11-7-13 Silver Lake Leader

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Vol. 112 No. 46 • Thursday, November 7, 2013 • Silver Lake, MN 55381
Single copy
$1.00
Silver Lake Leader photo by Alyssa Schauer
After working nearly 13 years for the local
soil and water conservation district in
Carver County, Greg Graczyk moves into
a new career as a land specialist agent for
Whitetail Properties Real Esate. He looks
forward to utilizing his experience in land,
wildlife and conservation to help landown-
ers recognize the “full” potential and ben-
efits of their land parcels.
By Alyssa Schauer
Staff Writer
M
aking career
changes can be
risky and even a
little frightening at times, but
for Greg Graczyk, he knew
his new career as a land spe-
cialist agent for Whitetail
Properties Real Estate would
be “an avenue that was going
to be fulfilling.”
Graczyk was raised on a
small family cash crop farm
operation outside of Silver
Lake, and he cultivated a pas-
sion for farming and the out-
doors at a very young age.
“I credit that passion to my
father (Gerald). He either had
me sitting on a tractor seat
next to him or tracking be-
hind him through the woods
and wetlands at a very young
age. He’s the one who
sparked my interest in a con-
servation career,” Graczyk
said.
Graczyk graduated from St.
Cloud State University with a
double major in biology and
environmental studies.
“After graduation, I
worked for a habitat wildlife
restoration company that al-
lowed me to travel across
Minnesota to evaluate land
and assist landowners with
the development and imple-
mentation of a variety of land
enhancement and manage-
ment practices,” Graczyk
said.
“I wanted to set roots
around the family farm, and
that led me to my job with a
local soil and water conserva-
tion district in Carver County.
I was the program coordina-
tor there for 13 years, and I
continued to assist landown-
ers with land management
decisions,” Graczyk said.
He added that position pro-
vided him with a deeper
knowledge on a variety of
local, state, federal and spe-
cial grant programs and regu-
lations.
“That knowledge made me
more efficient in assisting
landowners with the develop-
ment and implementation of
land management practices
and plans,” Graczyk said.
“As great as that job was, I
wanted something more,”
Graczyk said.
He said he found the job
listing for a “land specialist
agent” on the website for
Whitetail Properties.
“They are a real estate
agency based out of Illinois,
who recently brokered into
Minnesota. They assist new
owners with conserving,
maintaining and enhancing
wildlife habitat, and they
caught my interest when I
first saw an episode of their
TV show about deer hunting.
“Being an avid outdoors-
man, anything involving
shooting big deer interests
me, so after seeing them on
TV, I searched their website
and found a link for ‘careers.’
They were looking for land
specialist agents for Min-
nesota, so I thought I’d brush
up the old resume and send it
in,” Graczyk said.
Graczyk completed two
phone interviews before
heading to the corporate of-
fice in Illinois for training.
“I completed schooling
throughout the summer and
officially became full time,”
Graczyk said.
“I felt I could add a lot to
the job. Many real estate
agents can sell properties and
add something like, ‘There’s
15 acres of hunting land.’ But
I can tell interested buyers
about that hunting land — I
Career change has been ‘fulfilling’ for local man
Silver Lake Leader photo by Alyssa Schauer
Halloween fun
Last week, the preschool children at Faith
Presbyterian Preschool in Silver Lake
painted pumpkins to celebrate the holiday.
The students also dressed in their cos-
tumes and decorated Halloween cup-
cakes! In the front are Ashlynn Imdieke
and Garrett Mills. In the back are Ella
Graczyk, Hadley Wagner and Miranda
Nowak.
By Alyssa Schauer
Staff Writer
On Saturday, Oct. 26, the
Silver Lake American Legion
hosted a “30th anniversary”
party in honor of the construc-
tion of the American Legion
clubhouse, and Legion mem-
bers also celebrated 90 years
of charter membership.
Bob Sopkowiak, with the
help of a committee, organized
the event complete with food,
drinks and a short program
that highlighted the major
events in purchasing and
building the clubhouse.
Sopkowiak said the Legion
building was purchased in No-
vember 1982 but did not have
a “clear title” of ownership
until 1988.
“To purchase the building,
we invested money and
Leonard Fiala backed us up
with finances, too. At that
time, we were paying 12.75
percent interest on the loan,”
Sopkowiak said.
He said the building was
renovated completely with
volunteer help and, in 1991,
the Legion was issued a land
use permit to expand the club.
“The Lhotka brothers were
contracted for that construc-
tion, and a lot of the interior
work was completed by volun-
teers. We all worked very hard
to upgrade the clubhouse.
‘Failure’ was not in our vocab-
ulary,” Sopkowiak said.
The expansion included a
storage room for medical
equipment to be loaned to
those needing wheelchairs,
crutches and other medical
equipment.
Another meeting room, an
office and a grill area to be
used for steak frys also were
Silver Lake Legion Club
celebrates 30th anniversary
Please mark your calen-
dars for this year’s Thanks-
giving dinner on Thursday,
Nov. 28.
Everyone is encouraged
to attend and share all of the
things we have to be thank-
ful with others around us,
according to Mayor Bruce
Bebo.
“This year, we would re-
ally like to honor and show
our appreciation to all of our
veterans and those who are
serving in our military,”
Bebo said.
Look for more informa-
tion in future editions of the
Silver Lake Leader. Sign-up
will be at the city offices, or
call Bebo at 320-327-3157.
9th-annual Thanksgiving dinner Nov. 28
By Lori Copler
Staff Writer
Minnesota Commissioner of
Transportation Charlie Zelle
was in Hutchinson Friday, em-
phasizing that a good trans-
portation system is vital to the
state’s economy.
And not just the economy is
reliant on good transportation,
Zelle said.
“All the things we most care
about are supported by our
transportation system — our
health, our economy, the air
we breathe and the towns we
live in,” said Zelle. “Trans-
portation is our access to our
jobs, our schools, our churches
and our shopping.”
In turn, Zelle heard from
local politicians that good
transportation is vital for the
local economy, as pitches were
made to improve Highway 22
from Hutchinson to Glencoe
to connect Highway 7 to High-
way 212, and to improve
Highway 212 as a major east-
west artery from the Twin
Cities to the South Dakota bor-
der.
But Zelle had a more serious
message as well — there is a
huge gap between the state’s
transportation needs and the
revenue sources to fill those
needs.
In order to compete with its
neighboring states, Minnesota
needs a “world-class” trans-
Transportation commissioner: large
gap between needs, revenue sources
Silver Lake Leader photo by Lori Copler
Minnesota Commissioner of Transportation Charlie
Zelle was in Hutchinson Friday morning, where he
hosted a town hall meeting to discuss transportation
needs in the state.
Graczyk
Turn to page 2
Legion
Turn to page 3
Transportation
Turn to page 3
Page 2 — Silver Lake Leader, Thursday, November 7, 2013
Staff
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Publishers;
Rich Glennie, Editor; Brenda Fogarty,
Sales; Alyssa Schauer, Staff Writer/Of-
fice.
Letters
The Silver Lake Leader welcomes let-
ters from readers expressing their
opinions. All letters, however, must be
signed. Private thanks, solicitations
and potentially libelous letters will not
be published. We reserve the right to
edit any letter.
A guest column is also available to any
writer who would like to present an
opinion in a more expanded format. If
interested, contact the editor,
richg@glencoenews.com.
Ethics
The editorial staff of the Silver Lake
Leader strives to present the news in a
fair and accurate manner. We appreci-
ate errors being brought to our atten-
tion. Please bring any grievances
against the Silver Lake Leader to the
attention of the editor. Should differ-
ences continue, readers are encour-
aged to take their grievances to the
Minnesota News Council, an organi-
zation dedicated to protecting the pub-
lic from press inaccuracy and
unfairness. The News Council can be
contacted at 12 South Sixth St., Suite
940, Minneapolis, MN 55402, or
(612) 341-9357.
Press Freedom
Freedom of the press is guaranteed
under the First Amendment to the U.S.
Constitution:
“Congress shall make no law re-
specting an establishment of religion,
or prohibiting the free exercise thereof;
or abridging the freedom of speech, or
the press…”
Ben Franklin wrote in the Pennsyl-
vania Gazette in 1731: “If printers were
determined not to print anything till
they were sure it would offend nobody
there would be very little printed.”
Deadline for news and advertising
in the Silver Lake Leader is noon,
Tuesday. Deadline for advertising in
The Galaxy is noon Wednesday.
Established Dec. 20, 1901 by W.O. Merrill
Postmaster send address changes to:
Silver Lake Leader,
P.O. Box 343, 104B Lake Ave., Silver Lake, MN 55381
Phone 320-327-2216 FAX 320-327-2530
Email slleader@embarqmail.com
Hours: Mon. 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Tues. 8 a.m.-Noon,
Wed. Closed, Thurs. 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri. Closed.
Published Every Thursday at Silver Lake, MN 55381.
Periodicals paid at Silver Lake, MN.
Subscription Rates: McLeod County and Cokato, MN
– $30.00 per year. Elsewhere in MN – $34.00 per year.
Outside of state – $38.00.
Silver Lake Leader
Business & Professional Directory
COKATO
EYE CENTER
115 Olsen Blvd., Cokato
320-286-5695 or 888-286-5695
OPTOMETRISTS
*Paul G. Eklof, O.D.
*Katie N. Tancabel, O.D.
Kid’s Glasses
$
98.00
Evening and Saturday
appts. available
• 5” Seamless Gutters
• 6” Seamless Gutters
• K-Guard Leaf-Free
Gutter System
(lifetime clog free guarantee)
PHIL GOETTL
612-655-1379
888-864-5979
www.mngutter.com
M
2
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tfn
C
L
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S
A
j
For All Your Insurance needs
Home, Auto, Farm, Commercial
Call an Agent today
CITIZENS INSURANCE
AGENCY OF HUTCHINSON, LLC
Citizens Bank Building
P.O. Box 339 – 102 Main St. S, Hutchinson, MN 55350
Toll-Free: (888) 234-2910 www.ciahutch.com Fax: (320) 587-1174
K7eowAa
The Business and Professional Directory is provided each week for quick reference to businesses and
professionals in the Silver Lake area — their locations, phone numbers and office hours.
Call the Silver Lake Leader, (320-327-2216), or McLeod County Chronicle, (320-864-5518)
offices for details on how you can be included in this directory.
LUNDEEN
AUCTION
(612) 280-1725
Derek
Lundeen
Auctioneer
www.ludeenauction.com
Optician
Gerry’s Vision
Shoppe, Inc.
“Your Complete Optical Store”
(with In-House Lab)
Call for Appointment
864-6111
1234 Greeley Ave.,
Glencoe
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Hwy 12, Cokato
(320) 286-2179
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Silver Lake Leader photos
by Alyssa Schauer
Halloween fun
Last Thursday, Cedar
Crest Estate in Silver Lake
opened its doors to trick-
or-treaters in the area, and
some of the residents even
got into the Halloween
spirit and dressed in cos-
tume, too! Above is King
William Markgraf with his
skeleton grandson, Logan
Hendrickson. To the left is
Minnesota Gophers cheer-
leader Rose Jergens.
Silver Lake Leader photos
by Alyssa Schauer
Tricks and
some treats
On Halloween, the Silver
Lake Legion and Auxiliary
members hosted their an-
nual Halloween party at
the auditorium. Above, the
Pola-Czesky Royalty is in
costume for the spooky
hoilday. From left to right
are Jamie Kosek, Connor
Sullivan, Claire Wraspir,
Mya Dahlheimer and
Becca Green. To the right
are Shany’ah Dahlheimer
as Buzz Lightyear and
Deja Webster as Cleopa-
tra. The party entailed
games, coloring, door
prizes and free goodie
bags for all those in atten-
dance.
can fully explain all the assets
a parcel has to offer, from
wildlife species on the land to
the geography of the parcel to
its agricultural benefits,”
Graczyk said.
“Land has always been an
interest of mine. I’ve been
very fortunate to grow up
here and be part of a family
farming operation. I con-
tribute all that to Dad. He’s
the one who sparked that in-
terest and he once told me,
‘Land is one of the most re-
warding purchases because
God only made so much of
it.’ That is a motto I continue
to live by,” Graczyk said.
“In my past jobs, I’ve al-
ways loved working with
landowners, and I get to con-
tinue to do that with this new
job.
“It’s something I am look-
ing forward to — not only
showing parcels to interested
buyers, but being able to tell
them about the benefits of the
land. I feel I can add so much
more than just the financial
benefits, but I can share the
agricultural and recreational
aspects, too,” Graczyk said.
He said he also is looking
forward to working with
those interested in selling
land. “I can fully explain the
benefits of their land to pro-
mote to interested buyers,”
Graczyk said.
He added that his experi-
ence with Carver County will
assist him in future transac-
tions with buyers and sellers,
also.
“Working for the govern-
ment, I have a lot of experi-
ence with state and federal
programs and even if I do not
know the answer to a ques-
tion, I know where to go to
find it,” Graczyk said.
He shared his experience of
recently surveying a parcel of
land up for sale.
“I went out there before the
sun came up to take pictures.
I was sort of ‘hunting’ with
my camera and I captured
live shots of the wetland pop-
ulated with ducks and pheas-
ants. I also noticed deer prints
and trails. I know how to
show what the land has to
offer, and it’s going that extra
mile that will pay off,”
Graczyk said.
“I feel very proud to have
made it through the interview
and to have been offered this
job with Whitetail Properties.
They are more than just ‘real
estate guys.’ They are land
specialists who live agricul-
ture and wildlife recreation,”
Graczyk said.
“All these years, I came
into loving working with
landowners and helping them
with their problems. But ulti-
mately, I wanted something
more in life and this job gives
me the opportunity to con-
tinue working with landown-
ers. This is an avenue for
myself that is going to be ful-
filling for me,” Graczyk said.
Graczyk serves as a land
specialist agent for Whitetail
Properties in Carver,
McLeod, Sibley, Meeker,
Kandiyohi, Renville and
Chippewa counties.
