3-14-13 Arlington Enterprise

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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Serving the Communities of Arlington and Green Isle, Minnesota
www.arlingtonmnnews.com Volume 127 • Number 33 • Thursday, March 14, 2013 • Arlington, MN 55307
Single copy $1.00
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The public is encouraged to
attend an informational meet-
ing on Highway 5 projects
scheduled for construction
this summer, according to the
Minnesota Department of
Transportation (Mn/DOT).
The open house will be
held at the Arlington Commu-
nity Center from 5 p.m. to
6:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 19.
Mn/DOT staff and assisting
consultants will be able to ad-
dress impacts of the two proj-
ects.
The first project is High-
way 5 from Gaylord to Ar-
lington which will be con-
ducted in May and June. This
project will include mill and
overlay resurfacing. In addi-
tion, it will include sidewalk
reconstruction in Arlington.
There will be lane closures
and delays in conjunction
with this project. There will
also be a short detour for
bridge repair work.
The second project is High-
way 5 from Arlington to
Green Isle which will be con-
ducted in July to early Sep-
tember. This project will in-
clude pavement replacement
and culvert work. Traffic will
be detoured in two stages to
county roads.
Each project will cost
around $3 million and will
provide the motorists with a
smoother, safer ride, accord-
ing to Mn/DOT.
Prior to the resurfacing
project from Gaylord to Ar-
lington, the traffic signal light
at the intersection of High-
way 5 and West Main Street
in Arlington will be deactivat-
ed for a three-month evalua-
tion period.
In place of the signal light,
through-stop control (where
Highway 5 traffic does not
stop, but West Main Street
traffic does) will be imple-
mented and evaluated. If no
adverse traffic impacts are
observed during the evalua-
tion period, the signal will be
removed as part of the resur-
facing project, according to
Mn/DOT An earlier engi-
neering study determined the
existing traffic signal is not
needed now or in the future.
Public invited to Highway 5 construction meeting
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Green Isle City Coun-
cil, during a recent regular
meeting, unanimously ap-
proved a motion to raise the
water rates and base charge
beginning in 2013 through
2018 based on the study from
AEM Financial.
Mayor Dale ZumBerge and
City Council members Todd
Burg, Brian Oelfke, Shawn
Harms and Mark Wentzlaff
all voted in support of the
motion.
The base rate will increase
from $4.80 in 2012 to $6 in
2013.
The rate for up to 10,000
gallons of water will increase
from $3 in 2012 to $3.90 in
2013.
The rate for 10, 001 to
25,000 gallons of water will
increase from $3.75 in 2012
to $4.88 in 2013.
The rate for 25,001 and
more gallons of water will in-
crease from $4.69 in 2012 to
$6.10 in 2013.
The City Council made the
move after Sarah Rathlisberg-
er and Brad Falteysek from
AEM Financial presented a
basic overview on Fund Ac-
counting to the City Council.
Falteysek then presented a
detailed report on the water
and sewer rates for the City
of Green Isle. Falteysek sug-
gested that the city raise the
water rates and base charge
beginning in 2013 through
2018. The city, he said, could
then have a positive water
fund balance in 2018.
Other Business
• Joe Kreger commented
that the Green Isle Baseball
Association found a roller at-
tachment to be used with the
mower at the baseball park.
The equipment is at Arnolds
in Glencoe and the cost is
$394 plus $150 for assembly
to the mower.
• Kreger, in other news, re-
ported that the Park Board
met on Monday, Feb. 25.
There was some concern
about the safety of play-
ground equipment. Park
Board member Kris Winkel-
man offered to look at the
equipment and make sugges-
tions on possible repairs.
• In another matter, Kreger
is still working on a busing
arrangement with Arlington
officials to transport Green
Isle children to Arlington for
the Summer Recreation Pro-
gram.
• Kipp Trebesch, Sr. and
Kipp Trebesch, Jr. were pres-
ent and talked about the first
annual Jeff Gueningsman
Memorial Pull in Green Isle
last August. The event drew
approximately 1,500 people.
However, they heard there
were some hard feelings that
the local bars were not in-
volved with the event.
