10-31-13 Arlington Enterprise

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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Serving the Communities of Arlington and Green Isle, Minnesota
www.arlingtonmnnews.com Volume 130 • Number 17 • Thursday, October 31, 2013 • Arlington, MN 55307
Single copy $1.00
By Karin Ramige Cornwell
Manager
The results are in and Sib-
ley East did not meet the Ad-
equate Yearly Progress (AYP)
in the MCA math testing.
Sibley East’s Testing Coor-
dinator Lynn O’Brien pre-
sented the 2013 Minnesota
Comprehensive Assessments
(MCA) results to the school
board at its regular meeting
on Monday, Oct. 21.
Students in grades 3-8 and
grade 11 are tested.
The state average for profi-
ciency in math for all stu-
dents is 62.6 percent. Sibley
East came in at 48.2 percent.
Grades 7 and 8 were partic-
ularly low at 31.6 and 34.9
percents respectively.
Junior High Principal Steve
Harter said there wasn’t a
new math curriculum in the
junior high. He added a num-
ber of factors may have con-
tributed to the decrease in
scores, including online math
testing and teachers being on
leave during the review peri-
od.
The math tests have been
taken online for the last cou-
ple of years, but other years
students were given up to
three opportunities to pass the
test.
This was the first year the
students only had one oppor-
tunity to take the test.
Both the elementary and
junior high have an added
focus on math this year in
preparation for the next test.
The district did meet AYP
in Science and Reading.
Overall Sibley East is 49.4
percent proficient in Science
compared to the 52.1 percent
state average. Students in
grades 5, 8 and 11 were tested
in Science.
There was a new reading
test given this year and slight-
ly lower scores were expect-
ed.
Sibley East’s overall read-
ing results show the district
51.7 percent proficient com-
pared to the 57.8 percent state
average.
In other actions the board:
• Approved October 2013
bills and payments of
$1,177,288.29.
• Approved a resolution
supporting Minnesota State
High School League Founda-
tion and the Sibley East
School District making an ap-
plication for a Form A Grant
to offset student activity fees.
Approved the recommen-
dation to seek an independent
appraisal of the Gaylord land
parcel that the Minnesota De-
partment of Transportation is
seeking to obtain for the
Highway 22 project.
The district was given an
appraised value from the
state, but can seek an inde-
pendent appraisal.
The district will be reim-
bursed for the cost of the in-
dependent appraisal and the
state will honor the appraised
value given should the inde-
pendent appraisal come in
lower.
It’s a “win/win” situation,
according to Superintendent
Jim Amsden.
• Approved a one-time
$60,000 transfer from the
general fund to off-set a nega-
tive fund balance in the com-
munity Education and ECFE
Reserved Funds.
• Accepted donations, with
great appreciation, of $1,000
from the Arlington Lions
Club and $500 from the
Wolverine Basketball Club
for the marching band.
• Approved a recommenda-
tion to reschedule the No-
vember regular school board
meeting to Tuesday, Nov. 19
due to the American Educa-
tion Banquet scheduled on
Monday, Nov. 18.
Sibley East MCA math scores don’t make the grade
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Green Isle City Coun-
cil, during its regular meeting
on Tuesday night, Oct 22,
voted 4-0 and approved a mo-
tion to accept the bid of
$6,000 per lot or $258,000
from William Feldman and
Norm Beckman for the 43 va-
cant lots in the community.
A few of the lots are locat-
ed in the Green Isle Third Ad-
dition and Green Isle Fifth
Addition. Most of the lots are
located in the Green Isle
Sixth Addition and Green Isle
Seventh Addition, according
to the Sibley County Audi-
tor’s Office.
Mayor Dale ZumBerge and
City Council members Todd
Burg, Shawn Harms and
Mark Wentzlaff all voted in
favor of the motion.
City Council member Brian
Oelfke had a prior commit-
ment and was unable to at-
tend the meeting.
The Green Isle Economic
Development Authority
(EDA), which opened the
bids during a closed meeting
on Monday night, Oct. 21,
unanimously approved a mo-
tion and made a recommen-
dation for the Green Isle City
Council to reject all bids in
connection with the 43 vacant
lots.
One bid of $5,500 per lot
was received for all 43 vacant
lots from Feldman and Beck-
man.
Kathleen M. Tracy submit-
ted a pair of bids on behalf of
Ann Tracy Lopez. The first
bid of $2,001 was for Lot 9 in
Henry Circle. The second bid
of $2,001 apiece was re-
ceived for Lot 7 and Lot 8 in
Henry Circle.
EDA members John Foley,
Janie Glover, Mary Ott, Bert
Panning, Randal Bruegger
and Mark Wentzlaff all voted
in favor of the motion. Brian
Oelkfe had a prior commit-
ment and was unable to at-
tend the meeting. Dale Zum-
Berge is an ex-officio mem-
ber on the EDA.
The bidders were later con-
tacted and informed that the
Green Isle EDA had passed a
recommendation for the
Green Isle City Council to re-
ject all bids.
Feldman and Beckman,
earlier on Tuesday morning,
Oct. 22, had re-submitted a
bid of $6,000 per lot for the
43 vacant lots.
The Green Isle City Coun-
cil and Green Isle EDA re-
viewed and discussed the re-
submitted bid during a closed
meeting at 6 p.m. Tuesday,
Oct. 22
The Green Isle EDA, at
that same closed meeting,
unanimously approved a mo-
tion and made a recommen-
dation for the Green Isle City
Council to accept the bid of
$6,000 per lot for the 43 va-
cant lots.
Green Isle
Continued on page 3
Green Isle lots are sold to the highest bidder
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
After learning Sibley
County will receive a low 1.1
percent increase in County
Program Aid (CPA) payments
from the state, commissioners
are doing more than just com-
plaining about it.
First, the board directed
County Administrator Matt
Jaunich to contact the state to
learn why the aid is quite less
when compared to surround-
ing counties, such as Red-
wood getting a 30 percent in-
crease, Nicollet 22. 5,
McLeod 20.1 and Renville
19.8.
Of greatest concern is the
drastic cut in Tax-Base
Equalization Aid (TBEA) the
county is expected to experi-
ence next year. Yet, Jaunich
said Mark Dayton and the
State Legislature are touting
the increase in County Pro-
gram Aid, noting that proper-
ty taxes will be going down
because of the increase.
Sibley County is struggling
with the fact it will not be
getting this increase and
added benefit. Plus, this con-
tinues a downward trend in
aid. Sibley County’s aid is
less than it was in 2010 even
with the increase this year.
What Jaunich learned from
the state made commissioners
more unhappy and committed
to doing something about it.
Jaunich was directed to write
a letter on behalf of commis-
sioners to State Senator Scott
Newman and State Represen-
tative Glenn Gruenhagen. He
presented a draft to the board
at the Oct. 22 meeting.
“The letter is excellent,”
said County Commissioner
Bill Pinske. “However, this is
the law and now somebody
Sibley County
Continued on page 3
County does more than complain about state aid funding
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Star Witness
The Sibley East Senior High School will present “Star
Witness” during non-dinner theater performances in
the large gym at the Arlington school site at 7 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 9 and 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 10. Students
rehearsed a scene from the play on Monday after-
noon, Oct. 28. Left to right: Steven Roth, Kelsi Sick-
mann, Melanie Rovinsky and Emily Somerville. The
rest of the cast and crew includes Brandon Raghu,
Samantha Raghu, Lena Burgess, Elizabeth Zuniga,
Bailey Hoechst, Jennifer Rovinsky, Katelyn Quast,
Jean Sickmann, Caitlin Schmidt, Kirsten Campbell
and Ben Steinborn. The co-directors are Shannon
Hruska and Daren Dressler.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Sibley East Superin-
tendent Jim Amsden re-
cently met with the three
mayors in the school dis-
trict to discuss the vision
of the Sibley East Public
Schools.
Amsden had lunch with
Arlington Mayor Jim
Kreft, Green Isle Mayor
Dale ZumBerge and Gay-
lord Mayor Don Boeder
on Homecoming Friday.
The mayors later attended
a pepfest and rode with
Amsden on a float in the
Homecoming Parade.
Amsden said the pur-
pose of the meeting was to
begin the conversation and
seek input on the vision of
the Sibley East Public
Schools since one school
district is shared by three
communities.
What is your vision of
what the school district
could and should look like
in the next 10 to 15 years?
That was the main ques-
tion asked to the mayors
during the meeting, ac-
cording to Asmden.
The three mayors were
later asked to bring one or
two additional city leaders
to a meeting on Thursday,
Oct. 24.
All of these people have
now been asked to bring
one or two more leaders to
the next meeting at 6:30
p.m. Thursday, Nov. 14.
School Board Chairperson
Brian Brandt is the Sibley
East representative on the
committee.
Amsden will act only as
the facilitator at these
meetings and provide any
information and resources
requested by the group.
The goal, according to
Amsden, is to grow the
group and have a commu-
nity driven committee
which develops a vision
for the Sibley East Public
Schools and how they can
best serve the three com-
munities and all residents
in the school district. He
did not place a timetable
on the process.
The conversation on the
vision of Sibley East Pub-
lic Schools will be open to
all aspects of education,
but will probably focus on
the aging facilities at the
campuses in Arlington and
Gaylord.
Amsden said Sibley
East will continue to make
repairs on the current fa-
cilities in an effort to pro-
vide the best learning en-
vironment possible for the
students.
In addition, Amsden
said it is very important
for the group to discuss
possible ways for the com-
munities to connect and
partner with the school.
One example is for the
Sibley East Public Schools
and the three communities
to form a partnership with
community recreation and
community education.
Furthermore, Amsden
said it is very important
for the Sibley East Public
Schools to become more
accessible to people in the
three communities and
rural areas.
“The two schools are
truly the one thing that all
people in the school dis-
trict have in common,”
Amsden said.
Interested people who
would like to serve on the
committee or have any
questions are strongly en-
couraged to contact Ams-
den at 507-964-824 or
j a m s d e n @s i b l e y -
east.k12.mn.us. Interested
people can also stop by
and visit Amsden in his
office in Arlington.
Superintendent meets with
mayors to talk about the
vision at SE Public Schools
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 31, 2013, page 2
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Questions
about Health Care?
Maybe I can help!
Call
507-358-0864
or stop by
405 West
Main Street
Arlington
*
3
9
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4
3
E
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0
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4
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S
a
Resource Booths
PubIic HeaIth & Human Services
Veterans Services
(1-888-LINK-VET)
MN VaIIey Action CounciI
U of M Extension
TraiIbIazer Transit
MN River Area Agency on Aging
SaIvation Army
SibIey County Food SheIf
Free Rides!
Reserve your FREE
ride by Nov. 1st to
this event!
Call 507-237-4000
PIan to Attend the
FaII FaII CARE Event
C CC County A AA Area R RR Resources for E EE Everyone
Wednesday, November 6, 2013
2:00 p.m. & 6:00 p.m.
ArIington Community Center
204 Shamrock Drive
What's New in Medicare for 2014
Robin Thompson,
Senior Outreach Specialist with
MN River Area Agency on Aging
—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-
State SoIdier Assistance Programs
MN Department of Veterans Representative
Free ViaI
of Life
P
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iz
e
s
!
R
e
fre
s
h
m
e
n
ts
S
p
o
n
s
o
re
d
b
y
L
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g
's
M
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a
t
M
a
r
k
e
t No SoIicitation
51-3 A41-43E42-43Sa
Saturday,
Nov. 2
11 a.m.-1 p.m.
ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
814 W. Brooks St., Arlington, MN
GERMAN LUNCHEON
Pre-Sale Adults:
$
7.50 (at door
$
8.50); Children 6-10:
$
4
Dessert/Pie & Beverage:
$
3.50
MUSIC, BAKE SALE, LEFSE, GIFTS GALORE AND MORE!
Pre-Sale tickets available at: Morreim’s and Arlington State Bank.
*
4
2
-
4
3
S
E
a
Marktplatz
Zion’s
952-934-1525 800-362-3515
Extended through
February 22!
Back for the first time
in 20 years!
Relive the
Tradition!
C H A N H A S S E N D T . C O M
R
4
2
-
5
1
C
L
E
,4
3
-
4
2
A
a
Trick or Treat
so People Can Eat!
Seventh Day Adventist will
be gathering non-perishable
cans & food items
Thursday
Evening, Oct. 31
We will be stopping at
homes West of the railroad
tracks in Arlington.
Thank You!
*42-43Ea
7
th
Annual
Friday, Nov. 8
th
, 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Arlington Community Center
$
15.00 Advance Sale ONLY
(No tickets will be sold at door)
Available at Arlington Liquors, from any
Lions members, or by calling 507-964-2992.
Proceeds will be used to fund the Arlington/Green Isle
Meals on Wheels Program.
Must be 21 years old to purchase a ticket.
Arlington Lions
in partnership with
Arlington Liquors
A
4
2
-
4
3
S
,4
3
E
a
Wine & Beer Tasting Event
O
nly 300
tickets will
be sold
St. Mary’s CCW
TURKEY DINNER
St. Mary’s Church, Arlington
Sunday, November 10, 2013
10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Menu: Roast turkey, stuffing, gravy, mashed
potatoes, green beans, coleslaw, cranberry sauce,
dinner roll, pies and desserts, and beverages.