Along with his wife, Jill,
and two daughters, Ella and
Abigail, Graczyk also part-
ners with his father in the
family farming operation. His
new-found love revolves
around sharing outdoor expe-
riences with his family and
passing on the outdoor her-
itage and his love for the land
to his children.
Graczyk Continued from page 1
County parks closed during hunting season
The McLeod County Park
Commission will not allow the
public to enter any of the six
county parks from Nov. 8
through Nov. 17. The reason is
for public safety and to protect
the wildlife during hunting
season.
The affected parks are Buf-
falo Creek Park, Glencoe;
Swan Lake Park, Silver Lake;
William May Park, Winsted;
Stahl’s Lake Park, Hutchinson;
Lake Marion Regional Park,
Brownton; and Piepenburg
Regional Park, Hutchinson.
Just a reminder to the public
that there is no hunting al-
lowed on county park prop-
erty.
Nov. 11-15
Silver Lake
Senior Nutrition Site
Monday — Cranberry-glazed
chicken, baked potato, California-
blend vegetables, bread, mar-
garine, fruit cocktail, low-fat milk.
Tuesday — Hamburger tomato
casserole, green beans, mandarin
orange whip, bread, margarine,
cookie, low-fat milk.
Wednesday — Vegetable beef
soup, turkey sandwich, pineapple,
crackers, margarine, bar, low-fat
milk.
Thursday — Lemon-pepper fish,
brown rice, cole slaw, mixed veg-
etables, dinner roll, margarine,
raspberry parfait dessert, low-fat
milk.
Friday — Salisbury steak,
parslied whole potatoes, squash,
bread, margarine, blushing pears,
low-fat milk.
GSL Elementary
Breakfast
Monday — Tony’s breakfast
pizza or Cinnamon Toast Crunch
and string cheese and apple juice
cup, low-fat milk.
Tuesday — Pancake on a stick
with syrup or apple cinnamon muf-
fin and yogurt, mandarin oranges,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday — French toast
sticks with syrup or Golden Gra-
hams and string cheese, diced
peaches, low-fat milk.
Thursday — Tony’s breakfast
pizza or oatmeal with cinnamon
and raisins, orange juice, low-fat
milk.
Friday — Egg and cheese muf-
fin or blueberry muffin and yogurt,
orange juice, low-fat milk.
Helen Baker/Lakeside lunch
Monday — Hamburger on a
whole-grain bun, ham and cheese
on a whole-grain bun, oven-baked
beans, baby carrots with dressing,
apple wedges, pineapple tidbits.
Tuesday — Chicken nuggets,
chef salad with cheese, egg and
croutons, bread stick, mashed po-
tatoes with gravy, cucumber slices
with dressing, banana, chilled ap-
plesauce.
Wednesday — Cheesy Italian
dunkers, yogurt, American cheese
and crackers fun lunch, seasoned
green beans, cauliflower florets
with dressing, grapes, chilled
peaches.
Thursday — Pancakes with
scrambled eggs, chef salad with
cheese, egg and croutons, bread
stick, oven-baked tator tots, mari-
nated cucumbers and tomatoes,
orange wedges, chilled apple-
sauce.
Friday — Tony’s cheese pizza,
turkey and cheese on whole-grain
bread, seasoned carrots, caesar
romaine salad with dressing, apple
wedges, chilled mixed fruit.
Junior/Senior High breakfast
Monday — Breakfast pizza or
Cinnamon Toast Crunch and blue-
berry muffin, diced pears, low-fat
milk.
Tuesday — Pancake on a stick
with syrup, or oatmeal with cinna-
mon and raisins, mandarin or-
anges, low-fat milk.
Wednesday — Breakfast burrito
or ultimate breakfast round, yogurt,
diced peaches, low-fat milk.
Thursday — French toast sticks
or Cinnamon Toast Crunch and
apple cinnamon muffin, orange
juice, low-fat milk.
Friday — Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit or ultimate break-
fast round and yogurt, orange juice
cup, low-fat milk.
Junior/Senior High lunch
Monday — Macaroni and
cheese, garlic bread stick, sea-
soned peas, marinated cucumbers
and tomatoes, baby carrots with
dressing, apple, chilled apple-
sauce.
Tuesday — Chicken nuggets,
mashed sweet potatoes, dinner
roll, seasoned corn, chick pea
salad, red pepper strips with dress-
ing, banana, pineapple tidbits.
Wednesday — Oven-baked
turkey corn dog, oven-baked
beans, baked tator tots, broccoli
salad with raisins, jicama sticks
with dressing, kiwi wedges, chilled
peaches.
Thursday — Oven-baked
chicken, mashed potatoes with
gravy, seasoned carrots, dinner
roll, confetti cole slaw, cucumber
slices with dressing, orange
wedges, chilled applesauce.
Friday — Italian cuisine, pasta
bar with chicken alfredo or Italian
spaghetti with meat sauce, bread
stick, seasoned green beans, cae-
sar romaine salad, baby carrots
with dressing, apple, chilled mixed
fruit.
portation system, including not
just roads and bridges, but rail,
light rail, bus, air and water
transportation, Zelle said.
“The bottom line is that we
have to face some huge
changes in our future,” said
Zelle, including an aging pop-
ulation which might be better
served by bus and rail trans-
portation.
First, Zelle said, the state
needs to preserve its existing
infrastructure, which in most
cases is at least 50 years old
and aging.
Second, the state must
“complete regional connec-
tions” to ensure the flow of
traffic through the state.
But the problem, Zelle said,
is finding a sustainable fund-
ing source. Revenue sources,
such as gas taxes and federal
aid, can help the state depart-
ment of transportation plan for
five years.
“But what we really need is
a funding source that will take
us through the next 20 years,”
said Zelle.
And needs in the next 20
years include safety, mainte-
nance, the relief of congestion
and additional travel options,
Zelle indicated.
Zelle said there is a $12 bil-
lion gap over the next 20 years
just to address road and bridge
needs, and a $50 billion gap to
address all of the state’s needs,
including building new infra-
structure.
And while an additional gas
tax of 10 cents a gallon would
cost a driver, on average, $67
a year, that will not generate
enough to close the gap for a
couple of reasons, Zelle said.
First, the driving public is
aging and perhaps looking for
other modes of traffic; and,
second, younger drivers are
not as enamored with automo-
biles as they have been in the
past.
“Young people don’t have
the love of automobiles as
much as they have a love of
cell phones,” said Zelle.
“Things are changing.”
And with rising fuel costs,
people are driving less and
driving more fuel-efficient ve-
hicles.
Along with trying to find
new sources of revenue, Zelle
said the department of trans-
portation needs to take a
harder look at its own effi-
ciency.
“Are we using our existing
resources wisely? Are we
being smart about the money
that we do get?” Zelle said.
Technological advances can
be costly, but could save the
department money in the long
run.
For example, Zelle said, a
uniquely designed bridge in
the Twin Cities area uses stain-
less-steel construction. While
that bridge is costly, it should
have a long life expectancy.
And changing to LED light-
ing in road lighting and signals
has already saved significant
dollars, Zelle said.
“LED lighting could save us
$18 million a year,” said Zelle.
“We’re looking under every
pillow to find money.”
Along with an advisory
council of citizens and busi-
nesses to help MnDOT find ef-
ficiencies, Zelle said the
governor has charged him with
reaching out to the public for
advice and to share MnDOT’s
vision of the future.
State Rep. Glenn Gruen-
hagen, R-Glencoe, was the
first to step up with some ad-
vice — get rid of prevailing
wage requirements on proj-
ects.
“It drives up the cost of proj-
ects,” said Gruenhagen. Min-
nesota’s prevailing wages are
among the highest in the coun-
try, and higher than the federal
government.
“We have to reform that pre-
vailing wage — at least get it
down to the level of the federal
government,” said Gruen-
hagen.
Gruenhagen also said that
MnDOT needs to look at the
return on investment (ROI) on
different modes of transporta-
tion.
Light rail, Gruenhagen con-
tended, has a “very poor ROI.
It goes decades out. Roads and
bridges get a much quicker re-
turn on investment.”
But Zelle said more should
be considered on funding other
modes of transportation be-
sides “billing out into the fu-
ture,” including “direct
benefits” to the consumer,
such as elderly people who
may use other modes of trans-
portation, and relief on traffic
congestion and other issues.
“The key here is that there is
no one solution for all situa-
tions,” said Zelle.
McLeod County Commis-
sioner Ron Shimanski urged
MnDOT to look at ways to
make its fleets of vehicles
more efficient, and “put the
money saved toward our
roads.”
“That’s a very good point,
and we are looking at our fleet
management plan for just such
efficiencies,” said Zelle.
Hutchinson Mayor Steve
Cook said the area needs better
connection between regional
corridors to move goods pro-
duced locally, including im-
provements to Highway 22
between Hutchinson and Glen-
coe to provide a needed con-
nection from Highway 7 to
Highway 212.
McLeod County Commis-
sioner Kermit Terlinden also
said a group is pushing to com-
plete the expansion of High-
way 212 to a four-lane, and to
make it a major east-west cor-
ridor across the state.
Zelle thanked the group of
about 50 people for their com-
ments and suggestions.
Silver Lake Leader, Thursday, November 7, 2013 — Page 3
Visit us online at
www.GlencoeNews.com
“Pets are Braggin’ and
Tails are Waggin’ at...”
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OPEN through Wed., Nov. 27!
Order your
Thanksgiving
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North from Silver Lake on Cty. Rd. 2, follow blue signs.
Pie Order Hotline: 320-485-3704
Carlson’s Orchard
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Plenty of your favorite
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STOCK UP NOW!
End of Season Specials on Apples & Cider
NOVEMBER Hours: Tues.-Sun. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. • Lunch 11-4
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Thanksgiving group to meet
There will be a meeting Thursday, Nov. 7 (tonight), at 7
p.m., in the Silver Lake city offices to discuss the ninth-
annual Thanksgiving dinner. There is as much work lead-
ing up to the dinner as there is on Thanksgiving Day. This
event takes many volunteers and supporters, and those in-
terested in helping are asked to attend the meeting. Any
questions, call Mayor Bruce Bebo at 320-327-3157.
SLBA set to meet Tuesday
The Silver Lake Business Association will meet Tues-
day, Nov. 12, at 7 p.m., at the Silver Lake Auditorium. The
Silver Lake Business Expo will be discussed. Those inter-
ested in participating should attend.
Legion Vets dinner Nov. 9
The Silver Lake American Legion is hosting its annual
Veterans Day dinner at the Silver Lake Legion Post 141
on Saturday, Nov. 9. The social hour is at 6 p.m., and the
dinner is at 7 p.m. Sign up at the Legion to attend. Call the
Legion at 320-327-2404 for more information.
Seniors set to meet Nov. 11
The Silver Lake Senior Citizens Club will meet Mon-
day, Nov. 11, at 1 p.m., at the Silver Lake Auditorium.
Degree of Honor meets
Degree of Honor No. 182 will have a social meeting on
Tuesday, Nov. 12, at 5 p.m., in the Silver Lake Auditorium.
Opus Two to perform Nov. 7
Opus Two, an award-winning violin and piano duo, will
appear at First Lutheran Church, 925 E. 13th St., Glencoe,
tonight (Thursday), at 7 p.m., as the second performance
of the 2013-14 Glencoe Concert Association season. The
duo consists of violinist William Terwilliger and pianist
Andrew Cooperstock. Call 320-864-5367 for more infor-
mation.
Scout collection set Nov. 9
Glencoe Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts are teaming up to
collect food for the McLeod Emergency Food Shelf on
Saturday, Nov 9. Please place non-perishable food items
in a bag, and place the bag outside on your doorstep by 9
a.m. Saturday morning for the Scouts to pick up. This in-
cludes the cities of Glencoe and Silver Lake. If you are
missed during the pick up, please drop your donation off
at the food shelf at 808 12th St., Glencoe.
Common Cup choir concert
Choirs of Common Cup Ministry churches will “Come
Together in Song” for the seventh-annual concert on Sun-
day, Nov. 24, at 3 p.m., at the Hutchinson High School Au-
ditorium. The program will include individual choir
members, community vocal groups and a mass choir of all
participants. There is no charge for the concert. A free will
offering will be taken to help support the outreach min-
istries of Common Cup Ministry.
Upcoming Events
Submitted photo
On Saturday, Oct. 26, the Silver Lake American Legion
celerbated its 30th anniversary as a clubhouse. Food,
drinks, and a short program were part of the event.
Above, present Legion Commander Larry Lhotka
shares history about the charter.
part of the addition.
The 30th anniversary gath-
ering was attended not only by
Legion and Auxiliary mem-
bers and the community, but
other Legion members from
the Third District, including
past commanders from Glen-
coe, Norwood-Young Amer-
ica, Bayport and Waconia.
Speeches also were given by
Duane Yurek, who was mayor
of Silver Lake when the Le-
gion clubhouse opened in
1983, and current mayor Bruce
Bebo.
At the celebration, Ron
Yurek, the Legion gambling
manager, gave a report on how
gambling has benefited the
community of Silver Lake.
“In the last 30 years, nearly
$1 million has been generated
from gambling, and that
money goes directly back into
community projects,” Sop-
kowiak said.
“We are so thankful for all
who have supported us and
who continue to support us.
We wouldn’t be where we are
today without all the volun-
teers, donors and community
support. Thank you,” Sop-
kowiak said.
The Silver Lake American
Legion is home to Legion
members, Auxiliary members,
Sons of the American Legion
and Junior Auxiliary members.
Legion Continued from page 1
Transportation Continued from page 1
Menu
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
300 Cleveland Ave.,
Silver Lake
Dr. Tom Rakow, Pastor
320-327-2265
http://silverlakechurch.org
Sat., Nov. 9 — Men’s Bible
study, 7 a.m.
Sun., Nov. 10 — “First Light”
radio broadcast on KARP 106.9
FM, 7:30 a.m.; pre-service prayer
time, 9:15 a.m.; worship service,
9:30 a.m.; Sunday school, 10:35
a.m.