Kipp Trebesch, Sr. also in-
quired if the City Council
could eliminate the $500 fee
for the Industrial Park.
Mayor ZumBerge said the
city cannot waive the fee in
fairness to other groups who
pay the same amount for the
Industrial Park.
Oelfke suggested that the
two men may want to seek
donations to cover the fee.
• The City Council unani-
mously approved a motion to
approve a cell phone plan
with Supreme Wireless for
city employee Joe Dacey. The
plan will cost about $45 per
month plus two-year insur-
ance for $20.
• Oelfke reported that he
has received some complaints
about the plowing of streets
and the lack of sanding in
town after snowfalls.
The City Council will look
at the 2014 budget and deter-
mine if additional funds
should be added to the budget
for more sanding.
ZumBerge said plowing
complaints should be directed
to City Clerk Bert Panning.
He added that Panning and
Dacey will tour the town and
determine if the use of the
city tractor can help resolve
any issues.
• The City Council unani-
mously approved a motion to
hold the annual Spring Clean
Up Day on Saturday, April
27.
Water rates, base charge to increase in City of Green Isle
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Tour Of Tables
A record 32 tables were featured during the annual
Tour Of Tables at the Arlington Community Center on
Sunday afternoon and evening, March 10. “Snowmen
Melt Our Heart” was the theme for this table spon-
sored by Barb Meyers and Beth Walters. Front Row:
(left to right) Beth Walters, Linda Sinell, Barb Meyers
and Fran Ferch. Back Row: (l to r) Cheryl Farber, Sta-
cie Swenson, Tara Swenson and Jean Walters. The
event was sponsored by the Good Samaritan Society
- Arlington. The funds raised will go toward the com-
pletion of raising $201,000 for Phase II of the Care
Center Renovation Project. The Good Samaritan Soci-
ety - Arlington is within $59,000 of reaching this goal.
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
It is not known if the re-
ceiving of tax forfeited prop-
erty by Sibley County is a
possible financial gain or
loss.
Sibley County Administra-
tor Matt Jaunich brought up
the topic of what to do with
tax forfeited property previ-
ously used as the Gaylord
Salvage Yard at the board of
commissioners meeting on
Tuesday, March 12.
Jaunich was seeking direc-
tion from the board since the
county has been charged for
the care of the property,
which needs to be cleaned up.
One possibility to save on
the cost is to use the sentence
to serve program.
One holdup is waiting for a
response from the Minnesota
Pollution Control Agency
(MPCA) to find out the con-
dition of the land and what it
wants done if the land is con-
taminated.
Sibley County Attorney
David Schauer said until it is
known what pollution may be
there, it will be difficult to
sell the property and get it
back on the tax rolls.
Schauer added if the prop-
erty is contaminated enough,
the county may be able to get
on the state’s super fund list
to help pay for the cleanup.
Also what is not known is
what is inside two locked
buildings left behind by the
former owners and now be-
longing to the county. Will
the county strike gold or find
more costly problems?
Sibley County Assessor
Cal Roberts said there is
quite a bit of scrap iron, steel
and copper on the property.
He said in order to start the
salvage process, two of the
buildings need to be totally
torn down because they are a
danger.
Since nothing can be done
until spring anyway, Roberts
said Jaunich has a little time
to look into possibly offset-
ting the cleanup cost with sal-
vage material.
County Commissioner Bill
Pinske asked if the county
had to advertise for bids to do
the cleanup and salvage.
Schauer said that would make
sense and added that the
county has the right to cut the
locks on the buildings and
find out what is inside. Plus,
the county should make sure
the site is secure.
The next step is to hear
from the MPCA and get as-
sessment on the condition of
the property.
Other Business
• In other business, the
board voted to authorize the
purchase of Dragon Speak
speech recognition software
for public health and human
services at an estimated cost
of $10,954.58.
The computer software will
allow public health and social
service workers in the field to
speak notes at the time that
will go directly into the com-
puter system and can be
printed out later. The technol-
ogy will take advantage of
down time.