Tickets:
$
9.00 adults
$
4.00 children (ages 4 to 10)
Free for children ages 3 and under
Proceeds go to St. Mary’s Council of Catholic Women,
CCW Kitchen Fund and local special needs.
*43-44E44-45Sa
Take-Outs
Available
Friday, November 1: Arlington Veteran’s Steak
Fry, veteran’s building at fairgrounds, 5:30-7:30
p.m.
American Red Cross Blood Drive, Sibley Medical
Center, 8 a.m.-2 p.m.
Monday, November 4: Arlington City Council,
council chambers, 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, November 5: Arlington Garden Club,
7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, November 6: Knights of Columbus
officers, St. Mary’s Parish Hall, 8 p.m.
Thursday, November 7: Arlington Ambulance
Service, 7 p.m.
Arlington Lions Club, Arlington Haus, social 6
p.m., meeting 7 p.m.
Community
Calendar
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER
MAIN BANK
Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (straight thru)
DRIVE THRU
Monday - Thursday, 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.,
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Member
FDIC
Arlington State Bank
(507) 964-2256
Fax (507) 964-5550
www.ArlingtonStateBank.com
News Briefs
Accident northeast of Gaylord
A one-vehicle accident without injuries reportedly oc-
curred along 445th Avenue about three miles northeast
of Gaylord at 9:40 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24, according to
the Sibley County Sheriff’s Department.
Logan M. Jorgenson, 16, Green Isle, was driving a
1998 Saturn SC2 northbound on 445th Avenue and en-
tered a curve going east, according to the report. After
completing the curve, Jorgenson reportedly lost control
of the vehicle. The vehicle entered the north ditch and
rolled on its right side.
Jorgenson was not injured, according to the report.
The passengers, who were also not injured, were identi-
fied as Zachary D. Utendorfer, 15, Arlington, and Syd-
ney A. Busch, 15, Green Isle. All individuals were
wearing their seatbelts.
Alcohol was not a factor in this incident, according to
the report. The vehicle sustained moderate damage.
Vandalism in cemetery
An individual or individuals reportedly snapped a
branch on a tree located in the Arlington Public Ceme-
tery, according to the Arlington Police Department.
The incident was reported to authorities on Tuesday,
Oct. 22.
Updating current veterans list
The Arlington Enterprise newspaper is once again
updating its list of living veterans from the Arlington
and Green Isle area.
The newspaper, for the 12th consecutive year, will
publish a list of living veterans from the Arlington and
Green Isle area during the week of Veterans Day in No-
vember.
Living veterans who were not included on last year’s
list are encouraged to contact the Arlington Enterprise
at 507-964-5547 or kurtm@arlingtonmnnews.com. Liv-
ing veterans who were included on last year’s list do not
need to call.
Daylight saving time ends
It’s that time of year again. Daylight saving time will
end Sunday, Nov. 3.
Standard time officially begins at 2 a.m. Sunday.
Everyone should turn their clocks back one hour before
going to bed on Saturday night.
Submitted Photo
55th Class Reunion
The Arlington-Green Isle High School Class of 1958
held its reunion at the Island View Country Club in
Waconia on Saturday, Oct. 12. There were 54 students
in the class. Twelve are deceased. Twenty-five mem-
bers attended the reunion. Front Row: (left to right) Jo
Ann (Biermann) Schwartz, Janice (Grack) Eggers-
gluess, Don Trocke, Marion (Zumberge) Mackenthun,
Karen (Burke) Glieden, Beth (Griep) Litfin, Mary Ann
(Michaletz) Bauer and Virgil Oelfke. Middle Row: (l to
r) David Schulz, George Ewing, Sally (Schuetz)
Koester, Karen(Kamps) Trocke, Grace (Woehler)
Brinkmann, Gloria (Exsted) Sommers, Michael Brazil
and Leonard Lange. Back Row: (l to r) David Renneke,
Byron Bandelin, Richard Timm, Warren Kamps, Glen
Willmsen, Curt Renneke, Richard Harjes, Ronald Som-
mers and Allen Mueller.
The Belle Plaine City
Council recently interviewed
the three finalists for its city
administrator position, which
has been filled on an interim
basis by Finance Director
Dawn Meyer since Aug. 19
when David Murphy was re-
lieved of his duties, according
to an article in the Belle
Plaine Herald.
The three finalists are Jere-
my Barnhart, deputy director
of community operations and
development at the City of
Elk River; Jennifer Bausman
Schultz, procurement manag-
er at Scott County; and Kevin
McCann, city administrator at
the City of Gaylord.
The City Council will hold
a personnel committee meet-
ing during which it could take
action on hiring one of the
three finalists.
The city had 17 applicants
for the position, six of whom
were interviewed earlier this
month before the list of final-
ists was narrowed to three.
Gaylord city administrator interviews for Belle Plaine job
Call us to
place your
HAPPY ad.
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
964-5547
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 31, 2013, page 3
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Business & Professional
Directory
CALL TODAY TO BE INCLUDED IN OUR
BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY!
507-964-5547
Arlington
Chiropractic Clinic
JUSTIN E. DAVIS, D.C.
607 W. Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-2850
arlingtonchiropracticmn.com
Office Hours:
Mon. 9am-6pm; Tues. 9am-5pm;
Wed. 8am-6pm; Thurs. 1-6pm;
Fri. 8am-4pm; 1
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& 3
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Sat. 8am-11am
VETERINARIAN
RG OVREBO DVM LLC
Large Animal
Veterinary Services
Ultrasound repro, Surgical,
Medical and Nutrition
Small Animal House Call
by Appointment
Medical, Vaccination Services
and Surgical Referral
Dr. Robert G. Ovrebo
Office 507-964-2682
Cell 507-995-0507
Miller
Law Office
RAPHAEL J. MILLER
Attorney at Law
332 Sibley Avenue, Gaylord, MN 55334
Tel. (507) 237-2954
Wills - Family Law
Taxes - Estate Planning
General Law Practice & Trials
Free consultation on personal injury claims
MESENBRING
CONSTRUCTION
(507) 964-2864
“Your local home builder and
remodeler for over 38 years”
Member: MN River Builders Assn.
MN License #4806
ROSS R. ARNESON
ATTORNEY AT LAW
302 West Main
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-5753
Real Estate, Estate Planning,
Probate and Business Law
Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Saturdays by Appointment
Farm – Residential
Commercial
Licensed - Bonded - Insured
• 24-Hour Emergency
Service
• Free Estimates
Tyler Kranz, Owner
507-964-2525
Klehr Grading
&
Excavating, Inc.
JEFF & WENDY KLEHR
Dozer, Grader, Basements,
Septic Systems, Driveways, Backhoe Work,
Hauling Gravel/Rock/Sand, Skidloader
Jeff cell: 612-756-0595
Wendy cell: 612-756-0594
640 E. BROOKS ST., ARLINGTON, MN 55307
1-507-964-5783 • FAX: 507-964-5302
Local LAWN
Enforcement
Arlington, MN
Licensed and Insured
Mowing, fertilizing and
weed control, dethatching,
garden tilling, core aeration
www.locallawnenforcement.com
Adam and David Hansen
Adam cell: 507-327-0917
507-964-5835
• 5” Seamless Gutters
• 6” Seamless Gutters
• K-Guard Leaf-Free
Gutter System
(lifetime clog free guarantee)
PHIL GOETTL
612-655-1379
888-864-5979
www.mngutter.com
M
2
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C
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A
j
Gustafson
Family Dentistry
Dr. John D. Gustafson, D.D.S
Dr. Jared Gustafson, D.D.S
COMPREHENSIVE CARE
FOR ALL AGES
Office Hours: Monday–Friday
New Patients Welcome
Dr. Jason Anderson, D.D.S
Orthodontists
106 3
rd
Ave. NW,
Arlington
507-964-2705
M
2
4
tfn
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BODY REPAIR
See us for factory-trained
body repair work on
your vehicle.
• Free Estimates • Glass Replacement
• Collision Repair • Rust Repair
WINDSHIELD
REPLACEMENT
We install windshields
for all vehicles
We will contact the insurance company
for you and do all paperwork. See us
for professional glass installation.
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www.braumotors.com
Local
507-964-5539
Toll Free
800-664-2728
Buesgens
Septic Services
Septic Pumping/Pump Repair
& Portable Restrooms
507-665-3732
or 952-873-2208
Call Shane
A14El
Liberty
Station
Corner of Hwy. 5 & Chandler
Arlington, MN
507-964-5177 or
Toll-Free 866-752-9567
www.LibertyStationAutoSales.com
Jim
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Affordable Used Cars
BRAZIL
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36833 200
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Tires, Air Conditioning
& Maintenance
507-326-5751
MONDAY-FRIDAY 8-5
BEN BRAZIL,
Owner/Technician
brazilautomotive@gmail.com
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Here’s your chance to share your favorite holiday
recipe and have a chance to win Chanhassen Dinner
Theatre tickets! Simply type or print your favorite
recipe on the recipe form below, or attach your own
and mail it to our office. You can also enter your
recipe(s) online or email them. We will draw entries
from both our Arlington and Glencoe offices for FREE Chanhassen
Dinner Theatre tickets for you and a special someone to enjoy
dinner and a show. Winners will be published in the Nov. 24, 2013,
Holiday Gift Guide Supplement. Two winners will be selected in a
random drawing, one from each paper. Entries can only win once.
Deadline to receive entries is Nov. 4, 2013.
2013 Sibley Shopper Recipe Submission
Holiday Favorites
Recipe Contest
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Help From Man’s Best Friend
By Kurt Menk
Editor
An 8-year-old Pine City
girl was killed in a rollover
accident along Highway 169
near Belle Plaine at 2 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 27, according to
the Minnesota State Patrol.
A Honda Civic driven by
Timothy Adams, 48, Manka-
to, was traveling northbound
on Highway 169 when the
vehicle was rear-ended by a
2008 Ford Super Duty pickup
truck which was pulling a
horse trailer and slowing
down, according to the re-
port. Walter Grewe, 62,
Brooklyn Park, who was
driving the truck, reportedly
lost control of the vehicle.
The truck rolled into the ditch
and the trailer landed on top
of it.
His passenger and grand-
daughter, Laura Maloney, 8,
Pine City was pronounced
dead at the scene, according
to the report. Grewe and his
daughter, Erin Maloney, 35,
Pine City, both suffered non-
life threatening injuries. Any
possible injuries to Adams
were not documented.
The Scott County Sheriff’s
Department and Belle Plaine
Police Department assisted at
the scene.
Young girl is killed in crash near
Belle Plaine on Sunday afternoon
Motorists traveling east of
Green Isle will continue to
encounter delays and a detour
as both directions of High-
way 25 remain closed, ac-
cording to the Minnesota De-
partment of Transportation
(Mn/DOT).
Motorists should follow the
signed detour using Highway
5/25, Carver County Road 50
and Carver County Road
31/Sibley County Road 16 to
bypass the closure. The clo-
sure is necessary as crews re-
place the culvert beneath the
roadway at 335th Avenue.
All lanes are scheduled to
re-open by Thursday, Nov.
14.
For real-time travel infor-
mation anywhere in Minneso-
ta visit www.511mn.org.
Highway 25 closure near G.I. extended to Nov. 14
The City Council did just
that during its regular meeting
which followed at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 22.
The $6,000 per lot or
$258,000 will be set aside and
used to pay down the approxi-
mately $660,000 remaining in
special assessments on the 43
vacant lots.
The City of Green Isle orig-
inally bonded for the develop-
ment of the seven additions.
The special assessments were
to be used to make the bond
payments.
Although the Green Isle
City Council knew the city
would take a loss on the sale
of any lot, city officials be-
lieve it is more important to
get the properties back on the
tax rolls rather than have the
city own them.
Green Isle Continued from page 1
may have to go to lobby to get
this changed. It is obviously
blatantly wrong.”
Jaunich said much has
changed since the County
Program Aid law was set 10
years ago. He added that larg-
er counties sustaining growth
are benefiting while smaller
ones are falling off.
In the letter to Newman and
Gruenhagen, Jaunich pointed
out that in Sibley County CPA
is broken down into two fac-
tors. One is the Need Aid and
the other is the Tax-Base
Equalization Aid.
“While our Need Aid is ex-
pected to increase by $41,748
(25 percent) in 2014, our
TBEA is expected to decrease
by $37,716 (19 percent),” said
Jaunich in the letter. “This is a
total net increase in CPA to
Sibley County of $4,032 (1
percent). Our neighboring
counties are expected to see
total CPA increase in the
range of 13-32 percent.”
Jaunich added that Sibley
County does not believe this
is the end of its decrease in
TBEA, and as history shows,
“We believe we will be added
to the list of counties that no
longer receive this aid if
something is not done to
change the formula.”
According to the Depart-
ment of Revenue, since 2005
there has been an upward
trend in the number of coun-
ties ineligible for TBEA,
dropping from 86 to 71. The
letter added, “This decrease is
somewhat concerning to us as
a county, especially since
TBEA monies were increased
by $20 million from 2013 to
2014 by the legislature.”