Mon., Nov. 11 — Church board
meeting, 7 p.m.
Wed., Nov. 13 — Confirmation
class, 6 p.m.; prayer time and pup-
pet practice, 7 p.m.
Sat., Nov. 16 — Men’s Bible
study, 7 a.m.; women’s Bible
study, 9 a.m.
Dial-A-Bible Story, 320-327-
2843.
FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
108 W. Main St.,
Silver Lake
320-327-2452
Fax 320-327-6562
E-mail: faithfriends
@embarqmail.com
Carol Chmielewski, pastor
Office hours: Tuesdays,
Wednesdays, Thursdays from
1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Sun., Nov. 10 — Hand bells
practice, 8:45 a.m.; worship serv-
ice, 10 a.m.; fellowship to follow
service.
Tues., Nov. 12 — Newsletter
articles due.
Wed., Nov. 13 — Light supper,
5:30 p.m.; WOW classes, 6 p.m.;
choir practice, 6:45 p.m.
CHURCH OF THE HOLY
FAMILY
700 W. Main St.,
Silver Lake
Anthony Stubeda, Pastor
Thurs., Nov. 7 — Rosary and
Mass at Cedar Crest, 10:10 a.m.;
CCW, 7 p.m.
Fri., Nov. 8 — Mass, 8 a.m.
Sat., Nov. 9 — St. Pius X, Holy
Family youth group Bible study,
noon; reconciliation, 5:30 p.m.;
6:30 p.m.
Sun., Nov. 10 — Mass, 8 a.m.
and 8 p.m.
Mon., Nov. 11 — No Mass.
Tues., Nov. 12 — Mass, 8 a.m.;
eucharistic adoration, 8:30 a.m.-
10 p.m.; quilting, 9 a.m.; staff
meeting, 10 a.m.
Wed., Nov. 13 — Mass, 5 p.m.;
first- through sixth-grade religious
education, 5:30 p.m.-6:45 p.m.;
seventh- through 10th-grade reli-
gious education, 7 p.m.-8:15 p.m.
Thurs., Nov. 14 — Mass at
Cedar Crest, 10:30 a.m.; Area
Worship, 7 p.m.
Fri., Nov. 15 — No Mass.
WORD OF LIFE CHURCH
950 School Rd. S.W.
Hutchinson
320-587-9443
E-mail: infor@
loversoftruth.com
Jim Hall, Pastor
Sun., Nov. 10 — Worship, 9:30
a.m. and 6 p.m.
THE CHURCH OF JESUS
CHRIST OF LATTER DAY
SAINTS
770 School Rd.,
Hutchinson
Kenneth Rand,
Branch President
320-587-5665
Sun., Nov. 10 — Sunday
school, 10:50 a.m.-11:30 a.m.;
priesthood, relief society and pri-
mary, 11:40 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
RIVERSIDE ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
20924 State Hwy. 7 W.,
Hutchinson
320-587-2074
E-mail: assembly@
hutchtel.net
Dr. Lee Allison, pastor
Sun., Nov. 10— Worship, 8:30
a.m. and 10:30 a.m.
Wed., Nov. 13 — Family night
activities, 6:30 p.m.
FIRST CONGREGATION
UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST
31 Fourth Ave. S.W.,
Hutchinson
320-587-2125
E-mail: jmm@hutchtel.net
Sun., Nov. 10 — Sunday
school, 9 a.m.; worship, 10:15
a.m.
ST. PIUS X CHURCH
1014 Knight Ave., Glencoe
Anthony Stubeda, Pastor
Thurs., Nov. 7 — Morning
prayer, 7 a.m.; Mass, 7:20 a.m.;
staff meeting, 11 a.m.; Schoenstatt
boys’ group meeting, 2:50 p.m.;
fundraiser Unhinged! Pizza, 5
p.m.; CCW meeting, 7 p.m.
Fri., Nov. 8 — Morning prayer,
8 a.m.; school Mass, 8:20 a.m.; no
Spanish Mass.
Sat., Nov. 9 — Mothers group
rosary, 9 a.m.; pre-baptism in
Spanish, 10 a.m.; St. Pius X/Holy
Family youth group Bible study at
St. Pius X. noon; reconciliation, 4
p.m.; Mass, 5 p.m.
Sun., Nov. 10 —Mass, 9:30
a.m.; Spanish Mass, 11:30 a.m.;
Hispanic ministry religious educa-
tion for youths and adults, 12:45
p.m.; Guadalupe committee meet-
ing, 1:45 p.m.; Mass at Holy Fam-
ily, Silver Lake, 8 p.m.
Mon., Nov. 11 — No Mass;
gather meeting in Renville, 10
a.m.; mission club meeting, 1:30
p.m.; Schoenstatt girls’ group, 3
p.m.
Tues., Nov. 12 — No Mass; no
PAC meeting.
Wed., Nov. 13 — Evening
prayer, 5:40 p.m.; Mass, 6 p.m.;
kindergarten through sixth-grade
religious education, 7 p.m.-8 p.m.;
seventh- through 10th-grade reli-
gious education classes, 7 p.m.-
8:15 p.m.
SHALOM BAPTIST
CHURCH
1215 Roberts Rd. SW.,
Hutchinson
Rick Stapleton, senior pastor
Adam Krumrie, worship pas-
tor/director of
student ministries
Thurs., Nov. 7 — High school
lunch; worship team rehearsal, 6
p.m.
Sun., Nov. 10 —Adult growth
groups, Sunday school and wor-
ship, 9 a.m.; adult growth groups
and worship, 10:30 a.m.; discover
membership, noon; Shalom run-
ning group, 4 p.m.; Financial
Peace University, 7 p.m.
Mon., Nov. 11 — Griefshare
workshop, 6:30 p.m.; women’s
discipleship, 7 p.m.
Tues., Nov. 12 — Women’s
discipleship, 9 a.m.
Wed., Nov. 13 — AWANA for
children ages 4 through fifth
grade, 6:30 p.m.; SOS (Students
of Shalom) middle school, 6:30
p.m.; high school, 7:30 p.m.
BETHEL LUTHERAN
77 Lincoln Ave.,
Lester Prairie
Bethany Nelson, pastor
320-395-2125
Sun., Nov. 10 — Worship, 9
a.m.; coffee and fellowship, 10:15
a.m.; Sunday school, 10:15 a.m.;
council meeting, 10:30 a.m.
Tues., Nov. 12 — Crow River
Board Conference WELCA meet-
ing.
Wed., Nov. 13 — Choir, 7 p.m.
Page 4 — Silver Lake Leader, Thursday, November 7, 2013
952-934-1525 800-362-3515
Extended through
February 22!
Back for the first time
in 20 years!
Relive the
Tradition!
C H A N H A S S E N D T . C O M
R
4
2
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5
1
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3
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Silver Lake
Leader
Brian Mikolichek: Owner • Bonded-Insured
Residential Remodel
Service Light Commercial
Complete Plumbing and Heating Systems
Air Conditioning Installation
Winsted, MN 320-395-2002
M
ikolichek
Plumbing & Heating
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Early Deadlines
Due to the Thanksgiving holiday,
the deadline for the
Silver Lake Leader will be
Noon on Monday, Nov. 25
Papers will be printed on Tuesday
and on newsstands on Wednesday.
Thanks for your
cooperation!
At one of my interviews last
week, I was greeted with a
big, loving hug, and I realized
it has been one of those
months with great reporting
experiences again and I should
thank the Lord each day for
my job.
Last Monday, I encountered
one of the most heartwarming
interviews I’ve had in my
three years as a reporter.
I was meeting Willie
Tuominen and his mother,
Julie. As you may have read
last week, Willie was diag-
nosed with kidney failure and
at the young age of 7, received
a kidney transplant.
He was recently granted a
“wish” from the Make-A-
Wish Foundation and I headed
over to their apartment for the
story.
After a few knocks at their
door, I was greeted with a big
hug from a petite, red-headed
little boy (Willie) who grabbed
my hand and led me into the
dining room to begin the inter-
view.
He asked me all sorts of
questions: “Who are you?
Why are you here? What are
you doing?” before helping
me “unpack” my camera bag.
With all those questions, I
thought I was the one getting
interviewed. I think he’d make
a great reporter.
After looking through my
stash of business cards, re-
porter notebook and pile of
blue proofreading markers and
pens in my camera bag, he
proceeded to tell me about his
kidney.
He said he named it “Jacob”
and he even showed me all his
scars from his surgeries—
about three or four scars al-
most as long as his little torso.
I couldn’t help but tear up at
the sight of those previous in-
cisions, and I stared at him in
amazement, wondering how
this little boy could be so pos-
itive, so energetic, so friendly
after everything he has en-
dured.
And the emotions continued
as his mother shared the trau-
matic experience of his birth
and near-death situation.
After the interview, Willie
gave me a sheet of his school
pictures to keep, and I had to
laugh as I looked at eight wal-
let-sized portraits of Willie.
“Honey, I don’t think Alyssa
needs all eight pictures of
you,” his mother said as she
cut one out for me.
Willie and his mom are two
of the most inspiring and
friendly people I have met,
and I am so thankful to have
been able to share their story
with the hope of inspiring oth-
ers.
My fun week in reporting
continued with all of the Hal-
loween activities scheduled on
Thursday between Faith Pres-
byterian Preschool, Cedar
Crest Estate and the Hal-
loween party at the audito-
rium.
Halloween is my favorite
holiday — I love scary
movies, dressing up and, of
course, the candy!
And since I started report-
ing, I enjoy being “on the job”
to take Halloween pictures.
Parents and children are so
creative with costumes!
This year, I met a couple of
glamorous princesses, a few
beautiful witches (even a
Candy Corn Witch who
looked like candy corn), Buzz
Lightyear from Toy Story, the
bearded Si from the popular
television show Duck Dy-
nasty, Johnny Cash and June
Carter, and Cleopatra.
I really should have gotten
their autographs or at least had
my picture taken with them.
This reporting job also
brought me to the Legion for a
“senior dinner” on Monday,
hosted by the Silver Lake
Civic Association and Silver
Lake GFWC Women’s Club.
I enjoyed delicious rice hot-
dish, caesar salad and cake in
the company of some of my
favorite people (the senior-
aged adults), a few rounds of
card bingo and, of course,
good conversation about the
Jeep, defective GPS devices,
and polka-dancing.
After dinner, we engaged in
a “sing-a-long” session with
tunes like “You Are My Sun-
shine” and “On Top of
Spaghetti.”
We even sang a song to the
tune of “My Favorite Things”
about Maalox, dentures, frag-
ile bones, and prunes — all
things I have to look forward
to.
So in this month of Thanks-
giving, I must say I am thank-
ful for my job. I’m always
eager to see where it will bring
me each week.
Wouldn’t it be great if it
brought me to Hawaii or Spain
or Greece?
Maybe one day...
Much to be thankful for in this job
The Travel Section
By Alyssa Schauer
Way down the street is
Frank Zrust’s lumberyard.
They will even make fine
kitchen cabinets upon request.
Across the street is the fine,
solid, brick elementary and
high school built in 1922 for
$40,000 after the wooden one
burned down. School hours
are 9 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m.
until 4 p.m.
The first meeting of the Sil-
ver Lake Parent Teachers As-
sociation was held a few
months ago. They kicked off
the event by featuring the
Lyman Cooley Travel Talk
Show, accompanied by motion
pictures. Admission was 15
cents.
The High School gymna-
sium was filled to capacity
when the junior class play fea-
tured “Poor Father.”
Last week, the Silver Lake
school officials received a let-
ter from the state school in-
spector after his visit, stating
that all conditions were satis-
factory.
I see eight ladies skating on
the lake, dressed in long
dresses and coats and fancy
hats. Maybe they are some of
the group from the branch of
the Silver Lake Red Cross
Ladies. They do a lot of volun-
teer work and look very im-
pressive when they march in
parades, all dressed in long,
gleaming white, flowing
dresses.
Or was it was the ladies who
appeared on a program for the
Glencoe Women’s Club,
dressed in ethnic Czech cos-
tumes, singing and dancing for
the enjoyment of the Glencoe
ladies?
Just a few years ago, the
lake was completely dry. Peo-
ple had gardens on the edges.
Happy Bill Makovsky’s hay
mower broke down in the
middle of the lake. Before he
could get it fixed it started
raining. Some people say it
still remains under the water.
Up the street to the north is
Johnny Cermak’s Garage.
This was his father’s former
feed mill after he was injured
at the mill and died.
Johnny is a laid-back type
of mechanic, never in a hurry,
but gets things done and does
good work. In his smiley face
he most always smokes or
chews a two-inch long cigar.
Being a bachelor he lives
above the shop in some sort of
low-roofed room.
He just overhauled a Model
“A” and must have gotten the
bearings a little too tight. The
motor had difficulty turning
over. By pushing it outside
and pointing it downhill to-
wards the lake, three guys
shove it at a fast clip. The
driver pops the clutch; the
motor starts amid a cloud of
smoke, which very shortly
clears up and begins to purr
like a kitten.
One old guy said in the hot
summer the boys will chip in
10 cents each for one of them
to take a two-quart fruit jar
across the street to the Log
Cabin to be filled. They pass it
around until they cool off.
Then up to the corner diag-
onally from St. Adalberts
Church stands The Mallak
Confectionery and Clothing
Store.
Right next door is Frank
Dudek’s Tailor Shop. He must
be a fine tailor with the looks
of the way people are dressed
in Silver Lake. Frank makes
men’s shirts in one arm length
only. Then sells a sort of arm
garter so each man can adjust
the arm length he needs.
Across the alley is Ed
Nuwash’s Furniture Store and
Mortuary. Whenever there is a
funeral, furniture is moved to
one side, folding chairs are set
up and the casket is rolled in
up front. Women might be ad-
miring the new furniture while
giving their last respects.
Upstairs is the huge Krejci’s
dance hall entered by 38 out-
side roof-covered steps.
Next door is John
Navaratil’s Confectionary and
Grocery Store complete with a
soda fountain.