The final cost will depend
on how many other counties
go in on the cooperative proj-
ect. Funds are available in the
public health and human
services budget. The budget
committee has approved the
proposal.
• Information Systems Di-
rector Beth Wilson was given
authorization to purchase six
tables, three chairs and win-
dow coverings for the com-
puter training lab relocation
project at a cost of $4,600.
Wilson said the new tables
will allow for storage under-
neath where previously
Sibley County
Continued on page 2
Forfeited property could
be a financial gain or
loss for Sibley County
A bipartisan group of law-
makers is seeking to give
agricutural landowners more
rights under state eminent do-
main laws when their land is
condemned for construction
of a high-voltage electrical
transmission line, according
to a recent article in the Ses-
sion Daily.
State Representative David
Bly, a DFLer from North-
field, recently presented
House File 338 to the House
Energy Policy Committee.
The proposal aims to expand
the state’s “Buy the Farm”
law, which allows an owner
to require utility companies
to condemn and purchase
land contiguous to the parcels
needed to complete a public
improvement, up to and in-
cluding the entire property,
according to the article.
The proposal would uncap
appraisal fee awards to
landowners; remove a re-
quirement that a landowner
voluntarily elects to be con-
demned must be deemed
“commercially viable;” and
ensure that provisions of the
state’s condemnation laws --
like reimbursement for attor-
ney’s fees and damages for
loss of ongoing business --
apply to the acquisition of
land under “Buy the Farm.”
“We’re asking for farmers
to be justly and fairly com-
pensated,” Thom Petersen,
director of government affairs
for the Minnesota Farmers
Union was quoted in the arti-
cle.
Dale and Julie Schwartz
have a 100-cow, 575-acre
farm in rural Arlington. The
family has been in Dale’s
family for three generations,
but it may not make a fourth.
The farm is directly in the
path of the CapX 2020 Proj-
ect which is a major high-
voltage transmission line
under construction from
Testifies
Continued on page 3
Arlington woman testifies before lawmakers
News Briefs
House is vandalized in town
An individual or individuals reportedly threw eggs at
the Bob and Dawn Lueth residence along the 400 block
of Circle Lane in Arlington last week, according to the
Arlington Police Department. The incident was reported
to authorities on Friday, March 8.
Rose graduates from college
Renae Rose, a graduate of the Sibley East Senior
High School, graduated from the University of St.
Thomas during recent commencement exercises.
Rose graduated with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in
Business Administration - Accounting.
She is the daughter of Rick and Lorie Rose, Arling-
ton.
Band concert set for March 25
The Sibley East Senior High School will hold its
Winter Concert in the large gym at the Arlington school
site at 7 p.m. Monday, March 25.
The Wolverine Jazz Band and Concert Band will be
playing a variety of different selections.
A’s breakfast is March 17
The Arlington A’s baseball team will hold its annual
Wooden Bat Breakfast at the Arlington Community
Center from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sunday, March 17.
The menu will consist of scrambled eggs, sausages,
potato bites, cinnamon rolls, milk, juice and coffee.
Vets steak fry is March 15
The Arlington veterans organizations will hold a
steak fry in the Veterans Building at the Sibley County
Fairgrounds from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Friday, March
15.
The adult menu will include a steak dinner, pork chop
dinner, shrimp dinner, steak, shrimp dinner and bar-
beque ribs.
A childrens’ menu is also available.
Engagement
Ploeger - Hoffman
Shelby Ploeger and Marc
Hoffman are excited to an-
nounce their engagement.
Shelby attended the Sibley
East Senior High School and
then joined the United States
Navy in January of 1997. She
has served a tour of duty in
Iraq, and has been stationed
in Italy and Puerto Rico. She
continues to serve as a Senior
Chief Petty Officer in the Re-
serves. Shelby graduated
from the University of Wis-
consin at Stout in 2006 and is
currently employed with Buf-
falo Wild Wings in the corpo-
rate office.
Marc attended Burnsville
High School and is currently
employed with Applebee’s in
Shakopee, and with Delaware
North at Target Field as a su-
pervisor.