Sibley County believes it is
inadvertently being punished
when it comes to CPA, and in
particular TBEA, because it is
a county that is heavily de-
pendent on the tax base of its
agricultural land. Look no fur-
ther than Renville and Red-
wood County who no longer
receive TBEA.
“The Department of Rev-
enue has verified this stating
that for many of the ineligible
counties agricultural land
makes up a significant per-
centage of the total tax base,”
noted the letter, which added,
“some do benefit more than
others.”
The reasons for this are not
widely understood, according
to the letter, in part because of
the complexity of the formula,
but also because the legisla-
ture has frequently altered the
program.
“The Sibley County Board
of Commissioners is simply
asking that our local legisla-
ture take a look at the formula
to determine County Program
Aid,” said Jaunich in the let-
ter. “We believe the current
formula is conducive to bene-
fiting larger counties with a
more diverse economy. Like-
wise, we believe the current
formula is detrimental to the
smaller counties and those
who are highly dependent on
their agricultural community.”
The Sibley County Board of
Commissioners will hold its
next regular meeting in Gay-
lord at 9 a.m. Tuesday, Nov.
12.
Arlington resident Dan St. John re-
ceived help from his black lab, Grace,
while making a trip out to the local
compost site on Sunday afternoon, Oct.
27. The compost site was a popular
place as many people took advantage
of the pleasant weather and worked on
their yards.
Sibley County Continued from page 1
W W W . A R L I N G TO N M N N E W S . C O M
24” x 36”
Photo Posters
$ .00
+ tax
Call 507-964-
5547
for details!
Arlington Enterprise
Sibley Shopper
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 31, 2013, page 4
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Staff
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Pub-
lishers; Kurt Menk, Editor; Karin
Rami ge, Manager; Marvi n
Bulau, Production Manager;
Barb Mathwig, Office; Ashley
Reetz, Sales; and Jean Olson,
Proof Reading.
Letters
This page is devoted to opin-
ions and commentary. Articles
appearing on this page are the
opinions of the writer. Views ex-
pressed here are not necessarily
those of the Arlington Enter-
prise, unless so designated. The
Arlington Enterprise strongly
encourages others to express
opinions on this page.
Letters from our readers are
strongly encouraged. Letters for
publ i cati on must bear the
writer’s signature and address.
The Arlington Enterprise re-
serves the right to edit letters
for purpose of clarity and space.
Ethics
The editorial staff of the Arling-
ton Enterprise strives to present
the news in a fair and accurate
manner. We appreciate errors
being brought to our attention.
Pl ease bri ng any gri evances
against the Arlington Enterprise to
the attention of the editor. Should
differences continue, readers are
encouraged to take their griev-
ances to the Mi nnesota News
Council, an organization dedicated
to protecti ng the publ i c from
press inaccuracy and unfairness.
The News Council can be contact-
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940, Minneapolis, MN 55402, or
(612) 341-9357.
Press Freedom
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ment to the U.S. Constitution:
“Congress shall make no law
respecting an establishment of
religion, or prohibiting the free
exercise thereof; or abridging
the freedom of speech, or the
press…”
Ben Frankl i n wrote i n the
Pennsylvania Gazette in 1731:
“If printers were determined not
to print anything till they were
sure it would offend nobody
there would be very little print-
ed.”
Deadline for the Arlington
Enterprise news is 4 p.m., Mon-
day, and advertising is noon,
Tuesday. Deadl i ne for The
Gal axy adverti si ng i s noon
Wednesday.
Established in 1884.
Postmaster send address changes to:
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Phone 507-964-5547 FAX 507-964-2423.
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Entered as Periodicals postal matter at Arlington,
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Arlington ENTERPRISE
Sibley East should
consider broadcasting
meetings on cable TV
Our View: Broadcasting meetings is another
forum to connect with parents and taxpayers
Opinions
Guest Column
The Sibley East Public Schools have always used a number of
measures to connect with parents and taxpayers in the school dis-
trict. The most recent and successful measure has been the month-
ly column written by first-year Superintendent Jim Amsden.
However, one instrument that Sibley East has never seriously
considered is the taping and later broadcasting of its School Board
meetings on the local cable channel. Sibley East definitely has the
technology in place since it already tapes graduation ceremonies,
special events and athletic games/meets on a regular basis.
Although this newspaper has faithfully covered the meetings
every month for years, the taping and later broadcasting of each
meeting would provide an extra dimension to all parents and tax-
payers.
Newspapers are unable to print every comment from each
School Board member at all meetings. The broadcast, on the other
hand, would show every comment made during a meeting.
In addition, it would provide school officials and taxpayers with
a tool to go back and verify comments made and information pre-
sented at meetings.
Most importantly, however, is the taping and broadcasting would
bring the School Board meetings into the homes of not all, but
many families in the school district. Tapes could also be made
available at a nominal fee to taxpayers who do not have access to
cable TV. It would be another forum by which Sibley East could
further educate parents and taxpayers on various subjects and even
include its own sales pitch at the same time. It is a win-win situa-
tion for everyone.
Most cities, schools and counties in the area have been either
audio recording or visual taping and later broadcasting their meet-
ings for years. Sibley East, in fact, might be the last governmental
unit in the area that does not record or tape its meetings.
The suggestion is worthy of a serious discussion at a future
School Board meeting. The perfect time to implement this idea
would be at the annual organizational meeting in early January.
-K.M.
Too Tall’s Tidbits
Happy Birthday and Happy An-
niversary to the following local and
area residents compliments of the
Arlington Lions Club Community
Calendar.
November 1
In Memory Of David Maki, Allison
Utendorfer, Ben Jaszewski, John So-
biech, Miranda Matz and Stacia Re-
vier-Jasken.
November 2
Don Seeman, Elle Gustafson,
Patrick Cadell, Susan Brueggemeier,
Theresa Trocke, and Mr. and Mrs.
Scott Sorenson.
November 3
Gary Hultgren, Joan Kolander, Roy
Nordhausen, and Mr. and Mrs. Allie
Weber.
November 4
Carol Oelfke, Courtney Hildebrandt,
Izabelle Rischmiller, Kelly Scharp-
ing, Kyle Goetsch, Margo Otto and
Sarah Schuetz.
November 5
Alexia Vos, Jackie Lieske, Len Vos,
Melba Meffert, Nate Hardel, Peter
Noone, Stella Meyers, Mr. and Mrs.
Matt Conway, and Mr. and Mrs.
Peter Noone.
November 6
Brad Ziegler, Caleb Scharpe, Jordan
Thomes, Norm Roehler, Rhonda
Matz, Trenton Bratsch, Mr. and Mrs.
Jay Kreger, and Mr. and Mrs. Pat
Liebl.
November 7
Amelia Overson and Jesse Broin.
*****
A gorgeous young redhead went
into the doctor’s office and said that
her body hurt wherever she touched
it.
“Impossible!” said the doctor.
“Show me.”
The redhead took her finger,
pushed on her left shoulder and
screamed, then she pushed her
elbow and screamed even more. She
pushed her knee and screamed.
Likewise she pushed her ankle and
screamed. Everywhere she touched
made her scream.
The doctor said, “You’re not really
a redhead, are you?
“Well, no” she said, “I’m actually
a blonde.”
“I thought so,” the doctor said.
“Your finger is broken.”
*****
A duck walks into a bar and asks
the bartender if he has any grapes.
The bartender says, “no” and the
duck leaves.
The next day the duck walks into
the bar and asks the bartender if he
has any grapes. The bartender says,
“No!”
The third day the duck walks into
the bar and asks the same question.
The bartender says, “Listen! I did-
n’t have any grapes yesterday. I
don’t have any today, and I won’t
have any tomorrow. If you come in
here again and ask the same ques-
tion, I’ll nail your feet to the bar!”
The next day, the duck walks into
the bar and asks, “Do you have any
nails?”
The bartender says, “No.”
The duck asks, “Do you have
any grapes?”
*****
After waiting two hours for her
date, Sarah concluded she’d been
stood up. So she changed into paja-
mas, made some popcorn, and
flopped down in front of the TV.
Then the doorbell rang—it was
her date. He took one look at
Sarah and gasped. “You’re still
not ready?”
*****
A farmer in the country has a wa-
termelon patch and upon inspection
he discovers that some of the local
kids have been helping themselves
to a feast.
The farmer thinks of ways to dis-
courage this profit-eating situation.
So he puts up a sign that reads:
"Warning! One of these watermelons
contains cyanide!”
He smiled smugly as he watched
the kids run off the next night with-
out eating any of his melons.
The farmer returns to the water-
melon patch a week later to dis-
cover that none of the watermel-
ons have been eaten, but finds an-
other sign that reads: “Now there
are two!”
*****
By Amy Klobuchar
U.S. Senator
For Duluth resident Peggy Hies-
tand-Harri, it all started when her
mother received repeated phone
calls promising a Mercedes Benz
that would be shipped to her if she
would first wire money to Jamaica.
Over time these criminals were able
to learn more about her mother’s as-
sets and convinced her to max out
multiple credit cards.
In the end, Peggy’s mother was
robbed of $47,000 and left with little
chance to bring these crooks to jus-
tice or get her money back.
Unfortunately, we are seeing these
types of crimes happen all too often.
In fact, statistics show that roughly
one in five seniors have already
been victims of fraud or financial
abuse. These crimes harm seniors
and cost them billions of dollars
each year. According to a MetLife
Study on Financial Elder Abuse, in
just three years annual losses from
elder financial fraud increased 12
percent to nearly $3 billion in 2010.
Minnesota will soon see a “silver
tsunami” as our population contin-
ues to age. By 2020, there will be
more Minnesotans over 65 than chil-
dren in public schools, and by 2035,
Minnesota’s population over age 65
will more than double, as will our
population 85 and older. If we don’t
take action, these scams will only
continue to increase.
That’s why I recently introduced
legislation with Republican Senator
Susan Collins of Maine to crack
down on fraud targeting seniors. The
Senior Fraud Protection Act would
provide seniors the tools they need
to identify and avoid scams before
it’s too late, and it would streamline
our system to ensure complaints are
handled effectively and given to the
appropriate law enforcement agency
so that quick action can be taken to
bring criminals to justice.
My bill would also increase coor-
dination between the agencies
charged with protecting consumers
and law enforcement. It requires the
Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to
monitor the market and identify
fraud schemes targeting seniors.
This information would be used by
the FTC to work with agencies like
the FBI and the Consumer Financial
Protection Bureau to make certain
scammers don’t succeed in stealing
our seniors’ hard-earned savings.
But improving coordination and
cracking down on scamming opera-
tions are only part of the solution.
We need to encourage seniors to re-
port immediately if they have fallen
victim to a scam or if they suspect a
potentially fraudulent scheme is tar-
geting them – whether it be over the
telephone, by mail or on the Inter-
net.
In Minnesota, there are an esti-
mated 30,000 documented senior
fraud cases each year, but sadly,
most of these crimes go unreported
– only 1 in 44 seniors actually report
that they are victims of a fraud
scheme, and victims often face con-
fusion on where to turn for help. We
need to remove barriers to reporting
and one the best ways to do that is
improving our complaint system.
Our best line of defense against
fraud is education. That’s why my
bill would require the FTC to boost
efforts to educate not just seniors
about fraud, but also ensure their
families and caregivers know and
understand the signs to identify if
their loved one may have fallen vic-
tim to a crime. And, the FTC would
be required to share information on
how to contact the appropriate law
enforcement agency to ensure that
precious time is not lost to catch a
criminal.
And our efforts shouldn’t end
there. While scammers use a variety
of methods to target seniors, tele-
marketing calls are a favorite for
conducting these scams. The De-
partment of Justice estimates that
fraudulent telemarketing alone costs
Americans $40 billion annually. The
Do-Not-Call list was designed to
help protect consumers from these
calls. We need to ramp up efforts to
stop telemarketers who violate the
Do-Not-Call list. That’s why I re-
cently called on the Department of
Justice to increase their efforts to
prosecute criminals of telemarketing
scams that target our seniors.
Protecting seniors from fraud is
more than just dollars and cents. The
emotional and psychological toll
these crimes can have on victims
cannot be understated. It’s all of our
duty to protect the health and well-
being of our parents and grandpar-
ents, because all Minnesotans de-
serve to live out their years with dig-
nity and respect.
Protecting Minnesota seniors
By Glenn Mollette
Everybody needs medical insur-
ance. Without it you are headed for
the poor house or a shorter life.
Here is what our government
should do:
Make Medicaid available for
American citizens in poverty. Citi-
zens receiving some type of monthly
government check or making pover-
ty wages should pay "something"
for their medical insurance. The
payment might be a small amount
each month but medical insurance is
worth some kind of effort. We can't
afford free rides.
Make Medicaid available for the
sick with preexisting conditions.
When my wife was eliminated from
medical insurance because of her
multiple sclerosis we were living on
about $35,000 a year. The elimina-
tion of healthcare for the sickest
member of our family was devastat-
ing. We would have scraped and
skipped meals to pay almost any
premium but it wasn't available. Let
the sick with income pay for their
Medicaid insurance coverage. They
don’t mind if they have jobs.