The Farmers and Merchants
Bank built the next solid
building, but went broke a few
years ago during the Depres-
sion. Everyone lost all their
money at the time. The patrons
just received word that the
State Banking Commission
will pay them back a 5 percent
dividend on the $21,644 they
lost.
Charlie Podrasky now has a
3.2 tavern there.
J.J. Danek built the huge
three-story building on the
corner opening up the hard-
ware store and lodging up-
stairs and sells Ford cars. Just
recently he held a contest to
see how many pumps on a
hand tire pump it would take
to bust an inner tube. The tube
reached 24 inches in diameter
and seven feet across before it
burst at 6,678 pumps. Albert
Buska won a new inner tube
by guessing 7,000 pumps.
Earlier in the year, Daneks
had a “back-to-school” sale.
Buy 25 cents worth of school
supplies and you will receive
a lead pencil and an oversized
eraser for free.
To be continued …
Walking around Silver Lake
Tracing Roots
By Ron Pulkrabek
Editor’s Note: Ron Pulkrabek wrote his first series of
columns looking through the eyes of someone coming to Sil-
ver Lake in the 1930s and what it would have looked like
then. He continues this week walking down the streets in Sil-
ver Lake.
Church News
McLeod County Auditor-
Treasurer Cindy Schultz re-
minds McLeod County
residents that the second half
of property tax payments for
agricultural properties are due
Nov. 15.
Payments are accepted by
mail, in person at the McLeod
County North Complex build-
ing, 2391 Hennepin Ave.
North, from 8 a.m. to 4:30
p.m., or there is a convenient
payment drop box located just
outside of the building.
“If you are interested in
paying by credit card or e-
check, visit the county web-
site: www.co.mcleod.mn.us.
There is a fee involved for
paying your property tax by
this method,” Schultz said.
If mailing, please return
your statement stub with your
payment to ensure proper
credit. Postmark determines
mail payment date. Minnesota
statutes direct a penalty be as-
sessed on late payments.
2nd half ag
property tax
due Nov. 15
By Josh Randt
Sports Editor
The 2013 cross country sea-
son came to a climactic end this
weekend as Tori Burr repre-
sented the Glencoe-Silver Lake
girls’ team with a 21st-place fin-
ish at St. Olaf college, and the
boys’ team earned 8th place in its
first trip back to the event in over
a decade.
A total of eight runners from
GSL took to the course in North-
field on a beautiful Saturday af-
ternoon to cap off the 2013 cross
country season.
Girls
Burr earned the title of all-
state with her time of 15:29, but
said she was disappointed with
her overall performance in
Northfield.
“It wasn’t what I wanted,”
Burr said after the race. “I
wanted to improve on my place
or my time, but my legs were
just bricks ... It just wasn’t my
day I guess.”
The senior said the highlight
of the season was the team’s
ninth-place performance at the
section meet in Milaca last
month.
“We pulled together at sec-
tions, so that was fun to see,” she
said. “It was like a light bulb
went off for the other girls and
we finally came together as a
team.”
What sets Burr apart from the
other runners, girls’ head coach
Jann Savre said, is her work
ethic and goals.
“She sets her goals, and she
shows you why she’s as good as
she is, because she has these
goals,” Savre said. “Sometimes
you reach those goals and some-
times you don’t. But she’s al-
ways fighting on those goals. If
you watched her in all these
races, she’s fighting the entire
race.”
Even while her performance
wasn’t what she wanted, Burr
said she pushed through the final
leg of the race in order to attain
all-state honors.
“I knew once I was coming
down the home stretch that I
wasn’t going to be where I
wanted,” Burr recalled. “So I
was just fighting to stay at the
all-state spot. There was a point
that I was in 22nd (place) and I
caught up and passed a couple
people. I thought I at least had to
get all-state or I was going to be
really mad!”
Participating in her fourth
state meet in six years of varsity
running, Burr took a moment to
laugh while recognizing the dif-
ferences between herself then
and now.
“I don’t say I’m going to pass
out in certain spots anymore!”
Burr said with a laugh. “I used to
think of spots where I could just
drop out and roll over! This year
I haven’t done that.”
Boys
While the girls’ team loses its
top-runner to graduation, the
boys will return the majority of
the team that claimed eighth
place out of 16 teams at the state
meet this year with a team score
of 221 points.
Jac Chelman crossed the fin-
ish line first for GSL, completing
the course in 16:51 for 15th
place overall and will return as a
senior next year.
“This was all I wanted the
whole year,” Chelman said.
“We’ve been working really
hard just to get up here and I’m
glad we did it ... But we’ve got
to be working harder next year,
that’s for sure. We have to push
each other harder and build each
other up.”
The two seniors, Cody Becker
and Casey Schulz, will have to
cherish the memories of being
part of the first GSL boys’ team
to make it to state since the
1999-2000 team.
“It feels great,” Becker said of
being a part of this year’s team.
“I never could have pictured this
happening ... Just coming to state
blew my mind, and to go out as
a senior — I can’t ask for a better
team, I can’t ask for better
coaches ... our coaches are just a
perfect mixture to keep you in
the sport and make it fun, but
still be successful.”
Boys’ head coach Jeff Del-
wiche said, “I couldn’t have ex-
pected them to run any better,”
at the state meet.
Delwiche said he’ll take the
eighth-place finish, especially
since he was just happy the team
made it to state.
“I would probably still say
that sections was the absolute
prime part of their season,” Del-
wiche said. “But this was pretty
close. Just getting here was their
goal ... I think we did everything
we came to do.”
Delwiche is hopeful that the
performance of this year’s team
will attract more kids to the cross
country programs, now that they
have another state meet to hang
their hat.
“I know when my daughters
were running cross country that
the better they did the more girls
came out,” Delwiche said. “Ob-
viously, the better the program,
the more people you get out (for
the sport). We can only hope,
‘cause this was fun. It was a
good ride.”
Silver Lake Leader, Thursday, November 7, 2013 — Page 5
Sports
Boys’ SOCCER
Girls’ SOCCER
TENNIS
VOLLEYBALL
FOOTBALL
CROSS COUNTRY
September
03....at Delano.................L,5-1
05....Hutchinson ..............L,3-1
09....at Waconia...............L,6-0
12....at Mayer Lutheran. ..L,3-0
16....at Orono ................L,13-0
17....at Mound-Wtka........L,6-0
19....at Chain of Lakes ....L,5-1
23....Delano.....................L,3-0
24....at Hutchinson ..........L,5-0
26....Marshall Public ........L,2-1
27....Mankato Loyola ....Tie,2-2
28....Waconia...................L,7-0
October
01....Worthington .............L,9-0
03....at HF Catholic..........L,9-2
07....at Waseca..............L,11-0
September
03....at Delano.................L,2-0
05....Hutchinson ..............L,5-1
09....at Waconia...............L,7-1
10....at Mayer Lutheran ...L,1-0
12....at Watertown-Mayer.L,6-0
16....at Orono ..................L,8-0
17....at Mound-Wtka........L,8-0
19....at Chain of Lakes ....L,4-0
23....Delano.....................L,6-0
24....at Hutchinson ..........L,5-0
28....Waconia...................L,5-0
October
01....Worthington............W,3-0
03....at HF Catholic..........L,7-0
08....at Albert Lea ............L,7-0
September
03....at Annandale ..........W,6-1
05....at Delano. ................L,7-0
07....at Brainerd Inv ............4th
10....HF Catholic..............L,7-0
12....at Litchfield.............W,4-3
13....at Hutch Inv ................4th
14....at Litchfield Inv. ..........2nd
17....Hutchinson ..............L,5-2
19....N.London-Sp. ..........L,6-1
28....WCC, at Orono................
October
02....MACCRAY..............W,4-3
02....Providence ..............L,7-0
September
05....at Montgomery Inv. ..........
..............(Boys 8th) (Girls 17th)
11....at NYA .............................
..............(Boys 5th) (Girls 10th)
17....at Waconia Inv.................
...............(Boys 3rd) (Girls 5th)
19....GSL Inv............................
................(Boys 1st) (Girls 3rd)
24....at Dassel-Cokato.............
...............(Boys 2nd) (Girls 7th)
October
03....at Litchfield ......................
................(Boys 7th) (Girls 7th)
05....at Swain Inv. ....................
.............(Boys 6th) (Girls 23rd)
10....at Dassel-Cokato WCC
championships.........................
................(Boys 6th) (Girls 9th)
15....at Watertown-Mayer.........
................(Boys 1st) (Girls 5th)
24....at Milaca (Sections) .........
...............(Boys 2nd) (Girls 9th)
November
2......St. Olaf College (State
Championships).......................
........(Boys 8th) (Tori Burr 21st)
September
03....NYA Central .............L,3-1
09.....Sibley East .............L,3-0
10....Mound-Wtka...........W,3-0
12.....at Dassel-Cokato....L,3-1
14....Montevideo Inv ...........5th
17....Waconia...................L,3-0
19....at Orono. .................L,3-2
21....Sibley East Inv............3rd
24....at GFW....................L,3-1
26....Delano.....................L,3-0
October
01....at Hutchinson ..........L,3-2
03....Annandale..............W,3-2
08....at New London-Spicer .....
.......................................W,3-0
10....at Litchfield.............W,3-2
19....Rochester Inv .............7th
24....at Jordan (Sections) L,3-1
September
06....Hutchinson ............L,36-7
13....at Annandale ......W,48-28
20....New London-Spicer .........
...................................W,42-25
27....at Litchfield...........W,40-7
October
04....Spring Lake Park.L,21-20
11....Waconia (homecoming)...
...................................W,42-28
16....Dassel-Cokato....W,49-19
26....Breck (Sections).W,55-12
November
01....Watertown-Mayer (Sec-
tion Championship) ......W,33-0
08....at St. Croix Lutheran
(State quarterfinals at
Macalaster College in St. Paul)
..........................................7:00
GSL Panther
Fall Sports
The Glencoe-Silver Lake boys’ team and Tori Burr from
the girls’ team took part in the 2013 state cross country
meet Saturday, Nov. 2, at St. Olaf College in Northfield.
Above center, the boys’ team jockeys for position dur-
ing the start of the boys’ 5K, which they took eighth
place with a total of 221 team points. Above right, Tori
Burr pushes through the final leg of the girls’ 4K en
route to a 21st-place, all-state performance. Burr fin-
ished the course in 15:29.1.
Silver Lake Leader photos by Josh Randt
Boys 8th as team, Burr is all-state
By Josh Randt
Sports Editor
It’s been three long years, but
the Glencoe-Silver Lake Pan-
ther football team is headed
back to the state tournament
after claiming the Section 2
(Class AAA) championship
with a 33-0 win over Water-
town-Mayer (WM) on Friday,
Nov. 1.
The last time the Panthers
made it to the Class AAA state
tournament the 2010-2011 team
lost 37-14 in the first round to
Rochester Lourdes, who went
on to win the state champi-
onship over Holy Family
Catholic.
GSL now faces the 8-2 St.
Croix Lutheran Crusaders at
Macalaster College in St. Paul
on Friday, Nov. 8, at 7 p.m. with
a trip to the Metrodome on the
line.
***
The last time GSL and Water-
town-Mayer met happened to be
the same season that the Pan-
thers lost to Rochester Lourdes
in the opening round of the state
tournament in 2010.
The Royals and Panthers col-
lided during the former’s final
season in the Wright County
Conference, as GSL cruised to a
47-0 victory at Watertown.
When the two teams met Fri-
day night at Stevens Seminary
Stadium, a similar result sur-
faced when the Panthers routed
the Royals 33-0 for the Section
2 championship.
While the Royals’ program
has improved since the last
meeting, so has GSL’s, and it
showed.
GSL already had 27 of its 33
points heading into halftime, as
Jake Stuedemann found the end
zone three times on eight carries
for 81 yards. Colton Lueders
scored the other first-half touch-
down from eight yards out.
Stuedemann finished the
game with 125 yards on 17 car-
ries and four touchdowns, while
fullback Dalton Clouse pounded
out 127 yards on 19 carries.
“We were really getting a
good surge off the line,” Lued-
ers said. “We were coming up
and going on sound, and they
were still moving and trying to
figure out what they were doing.
We were just firing off.”
Not only was the offensive
line pushing bodies around, but
Lueders and Clouse were given
the opportunity to lead block a
number of times for Stuede-
mann as well, which they rel-
ished.
“As long as we block hard,”
Lueders said with a smile, “it
makes it fun for us when we’re
smashing them in the face.”
“Especially when me and
Lueders lead up the middle with
huge blocks,” Clouse echoed.
“It gives me goose bumps!”
“They’re both relentless as far
as hitting,” head coach Scott
Tschimperle said of the two
backs. “Especially Clouse. He
relishes contact. He’d rather in-
flict the pain than receive it.”
While the GSL offense was
getting goose bumps, the Pan-
ther defense was busy knocking
them off the Royals’ offense.
Spearheaded by senior line-
backers Keenan Mehlos and
Carter Pinske, the Panther de-
fense held WM to just one rush-
ing yard, and 83 yards passing
for a total of 84 offensive yards
on 41 plays.
Royal quarterback Brett
Johnson was running for his life
early and often as GSL sacked
him six times and forced the
junior to hurry his throws all
evening.
“(It was) a big performance
by everybody,” Mehlos said.
“We all came together and did
our jobs and shut them down.”
The section championship is
welcomed, but defensive end
Adam Eberhard said there’s still
one more goal to check off on
this team’s list.
“We had a nice streak of eight
or nine section championships,”
Eberhard said of GSL’s history.
“Hopefully we can start anew
and get all the way to the last
game. The big game.”
“We can’t be satisfied now,”
Tschimperle said. “We have big-
ger goals that we want to get to.
We need to remain focused and
willing to continue to get better.
“Our goal is to get to the
dome,” Tschimperle said. “A lot
of people think it’s expected of
us to get there, not realizing how
much work it takes to get there
... The great thing about it, the
kids have been focused all sea-
son long from when we started
two-a-days up to now. That
makes it fun and rewarding
when the kids are doing what
you want them to do, and good
things are happening for them.”
