an overall
length of 107 feet, the book
said. The peak of the roof was
50 feet above the ground and
the steeple rose to a height of
160 feet.
“This church was built to
last indefinitely,” Father Berg-
er wrote in the book. “The
walls built of solid brick are
16 inches thick. There were
few buildings in Minnesota of
any type that proved its equal
in size and substance in
1882.”
Father Ryan held Mass in
the new church for the first
time on Dec. 3, 1882, accord-
ing to the book. The first High
Mass was not said in the new
church until Christmas Day.
With the pews in place, the
church had a seating capacity
of 450 people, the book said.
When all the bills were in, the
total cost was found to be be-
tween $20,000 and $25,000.
“Prior to 1882, the Green
Isle parish was listed merely
as the Green Isle Parish, but
when the present church was
built it was placed under the
patronage of St. Brendan,”
Father Berger wrote in the
book.
The new church in Green
Isle was dedicated on June 4,
1883.
St. Brendan’s Continued from page 1
O
n
e
Stop
Shopping
Place an ad for any of our papers:
Arlington Enterprise
Te Sibley Shopper • Te Galaxy
Te McLeod County Chronicle
Te Glencoe Advertiser • Silver Lake Leader
at any one of our three locations:
402 W. Alden St., Arlington
507-964-5547
info@
arlingtonmnnews.com
716 E. 10th St., Glencoe
320-864-5518
advertising@
glencoenews.com
104B Lake Ave., Silver Lake
320-327-2216
slleader@
embarqmail.com
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 3, 2013, page 12, www.arlingtonmnnews.com
ARLINGTON FIRE DEPARTMENT ROSTER: Front Row: Bobbi Zaske, Luke
Geib, John Zaske, Tom Pomplun, Jon Rose, Jim Farber, Jeff Otto. Back
Row: Jeff Tuchtenhagen, Tim Haggenmiller, Spencer Haggenmiller, Cur-
tis Ling, Brent Doetkott, Nick Rauch, Doug Mackenthun, Jen Otto, Grant
Bening. Missing: Chad Carpenter, Corey Carpenter, Keith Dressen, Jere-
my Otto, Tom Pfarr, Josh Plfanz, Jon Piotter, Jason Quast, Rick Schmidt,
Paul Soeffker, Jim Soeffker and Tony Voigt.
GREEN ISLE FIRE DEPARTMENT ROSTER: Eric Anderson, Randal Bruegger, Keith Doetkott, Jeff Ehrich, Dave
Flannery, Dan Graczak, Bill Koch, Dan Kroells, Joe Lemke, Jason Mackenthun, Todd Meeker, Kort Meyer, Nate Ott, Steve
Renneberg, JJ Schauer, John Schauer, Dean Stoeckman, Chad Vos, Scott Vos, Joel Wentzlaff, Adam Wroge, Ryan Wroge.
A & N Radiator Repair
After Burner Auto Body
Arlington Dugout
Arlington Enterprise
Arlington Market
Arlington NAPA
Arlington State Bank
Arneson Law Office
Brau Motors
CMC Construction
Cenex C Store
Chef Craig’s Caterers
CornerStone State Bank
Good Samaritan Society
Arlington Campus
Gustafson Family Dentistry
Haggenmiller Lumber
Hutchinson Co-op (Arlington)
Jerry’s Home Quality Foods
Kick’s Bakery
Kolden Funeral Home
Kreft Cabinets, Inc.
Krentz Construction, LLC
Lensing Insurance
Liberty Station
Local Lawn Enforcement
Mesenbring Construction
Morreim Pharmacy
Dr. H.M. Noack
Pinske Real Estate & Auctioneers
Quick Shop/Subway
R & R Auto Repair
Reetz Floral
Reflections/Stu’s
Seneca Foods
Sibley Medical Center
TSE, a division of Ametek
Thomes Bros.
Tranquility Hair Salon & Tanning
Tuchtenhagen Construction, LLC
UFC/United Xpress
Vos Construction, Inc.
Y-Not Plumbing & Heating Inc.
THIS PAGE SPONSORED BY THESE AREA BUSINESSES:
Room-By-Room Fire Hazard Checklist
1. Living Room
c Open the flue or damper before starting a fire in your fireplace,
every time.
c Keep all flammables at least three feet away from fireplace.
c Place a sturdy fireplace screen in front of the fireplace.
c Have your chimney cleaned and inspected by a professional at
least once a year.
c Keep candles and lamps at least one foot away from your curtains.
c Have an electrician inspect and tighten any loose electrical con-
nections at least once a year.
c Use safety caps to cover all unused outlets.
c Use large, deep ashtrays. Never leave a burning cigarette unat-
tended.
2. Bedroom
c Never use candles in your bedroom.
c Keep all lamps free of flammable materials.
c Don’t run electrical cords under rugs.
c Replace and repair loose or frayed electrical cords.
c Don’t allow permanent use of extension cords.
c Don’t staple or nail electrical cords.
c Never smoke in bed.
c Never leave heavy objects on the bed when an electric blanket is
in use.
c Install a carbon monoxide alarm near bedrooms.
3. Bathroom
c Don’t overload outlets with cords from too many appliances. Plug
them in one at a time.
c If an outlet or switch feels unusually warm, stop using it and call
an electrician.
c Never set hot appliances on flammable materials.
c Unplug all appliances when done using them.
c Make sure cords from appliances are not getting pinched in draw-
ers.
c Keep towels and other flammable at least three feet away from
space heaters.
4. Hallway
c Install ceiling-mounted smoke alarms that are at least four inches
away from the walls on every level of your home.
c Ensure smoke alarms ar UL listed.
cWall-mounted smoke alarms should be installed four to 12 inches
away from the ceiling.
c Don’t install smoke alarms near windows, doors or ducts.
cTest your smoke alarms once a month.
cVacuum your smoke alarms every six months.
c Change your smoke alarm batteries at least once a year. Make sure
batteries are always in smoke alarms.
5. Kitchen
c If you have a fire extinguisher, be sure you are properly trained to
use it.
c Make sure the fire extinguisher is for multipurpose use.
c Keep the fire extinguisher in a place where it is easy to access.
c Never leave anything on the stove or under the broiler unattended.
c Keep the cooking area clear of items that can burn.
c Maintain a three-foot kid-free and pet-free zone around the stove.
cAvoid wearing loose-fitting clothing while you are cooking.
6. Basement
c Have your heating system serviced once a year before cold weath-
er begins.
cWhen buying a new unit, have a qualified technician install it or
check that it was installed properly.
c Choose a heating device with an automatic shutoff feature.
c Make sure your clothes dryer is installed and serviced by a profes-
sional.
c Have a gas-powered dryer inspected by a professional at least
once a year to check flexible gas lines for damage and proper
connection, and to ensure all piping is free of leaks.
c Keep areas around heating sources clear of debris and insulated
from the heating source.
c Be sure to clean the lint tray in your dryer before each use and
check around the drum for any accumulated lint.
c Have a professional clean the inside of your dryer every one to
three years.
c Do not sotre clothing or other combustibles any closer than one
foot from the dryer.
c Do not let your dryer continue running when you leave your
home.
October 6–12 October 6–12
T
H
A
N
K
Y
O
U
A
R
EA
FIR
EFIG
H
TER
S!
This document is © 2013 by admin - all rights reserved.