Let the rest of America buy health
insurance through private compa-
nies. We’ve covered the poor and
the sick in points one and two. Let’s
get the government out of the rest of
our healthcare purchases. Healthy
working Americans have to pay
their car payments, house payments,
utility bills, etc. We can pay our in-
surance premiums.
The real need is for government to
eliminate the 48 billion dollars of
medical provider fraud that we had
last year in America. This is only the
fraud that we know about. We have
to bring the cost of medical care
down. This will not happen unless
our government cracks down on
fraudulent Medicare/Medicaid
charges. With increased enrollment,
these fraudulent charges will sky-
rocket further.
Next, you and I must be involved
in the process of bringing costs
down. Negotiate with doctors. Make
several calls and find how much
they are charging for office visits,
surgeries and other procedures. For
example, one Washington Post arti-
cle revealed that the Las Colinas
Medical Center just outside Dallas
billed Medicare, on average,
$160,832 for lower joint replace-
ments. Five miles away and on the
same street, Baylor Medical Center
in Irving, Texas, billed the govern-
ment an average fee of $42,632 for
the same procedures. In downtown
New York City, two hospitals 63
blocks apart varied by 321 percent
in the prices they charged to treat
complicated cases of asthma or
bronchitis. One charged an average
of $34,310; the other billed, on aver-
age, $8,159.
Finally, every day we have to
fight the battle of taking care of our-
selves. We can't smoke our brains
out, eat fat and a pound of sugar
every day and be healthy. With our
best efforts, health problems are in-
evitable, but we all must become re-
sponsible for our health.
Glenn Mollette is an American
columnist read in all fifty states.
Contact him at GMollette@aol.com
Like his facebook page at www.face-
book.com/glennmollette. He is the
author of American Issues, Nursing
Home Nightmares and eight other
books.
Solving Obamacare, our medical insurance crisis
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 31, 2013, page 5
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
American Education Banquet
Monday, November 18
Tickets will be on sale through Thursday, November 14.
Adults
$
10.00 (Sirloin Tips in Mushroom
Sauce entree); Children’s Menu
$
5.00
(Boneless Chicken Wings and Mac & Cheese)
Tickets must be purchased in
advance and are available at both
the Sibley East school offices.
Banquet activities begin at 6 p.m. with a
social hour, featuring performances by the
Sibley East Show Choir and Jazz Band.
Banquet and program to follow.
A42-45SEa
History
Halloween Costume Winners
Enterprise photo by Megan Bennett
The following children were selected as
costume winners in the age 0-3 catego-
ry at the A-GI Women of Today Hal-
loween event at the Sibley East Public
School on Saturday afternoon, Oct. 26.
Left to right: Becca Dhaene, Chelsea
Castaneda and Blake Mathews.
Enterprise photo by Megan Bennett
The following children were selected as
costume winners in the age 4-7 catego-
ry at the A-GI Women of Today Hal-
loween event at the Sibley East Public
School on Saturday afternoon, Oct. 26.
Left to right: Maelynn Thoele, Lydia
Rose and Will Feterl.
Enterprise photo by Megan Bennett
The following children were selected as
costume winners in the age 8 and older
category at the A-GI Women of Today
Halloween event at the Sibley East Pub-
lic School on Saturday afternoon, Oct.
26. Left to right: Willow Schmidt,
Chetan Kumar and Jacquelyn Wibstad.
95 Years Ago
October 31, 1918
Louis Kill, Editor
This world does not seem so
large after all, as almost daily
we hear of instances where Ar-
lington boys have met in France.
A recent letter from Oscar Alt-
now stated that he had met Ben-
nie Meyer in France. Bennie is
serving as a barber while Oscar
is doing carpenter work in the
engineer corps.
An almost incessant rainfall
has visited this section since last
Friday and the roads have suf-
fered in consequence. Many are
of the opinion that the disease
germs which have filled the air
during the past several weeks
will now disappear, and that the
epidemic of Spanish Influenza,
which has been spreading
through the country like wild-
fire, will now be considerably
lessened. Our public schools
were reopened Tuesday after
being closed for several weeks
as a precaution against the
spread of the influenza. As there
were no cases in this vicinity it
was thought safe to continue the
sessions.
Arlington markets: Wheat,
2.07; barley, 79c; rye, 1.46; oats,
60c; flax, 3.40.
70 Years Ago
November 4, 1943
Louis Kill, Editor
This community mourns the
passing of one of its most
beloved and respected citizens
in the late Alexander F. Thomes,
who died Thursday, October 29,
at 5:45 p.m. in the Veterans’
Hospital, Minneapolis. He
reached the age of 55 years, 8
months and 26 days. Mr
Thomes succumbed to a heart
ailment with which he had been
afflicted for the past six years.
For the past year he was obliged
to give up his duties at the hard-
ware store almost entirely.
Arlington once again has a
harness shop after being without
one since last spring when
Leonard Brau closed his estab-
lishment to go into the armed
forces. The shop was reopened
this week by Leonard’s brother,
Norbert Brau of Lucan, Minn.
Norbert, like Leonard, has
grown up in the harness and
shoe repair business and is capa-
ble of giving this community the
service it so sorely needs in the
harness repair line.
Reinhard Wolter lost a valu-
able cow last Wednesday
evening when the animal fell
into a cistern at the farm home
north of town and drowned. An
effort was made to save the cow
by pumping the water from the
cistern with the local fire truck,
but this proved impossible due
to the debris in the cistern.
45 Years Ago
October 31,1968
Val Kill, Editor
Nearly 50 area schools at-
tended the Southwest Minnesota
Association of Student Councils
Convention in Mountain Lake
High School. Those attending
from the Arlington-Green Isle
council were; Dan O’Brien,
Randy Trocke, Larry Marquardt,
David Nieland, and Mike
McGuire, along with their advi-
sor, Mr. Goblirsch. Mike
McGuire was selected to lead
one of the many discussion
groups.
No signs have turned up on
two Henderson men missing
since Saturday near Henderson
along the Minnesota River. Au-
thorities from half dozen coun-
ties are continuing an air and
land search. Missing are David
Kahlow, 26, and Larry Steck-
man, 24, who left home about 7
a.m. Saturday to go duck hunt-
ing. Relatives of the two men
notified the Henderson police
several hours later that the pair
hadn’t returned. The search is
over several hundred acres of
flooded land about 3 miles north
of Henderson.
Peewee football players were
given a special treat here Mon-
day afternoon as they closed out
their season with a victory over
Shakopee. Oak Grove Dairy
brought Frank Quilici of the
Minnesota Twins to Arlington to
talk with the boys. Oak Grove
also furnished hamburgers and
milk. The Peewee team is
coached by Jim O’Brien and
Bill Piniske.
20 Years Ago
October 28, 1993
Kurt Menk, Editor
Gaylord city zoners recently
granted a permit to Sibley
County for the construction of
the new jail to be located south
of the existing jail. The new jail
will house 18 adult offenders
and two juvenile offenders,
three times more than the pres-
ent jail. Construction is expect-
ed to begin early next year.
The Arlington-Green Isle and
Gaylord school boards, during a
joint meeting in Arlington Mon-
day night, separately and unani-
mously adopted a resolution to
add the elementary grade PreK-
6 of both school districts to the
Interdistrict Cooperative Agree-
ment (ICA) and in the same res-
olution, adopted a grade 6-9
alignment at the Gaylord site
next year.
John and Rebecca Schlueter,
Arlington, are proud to an-
nounce the birth of their son,
Travis John. Travis was born
September 18, 1993 at Ridge-
view Medical Center in Waco-
nia. He weighed 8 pounds, 1
ounce and was 19 1/2 inches
long.
Sibley County Court
The fol l owi ng mi sde-
meanors, petty misdemeanors
and gross mi sdemeanors
were heard in District Court
October 18-25: Minnesota
State Patrol (MSP); Sheriff’s
Office, (SO); Department of
Natural Resources (DNR): MN
Department of Transportation
(MNDOT):
Michelle K. Biescheid, 35,
Le Sueur, speed, $135, proof
of insurance, dismissed, Ar-
lington PD; Thomas D. Latour,
60, Carver, speed, $145, Ar-
lington PD; Jeffrey J. Matz,
52, Arlington, no building per-
mit, foundation required, arch
detail, required roof pitch, un-
supervi sed probati on one
year, no same or si mi l ar,
$185, Arlington PD; William A.
McCormick, 25, Arlington, as-
sault-peace officer-physically
assaults, stay of imposition,
supervi sed probati on two
years, local confinement 15
days credit for time served two
days, local confinement 15
days, home monitor-electronic
alcohol 30 days for indetermi-
nate, jail and EAM may be for-
given if defendant complies
wi th staggered sentenci ng
procedures and the j udge
finds he has remained chemi-
cal free, sentence to service
40 hours for indeterminate,
follow all instructions of proba-
ti on, si gn probati on agree-
ment, sign all releases of in-
formation, chemical depend-
ency evaluation/treatment, fol-
low recommendations of eval-
uation, aftercare, victim impact
panel, no alcohol/controlled
substance use, no possession
of alcohol or drugs, random
testing, do not enter bars or
liquor stores, where alcohol is
the primary source of income,
keep court/attorney informed
of current address, remai n
law-abiding, no driver license
violations, no alcohol-related
traffic offenses, $135, Arling-
ton PD; Timothy J. Pesek, 58,
Henderson, dri ve
over/through/ around barri-
cade-highway, $125, Arlington
PD; Bridget M. Peterson, 19,
Hutchinson, speed, $145, Ar-
lington PD; Edgar G. Herrera,
39, Gaylord, failure to display
current registration-expired
pl ates, di smi ssed, Gayl ord
PD; Edegar O. Lopez-
Rodiguez, 38, driving without
a val i d l i cense or vehi cl e
class/type, $185, Gaylord PD;
Heidi S. Thoele, 47, Nicollet,
speed, $145, Gayl ord PD;
Conrad M. Clobes, 33, Hector,
contributing to delinquency of
a child or status as petty of-
fender, stay of imposition, su-
pervised probation two years,
sentence to service10 days for
indeterminate, follow all condi-
tions set forth in the probation
agreement, follow all instruc-
tions of probation, sign proba-
tion agreement, sign all re-
leases of information, chemi-
cal dependency
evaluation/treatment, follow
recommendations of evalua-
tion, no alcohol/controlled sub-
stance use, no possession of
alcohol or drugs, random test-
ing, no same or similar, no
contact with victim(s), mental
health screening, complete
booking, remain law-abiding,
$285, Gibbon PD; Michael K.
Eng III, 24, Gibbon, driving
after revocation, $285, unin-
sured vehicle, fail to signal for
turn, proof of insurance, dis-
missed, Gibbon PD; Joseph
R. Wahlen, 20, Le Sueur, no
migratory water fowl stamp,
$135, DNR; Bradl ey J.
Weiers, 23, New Prague, no
federal waterfowl stamp,
$135, DNR; Richard J. Ames,
84, Burnsville, speed, $125,
MSP; Michelle R. Beckman,
40, Arlington, speed, $145,
MSP; Manuel V. Duran, 21,
Glencoe, speed, proof of in-
surance, $325, MSP; Denise
M. Feri man, 59, Le Sueur,
speed, $145, MSP; Steven M.
Fri el er, 61, Paynesvi l l e,
speed, $135, MSP; Brent R.
Howk, 27, Arlington, speed,
$125, MSP; Jeffrey J. Matz,
52, seat belt required, dis-
missed, wheel hub leaking, no
fire extinguisher, continued,
unsupervised probation one
year, pay costs, no same or
similar, $185, MSP; Thomas
L. Nel son, 64, Champl i n,
speed, $135, MSP; Isaac
Smith, 64, White Hall, Ariz.,
speed, seat bel t requi red,
$150, MSP; Patrick J. Toth,
38, Spicer, speed, $145, MSP;
John J. Wemeier, 52,Arling-
ton, speed, $125, MSP; Eliza-
beth A. Wrycza, 49, Eagan,
speed, $135 MSP; Debra L.
Cermak, 58, Belle Plaine, DWI
dismissed, careless driving,
stay of imposition, unsuper-
vi sed probati on one year,
chemical dependency evalua-
tion/treatment within 60 days
may revert to supervised pro-
bation if treatment is recom-
mended, follow recommenda-
tions of evaluation, victim im-
pact panel file proof with the
court, remai n l aw-abi di ng,
keep court/attorney informed
of current address, sign all re-
leases of information, $350,
SO; Mol l y M Gl over, 26,
Green Isle, proof of insurance,
di smi ssed, SO; Randal l L.
Hui ras, 58, Sl eepy Eye,
speed, $125, SO; Jonathan P.
May, 28, Mound, passing on
right when prohibited, $135,
SO; Eric E. Shaw, 19, Willmar,
dri vi ng after revocati on,
speed, $200, SO; Shain M.
Shepherd, 27, Henderson,
speed, $135, SO; David M.
Thomas, 33, Bel l e Pl ai ne,
speed, $125, SO; Robert M.