The focus now shifts to St.
Croix Lutheran, who runs a veer
option-offense similar to GSL’s
with a pair of quick running
backs and a solid quarterback in
David Ponath, but employs a
man defense, of which GSL has
not seen a lot.
The Glencoe-Silver Lake varsity offensive
and defensive players pose with their Section
2 (Class AAA) championship trophy after de-
feating Watertown-Mayer 33-0 on Friday, Nov.
1. Front row from left: Tristan Weber, Chris
Lemke, Josh VonBerge, Carter Pinske*,
Keenan Mehlos*, Jake Stuedemann*, Dalton
Clouse*, Nolan Lepel, Jacob Popelka and
Teddy Petersen. Back row from left: Adam
Eberhard, Dominic Bondhus, Colton Lued-
ers, Tyler Donnay, Luke Syvertson, Keaton
Anderson, Tanner Grack, Alex Ramano, Zach
Jones, Mason Goettl, Aaron Schuch, Bennett
Bielke and Austin Maynard. *Captains.
Silver Lake Leader photo by Josh Randt
State tournament bound
Page 6 — Silver Lake Leader, Thursday, November 7, 2013
Sounds like multiplication?
It’s newspaper talk for a six column by 1.25 inch ad. Too small to be effective? You’re reading this one!
Put your ad in the Silver Lake Leader today. Call: 320-327-2216
6 col. x
1.25 in.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS FOR CENTERPOINT ENERGY MINNESOTA CUSTOMERS
On August 2, 2013, CenterPoint Energy filed a request with the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission (MPUC) to change its rates for utility distribution
service. If approved by the MPUC, the proposed new rates will result in an overall increase in revenue of $44.3 million, or about 5 percent annually. The
requested increase would add about $4.00 to a typical residential customer’s monthly bill.
We expect the MPUC’s final decision on this request in June 2014. If final rates
are less than interim rates, customers will be refunded the difference with
interest. If final rates are higher, customers will not be charged the difference.
PUBLIC HEARINGS
Any CenterPoint Energy customer or other person may attend or provide
comments at the hearings. You are invited to comment on the adequacy and
quality of CenterPoint Energy’s service, the level of rates or other related matters.
You do not need to be represented by an attorney.
Administrative Law Judge, LauraSue Schlatter will conduct five public hearings.
You may participate at any of the dates, times and locations shown at right:
WRITTEN COMMENTS
Written comments may be sent to: Administrative Law Judge, LauraSue Schlatter
Office of Administrative Hearings (OAH)
P.O. Box 64620, St. Paul, MN 55164-0620
ratecomments.oah@state.mn.us
Customers may also send comments to the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission:
121 Seventh Place East, Suite 350, St. Paul, MN 55101-2147
Email: PublicComments.puc@state.mn.us
Telephone: 651-296-0406 or 800-657-3782 or your preferred Telecommunications Relay Service
Written comments are most effective when the following three items are included:
1. The issues in CenterPoint Energy’s proposal you are addressing
2. Your specific recommendations
3. The reason for your recommendations
Please include OAH docket number 80-2500-30979 and MPUC docket number G-008/GR-13-316 in all communications. The deadline for written comments
is December 31, 2013.
Important: Comments will be made available to the public on the MPUC’s website, except in limited circumstances consistent with the Minnesota
Government Data Practices Act. The MPUC does not edit or delete personal identifying information from submissions.
EVIDENTIARY HEARINGS
Formal evidentiary hearings on CenterPoint Energy’s proposal are
scheduled to start on January 14, 2014, in the MPUC’s large hearing
room, 3rd floor, 121 Seventh Place East, St. Paul. The purpose of the
evidentiary hearings is to allow CenterPoint Energy, the Minnesota
Department of Commerce – Division of Energy Resources, the
Minnesota Office of Attorney General – Antitrust and Utilities Division
and others to present testimony and to cross-examine each other’s
witnesses on the proposed rate increase.
Anyone who wishes to formally intervene in this case should contact the
Administrative Law Judge, LauraSue Schlatter, at the address at left.
CenterPoint Energy requested the rate changes described in this
notice. The MPUC may either grant or deny the requested changes, in
whole or in part, and may grant a lesser or greater increase than that
requested for any class or classes of service.
FOR MORE INFORMATION
You may visit CenterPoint Energy’s offices during normal business
hours (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday) to examine the
proposed rate schedule and a comparison of present and proposed
rates at:
800 LaSalle Avenue, 14th floor, Minneapolis, MN 55402
Phone: 612-372-4727
Web: CenterPointEnergy.com/RateCase
Or you may contact the Department of Commerce at:
85 Seventh Place East, Suite 500, St. Paul, MN 55101
Phone: 651-539-1534
Persons with hearing loss or speech disabilities may call through their
preferred Telecommunications Relay Service.
Web: https://www.edockets.state.mn.us/EFiling/search.jsp
(Select 13 in the year field, enter 316 in the number field, select search,
and the list of documents will appear on the next page), to examine
the filing.
ACCOMMODATIONS
If any reasonable accommodation is needed to enable you to fully
participate in these public hearings (for example, sign language or
foreign language interpreter, wheelchair accessibility, or large print
materials), please contact the MPUC at 651-296-0406 or
800-657-3782 one week in advance of the hearing.
RATE INCREASE NOTICE
©
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1
3
C
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n
t
e
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P
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in
t
E
n
e
r
g
y
1
3
2
7
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7
Date Time Locations
Monday 7:00 p.m. Central Lakes Community College
Dec. 2 501 W. College Dr., Room E203, Brainerd
Tuesday 7:00 p.m. Normandale Community College, Classroom P0808
Dec. 3 9700 France Ave. S., Bloomington
Wednesday 7:00 p.m. Mankato Place Mall, Mankato Room
Dec. 4 12 Civic Center Plaza, Mankato
Monday 1:00 p.m. CEAP – Community Room
Dec. 9 7051 Brooklyn Blvd., Brooklyn Center
Tuesday 7:00 p.m. Sabathani Community Center, Auditorium
Dec. 10 310 E. 38th St., Minneapolis
The chart below shows the effect of both the interim and proposed rate changes on monthly bills for residential, commercial and industrial customers with average natural gas use:
Customer type Avg monthly usage Avg monthly bill: Avg monthly bill: Avg monthly bill: rates
(usage in therms) in therms current rates interim rates proposed
Residential 73 $57.50 $60.25 $61.50
Commercial/Industrial - Up to 1,500/year 60 $51.50 $54.00 $55.00
Commercial/Industrial - 1,500 to 5,000/year 226 $166.50 $174.75 $167.25
Commercial/Industrial - 5,000 or more/year 1,136 $774.25 $812.00 $788.50
Small Volume Dual Fuel Sales Service - Up to 120,000/year 3,799 $2,114 $2,217 $2,161
Small Volume Dual Fuel Sales Service - 120,000 or more/year 13,743 $7,449 $7,813 $7,617
Large Volume Dual Fuel Sales Service 125,750 $59,200 $62,089 $60,736
* Figures above are rounded (residential and commercial/industrial customers are rounded to the nearest $0.25 and dual fuel customers are rounded to the nearest whole number).
R44CLEa
Albin Cyril Lewandowski,
87, of Silver Lake, died Nov.
1, 2013, at Prairie Senior Cot-
tages in Hutchinson.
A Mass of Christian Burial
was held
Mo n d a y,
Nov. 4, at
Holy Fam-
ily Catholic
C h u r c h ,
S i l v e r
Lake. The
Rev. Paul
S c h u -
macher was
the cele-
brant.
Pallbearers were Tim We-
seloh, Ryan Allen, James
Lewandowski, Eric Hawes,
Stan Horstmann and Ron
Lewandowski. Interment was
in Holy Family Cemetery, Sil-
ver Lake.
Mr. Lewandowski was born
April 18, 1926, in McLeod
County, to Frank and
Josephine (Pawlak) Lewan-
dowski.
On Oct. 4, 1944, he enlisted
in the U.S. Army and served in
Korea in the Pacific.
On Oct. 14, 1950, Leona M.
Fiecke and Albin C.
Lewandowski were joined in
holy marriage in Riverside,
Calif., and they shared 61
years of marriage.
He farmed for over 20 years
and also worked for Miller-
bernd Manufacturing in Win-
sted during that time. He
retired from Millerbernd Man-
ufacturing.
Mr. Lewandowski enjoyed
camping, threshing bees, an-
tique tractor shows and he
loved attending parades.
Survivors include his chil-
dren, Jane Hawes of Cokato
and loving companion, Randy
Youngkrantz, Dean Lewan-
dowski and companion Vicki
of Princeton, Jeanie (Patrick)
Ebert of Hutchinson, David
(Roxi) Lewandowski and
Donna (James) Richards, all
of Silver Lake; grandchildren,
Daniel and Eric (Angela)
Hawes, Kristin (Ryan) Allen
and Lisa (Tim) Weseloh,
James (Jessica) Lewandowski,
Jessie Lewandowski, Mathew
Richards, Michael Richards
and Joseph Richards; great-
grandchildren, Blake, Allie,
Austin, Wyatte, Izzabella,
Mason, Brady, Hadley, Gavin,
Audrey and Laynee; sister,
Bernice Strauss of Winsted;
and brothers, Benny (Jean)
Lewandowski of Lester Prairie
and Larry (Della)
Lewandowski of Glencoe.
Preceding him in death were
his parents; wife, Leona; in-
fant son, James Andrew
Lewandowski in 1968; son,
Dale Edward Lewandowski in
1971; and sister, Irene Herbert.
The Maresh Funeral Home
in Silver Lake served the fam-
ily. Online condolences may
be made at www.mareshfu
neralhome.com.
Albin Lewandowski, 87, of Silver Lake
Albin
Lewandowski
Obituaries
Darlene Jeanette Vorlicek,
76, of Buffalo, died Sunday,
Nov. 3, 2013, at her residence.
Funeral services will be
held Tuesday, Nov. 12, at 11
a.m., at the Peterson Chapel in
Buffalo.
Pallbearers will be Clarence
Vorlicek, Dale Grochow,
Zachary Grochow, Dean Carl-
son, Samuel Carlson and Joel
Carlson. Interment will be at
Ripley Cemetery in Litchfield.
Darlene J. Lenz was born
July 20, 1937, in Janesville, to
William J. and Amanda E.
(Shult) Lenz. She graduated
from Foley High School in
1955.
On June 20, 1959, Darlene
J. Lenz and Robert “Bob” Vor-
licek were joined in holy mar-
riage at Stockholm Lutheran
Church in rural Cokato. God
blessed their marriage with a
son, Allen.
Mrs. Vorlicek was a good
homemaker. She enjoyed can-
ning, cooking and watching
the Minnesota Twins. She es-
pecially enjoyed her grand-
daughters coming to Arizona
to visit in the winter. She was
a very caring and giving per-
son.
Survivors include her loving
husband of 54 years, Robert
“Bob” Vorlicek; son, Allen R.
(Dianne) Vorlicek of St.
Michael; grandchildren, Chel-
sea, Ashley and Madeline; a
brother, Floyd Lenz; brother-
in-law and sister-in-law, Clar-
ence and Pat Vorlicek of
Cokato; sisters-in-law, Helen
Miller of Bloomington and Es-
ther Trautmann of Littleton,
Colo.; other relatives and
friends.
Preceding her in death were
her parents; a granddaughter,
Natalie Vorlicek; and a sister-
in-law, JoAnn Oliva.
The Peterson Chapel in Buf-
falo is serving the family. On-
line condolences may be made
at www.thepetersonchapel.
com.
Darlene J. Vorlicek, 76, of Buffalo
Silver Lake Leader photos
by Alyssa Schauer
and Brenda Fogarty
First snow
Get out the mittens,
scarves, and boots! The
first measureable amount
of snow for the winter sea-
son fell Tuesday evening,
Nov. 5 in Silver Lake.
Nearly 4-1/2 inches were
recorded as flurries moved
in from the east around 4
p.m. and it continued to
snow through the night.
On Wednesday, children
were spotted trudging
through the fluffy, white
mess to school. This
weekend, temperatures
are expected to be in the
40s and there is a 30 per-
cent chance of rain and
snow forecasted for Friday
evening.
Silver Lake Leader, Thursday, November 7, 2013 — Page 7
TO MCLEOD COUNTY TAXPAYERS
The Second Half of your property tax
payments are due November 15, 2013 for
agricultural properties.
Payments are accepted by mail, in person
at the McLeod County North Complex
building 2391 Hennepin Ave. N. from 8:00
a.m. to 4:30 p.m., or there is a convenient
PAYMENT DROP BOX located just outside of
the building.
If you are interested in paying by credit
card or e-check, visit the County website:
www.co.mcleod.mn.us. There is a fee
involved for paying your property tax by
this method.
If mailing, please return your statement
stub with your payment to insure proper
credit. Postmark determines mail payment
date. Late postmarks will be returned for
proper penalty. Minnesota Statutes direct
a penalty be assessed on late payments.
Cindy Schultz
McLeod County Auditor-Treasurer
2391 Hennepin Ave N
Glencoe, MN 55336
320-864-1271
R44-45Ca
Submitted photo
October Panther Pride winners
The October Panther Pride winners at Glencoe-Silver Lake
were, front row, left to right, Sawyer Rosenlund, Emily
Kientzy, Evan Motzko, Reagan Feltmann, Samantha Matt-
son, Guillermo Avila, Jack Tobias, Lia Oelfke, Joseph Silva
and Berlin Kass. In the second row are Emma Salisbury,
Evan Marti, Brayden Mathwig, Jaileen Alvarado, Gavin
Kottke, Ellie Scheidt, Luke Roepke, Chloe Hoemberg,
Luke Schmieg, Geniess Balderas, Jason Maire, Olivia
Wanous and Ava Koenen. In the back row are Natalie
Davis, Caden Neid, Claire Verdeck, Eli Ehrke, Braxton
Streich, Jaeleigh Fern, Isabelle McCrea, Blake Kaczmarek,
Natosha Fisher and Thomas Dressen.
We started the week with our first real “sort-of-large”
snow threat. As I write this, it still hasn’t happened and I’m
rather pleased that I don’t have to technically venture a
guess as to what did happen.
Early news reports got pretty excited about this, and I’m
thinking they’re overdoing it a bit, especially for our area.
If things hold together we should have only seen minor ac-
cumulations. The bulk of the precipitation was aimed to
our south, and cold air is limited this year so, hopefully,
the weather doesn’t make me look silly. But I’m guessing
we survived this blast with only minor effects.
Onto the end of week forecast: things will be cool this
week with highs in the upper 30s to lower 40s with lows
in the 20s.
Another storm will push into the area Friday into early
Saturday. This one is aimed a bit to our north, but we could
be in line for some more rain and/or snow showers.
The all-important deer hunting opener is looking mostly
OK once we get the late week storm to exit the area. Highs
should stay in the upper 30s to lower 40s. If you’re travel-
ing to hunt, the northern portion of the state could have a
bit more in question with this storm, so watch more up-to-
date forecasts.
Also it’s worth mentioning, if the late-week storm moves
south a bit, we could see a little more precipitation and
snow … fair warning.
Have a great week all, and good luck to the hunters ….
stay safe!
Ma dobry weekendem Mit dobry vikend
Wednesday night — Lows 22-28; partly cloudy.
Thursday — Highs 38-44; lows 22-28; mostly clear.
Friday — Highs 38-46; lows 25-31; clouds increase/rain
or snow later.
Saturday — Highs 38-46; lows 25-31; rain/snow early,
clouds.
Sunday — Highs 38-46; mostly clear.
Weather Quiz: How much snow will we see this year?
Answer to last week’s question: What are normal
snowfall totals by month in an average winter? October
= 0.6 inches, November = 10, December = 10, January =
13.5, February = 8.2, March = 10.4, April = 3.1 and May
= 0.1 inches.
Remember: I make the forecast, not the weather!
Weather Corner
By Jake Yurek
Daughter born to Jureks
Aaron and Brenda
Jurek are proud to an-
nounce the birth of their
daughter, Chloe Mari-
lynn, on Sept. 28, 2013,
at 2:50 p.m. Chloe
weighed 7 pounds, 14
ounces, and was 19
inches long. Grandpar-
ents are Brad and Barb
Droege of Hamburg
and Doug and Lynn
Jurek of Victoria. Great-grandparents are Lois Droege of
Hamburg, Lucy Kauffmann of Arlington, Howard and Bea
Schuette of Plato, and Jim and the late Marilyn Jurek of
Silver Lake.
People News
A benefit for Frank and
Therese (Shimanski) Hlavka
of Sherburn will be held on
Sunday, Nov. 24, from 8:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Good
Shepherd Hall at 311 North
Sverdrup Ave., Jackson.
This is not a story of one
person, but two: Frank and
Therese Hlavka. Their journey
started in December 2012
when Frank was diagnosed
with cancer in the bile ducts of
his liver, which resulted in sur-
gery on Dec. 26 to remove 60
percent of his liver.
With such a rare cancer, the
doctors felt Frank should have
radiation and chemotherapy
simultaneously. He began
treatment in February and fin-
ished in March.
After undergoing a second
round of chemo between April
and July, another CT scan in
August showed Frank’s cancer
was still present. He was re-
moved from a clinical trial at
Mayo in October as his cancer
continues to grow and spread.
In March 2013, Therese was
diagnosed with ovarian can-
cer. She went through the rec-
ommended six cycles of
chemo between April and Au-
gust. She is set for a three-
month checkup in November.
Join in a time of fellowship
and support for Frank and
Therese and their family at the
pancake breakfast benefit on
Sunday, Nov. 24.
Also, there will be a silent
auction, a craft sale, and a
bake sale during the benefit. If
you have questions, contact
Kathy Nowak at 320-420-
4743 or Genny Lhotka at 320-
583-9222.
Donations can be made at:
Bank Midwest
PO Box 49
Jackson, MN 56143
C/O Frank and Therese
Hlavka Benefit.
Benefit for Hlavka family
set Nov. 24 in Jackson
The holiday season is a time
for people to reflect on what
makes them grateful. Family,
friends and good health come
to mind for many.
Countless patients like
Ethan Hoffart, however, strive
for good health during the hol-
idays, oftentimes in a hospital
room, away from family and
friends. Blood donations can
bring them hope.
When Ethan was 10 years
old, he spent most of the holi-
day season being treated for
aplastic anemia, a disease in
which the body’s bone mar-
row doesn’t make enough new
blood cells.
For four months, Ethan was
dependent on blood transfu-
sions every seven days and
platelet transfusions every
three days.
“I probably wouldn’t even
be here if no one gave blood,”
he said. “The transfusions
pretty much saved me.”
Thanks in part to volunteer
donors, Ethan’s disease is
under control, and he will be
at home with his family for the
holidays this year.
All blood types are needed,
especially O negative, A neg-
ative and B negative. Appoint-
ments to donate with the
American Red Cross and
bring hope to patients in need
can be made at redcross-
blood.org or 1-800-RED
CROSS.
Upcoming McLeod County
blood donation opportunities
include:
• Wednesday, Nov. 20, from
1 p.m. to 7 p.m., at Lester
Prairie City Hall, 37 Juniper
St. N.
• Friday, Nov. 22, from 1
p.m. to 6 p.m., at Hutchinson
Mall, 1060 Highway 15.
• Wednesday, Nov. 27, from
1 p.m. to 7 p.m., at Glencoe
City Center, 1107 11th St.
(complimentary T-shirt for
presenting donors, while sup-
plies last).
• Friday, Nov. 29, from 1
p.m. to 7 p.m. at Neisen’s Bar
‘n’ Grill, 300 Dorans St. in
Biscay (complimentary T-shirt
for presenting donors, while
supplies last).
To donate blood, simply call
1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-
733-2767) or visit redcross-
blood.org to make an
appointment or for more infor-
mation.
All blood types are needed
to ensure a reliable supply for
patients. A blood donor card or
driver’s license or two other
forms of identification are re-
quired at check-in. Individuals
who are 17 years of age (16
with parental consent in some
states), weigh at least 110
pounds and are in generally
good health may be eligible to
donate blood.
High school students and
other donors 18 years of age
and younger also have to meet
certain height and weight re-
quirements.
Blood donations bring
hope during the holidays,
4 drives set in November
Fire hydrants
to be flushed
The city of Silver Lake will
flush hydrants on Thursday,
Nov. 7 (today), beginning at 9
a.m., weather permitting.
By Lori Copler
Staff Writer
Most taxing authorities in
McLeod County are consider-
ing moderate property tax
hikes, keeping their levies the
same or even lowering them,
the McLeod County Board of
Commissioners heard at a
workshop session Tuesday
morning, Oct. 29.
But that won’t necessarily
mean that property taxes will
remain the same or be lower
for property owners, County
Auditor-Treasurer Cindy
Schultz told the County Board.
Schultz said the workshop
was to see what “proposed tax
notices are going to look like”
as local government units pre-
pare for their annual truth-in-
taxation hearings.
One issue with the proposed
tax statements, scheduled to
go out this month, is that they
are based on the preliminary
levies that were adopted in
September, and won’t show
the results of any referendums
held in conjunction with the
November election.
As an example, Schultz
said, the Hutchinson school
district has a debt-redemption
levy that is set to expire at the
end of this year. However, the
district also has a two-question
ballot this week on whether to
replace that levy or even in-
crease it.
Because the taxation notices
are already prepared, they
won’t reflect the results of that
election, and the proposed no-
tices show that school taxes
will be going down.
“What people are seeing
now may not be the reality
next year,” said Schultz. If the
referendum passes, she said,
her office will get “phone calls
next March” when actual tax
statements go out.
Because of declining resi-
dential values and an increase
in agricultural land values,
most homes’ property taxes
will likely be lower or the
same, unless valuations in-
creased significantly because
of improvements, Schultz said.
Conversely, property taxes
on ag land may go up, even if
taxing units are holding their
levies the same or lowering
them, because of the increased
valuation of the property.
Another factor that could be
a “big impact” is the tier sys-
tem for property taxes, said
Schultz.
Currently, property valued
at $1.5 million or less (Tier 1
property) has a .5 tax rate.
Once the valuation crosses the
$1.5 million threshold, the tax
rate doubles to a 1 tax rate.
Schultz cited an instance of
commercial property in a
township that will have topped
the $1.5 million threshold, and
will see a property tax increase
of near 67 percent.
“It’s a huge factor,” said
Schultz of the tier system,
which was set up by the Min-
nesota Department of Rev-
enue.
The County Board also
briefly discussed whether it
should continue to consider its
proposed 2.27 percent levy in-
crease.
Commissioner Jon Chris-
tensen pointed out that while
the county currently has no
debt, it continues to levy as if
it does, generating extra
money. He also noted that the
county is getting another
$415,000 in county program
aid from the state.
However, Commissioner
Sheldon Nies noted that the
county remains in labor nego-
tiations with its employee
unions.
“We have no idea where our
negotiations with unions are
going,” said Nies. “We’re
starting out with requests for
increases of 10 to 12 percent.”
Nies also pointed out that
the County Board had com-
mitted to its jail expansion and
courthouse security project,
and may need to use reserves
to help pay for that.
Nies suggested waiting until
December to set the final levy.
County Board discusses tax notices;
proposed 2.27% levy increase for 2014
Visit us online atwww.GlencoeNews.com
Page 8 — Silver Lake Leader, Thursday, November 7, 2013
Silver Lake Leader photos
by Alyssa Schauer
Senior dinner
On Monday, the Silver
Lake Civic Association
teamed with the Silver
Lake GFWC Women’s
Club to host a “senior din-
ner” at the Silver Lake
American Legion. Above,
from left to right are Laura
Kaczmarek, Kathy Kacz-
marek, Gary Kaczmarek,
Ed Goede, Delores Goede
and Deannie Navratil. To
the right, LeRoy and Judy
Penas are served with rice
hotdish, casesar salad,
dinner rolls, and cake,
catered by Molly’s Cafe in
Silver Lake. The night con-
sisted of singing, card
bingo, and door prizes.
75 YEARS AGO - NOV. 12, 1938 — Silver
Lake polled 325 votes at the general election
held on Tuesday, Nov. 8.
At the meeting of the McLeod County
Bankers Association held last week Wednesday
at Hutchinson, F.J. Burich, president of the Cit-
izens State Bank of Silver Lake, was re-elected
president of the organization.
The Christian Endeavor Society of the Silver
Lake Presbyterian Church will present the
three-act comedy-drama, “A Little Clodhop-
per,” on Friday and Saturday, Nov. 18-19, in the
church parlor. The play is under the direction of
Mrs. Joseph Leksa. The cast of characters in-
cludes Hilmer Hlavka, Donald Hlavka, Emily
Kovar, Patricia Wraspir, Emily Makovsky, Mil-
dred Hakel, Benjamin Hakel, Harvey Hlavka,
Jerome Leksa and Mavis Wraspir. Admission is
15¢ and 25¢.
Instead of the Penny Bingo played the past
winter at St. Adalbert’s School, a new kind of
bingo will be introduced this coming week,
Tuesday, Nov. 15. Every player will pay 40¢ for
the whole evening with 30 games played
through the evening session.
Kaminsky Transfer is prepared to haul clean
lake sand for plastering and foundations.
Mrs. Anthony Witucki recently purchased the
former Joe Witucki farm owned by F.J. Pahl.
Some of the specials at The Quality Food
Store include: Kraft cheese, 2 pound box, 45¢;
Softasilk cake flour, 4 pound bag, 25¢; Kel-
logg’s shredded wheat, 10¢ a package; lettuce,
two heads for 13¢; six Texas seedless grapefruit
for 15¢; Ocean Spray cranberry sauce, No. 2
can, 15¢.
Sons were born to Dr. and Mrs. Ellston J.
Mikulecky on Nov. 8, Mr. and Mrs. Carlos A.
Avery on Nov. 7, and Mr. and Mrs. Henry
Dostal on Oct. 31.
50 YEARS AGO - NOV. 7, 1963 — Temper-
atures have hit as high as 58 degrees with mild
nights, but foggy mornings.
One filing has been made for the three Silver
Lake Village offices open. Mrs. Gertrude
Navratil has filed for re-election as village treas-
urer. There are no filings for the office of mayor
or councilman as Joe Gehlen and Joe Benz, in-
cumbents, declined to file for these respective
offices.
The senior class of Silver Lake High School
will present the comedy, “A Connecticut Yan-
kee in King Arthur’s Court,” on Friday evening,
Nov. 8, at the high school gym.
Don Knott is building three new houses in
Silver Lake.
Vernon Lilienthal, 40, of Plato, was killed by
a dynamite blast on Monday noon when work-
ing at blasting rocks on the Emil Schuette farm
near Plato.
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Fitzloff of Hutchinson
were killed Monday morning when their car
struck a westbound Great Northern freight train
at the crossing near the depot in Litchfield.
An open house 50th wedding anniversary for
Mr. and Mrs. John Drahos will be held on Sun-
day, Nov. 10, at the Oddfellow Hall in Hutchin-
son.
The public is invited to attend the wedding
dance honoring Carol Habisch and Donald
Miskovsky on Saturday evening, Nov. 9, at the
Blue Note Ballroom, Winsted.
A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Hubert
Schermann on Nov. 3. Mr. and Mrs. Junior Vor-
licek are the parents of a daughter born on Nov.
3.
25 YEARS AGO - NOV. 10, 1988 — Silver
Lake residents cast 321 ballots at the general
and city elections on Tuesday. Duane Yurek,
who was unopposed, was elected mayor. In the
four-year City Council race, Dale Miska, in-
cumbent, and Dale Nowak were elected to the
two positions. The two-year City Council race
had Gary Rannow being elected.
Variety Plus will be serving free coffee and
cookies on Friday and Saturday, Nov. 11-12.