Bosma, 45, Winthrop, reckless
driving, dismissed, Winthrop
PD; Louanne M. Bunker, 59,
Winthrop, driving after sus-
pensi on, l ocal confinement
two days, credi t for ti me
served two days, $85,
Winthrop PD; Cody J. Camp-
bell, 33, North Mankato, driv-
ing after cancelation, possess
over 1.4 grams of marijuana in
motor vehicle, local confine-
ment 21 days, credit for time
served seven days, $135,
p h a r m a c y -
possess/control/manufacture/s
ell/furnish/dispense, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia,
operate unregi stered vehi -
cle/without plates displayed on
publ i c state/hi ghway, di s-
missed, Winthrop PD; Michael
J. Thompson, 45, Oronoco,
speed, $125, proof of insur-
ance, di smi ssed, Wi nthrop
PD; Mark A. Todd Jr., 38,
Eagan, driving after revoca-
tion, continued, unsupervised
probation one year, no same
or similar, pay costs, no driv-
ing without insurance, no driv-
er license violations, $100,
proof of insurance, dismissed,
Winthrop PD:
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 31, 2013, page 6
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Sports
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The third seeded Sibley
East varsity girls volleyball
team was upset by visiting
and sixth seeded Watertown-
Mayer 3-2 during the opening
round of the Section 2AA
North Sub Section Girls Vol-
leyball Tournament on Thurs-
day night, Oct. 24.
The Lady Wolverines, who
swept Watertown-Mayer in a
Minnesota River Conference
match just two weeks ago,
dropped the first two games
25-20 and 25-23 respectively.
Sibley East, meanwhile,
rallied and won the third and
fourth games 25-21 and 28-
21 which forced the fifth and
deciding game.
The Wolverines, after an
early lead, lost the fifth game
15-11.
“This was a tough one for
us to swallow after beating
them in three sets two weeks
ago,” said Sibley East head
coach Chip Wolverton. “I
think they came in deter-
mined to play better and they
definitely did. Each of the
sets could have gone either
way. We were just on the un-
fortunate end of three of
them.”
Senior Megan Eckberg col-
lected a career high 19 kills
and four blocks. Junior Shel-
by Voight recorded a career
high 42 digs while junior
Karley Lind converted 29 of
29 serves and dished out 36
set assists. Junior Autumn
Dose had 13 digs and eight
kills while sophomore Megan
Krentz contributed a dozen
kills and five blocks. Sopho-
more McKayla Stumm posted
16 digs while sophomore
Alyssa Weber added 10 kills.
“I’m proud of the way this
team battled tonight and all
year,” said Wolverton. “They
have been a very fun team to
work with, and an easy team
to coach because they formed
such a tight bond with each
other and enjoyed coming to
play with each other all year.”
Wolverton continued, “I'm
glad for Megan Eckberg to
end her career with a winning
season. Her influence on this
team and the leadership she
has provided had a lot to do
with our success this season,
and will leave a lasting mark
on our program. If you' re
going to have only one senior
on your team, Megan is the
one you want.”
Wolverton added, “As for
the rest of the team, we have
accomplished some things
that haven’t been done in a
long time around here, but
nobody is satisfied with how
it ended. The girls all have
the feeling that we will ac-
complish more great things in
the future.”
The Lady Wolverines con-
cluded the season with a 4-3
mark in the MRC and a 20-9
record overall.
SE volleyball team upset by
Watertown-Mayer in playoffs
Enterprise photo courtesy of Becky Shogren
Sibley East junior setter Karley Lind,
middle, tipped the ball at the net
against visiting Watertown-Mayer in
Gaylord on Thursday evening, Oct. 24.
Junior Kelli Martens is pictured on the
left while junior Autumn Dose is pic-
tured on the right.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Sibley East sophomore Justin Bennett competed in
the Section 2A Boys Cross Country Meet at the Mont-
gomery Golf Course on Thursday afternoon, Oct. 24.
Sibley East senior Maren Miner competed in the Sec-
tion 2A Girls Cross Country Meet at the Montgomery
Golf Course on Thursday afternoon, Oct. 24.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
boys and girls cross country
teams competed in the Sec-
tion 2A Cross Country Meet
at the Montgomery Golf
Course on Thursday after-
noon, Oct. 24.
Boys Team
The varsity boys team
placed 14th among 20 teams
at the meet. Waseca captured
top honors.
Sophomore Jack Ballalatak
was the top runner for Sibley
East after he placed 52nd
among 141 runners with a
time of 18:40. Sophomore
Justin Bennett finished 62nd
with a clocking of 18:50
while junior Sam Thies
placed 70th with a showing
of 19:08. Eighth grader
Logan Tesch finished 91st
with a time of 19:35 while
eighth grader Kristian Schow
placed 96th with a clocking
of 19:47. Senior Ben
Ahlstrand finished 106th with
a showing of 20:03 while
junior Korban Strand placed
124th with a time of 21:12.
Waseca junior Shane Stre-
ich captured top honors with
a time of 15:41.
Girls Team
The varsity girls team
placed 17th out of 19 teams
at the meet. Waseca won the
section meet.
Freshman Alison Eibs was
the top runner for Sibley East
after she placed 40th among
132 runners with a time of
17:13. Senior Maren Miner
finished 95th with a clocking
of 18:52 while freshman Abi-
gail Butler placed 99th with a
clocking of 19:07. Seventh
grader Breann Fahning fin-
ished 108th with a showing
of 19:48 while junior Karina
Robeck placed 113th with a
recording of 20:24. Eighth
grader Tamara Ehrich fin-
ished 118th with a time of
20:54 while senior Heidi Mil-
czark placed 122nd with a
clocking of 23:03.
Waterville-Elysian-Morris-
town/Janesville-Waldorf-
Pemberton sophomore Tier-
ney Winter captured top hon-
ors with a time of 15:01.
Sibley East cross country teams compete in Section 2A Meet
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Sibley East senior quarterback Brody
Rodning scrambled away from a Fair-
mont defender on Saturday afternoon,
Oct. 26.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The visiting Sibley East
varsity football team lost to
Fairmont 30-6 during the
semi-final round of the Sec-
tion 2AAA Playoffs on Satur-
day afternoon, Oct. 26.
The Wolverines fell behind
7-0 just two minutes into the
game after a long touchdown
pass.
The deficit grew to 14-0
early in the second quarter
after Fairmont blocked a Sib-
ley East punt and later scored
on another touchdown pass.
The Wolverines had their
best opportunity to score
midway through the second
quarter. Sibley East marched
the length of the field, but the
drive stalled after a fourth-
and-four play on the Fair-
mont 14-yard line.
Sibley East minimized the
damage after it stopped a
Fairmont scoring threat late
in the first half.
It was all Fairmont in the
second half as the Cardinals
recorded two touchdowns and
added a field for a 30-0 lead.
Sibley East scored its only
touchdown on a 60-yard run
by senior Erik Danielson late
in the fourth quarter.
A run for the two-point
conversion failed though as
Fairmont cruised to an even-
tual 30-6 victory.
“Fairmont is a very good
3A team and for us to com-
pete it is going to take a
greater year-round effort in
the weight room and more
time working on football over
the summer,” said Sibley East
head coach Chuck Hartman.
“Having been in AA the last
couple years the jump to
AAA requires a little more if
you want to be great and win
the section.   Plus, the MRC
has really turned into one of
the toughest leagues in Min-
nesota.” 
Hartman continued, “I
think we had our chances. We
moved the ball down to the
10-yard line in the second
quarter and a score there
would obviously have been
huge.  Down 14-0 it could
have been 14-7 going in at
halftime.  Fairmont just made
more plays and had fewer
mistakes than we did.  That’s
playoff football.”
The Wolverine offense
compiled 271 total yards dur-
ing the loss.
Danielson led the ground
game with 27 attempts for
193 yards and one touch-
down. Senior Alex Pedraza
ran for 31 yards on 10 carries
while senior Beau Swenson
recorded 30 yards on seven
rushes.
Senior quarterback Brody
Rodning completed one of
four passing attempts for 10
yards. Junior Lukas Bullert
tossed an interception in his
only passing attempt.
Swenson had the lone re-
ception for 10 yards.
The Wolverine defense did
not force a turnover in the
loss. Senior Ben White con-
tributed two solo tackles, 10
assisted tackles, three tackles
for a loss and a blocked kick.
Junior Ben Frietag collected
three assisted tackles, one
tackle for a loss and one quar-
terback sack. Senior Colton
Bates had one solo tackle and
six assisted tackles. Sopho-
more Travis Schmidt com-
piled four solo tackles and
two assisted tackles while
senior Austin Sadler recorded
four solo tackles and one as-
sisted tackle. Senior Francis-
co Guzman added one solo
tackle and five assisted tack-
les.
“First off, I want to con-
gratulate our seniors on a
good career,” said Hartman
“They came up short of our
goals this season, but overall
they had a good career.   We
will miss them.”
Hartman added,   “Erik
Danielson, Cordell Bates and
Ben White started varsity
from game one of their soph-
omore year and never missed
a start in the 31 games we
played over that time.”
The Wolverines conclude
the season with a 2-5 mark in
the Minnesota River Confer-
ence and a 4-6 record overall.
Fairmont will now travel to
Belle Plaine for the Section
2AAA championship game at
7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 1.
SE football team falls to
Fairmont 30-6 in playoffs
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 31, 2013, page 7
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Blessings
For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this is not from
yourselves, it is the gift of God— not by works, so that no one can boast.
Ephesians 2:8-9 NIV
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN (WELS), Arlington
Pastor Bruce W. Hanneman
8:45 a.m. Sunday School, 9:00 a.m. Adult Bible Study
10:00 a.m. Worship
Commercial and Industrial Builders
Green Isle, MN 55338
ph. 507.326.7901 fax: 507.326.3551
www.vosconstruction.com
Arlington State Bank
Serving the Community Since 1895
BANKING SERVICES
964-2256
Arlington
A & N Radiator Repair
Allen & Nicki Scharn, Owners
23228 401 Ave., Arlington
877-964-2281 or 507-964-2281 Bus.
Certified ASE Technician on Staff
Also distributor for Poxy Coat II
Industrial Grade Coatings/Paint
MID-COUNTY
CO-OP
700 W. Lake St., Box 177
Cologne, MN 55322
(952) 466-3700
or TOLL FREE: 1-888-466-3700
HUTCHINSON CO-OP
AGRONOMY
LEON DOSE,
Arlington Branch Manager
411 7
th
Ave. NW • (507) 964-2251
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
402 W. Alden, Arlington
507-964-5547
Online at
www.Arlington
MNnew.com
Arlington Haus
Your Hometown Pub & Eatery
1986-2009
Arlington • 1-507-964-2473
STATE BANK OF
HAMBURG
100 Years. 100 Reasons.
Phone 952-467-2992
statebankofhamburg.com
CONVENIENCE
STORE
Hwy. 5 N., Arlington
507-964-2920
Homestyle Pizza
Real or Soft Serve Ice Cream
Gas – Diesel – Deli – Videos
(507)
964-2212
www.
chefcraigs
.com
23180 401 Ave., Arlington Phone 507-964-2264
EQUAL
HOUSING
LENDER
CRAIG BULLERT
ARLINGTON, MN
23189 Hwy. 5 North,
Arlington, MN 55307
arlington@hutchcoop.com
Office (507) 964-2283
Cell (320) 583-4324
HC
FUNERAL SERVICE
P.O. Box 314
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-2201
Member
FDIC
Menus
Church News
GAYLORD ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
Gaylord
Sunday, November 3: 9:00
a.m. Sunday school. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday worship service with
Communion.
Wednesday, November 6:
6:30 p.m. Evening Bible classes
and Youth Focused. 8:00 p.m.
Supper welcome!
ST. PAUL’S UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Henderson
(507) 248-3594 (Office)
Rev. Brigit Stevens, Pastor
Find us on Facebook:
St. Paul’s UCC - Henderson
Sunday, November 3: 9:00-
9:50 a.m. Sunday school. 10:00
a.m. Worship.
ST. PAUL’S EV.
REFORMED CHURCH
15470 Co. Rd. 31, Hamburg
Dan Schnabel, Pastor
952-467-3878
www.stpaulsrcus.org
Sunday, November 3: 8:30
a.m. Sunday school and Bible
study. 9:30 a.m. Worship serv-
ice.
Wednesday, November 6:
6:30 p.m. Catechism class.
Thursday, November 7:
Women’s Guild.
ORATORY OF
ST. THOMAS
THE APOSTLE
Jessenland
507-248-3550
Fr. Sam Perez
Thursday: Weekly Mass at
5:00 p.m.
ST. MARY, MICHAEL
AND BRENDAN AREA
FAITH COMMUNITY
Fr. Keith Salisbury, Pastor
Friday, November 1: 5:30
p.m. All Saint’s Day Mass
(Mic). 7:00 p.m. All Saint’s Day
Mass (Mar).
Saturday, November 2: 5:00
p.m. Mass (Mar).
Sunday, November 3: 7:30
a.m. Mass (Bre). 9:00-10:15
a.m. Elementary religious edu-
cation (Mar). 9:00 a.m. Mass
(Mic). 10:30 a.m. Mass (Mar).
11:15 a.m. Coffee & donuts
(Mar).
Monday, November 4: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre and Mar). 8:00
p.m. AA and AlaNon (Mar).
Tuesday, November 5: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre and Mar).
Wednesday, November 6:
8:30 a.m. Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m.
Word and Communion (Oak
Terrace). 3:15-4:30 p.m. Ele-
mentary religious education
(Mic). 5:00 p.m. Mass (Mar).
7:00-8:00 p.m. Jr./Sr. High reli-
gious education Vocation Night
(Mar). 7:00 p.m. KC Officers
Meeting) Mar.
Thursday, November 7: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre and Mic). 7:30
p.m. Narcotics Anonymous
(Mic).
TRINITY LUTHERAN
32234 431st Ave., Gaylord
Rev. James Snyder,
Interim Pastor
Sunday, November 3: 10:00
a.m. Worship with Holy Com-
munion.
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Pastor William Postel
Phone 507-964-2400
Sunday, November 3: 9:00
a.m. Bible class. 10:00 a.m.
Worship.
Thursday, November 7: 5:30
p.m. Deadline for bulletin.
EVANGELICAL
COVENANT CHURCH
107 W. Third St., Winthrop
Pastor Kyle Kachelmeier
(507) 647- 5777
Parsonage (507) 647-3739
www.wincov.org
Sunday, November 3: 9:30
a.m. Worship. 10:45 a.m. Sun-
day school.
Wednesday, November 6:
9:00 a.m. Prayer coffee. 6:00
p.m. AWANA.
Thursday, November 7: 9:30
a.m. Women’s Bible study.
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN
Green Isle
Pastor Eric W. Rapp
Friday, November 1: 10:00
a.m. Deadline for Sunday bul-
letin.
Saturday, November 2: 10:00-
11:30 p.m. Children’s Christmas
practice.
Sunday, November 3: 9:00
a.m. Worship. 10:00 a.m. Sun-
day school. 10:15 a.m. Bible
study with Rhonda. 3:30 p.m.
Bible study with pastor. 4:30
p.m Joint choir practice.
Wednesday, November 6:
6:30-7:30 p.m. Confirmation
and Wed. night school grades 1-
5.
PEACE LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Kurt Lehmkuhl, Pastor
Saturday, November 2: 5:00
p.m Worship service.
Sunday, November 3: 8:15
a.m. Sunday school. 9:30 a.m.
Worship service..
Wednesday, November 6:
3:45 p.m. Catechism.
ZION LUTHERAN
814 W. Brooks St.
Arlington – (507) 964-5454
James Carlson, Pastor
Saturday, November 2, 11:00
a.m.-1:00 p.m. Marktplatz.
Sunday, November 3: 9:00
a.m. Worship with Holy Comm-
union. 10:00 a.m. Fellowship
and Sunday school.
Tuesday, November 5: ZCW
Tuesday group at Bert Ped-
erson’s home. 6:00-7:00 p.m.
TOPS in church basement.
Wednesday, November 6:
3:45 p.m. 7th & 9th Confirma-
tion. 4:30 p.m. 8th Confirma-
tion. 5:30 p.m. Board of Wor-
ship and music meeting. 7:30
p.m. Wednesday group at Betty
Rud’s home. 7:30 p.m. Deacon’s
meeting.
Thursday, November 7: 9:00
a.m. and 1:00 p.m. Zion service
on cable. 7:00 p.m. ZCW Thurs-
day group at church.
ZION LUTHERAN
Green Isle Township
Pastor Eric W. Rapp
Friday, November 1: 10:00
a.m. Deadline for Sunday bul-
letin.
Saturday, November 2: 10:00-
11:30 a.m. Children’s Christmas
practice at St. Paul’s.
Sunday, November 3: 10:30
a.m. Worship with Communion.
3:30 p.m. Bible study at St.
Paul’s with pastor. 4:30 p.m.
Joint choir practice at St. Paul’s.
Wednesday, November 6:
6:30-7:30 p.m. Confirmation
and Wed. night school grades 1-
5 at St. Paul’s.
CREEKSIDE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Christian & Missionary
Alliance
Dr. Bill Kuhn,
Interim Pastor
114 Shamrock Drive
Arlington – 507-964-2872
email: creeksidecc@media-
combb.net
Sunday, November 3: 10:30
a.m. Worship service, Lord’s
Supper, followed by potluck.
Wednesday, November 6:
7:00-8:30 p. m. R. E.A. C.H.
Youth Group at Terry and Becky
Shogren’s home, 6th through
12th grade.
Thursday, November 7: 6:30
p. m. Men’s Bible study at
Chuck Peik’s home. 1:00 & 7:00
p. m. Women’s Bible study,
“Revelation” at Jean Olson’s
home.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
(507) 304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
507-234-6770
Saturday: Church services at
9:30 a.m. Bible study at 11:00
a.m. Fellowship dinner at 12:00
p.m. All are welcome.
UNITED METHODIST
Arlington
Rodney J. Stemme, Pastor
www.arlingtonunited
methodist.org
Saturday, November 2: 8:00
a.m. A-Men men’s group. 9:30
a.m. Women United.
Sunday, November 3: 9:00 &
11:00 a.m. Worship with Com-
munion. 10:15 a. m. Sunday
school.
Tuesday, November 5: 6:30
p.m. Worship team. 7:30 p.m.
Stewardship Finance.
Wednesday, November 6:
7:00 p.m. Choir and Confirma-
tion. 8:15 p.m. “Shiny Gods”
study.
Thursday, November 7: 10:00
a.m., 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. Wor-
ship on cable TV. 1:00 and 7:00
p.m. Women’s Bible study at
Jean Olson’s.
ST. PAUL LUTHERAN
(WELS),
Arlington
Bruce Hannemann, Pastor
WEBSITE:
www.stpaularlington.com
EMAIL:
Bruce.Hannemann@stpaul
arlington.com
Sunday, November 3: 8:45
a.m. Sunday school. 9:00 a.m.
Family Bible study. 10:00 a.m.
Worship with Communion.
Board of Education meeting.
11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Mission
Society beef dinner.
Monday, November 4: 7:00
p.m. Elder’s meeting.
Tuesday, November 5: 8:45-
10:45 a.m. M.O.M.’s meeting
Wednesday, November 6:
2:00 p.m. Bible study. 3:45 p.m.
Public school Confirmation
class, 7:30 p.m. Choir practice.
Thursday, November 7: 9:00
a.m. MVL Veterans Day service.
10:00 a.m. Bulletin information
due. 11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.
Services on cable TV channel 8.
6:30 p.m. Worship Committee.
SENIOR DINING
Call 326-3401 for a meal
Suggested Donation $3.85
Meals are served at Highland
Commons dining room
Monday-Friday
Monday: Hamburger, oven
brown potatoes, corn, bun, mar-
garine, apricots, low fat milk.
Tuesday: Chi cken Al a Ki ng,
peas and carrots, fruit salad, rice,
cookie, low fat milk.
Wednesday: Pork loin, whole
parslied potatoes, carrots, dinner
roll, margarine, frosted cake, low
fat milk.
Thursday: Italian meat sauce,
spaghetti noodles, lettuce, dress-
i ng, mi xed vegetabl es, garl i c
bread, margarine, ice cream, low
fat milk.
Friday: Chicken chow mein,
rice, chow mein noodles, Oriental
vegetables, mandarin oranges,
pudding, low fat milk.
SIBLEY EAST ELEMENTARY
BREAKFAST MENU
Arlington and Gaylord
Breakfast is served at 8:00 a.m.
daily. A 1/2 pint of milk is served
with each meal daily. Menu is sub-
ject to change.
Monday: Crunchmania, juice,
milk.
Tuesday: Mini pancake, juice,
milk.
Wednesday: Cereal , seeds,
fruit cup, milk.
Thursday: Frudel, juice, milk.
Friday: Oatmeal bar, cheese
stick, juice, milk.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Arlington
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: Pizza, Romaine salad,
green beans, carrot sticks, fruit,
milk.
Tuesday: Sub sandwich, let-
tuce, tomato, pepper, onion, pick-
les, corn, orange smiles, milk.
Wednesday: Sea shapes, scal-
loped potatoes, broccoli and car-
rots, cheese plate, fruit, milk.
Thursday: Mexican haystack,
lettuce, tomato, pepper, onion,
salsa, refried beans, peas, fruit,
milk.
Friday: California hamburger on
bun, oven potatoes, tomato, let-
tuce, brown beans, fruit, milk.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Gaylord
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: Pizza, Romaine salad,
carrot sticks, green beans, fruit,
milk.
Alternate: Grilled chicken.
Tuesday: Sub sandwich, toma-
to, lettuce, green pepper, onion,
pickles, corn, fruit, milk.
Alternate: Breaded pork.
Wednesday: Sea shapes, oven
potatoes, broccoli, carrots, fruit,
milk.
Alternate: Salad bar.
Thursday: Nacho cheese, beef
dip, tortilla chips, corn, black bean
salad, fruit, milk.
Alternate: Hot dog on bun.
Friday: California burger, oven
potatoes, baked beans, fruit, milk.
Alternate: Cheese stuffed sticks
with dipping sauce.
Austin O’Hara, a freshman
psychology major from
Green Isle, is the vice presi-
dent of the Campus Crusade
for Christ at the Southwest
Minnesota State University
for the 2013-2014 academic
year.
O’Hara is a 2009 graduate
of the Sibley East Senior
High School in Arlington. He
is the son of John O’Hara,
Green Isle.
To grow and strengthen
one another as Christians in
faith, fellowship, and fun,
Campus Crusade for Christ is
an interdenominational, stu-
dent Christian organization
seeking to provide a spiritual
environment for students. It is
a local chapter of Campus
Crusade for Christ, Interna-
tional.
Founded in 1963, South-
west Minnesota State Univer-
sity experiences continual
growth by serving students
on-campus, online and
around the state. Students
enjoy a close working rela-
tionship with faculty and
other students as well as a ro-
bust campus environment
with over $100 million in
construction over the past ten
years including a new Stu-
dent Center and Conference
Center; Foundation Resi-
dence Apartments; a renovat-
ed library and science labs; a
new Regional Event Center,
home to Mustang Football
and Soccer; and Sweetland
Hall, a new 250-bed resi-
dence hall that opened in the
fall of 2009.
O’Hara is vice president of
Campus Crusade for Christ
The Le Sueur Police De-
partment is looking for infor-
mation in connection with a
theft that occurred at Scoop’s
Liquor on Saturday, Oct. 12,
according to the Le Sueur
News Herald.
The two individuals have
targeted other places along
Highway 169. Surveillance of
them in other stores includes
suspicious activity and it is
believed they have been in-
volved in robberies in the
past. Prior to each robbery
the two suspects typically
have one person distract the
store worker, while the other
slips into a back office.
Police seek 2 connected with liquor store theft
Mike Johnson has submit-
ted a letter of resignation as
the Gibbon Police Chief, ac-
cording to an article in the
Winthrop News.
Working for the gibbon po-
lice Department for the past
12½ years as its chief. John-
son stated that he would be
willing to work for the city as
long as needed, but would
like to be done by at least
Dec. 31.
Mike Johnson resigns as Gibbon police chief
See what’s
brewing on
the
job
market.
See the Arlington ENTERPRISE
CLASSIFIEDS
Get a Subscription
to the Arlington
Enterprise!
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Subscriptions
starting at
$
33.00/yr.
507-964-5547
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 31, 2013, page 8
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
LIESKE TRACTOR
Wanted: Your OLD TRACTORS,
any condition, make or model. We
also specialize in new and used
TRACTOR PARTS AND REPAIR.
Call Kyle. Located west of Hender-
son. (612) 203-9256.
AUTOMOTIVE
Parts, Repair
$$ DOLLARS PAID $$ Junk vehi-
cles, repairable cars/trucks. FREE
TOWING. Flatbed/ wrecker serv-
ice. Immediate pick up. Monday-
Sunday, serving your area 24/7.
(952) 220-TOWS.
Trucks, Vans, SUV’s
2007 Ford Edge SEL, black cloth
interior, full sunroof, 114,000 miles,
$11,900. Call (507) 317-7307.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
CONKLIN© DEALERS NEEDED!
Lifetime career in marketing, man-
agement and applying “Green” prod-
ucts made in America. Full time/ part
time. For a free catalog call Franke’s
Conklin Service now at (320) 238-
2370. www.frankemarketing.com.
Part time maintenance person for
apartment complex in Gaylord.
Must live within 10 minutes driving
time of work site. Call (507) 237-
5449 for application.
PART-TIME REINDEER HELP
November-December at showing
events. Animal handling experi-
ence preferred. Must be flexible
and available weekends. (952)
250-3113 or 250-4440.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
Property Management Office looking
for someone to fill our accounts po-
sition. Duties include payables, re-
ceivables, invoicing/billing, customer
service, answering phones, etc. Part
time position. QuickBooks knowl-
edge requi red. Send resume
gkp.mgr@gmail.com.
Truck drivers needed with Class A
CDL for hauling in upper Midwest
area with vans or hopper-bottom
trai l ers. Must have 2 years or
more verifiable OTR experience.