The Silver Lake Knights of Columbus are
sponsoring their Ham & Poultry Party on Fri-
day, Nov. 11, at the Silver Lake Auditorium.
The Silver Lake Fire Department was called
to a grease fire on the stove at the Jeff Muen-
chow home on East Main Street on Monday,
Nov. 7.
At a recent meeting of the Presbytery of Min-
nesota Valleys, Gladys Smoley was honored
with the “Outstanding Senior Presbyterian
Award” for 1988.
The Ladies Aid of St. Adalbert’s Church are
sponsoring a rummage sale on Saturday,
Nov.12, in the church basement.
A daughter was born on Nov. 8 to Bill and
Carmen Merrill.
Down Memory Lane
Compiled by Margaret Benz
Submitted photo
Corn drive for Courage Center
The Glencoe-Silver Lake chapter of the
FFA held its annual corn drive for True
Friends Camps (Friendship Ventures) on
Oct. 25. Approximately 20 members par-
ticipated, raising $2,600. Above, Zach Pier-
son collects a donation from Jon Lemke
of Glencoe. “Members look forward to this
event every year,” FFA adviser Becky Had-
dad said. “They enjoy getting out and
meeting local farmers, and appreciate the
opportunity to raise money for a worthy
cause.” For over 59 years now, FFA
fundraising activities have helped sponsor
children and adults with physical disabili-
ties so that they can attend camp. All pro-
ceeds from the FFA drives are used to
support camp needs: camper sponsor-
ships, buildings and equipment, to name
a few. Camping services are just some of
the many programs and services offered
by Courage Center, a non-profit rehabilita-
tion center in the Twin Cities. For more in-
formation about Courage Center
programs and services for people with
physical disabilities or sensory and neu-
rological impairments, please call 763-588-
0811 or visit www.CourageCenter.org.
Pumpkin Waffles with Apple Cider Syrup
Ingredients:
2-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
4 teaspoons baking powder
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground allspice
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1 cup canned pumpkin
2 cups milk
4 eggs, separated
1/4 cup butter, melted
Cider Syrup:
1/2 cup white sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 cup apple cider
1 tablespoon lemon juice
2 tablespoons butter
Directions:
Preheat a waffle iron according to manufac-
turer’s instructions. Combine the flour, baking
powder, cinnamon, allspice, ginger, salt, and
brown sugar in a mixing bowl. In a separate
bowl, stir together the pumpkin, milk, and egg
yolks. Whip the egg whites in a clean dry bowl
until soft peaks form. Stir the flour mixture and
1/4 cup melted butter to the pumpkin mixture,
stirring just to combine. Use a whisk to fold 1/3
of egg whites into the batter, stirring gently until
incorporated. Fold in remaining egg whites.
Cook waffles according to manufacturer’s in-
structions. To make the syrup, stir together the
sugar, cornstarch, and cinnamon in a saucepan.
Stir in the apple cider and lemon juice. Cook
over medium heat until mixture begins to boil;
boil until syrup thickens. Remove from heat and
stir in the 2 tablespoons butter until melted.
Serve warm.
Party Potatoes
Ingredients:
4 cups mashed potatoes
1 cup sour cream
1 package (8 ounces) cream cheese, softened
1 teaspoon minced chives
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/4 cup dry bread crumbs
1 tablespoon butter, melted
1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese
Directions:
In a large bowl, combine potatoes, sour cream,
cream cheese, chives and garlic powder. Turn
into a greased two-quart casserole dish. Com-
bine bread crumbs with butter; sprinkle over po-
tatoes. Bake at 350 degrees for 50 to 60
minutes. Top with cheese and serve immedi-
ately.
Southern Italian Thanksgiving Stuffing
Ingredients:
1-1/2 pounds bulk Italian sausage
2 tablespoons olive oil
6 ounces pancetta bacon, diced
2 onions, chopped
7 large celery stalks, chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
6 cups day-old French bread, cut into 1/2-inch
cubes
3 cups crumbled cornbread
1-1/2 tablespoons rubbed dried sage
1-1/2 tablespoons poultry seasoning
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup toasted pine nuts
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese
1/2 cup butter
2 tablespoons chopped fresh sage
1 ounce shaved Parmesan cheese
Directions:
Preheat an oven to 375 degrees. Grease a deep
9x13-inch dish or roasting pan. Heat a large
skillet over medium-high heat and stir in the
sausage. Cook and stir until the sausage is
crumbly, evenly browned, and no longer pink.
Drain and discard any excess grease. Place the
browned sausage into a large mixing bowl.
Meanwhile, heat the olive oil and pancetta in a
large skillet over medium heat. Once the
pancetta begins to brown, stir in the onions and
celery, and cook until the onion softens and
turns translucent, about 8 minutes. Stir in the
garlic, and cook another 3 minutes until the
aroma of the garlic mellows. Scrape the onion
mixture into the bowl with the crumbled
sausage. Add the French bread, cornbread, dried
sage, poultry seasoning, salt, and pine nuts; stir
well. Pour in the chicken broth and mozzarella
cheese; stir until the chicken stock has been ab-
sorbed by the bread and the stuffing is evenly
mixed. Pack the stuffing into the prepared bak-
ing dish and dot the butter overtop. Cover with
aluminum foil. Bake for 45 minutes, then re-
move the foil, and continue baking until the top
has turned golden brown, about 15 minutes
more. Sprinkle with the fresh sage and shave
Parmesan cheese to serve.
Kitchen Delights
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AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
LIESKE TRACTOR
Wanted: Your OLD TRACTORS,
any condition, make or model. We
also specialize in new and used
TRACTOR PARTS AND REPAIR.
Call Kyle. Located west of Hender-
son. (612) 203-9256.
AUTOMOTIVE
Parts, Repair
$$ DOLLARS PAID $$ Junk vehi-
cles, repairable cars/trucks. FREE
TOWING. Flatbed/ wrecker service.
Immediate pick up. Monday-Sun-
day, serving your area 24/7. (952)
220-TOWS.
Trucks, Vans, SUV’s
2007 Ford Edge SEL, black cloth
interior, full sunroof, 114,000 miles,
$11,900. Call (507) 317-7307.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
CONKLIN© DEALERS NEEDED!
Lifetime career in marketing, man-
agement and applying “Green”
products made in America. Full
time/ part time. For a free catalog
call Franke’s Conklin Service now
at (320) 238-2370. www.frankemar-
keting.com.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
PART-TIME REINDEER HELP
November-December at showing
events. Animal handling experience
preferred. Must be flexible and
available weekends. (952) 250-
3113 or 250-4440.
Property Management Office look-
ing for someone to fill our accounts
position. Duties include payables,
receivables, invoicing/billing, cus-
tomer service, answering phones,
etc. Part time position. QuickBooks
knowledge required. Send resume
gkp.mgr@gmail.com.
Truck drivers needed with Class A
CDL for hauling in upper Midwest
area with vans or hopper-bottom
trailers. Must have 2 years or more
verifiable OTR experience. Mallak
Trucking of Olivia. (320) 523-5029.
Work Wanted
HANDYMAN: Will do remodeling of
kitchens, bathrooms, hanging
doors and windows, painting, sheet
rocking, texturizing or any minor re-
pairs inside or outside. Will also do
cleaning of basements/garages.
Call (320) 848-2722 or (320) 583-
1278.
FOR SALE
Firewood
Hardwood firewood for sale. Dry
and ready to burn. Delivery avail-
able in large and small amounts.
Call Travis (320) 510-2169.
Heating/Air Conditioning
Special-95% Goodman gas furnace
and programmable thermostat,
$2,200 installed or AC unit, $1,900
installed. J&R Plumbing Heating
AC, Lester Prairie (320) 510-5035.
LIVESTOCK, PETS
Cattle
Miniature Hereford cattle. Cows,
heifers, steers, bulls, 218 Cattle
Company. (507) 964-2544, leave
message.
REAL ESTATE
Houses
3BR family residence, 1202 North
9th Street, Olivia. $30,600. (320)
220-0120.
By owner. 4BR farm house, 2929
Brush Prairie Road, Lester Prairie,
MN. $72,000. (612) 759-4358.
One-of-a-kind immaculate
Winthrop 4BR home, in ground
pool, 6-stall garage. move in ready.
$179,000. Facebook/Trebelhorn
home. (507) 276-0655.
4.79 Lovely acres, nice 3BR, 2BA
home with vaulted ceilings and
more. 30x20 shed (water and elec-
tric in shed.) See photos, virtual
tours and more info on
w w w . C 2 1 k a n d i . c o m .
MLS#6003577, listed at $199,973,
2711 NW 6th Street, Willmar, MN
Agent Rebecca Trongaard (320)
905-4992.
Mobile Homes
1993 Liberty. Glencoe. 3BR. All ap-
pliances. New furnace. Easy fi-
nance. (612) 759-9161.
www.swsales.org.
RENTAL
Apartment
Glencoe Towns Edge Estates has a
2BR & 3BR available soon. In-
cludes heat, water, garbage and
sewer. We accept cats and small
dogs. (320) 864-6600.
Updated, spacious one and two BR
apartments in Renville. Includes
heat, water garbage. New stove,
fridge, air conditioner. Pet-friendly.
Call (320) 564-3351 for appoint-
ment.
Want To Rent
Father and Son Operation looking
for farmland to rent. Call (320) 523-
1116 or (320) 522-0272.
Want to rent farmland for 2014 and
beyond. (320) 510-1604.
Young farmer looking for land to
rent for 2014 and beyond. Compet-
itive rates and reference available.
Call Austin Blad (320) 221-3517.
SERVICES
Adult Care
Do you need a caregiver? Contact
michelle Furr at Advantage Care
LLC. Respite care and in-home
care avialable. (320) 522-0700.
Misc. Service
CUSTOM LOG SAWING- Cut at
your place or ours. White oak lum-
ber decking and firewood. Give Vir-
gil a call. Schauer Construction,
Inc. (320) 864-4453.
Snow Removal
WILL DO: Snowplowying and
snowblowing. Residential and com-
mercial. Call now to reserve a spot.
CHAD BANDAS (320) 327-6572
(home) or (320) 282-0488 (cell.)
Silver Lake Leader, Thursday, November 7, 2013 — Page 9
www.GlencoeNews.com
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AGRICULTURE AUTOMOTIVE EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE LIVESTOCK
& PETS
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All ads appear online
at GlencoeNews.com
Silver Lake Leader
To place an ad: Call: 320-327-2216; Fax: 320-327-2530; E-Mail: slleader@embarqmail.com; Mail: P.O. Box 343, Silver Lake, MN 55381
Advertising
Deadlines
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The Arlington Enterprise & The Silver Lake Leader Tuesdays at Noon
The Glencoe Advertiser, The Sibley Shopper
& The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
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Silver Lake Leader
Silver Lake • 327-2216
THANKS TO THESE
PARTICIPATING BUSINESSES:
• Molly’s Cafe • Memory Market • GRHS Gift Shop
• Glencoe City Center • Crow River Winery
• Wise Furniture Co. • The Flower Mill
• Heart & Home Boutique • Carlson’s Orchard
Pines-n-tiques • State Theatre • The Peppermint Twist
fa
ll
MOLDMAKER /
CNC MACHINIST
A progressive precision machine
shop has full time openings for tal-
ented, hardworking individuals to
set up and operate CNC machining
centers. Qualified candidates will
have a 2 year Vo-Tech degree and
2 plus years machine shop experi-
ence. Must be able to perform
close tolerance work, use CAM
software to program CNC mills,
and use precision measuring equip-
ment in the manufacture of plastic
injection molds. We offer compet-
itive wages and benefits. Submit
resumes to:
Suburban Mold &
Machining, Inc.
2823 12
th
Street East
Glencoe, MN 55336
E-mail: gregeurich@embarqmail.com
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ENERGY STAR WINDOWS $249
Installation included - any size double
hung. Year around installation - fi-
nancing available. True lifetime war-
ranty product. Call 888/690-9892 or
visit www.greensourcewindows.com
FARM LAND AUCTION
2 of 3 parcels selling with no minimum/
no reserve. 29.97 acres/development
potential, 10 acres wooded/tillable, 62
acres tillable. Online auction closes Nov.
19. www.AllianceBid.com 763/262-5555
License # 86-79. Alliance Bid Inc.
IF YOU USED
the blood thinner Pradaxa and suf-
fered internal bleeding, hemorrhaging,
required hospitalization or a loved one
died while taking Pradaxa between
October 2010 and the Present. You may
be entitled to compensation. Call Attor-
ney Charles H. Johnson 800/535-5727
CASH FOR CARS:
All cars/trucks wanted. Running or not! Top
dollar paid. We come to you! Any make/
model. Call for instant offer: 800/871-9145
DISH TV RETAILER
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12
mos.) & High Speed Internet start-
ing at $14.95/month (where avail-
able.) Save! Ask About same day In-
stallation! Call now! 800/297-8706
CANADA DRUG CENTER
is your choice for safe and affordable med-
ications. Our licensed Canadian mail order
pharmacy will provide you with savings
of up to 75% on all your medication needs.
Call today 800/259-1096 for $10.00 off
your first prescription and free shipping.
DONATE YOUR CAR
Truck or Boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free
3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing,
all paperwork taken care of 800/439-1735
GUARANTEED INCOME
for your retirement. Avoid market risk
& get guaranteed income in retire-
ment! Call for free copy of our safe
money guide plus annuity quotes from
A-rated companies! 800/631-4558
ENJOY 100% GUARANTEED
delivered-to-the-door Omaha Steaks!
Save 74% plus 4 free burgers - The Fam-
ily Value Combo - only $39.99. Order to-
day 877/415-6938, use code 48829ALF
- or www.omahasteaks.com/mbfam99
MISCELLANEOUS AUTOS WANTED
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
AUCTIONS
HEALTH
Advertise here
statewide
in 270 newspapers
only $249 per week!
Less Than $1 per
newspaper!