(320) 523-5029.
Wanted organized and depend-
able person with good computer
skills to work with Arlington author
to meet deadlines on upcoming
book. References required. (507)
964-2550.
Work Wanted
HANDYMAN: Will do remodeling
of kitchens, bathrooms, hanging
doors and wi ndows, pai nti ng,
sheet rocking, texturizing or any
minor repairs inside or outside.
Wi l l al so do cl eani ng of base-
ments/garages. Call (320) 848-
2722 or (320) 583-1278.
FOR SALE
Heating/Air Conditioning
Special-95% Goodman gas fur-
nace and programmable thermo-
stat, $2,200 installed or AC unit,
$1,900 installed. J&R Plumbing
Heating AC, Lester Prairie (320)
510-5035.
Wanted To Buy
BUYING JUNK BATTERIES
We buy used batteries. Paying
$10 for automotive batteries. We
pick up. Call 800-777-2243.
LIVESTOCK, PETS
Cattle
Miniature Hereford cattle. Cows,
heifers, steers, bulls, 218 Cattle
Company. (507) 964-2544, leave
message.
REAL ESTATE
Houses
3BR family residence, 1202 North
9th Street, Olivia. $30,600. (320)
220-0120.
One-of-a-ki nd i mmacul ate
Winthrop 4BR home, in ground
pool , 6-stal l garage. move i n
ready. $179,000. Facebook/Tre-
belhorn home. (507) 276-0655.
4.79 Lovely acres, nice 3BR, 2BA
home with vaulted ceilings and
more. 30x20 shed (water and
electric in shed.) See photos, virtu-
al tours and more i nfo on
w w w . C 2 1 k a n d i . c o m .
MLS#6003577, listed at $199,973,
2711 NW 6th Street, Willmar, MN
Agent Rebecca Trongaard (320)
905-4992.
RENTAL
Apartment
Village Cooperative of Hutchinson
(320) 234-7761. 55+ Senior living.
Three units available (3-2BR, 1-
1BR.) Call for your tour! Come in
and check out the wonderful in-
centives offers and learn how you
can save over $8,000! Equal
Housing Opportunity.
2BR updated duplex on E. Clinton
Street. Large living room. Over-
sized garage, W/D on main level,
AC, Arlington. No smoking or pets.
$600 rent plus utilities and deposit.
Available now. (952) 758-7622.
RENTAL
Apartment
Updated, spacious one and two
BR apartments in Renville. In-
cludes heat, water garbage. New
stove, fridge, air conditioner. Pet-
friendly. Call (320) 564-3351 for
appointment.
Want To Rent
Father and Son Operation look-
ing for farmland to rent. Call (320)
523-1116 or (320) 522-0272.
Wanted: Farmland to rent 2014
and beyond. Curtis Weckwerth
(507) 380-9128, Wayne Franzeen
(507) 380-2466.
Young farmer looking for land to
rent for 2014 and beyond. Com-
petitive rates and reference avail-
able. Call Austin Blad (320) 221-
3517.
SALES
Sales
A Primitive Christmas Sale by Two
Old Goats. Thursday, November 7,
12 p.m.- 6 p.m.; Friday, November
8, 12 p.m.-6 p.m.; Saturday, No-
vember 9, 9 a.m.- 1 p.m. Santa’s,
snowmen, l i ghts wi th greens,
sl eds, toboggans, wi th l ots of
trees. For this sale only the elves
will be restocking each night. It’s
gonna be quite the sight! So come
join the magic. 317 Main Street,
Arlington, MN.
SERVICES
Adult Care
Do you need a caregiver? Contact
michelle Furr at Advantage Care
LLC. Respite care and in-home
care avialable. (320) 522-0700.
Classifieds
ADD ANOTHER PAPER
FOR ONLY
$
2.00 PER PAPER
(based on first week pricing)
The McLeod
County Chronicle
Silver Lake Leader
The Glencoe
Advertiser
The Sibley Shopper
Arlington Enterprise
The Galaxy
3-WEEK SPECIAL: ONE WEEK:
$
15
80
2
nd
Week 1/2 Price
3
rd
Week FREE
McLeod
Publishing
All Six Papers Reach Over 50,000 Readers Weekly in over 33 Communities
For 20 words, one time in
ANY TWO PAPERS and on the internet.
30¢ per word after first 20 words.
AGRICULTURE AUTOMOTIVE EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE LIVESTOCK
& PETS
LIVESTOCK
& PETS
REAL ESTATE SERVICES RENTAL RENTAL
All ads appear online
at GlencoeNews.com
Enterprise
To place an ad: Call: 507-964-5547; Fax: 507-964-2423; E-Mail: info@ArlingtonMNnews.com; Mail: P.O. Box 388, Arlington, MN 55307
Advertising
Deadlines
The McLeod County Chronicle Mondays at Noon
The Arlington Enterprise & The Silver Lake Leader Tuesdays at Noon
The Glencoe Advertiser, The Sibley Shopper
& The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
Available...
1 & 2 Bedroom
Apartments Available
All utilities,
except electric
Income based
Must be 62 or older
or handicapped
Highland Commons
Arlington
507-964-5556
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HANDICAP
ACCESSIBLE
Independent Living
55+ Arlington Sr. Apartment ONLY
One-Bedrooms Available
Garage Available
Apply NOW & Move this Fall!
FREE Application
FREE Damage Deposit
FREE 1
st
Month Rent
Lease Today!
800-873-1736 or 507-642-8701
kanderson@amberfieldplace.com
www.amberfieldplace.com
A340-43E41-44Sa
Managed by Great Lakes Management Co.
PELVIC/TRANSVAGINAL MESH?
Did you undergo transvaginal placement
of mesh for pelvic organ prolapse or stress
urinary incontinence between 2005 and
the present? If the mesh caused complica-
tions, you may be entitled to compensation.
Call Charles H. Johnson Law and speak
with female staff members 800/535-5727
NO MINIMUM - NO RESERVE
Farm land auction with devel-
opment potential. 2 Parcels.
Online auction closes November 19.
www.AllianceBid.com 763/262-5555.
License # 86-79. Alliance Bid Inc.
REGIONAL RUNS AVAILABLE
Choose the total package. Regular, fre-
quent home time; top pay benefits; monthly
bonuses; automatic detention pay & more!
CDL-A, 6-mos exp. req’d. EEOE/AAP
866/322-4039 www.drive4marten.com
CASH FOR CARS:
All cars/trucks wanted. Running or not! Top
dollar paid. We come to you! Any make/
model. Call for instant offer: 800/871-9145
DISH TV RETAILER
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12
mos.) & High Speed Internet start-
ing at $14.95/month (where avail-
able.) Save! Ask About same day In-
stallation! Call now! 800/297-8706
ENJOY 100% GUARANTEED
delivered-to-the-door Omaha Steaks!
Save 74% plus 4 free burgers - The Fam-
ily Value Combo - only $39.99. Order to-
day 877/415-6938, use code 48829ALF
- or www.omahasteaks.com/mbfam99
DONATE YOUR CAR
Truck or Boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free
3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing,
all paperwork taken care of 800/439-1735
GUARANTEED INCOME
for your retirement. Avoid market risk
& get guaranteed income in retire-
ment! Call for free copy of our safe
money guide plus annuity quotes from
A-rated companies! 800/631-4558
CANADA DRUG CENTER
is your choice for safe and affordable med-
ications. Our licensed Canadian mail order
pharmacy will provide you with savings of
up to 75% on all your medication needs.
Call today 800/259-1096 for $10.00 off
your first prescription and free shipping.
MISCELLANEOUS AUTOS WANTED
HELP WANTED - DRIVERS
MISCELLANEOUS
MEDICAL
AUCTIONS
Advertise here statewide in 240
newspapers for only $199 per week!
Call 800-279-2979.
OAK TERRACE
Healthcare Center of Gaylord
has openings in the following positions:
SKILLED NURSING HOME
NURSING ASSISTANT:
• Weekend hours 6:00am-2:30pm
and 2:15pm-10:45 pm shifts.
MAINTENANCE:
• Part-time position available for general maintenance
of building. Applicant must be able to work independ-
ently M-F 8am-2pm with some on call opportunity.
Boiler license preferred. Pay depends on experience.
ASSISTED LIVING
LPN:
• Part-Time hours, 2:30pm-11:00pm
Applications are available at:
640 Third St., Gaylord, MN
Or online at www.oakterraceliving.com
For further information, contact Human Resources
at 507-237-8703. EOE
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MOLDMAKER /
CNC MACHINIST
A progressive precision machine
shop has full time openings for
talented, hardworking individuals
to set up and operate CNC ma-
chining centers. Qualified candi-
dates will have a 2 year Vo-Tech
degree and 2 plus years machine
shop experience. Must be able to
perform close tolerance work, use
CAM software to program CNC
mills, and use precision measur-
ing equipment in the manufacture
of plastic injection molds. We
offer competitive wages and ben-
efits. Submit resumes to:
Suburban Mold &
Machining, Inc.
2823 12
th
Street East
Glencoe, MN 55336
E-mail: gregeurich@embarqmail.com
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Pinske Real Estate
& Auctioneers
(507) 964-2250
Arlington
• 2 or 3 BR updated
rambler. Nicely located
on corner lot in Arling-
ton.
$
85,000
We need listings of
homes, farms and hobby
farms. If you are thinking
about selling it will pay for
you to call us.
REAL ESTATE
A43E44SGj
A43-44Ea
A43-44Ea
Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington
is seeking the following positions:
• Full-Time Director of Dietary Services
Benefit eligible.
• Housekeeping/Laundry Assistant, day
shifts, include every other weekend/
holiday, 36-40 hours per pay period.
• Assistant Cook/Cook position, 4 days per week,
includes ever other weekend/holiday.
• Dietary Aide, 7:30-12:45, every other weekend/holiday.
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information,
call Tiffany Brockhoff,
Human Resource Director at
507-964-2251 or email:
tbrockof@good-sam.com
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap Drug-Free Workplace
Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life.
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Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington
is seeking the following positions:
– SIGN-ON BONUS –
• 2 – LPN/RN Charge Nurse for evening
shifts, 50+ hrs per pay period.
• CNA, 10:15pm-6:15am, every other
weekend with potential of evening shifts
during the week.
• 2 – Full-Time CNA, evening shifts, benefit eligible,
every other weekend/holiday.
• 2 – Part-Time CNA positions with rotating shifts,
includes every other weekend/holiday, 30-45 hrs per
pay period.
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information,
call Tiffany Brockhoff,
Human Resource Director at
507-964-2251 or email:
tbrockof@good-sam.com
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap Drug-Free Workplace
Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life.
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SERVICES
Child Care
Licensed daycare has full time and
part time openings. Lots of fun ac-
tivities. Call (320) 864-3191 to set
up an interview.
SERVICES
Misc. Service
CUSTOM LOG SAWING- Cut at
your place or ours. White oak lum-
ber decking and firewood. Give
Virgil a call. Schauer Construction,
Inc. (320) 864-4453.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 31, 2013, page 9
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Frank’s Potato
Supplier of fresh MN potatoes will be at the
Nicollet Mart in Nicollet, MN
Fridays & Saturdays
October into November
– Weather Permitting –
or call:
507-995-1201
507-931-4572
*40-43Ea
Stock Up NOW
LOW
PRICES!
combined
Bosch geothermal heating and cooling systems can
save you up to 70% on your home energy bills. With an
additional 30% federal tax credit, these systems are now
more affordable than ever!
Visit our site to find out
how much you can save.
BoschGeo.com/PropanePig
Propane bills too high?
Stop feeding the pig and get Geo.
S
ealed
B
id
S
ale
Friday, November 22, 2013
Arlington Bowling Alley
508 2
nd
Avenue NW • Arlington, MN 55307
Reserve Bid =
$
25,000
Contact Arlington State Bank for Bid Sheets (507) 964-2256
A41-44E42-45SGa
Legals
NOTICE OF MORTGAGE
FORECLOSURE SALE
THE RIGHT OF VERIFICA-
TION OF THE DEBT AND IDEN-
TITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDI-
TOR WITHIN THE TIME PROVID-
ED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECTED
BY THIS ACTION.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
that default has occurred in condi-
tions of the following described
mortgage:
DATE OF MORTGAGE: No-
vember 28, 2007
MORTGAGOR: Eric D. Hen-
drickson and Michelle M. Hen-
drickson, husband and wife.
MORTGAGEE: Washi ngton
Mutual Bank, FA.
DATE AND PLACE OF
RECORDING: Filed December
20, 2007, Sibley County Registrar
of Titles, Document No. T-20099
on Certificate of Title No. 6813.0
ASSIGNMENTS OF MORT-
GAGE: Assigned to: JPMorgan
Chase Bank, National Association.
Dated July 16, 2013 Filed August
5, 2013, as Document No.
T22892.
Said Mortgage being upon Reg-
istered Land.
TRANSACTION AGENT:
NONE
TRANSACTION AGENT’S
MORTGAGE IDENTIFICATION
NUMBER ON MORTGAGE:
NONE
LENDER OR BROKER AND
MORTGAGE ORIGINATOR
STATED ON MORTGAGE: Wash-
ington Mutual Bank, FA
RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE
SERVICER: JPMorgan Chase
Bank, Ntional Association
MORTGAGE PROPERTY AD-
DRESS: 318 10th Street, Gaylord,
MN 55334
TAX PARCEL I.D. #:
320507000
LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
Lot 13 and the South 25 feet of
Lot 14, in Block 50, in Second
West Addition to the City of Gay-
lord, Sibley County, Minnesota
COUNTY IN WHICH PROPER-
TY IS LOCATED: Sibley
ORIGINAL PRINCIPAL
AMOUNT OF MORTGAGE:
$129,600.00
AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED
TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF
NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF
ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE:
$125,441.71
That prior to the commence-
ment of this mortgage foreclosure
proceeding Mortgagee/Assignee
of Mortgagee complied with all no-
tice requirements as required by
statute; That no action or proceed-
ing has been instituted at law or
otherwise to recover the debt se-
cured by said mortgage, or any
part thereof;
PURSUANT to the power of
sale contained in said mortgage,
the above described property will
be sol d by the Sheri ff of sai d
county as follows:
DATE AND TIME OF SALE:
November 15, 2013 at 10:00 AM
PLACE OF SALE: Sheriff’s Of-
fice, Sheriff’s Department, 310
Park Avenue, Gaylord, MN
to pay the debt then secured by
said Mortgage, and taxes, if any,
on said premises, and the costs
and disbursements, including at-
torneys’ fees allowed by law sub-
ject to redemption within six (6)
months from the date of said sale
by the mortgagor(s), their personal
representatives or assigns unless
reduced to Five (5) weeks under
MN Stat. §580.07.
TIME AND DATE TO VACATE
PROPERTY: If the real estate is
an owner-occupied, single-family
dwelling, unless otherwise provid-
ed by law, the date on or before
which the mortgagor(s) must va-
cate the property if the mortgage
is not reinstated under section
580.30 or the property is not re-
deemed under section 580.23 is
11:59 p.m. on May 15, 2014, un-
less that date falls on a weekend
or legal holiday, in which case it is
the next weekday, and unless the
redemption period is reduced to 5
weeks under MN Stat. Secs.
580.07 or 582.032.
MORTGAGOR(S) RELEASED
FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGATION
ON MORTGAGE: None
“THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW
FOR REDEMPTION BY THE
MORTGAGOR, THE MORT-
GAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRE-
SENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS, MAY
BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS
IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS EN-
TERED UNDER MINNESOTA
STATUTES, SECTION 582.032,
DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER
THINGS, THAT THE MORT-
GAGED PREMISES ARE IM-
PROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL
DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE
UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY
USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRO-
DUCTION, AND ARE ABAN-
DONED.”
Dated: September 12, 2013
JPMorgan Chase Bank,
National Association
Mortgagee/Assignee of Mort-
gagee
USSET, WEINGARDEN AND
LIEBO, P.L.L.P.
Attorneys for Mortgagee/Assignee
of Mortgagee
4500 Park Glen Road #300
Minneapolis, MN 55416
(952) 925-6888
30 – 13-005754FC
THIS IS A COMMUNICATION
FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR.
Publish: September 26, Octo-
ber 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31, 2013
NOTICE OF MORTGAGE
FORECLOSURE SALE
THE RIGHT OF VERIFICA-
TION OF THE DEBT AND IDEN-
TITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDI-
TOR WITHIN THE TIME PROVID-
ED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECTED
BY THIS ACTION.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
that default has occurred in condi-
tions of the following described
mortgage:
DATE OF MORTGAGE: August
8, 2006
MORTGAGOR: Paul a R.
Cheever, a single person.
MORTGAGEE: Mortgage Elec-
tronic Registration Systems, Inc.
DATE AND PLACE OF
RECORDING: Recorded August
14, 2006, Sibley County Recorder,
Document No. A-207043
ASSIGNMENTS OF MORT-
GAGE: Assigned to: The Bank of
New York Mellon FKA The Bank of
New York, as Trustee for the Cer-
tificateholders of the CWALT, Inc.,
Alternative Loan Trust 2006-OC11
Mortgage Pass-through Certifi-
cates, Series 2006-OC11. Dated
June 14, 2012, Recorded June
28, 2012, as Document No.
A227374.
TRANSACTION AGENT: Mort-
gage Electronic Registration Sys-
tems, Inc.
TRANSACTION AGENT’S
MORTGAGE IDENTIFICATION
NUMBER ON MORTGAGE:
100077960000090655
LENDER OR BROKER AND
MORTGAGE ORIGINATOR
STATED ON MORTGAGE: Deci-
si on One Mortgage Company,
LLC
RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE
SERVICER: Select Portfolio Serv-
icing, Inc.
MORTGAGE PROPERTY AD-
DRESS: 312 East Adams Street,
Arlington, MN 55307
TAX PARCEL I.D. #:
31.0260.000
LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
Lot number One (1), and Lot
number Two (2), excepting the
West 25 feet of Lot 2, in Block
number El even (11) i n
Streissguth’s Addition to the Vil-
lage of Arlington, Sibley County,
Minnesota.
COUNTY IN WHICH PROPER-
TY IS LOCATED: Sibley
ORIGINAL PRINCIPAL
AMOUNT OF MORTGAGE:
$109,120.00
AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED
TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF
NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF
ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE:
$128,104.67
That prior to the commence-
ment of this mortgage foreclosure
proceeding Mortgagee/Assignee
of Mortgagee complied with all no-
tice requirements as required by
statute; That no action or proceed-
ing has been instituted at law or
otherwise to recover the debt se-
cured by said mortgage, or any
part thereof;
PURSUANT to the power of
sale contained in said mortgage,
the above described property will
be sol d by the Sheri ff of sai d
county as follows:
DATE AND TIME OF SALE:
December 13, 2013 at 10:00 AM
PLACE OF SALE: Sheriff’s Of-
fice, Sheriff’s Department, 319
Park Avenue, Gaylord MN
to pay the debt then secured by
said Mortgage, and taxes, if any,
on said premises, and the costs
and disbursements, including at-
torneys’ fees allowed by law sub-
ject to redemption within six (6)
months from the date of said sale
by the mortgagor(s), their personal
representatives or assigns unless
reduced to Five (5) weeks under
MN Stat. §580.07.
TIME AND DATE TO VACATE
PROPERTY: If the real estate is
an owner-occupied, single-family
dwelling, unless otherwise provid-
ed by law, the date on or before
which the mortgagor(s) must va-
cate the property if the mortgage
is not reinstated under section
580.30 or the property is not re-
deemed under section 580.23 is
11:59 p.m. on June 13, 2014, un-
less that date falls on a weekend
or legal holiday, in which case it is
the next weekday, and unless the
redemption period is reduced to 5
weeks under MN Stat. Secs.
580.07 or 582.032.
MORTGAGOR(S) RELEASED
FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGATION
ON MORTGAGE: None
“THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW
FOR REDEMPTION BY THE
MORTGAGOR, THE MORT-
GAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRE-
SENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS, MAY
BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS
IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS EN-
TERED UNDER MINNESOTA
STATUTES, SECTION 582.032,
DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER
THINGS, THAT THE MORT-
GAGED PREMISES ARE IM-
PROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL
DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE
UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY
USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRO-
DUCTION, AND ARE ABAN-
DONED.”
Dated: October 9, 2013
The Bank of New York Mellon
f/k/a
The Bank of New York, as
Trustee
Mortgagee/Assignee of Mort-
gagee
USSET, WEINGARDEN AND
LIEBO, P.L.L.P.
Attorneys for Mortgagee/Assignee
of Mortgagee
4500 Park Glen Road #300
Minneapolis, MN 55416
(952) 925-6888
38 – 13-007006 FC
THIS IS A COMMUNICATION
FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR.
Publish: October 17, 24, 31,
November 7, 14, and 21, 2013
CITY OF ARLINGTON
PLANNING & ZONING
COMMITTEE
PUBLIC HEARING
The Arlington Planning & Zon-
ing Committee will meet and con-
duct a public hearing on Thursday,
November 14, 2013 at 7:01 p.m.
or as soon thereafter, in the City
Hal l Counci l Chambers, 204
Shamrock Drive. The purpose of
the public hearing is to take oral
and written comments on a pro-
posed preliminary plat which is a
re-subdivision of the Memorial
Park Addition plat.
The proposed plat will have the
following effect:
1. Combine the hospital and
former clinic properties into one
lot,
2. Adjust the shared boundary
between the hospital and Memori-
al Park to accommodate future
hospital expansion needs, and
3. Simplify legal descriptions for
subject property.
Any person desiring to com-
ment on this matter is invited to do
so in writing or orally at the time of
the public hearing. Written com-
ments should be directed to Cyn-
thia Smith-Strack, P&Z Adminis-
trator, City of Arlington, 204 Sham-
rock Drive, Arlington MN 55307. A
complete copy of the proposed
preliminary plat is available for re-
view at Arlington City Hall during
normal business hours.
/S/ Cynthia Smith-Strack
Cynthia Smith-Strack,
P&Z Administrator
Publish: October 31, 2013
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, October 31, 2013, page 10
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
A & N Radiator Repair
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Brau Motors
CMC Construction
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Jerry’s Home Quality Foods
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Kolden Funeral Home
Kreft Cabinets, Inc.
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Dr. H.M. Noack
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tioneers
Quick Shop/Subway
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THIS PAGE SPONSORED BY THESE AREA BUSINESSES:
Members of the 2013 Sibley East cheerleading squad (in no particular
order) are: Elizabeth Becerra (captain), Megan Mathews (captain), Jessica
Garza, Megan Elseth, Mariah Cross, Emily Deno, Jessica Gadbaw, Daisy
Sanchez, Lexi Wilson, Rachel Loncorich, Cailee Mathwig, Larissa Prafke,
Harley Jo Borgman. Advisor Tammy Rechtzigel.
CHEERLEADERS
Photos courtesy of LifeTouch Photography.
Members of the 2013 Sibley East volleyball team (in no particular order)
are: Sydney Fogarty, Autumn Dose, Paige Nelson, Katie Tuchtenhagen,
Megan Krentz, McKayla Stumm, Mikayla Perschau, Kailey Geib, Megan
Eckberg, Melli Martens, Shelby Voight, Karley Lind, Alyssa Weber, Natalie
Mesker and Rachel Sorenson. Head coach Chip Wolverton and assistant
coaches Stepahnie Schultz and Kevin Effertz.
VOLLEYBALL
Members of the 2013 Sibley East football team (in no particular
order) are: Francisco Guzman, Brody Rodning, Devin Mahon,
Lukas Bullert, Julius Asmussen, Steven Haefs, Alex Pedraza, Austin
Sadler, Erik Danielson, Shayne Danielson, Aaron Bates, Ben White,
Michael Henderson, Nick Haupt, Brandon Ashton, Aaron Kapke,
Cody Swenson, Colton Bates, Tyler Bates, Zach Clarke, Levi Sali-
nas, Alex Battcher, Tristan Podratz, Ben Freitag, Donny Swanson,
Ethan Effertz, Sam Bullert, Darien Schulte, Brenden Bessel, Cordell
Bates, Miah DuFrane, Jordan Herd, Arvin Latchman, Tyler
Kratzke, Alex Bessel, Jon DuFrane, Zach Porter, Cole Bruhn, An-
drew Grack, Aaron Luskey, Beau Swenson, Kalab Stoeckman, Kody
Klopfleisch. Coaches - Chuck Hartman, Rod Tollefson, Mike Haller,
Carl Bratsch, Todd Warzecha, Tom Webster.
FOOTBALL
Members of the 2013 Sibley East tennis team (in no particular order) are: Alicia
Kranz, Alli Harter, Anna Grack, Ashley Mercier, Breann Walsh, Caydan Anderson,
Elizabeth Thies, Ella Lundstrom, Emily Tuchtenhagen, Faith Young, Hailey Haggen-
miller, Karissa Sorenson, Kelsey Klaustermeier, Kelsey Luepke, Kim Kurtweg, Korri
Brockoff, Lindsey Flieth, Mandy Thomes, Mariah Schrupp, Melissa Otto, Mikayla
Holmes, Norman Gonzalez, Rachel Davis, Rebecca Davis, Sierra Allison and Teresa
Ehrich. Head coach Melissa Laumeyer and assistant coach Rene Moriarty
TENNIS
Members of the 2013 Sibley East cross country team (in no particular
order) are: Boys team - Ben Ahlstrand, Sam Thies, Korban Strand, Jonah
Butler, Chase Ellwood, Justin Bennett, Jack Ballalatak, Ian Holmes, Jack
Rosenfeld, Logan Tesch, Kristian Schow, Cameron Thurn and Mike Schenck.
Girls team - Maren Miner, Heidi Milczark, Karina Robeck, Alison Eibs, Abi-
gail Butler, Tamara Ehrich, Breanna Fahning, Ariel Butler and Taylor Strand.
Head coach Dan Meier and assistant coach Mike Vrklan.
CROSS
COUNTRY
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