Call 800-279-2979
or this newspaper
Paraprofessional Opening
The Glencoe-Silver Lake School District is looking for a Paraprofessional
in the Special Education Program at the Lincoln Junior High/GSL High
School Campus for 6.75 hours a day during the school year. The online
application and position information are available on the GSL website
under “employment” at www.gsl.k12.mn.us.
K44CL45Aa
Richard Larson Builders, Inc.
has immediate opening for the
following positions:
Carpenters,
Siding Laborers
Roofing Laborers
Excellent opportunity to join
central Minnesota’s premier
contractor.
Apply in person or online:
Richard Larson Builders, Inc.
640 Adams Street
Hutchinson, MN 55350
www.larsonbuilders.com/
about/join-our-team
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The Glencoe Advertiser
716 E 10
th
St., PO Box 188, Glencoe, MN 55336
ph. 320-864-5518 fax: 320-864-5510
Contact:
Karin Ramige Cornwell • karinr@glencoenews.com
Brenda Fogarty • brendaf@glencoenews.com
Sue Keenan • suek@glencoenews.com
To be included in this popular edition call:
Last Chance Deadline:
Call
Today!
The Holiday Gift Guide will be delivered in the
Glencoe Advertiser, Sibley Shopper and through the mail
in the Waconia Area during the week of Nov. 24.
2013 Holiday GIFT GUIDE
Your guide to holiday shopping, fun & festivities!
This great annual section is
always full of great reader-
submitted recipes,
coloring contest and holiday
events. The easy-to-read book
format also makes it convenient
to use throughout the holidays!
This section will be sent out
to over 20,000 homes in 21
communities in the McLeod,
Sibley and portions of LeSueur
and Carver counties, including
expanded
distribution to
WACONIA.
Lt. j.g. Megan Smith
U.S. Navy
Serving in a naval hospital
in Bremerton, Washington
Wife of Cody Smith;
daughter of Frank & Lori
Kaczmarek
Silver Lake
Staff Sgt. Jeremy
Schuch
Marines
Serving at Camp Lejeune, N.C.
Husband of Leah Schuch; son
of Julie Schuch (Brownton)
and Kim Schuch (Gaylord)
Glencoe
Jillian Schuch
Navy
Serving in Japan
Daughter of Julie Schuch
(Brownton) and Kim Schuch
(Gaylord)
Glencoe
Alex McCleskey
Marines
Serving in
Afghanistan/Calif.
Husband of Erica Alsleben
McCleskey; son of Ken &
Laurie
Glencoe
Tucker Ingenthron
Army National Guard
Serving in Afghanistan
Son of Kris & Collette
Ingenthron
Glencoe
Gene Makovsky
U.S. Navy
Serving on the USS America
Grandson of Ron Makovsky
29 Palms, Calif.
Pfc. Marshall Erik
Tromborg
U.S. Army
Serving in Minn. National
Guard
Son of Craig & Lynn
Tromborg
Glencoe
MM3 Charles Rettig
U.S. Navy
Serving in Ballston Spa, N.Y.
Son of Elmer & Amy Rettig
Stewart
MSgt. Gloria
Washington
Air Force
Serving at Kirtland AFB,
N.M.
Daughter of Elmer & Amy
Rettig
Stewart
MSgt. Antoine
Washington
Air Force
Serving at Kandahar,
Afghanistan
Son-in-law of Elmer & Amy
Rettig
Stewart
Staff Sgt. Christopher
Charles Becker
U.S. Air Force
Serving in Mpls./St. Paul IAP
Air Reserve
Son of Charlie & Linda Becker
Glencoe
Spc. Christpher
Templin
Army
Serving in Bagram,
Afghanistan
Son of Shari Templin
Glencoe
Laurissa Flannery
Army National Guard
Training in Fort Lee, Va.
and Fort Jackson S.C.
Daughter of Mary Flannery
& Nathan Matthews
Glencoe
Spc. Colby Mickolichek
Army National Guard
Serving in FOB Frontenac
Afghanistan
Son of John & Colleen
Mickolichek
Hutchinson
Sgt. Alex Victorian
Army
Serving at Fort Stewart, Ga.
Son of Mike Victorian
Silver Lake
On Veterans Day, we salute the American veterans and active-duty military whose courage and dedication
have protected our freedom and our way of life for generations. We recognize their service and their
sacrifice, their selflessness and bravery, their hard work and their faith. Please join us in celebrating the men
and women of our military, past and present, this Veterans Day. Proudly fly your flag, thank a
veteran and show your support for those who continue to serve today.
CONTACT SILVER LAKE LEADER IF
YOU’D LIKE TO BE ADDED AS A
SPONSOR TO OUR UPCOMING
COMMUNITY PAGES - 327-2216.
Stritesky Trucking
Silver Lake • 320-327-2628
First Community Bank
with locations in Silver Lake & Lester Prairie
320-327-3191
www.fcblpsl.com
Edina Realty
Jeanne Ray, Realtor - RSA, Hutchinson
320-583-7184 • rayjea@mchsi.com
Electronic Servicing
216 Grove Ave. SE, Silver Lake
320-327-2742
www.electronicservicing.net
Shimanski Orchard
11155 200
th
St., Silver Lake
320-327-0112
Sumter Mutual
Insurance Company
117 W. Main St., Silver Lake
320-327-2887
Harlan’s Auto Repair
211 N. Lake Ave., Silver Lake
320-327-2255
Kaz’s
Auto & Truck Repair
Hwy. 7, Silver Lake
320-327-2516
Schmeling Oil Co., Inc.
Serving the Silver Lake area since 1976
320-587-3361 or 800-578-5636
Crow River Press
170 Shady Ridge Rd., Hutchinson
320-587-2062 • crowriverpress.com
Hutchinson Health
3 Century Ave. SE, Hutchinson
Clinic 320-234-3290
www.hutchhealth.com
Grandma’s Closet
Costume & Prop Rental
104 Lake Ave., Silver Lake
Chris 320-510-1567 • Rhonda 320-327-0144
Holt Motors
Hwy. 12, Cokato
320-286-2176
www.holtmotors.com
CONTACT SILVER LAKE LEADER IF
YOU’D LIKE TO BE ADDED AS A
SPONSOR TO OUR UPCOMING
COMMUNITY PAGES - 327-2216.
THIS PAGE BROUGHT TO YOU BY THESE AREA SPONSORS:
Your hometown newspaper, the Silver Lake Leader
104B Lake Ave., P.O. Box 343, Silver Lake, MN 55381 • 320-327-2216 • Fax 320-327-2530 • slleader@embarqmail.com
Page 10 — Silver Lake Leader, Thursday, November 7, 2013
CONGRATULATIONS
Thanks for a
Great Season!
Class AAA State Tournament
Fri., Nov. 8 @ Macalester College
GSL vs. St. Croix Lutheran
7:00 p.m.
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GO PANTHERS!
GSL Panther Football
Section 2 Class AAA Champs
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Silver Lake Leader, Thursday, November 7, 2013 — Page 11
Glencoe
320-864-5565
snapfitness.com/glencoe
Glencoe's 24-hour
fitness solution
JERRY
SCHARPE, Ltd.
ACCOUNTANTS
Serving Clients Throughout
The Area Since 1971
712 East 13
th
St.
Glencoe, MN 55336
Phone: (320) 864-5380
23 Juniper St. N,
Lester Prairie
320-395-8495
This page sponsored by these area businesses:
Banking • Mortgage
Investments • Trust
www.Security-Banks.com
Security
Bank &
Trust Co.
606 11
th
St. E,
Glencoe
320-864-3161
www.firstmnbank.com
806 10
th
St., Suite 101, Glencoe
2200 10
th
St. E,
Glencoe
2211 11
th
St. E.
Glencoe, MN
(320) 864-6132
www.coborns.com
1106 Hennepin Ave.,
Glencoe
320-864-4414
1805 Hennepin Ave. N.
Glencoe
320-864-3121
www.grhsonline.org
RE/MAX
HOMES
320-864-6870
www.teamjenkins.net
Kirk Miller
1215 Greeley Ave.
Glencoe, MN 55336
320-864-4397 or 888-864-9020
www.edwardjones.com
1120 DeSoto Ave. N, Glencoe
320-864-5103
HARLAN’S
Auto Repair
211 N. Lake Ave. PO Box 245
Silver Lake, MN 55381
320-327-2255
Sumter Mutual
Insurance Company
~
SINCE 1879
~
117 W. Main St.,
P.O. Box 269
Silver Lake, MN 55381
320-327-2887
COSTUME
& PROP RENTAL
Vintage Clothing,
Costumes, Props,
Accessories and
Formalwear.
104 Lake Ave.,
Silver Lake
Dairy Queen
320-864-3804
Happy
Hour Inn
Across from the
courthouse, Glencoe
320-864-4412
OPEN 7 Days a Week
Terry Jones
Glencoe
320-864-5581
rofessional
nsurance
roviders
305 11
th
St. E,
Glencoe
320-864-5184
“The Decorating Store
at Your Door”
Call
320-864-6754
Schatz
Construction,
Inc.
1011 Armstrong Ave.
Glencoe, MN 55336
320-864-3131
Glencoe VFW
923 Chandler Ave.
320-864-5992
John D. Decker
1006 Greeley Ave.,
Glencoe
320-864-5548
200 Third St. SW
Plato, MN
320-238-2193
702 10
th
St. E,
Glencoe
320-864-3062
ANDERSON INS.
& FIN. SVCS INC.
LARRY ANDERSON
AGENT
806 10
th
St., Suite 102, Glencoe
864-5515 • 888-288-5515
1320 Pryor Ave., Glencoe
320-864-6222
Gerry’s
Vision
Shoppe
1234 Greeley Ave.,
Glencoe
320-864-6111
Young America
Mutual
Insurance Company
615 W.13th St., Glencoe
Connie Jaskowiak,
Manager
(320) 864-3069
Fax: (320) 864-6301
SCHOENEBERGER
DENTAL CLINIC
1010 Greeley Ave.
Glencoe
320-864-5128
M
olly’s
gallery
Café
Homemade
with quality ingredients
Hwy 7, Silver Lake
320-327-2524
Southwest Eye Care
Your community full-service
eye care facility
1201 Greeley Ave. N #3
Glencoe, MN
320-864-2020
Gas – Diesel – Propane
Fresh Food
415 Chandler Ave., Glencoe
320-864-6608
216 Grove Ave NE
Silver Lake
320-327-2742
www.electronicservicing.net
Owner
Duane Wawrzyniak
A & K
Repair
Electric Motor Repair
609 West 13
th
St.
Glencoe
320-864-6077
LIGHT
P WER
Glencoe, MN
COMMI SSI ON
A
N
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James Rosckes, Glencoe
Office: (320) 864-5729
Cell: (612) 310-5729
james@flatworksconcrete.com
www.flatworksconcrete.com
FIRST COMMUNITY BANK
WITH LOCATIONS IN
SILVER LAKE • LESTER PRAIRIE
201 Main St. W.
Silver Lake
320-327-3191
www.fcblpsl.com
Michele’s
Day Care
108 Century Lane
Silver Lake
Michele Ebert
320-327-2834
320-864-6823
1121 Elliott Ave.
Glencoe
1401 Main St. West
Silver Lake
320-327-6577
www.cedarcrestmn.com
Thanks for a great season!
Chris Brecht
320-510-1567
Rhonda Kaczmarek
320-327-0144
Free Estimates
Owner: Ross Horstmann
Silver Lake
320-327-2104
Cell: 320-296-6061
910 E. 10
th
St.
Glencoe
320-864-5525
www.napastargroup.com
Hite
Hardware
& Paint
740 11
th
St., Glencoe
320-864-3713
2108 8
th
St. E.
Hwy. 212, Glencoe
864-5909
AUTO & TRUCK REPAIR
K
AZ’S
NOT YOUR
AVERAGE JOE!
Joe Kaczmarek
Silver Lake, MN
701 Highway 7, (320) 327-2516
Schauer
& Sons
Construction
SILVER LAKE, MN
320-327-3170
Therapeutic Massage
Michele Fogarty, Silver Lake
320-327-2211
Dale’s Appliance
& Refrigeration,
Inc.
Dale
Klaustermeier
6978 190
th
St.
Lester Prairie
395-2719
1303 Union Ave N
Glencoe, MN 55336
320-864-6335
dobravabrothers.com
& Rent-It-
Center
330 E. 10
th
St., Glencoe
320-864-5561
Andy Vasek
Shandon Mathews
320-583-4541
Hwy. 212 E.,
Glencoe
320-864-6038
www.bumpsrestaurant.com
K & K
STORAGE,LLC
512 Lake Ave N.,
PO Box 248
Silver Lake, MN 55381
320-327-0123
2735 12
TH
ST.
GLENCOE
On-Site Repairs Available
GLENCOE, MN
320-864-5181
800-950-5180
www.harpelbrothers.com
320-864-6106
2915 10
th
St. E.
Glencoe
410 10
th
St. E., Glencoe
320-864-5352
Dale’s
Plumbing & Heating, Inc.
2110 9
th
St. E.
Glencoe, MN 55336
320-864-6353
McLeod County Chronicle
716 E. 10
th
St., Glencoe, MN 55336
www.GlencoeNews.com • www.McPubDesigns.com
320-864-5518
Silver Lake Leader
104B Lake Ave., Silver Lake, MN 55381
www.GlencoeNews.com • www.McPubDesigns.com
320-327-2216
Boys Cross Country
8
th
Place as Team
Tori Burr
21
st
Place, All-State
&
CONGRATULATIONS CONGRATULATIONS
Member SIPC
GRUENHAGEN
INSURANCE
Glenn Gruenhagen,
CLU, ChFC
Emily Gruenhagen
624 East 13
th
St., Suite 101
Glencoe
(320) 864-5903
4561 Hwy 212, Glencoe
800-558-3759
(Toll Free)
320-864-5571
View photos from the entire 2013 fall sports season
@ www.glencoenews.com
The McLeod County Chronicle
Page 12 — Silver Lake Leader, Thursday, November 7, 2013
This document is © 2013 by admin - all rights reserved.