Shelby is the daughter of
Jim and Regi Ploeger, Arling-
ton.
Marc is the son of Tony and
Nancy Hoffman, Eagan.
An April 6 wedding is
being planned at the Arling-
ton United Methodist Church.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Beg For Justice
Beg For Justice provided the musical entertainment
during the annual Tour Of Tables event at the Arling-
ton Community Center on Sunday afternoon and
evening, March 10.
Marc Hoffmann and
Shelby Ploeger
everything had to be on the
crowded top. The building
committee has given approval.
• The date was set for the
Sibley County Board of Ap-
peal and Equalization meeting
which is 6 p.m. Monday, June
17 in the board room. The
meeting has to run until at
least 7 p.m.
Cal Roberts, County Asses-
sor, wanted the change in the
scheduled time in order to
save money by including the
notice of tax value to residents
in with the property state-
ments.
The county did this last year
and saved close to $3,000 in
postage. Roberts wanted to
start printing that afternoon
and added, “It is very correct
and proper that we do it.”
• Linda Olson was hired as
a part-time home health aide
and will be utilized on an as
needed basis.
• Under commissioner re-
ports, County Commissioner
Joy Cohrs attended a meeting
in St. Paul where she learned
the state has in its proposed
budget $40 million for SHIP
health program grants.
Cohrs said the county em-
ployee “biggest loser” compe-
tition has resulted in a loss of
more than 300 pounds so far.
The next challenge coming in
April as part of the wellness
program involves teams using
pedometers, indicating how
far someone has walked.
At another meeting, Cohrs
learned that cleanup efforts on
the Crow River over the past
nine years resulted in the col-
lection of 58.9 tons of trash.
More spring cleanup projects
are planned on the river at dif-
ferent locations.
The Minnesota River Board
is going through some
changes after an external re-
view. The board is consider-
ing changing from involving
county commissioners to rep-
resentatives from the water-
shed groups.
County Commissioner Pet-
tis reported that the Minnesota
Valley Railroad Authority has
a pot of money it will use on
improvements to four county
bridges.
County Commissioner Bill
Pinske said the Trailblazers
bus transit company is having
trouble keeping and hiring
drivers. He said low salary is
the main issue.
Sibley County Continued from page 1
A new season of hope has
arrived in Sibley County
thanks to the American Can-
cer Society Daffodil Days
which begin soon.
Flowers will be available
at the Arlington State Bank
on Friday morning, March 15
and the Drive-Thru Bank on
Friday afternoon, March 15
and Saturday morning,
March 16.
This longstanding program
celebrates the American Can-
cer Society’s mission to fight
for everyone touched by can-
cer and to help create a world
with less cancer and more
birthdays.
Daffodil Days
March 15, 16
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 14, 2013, page 2
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
When you place your ad in
additional papers, you save!
Place your ad in the Arlington Enterprise and receive savings
when placing the ad in any of these additional publications:
Glencoe Advertiser, McLeod County Chronicle, Sibley Shopper, Silver Lake Leader
Call 964-5547 to place your ad today!
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SibleyMedical.org
Arlington 507-964-2271
Gaylord 507-237-5523
Henderson 507-248-3433
Winthrop 507-647-5318
March is National Colorectal Cancer Month.
Colorectal (colon and rectal) cancer is the 2nd leading cause
of cancer-related deaths in the United States. But, if caught
early, it is often curable.
Get the best care.
Many people are worried about discomfort during a
colonoscopy scieening. Ai Sibley Medical Ceniei, Ceiiifed
Nurse Anesthetists will help during your procedure to provide
increased comfort, patient safety and a faster recovery.
Don’t wait.
The best way to prevent colorectal cancer is to start getting
colonoscopy screenings at 50 (or earlier if there’s a family
history).
Call today to get a free preparation kit.
If you schedule a colonoscopy in March, you’ll get a free
colonoscopy preparation kit. So, call today!
Time to get up close
and personal
Thank You
I would like to thank
Sibley Medical Clinic,
Dr. Mohammed, Ar-
l i ngton Ambul ance
and the doctors and
nurses at Abbott.
And, special thank
you to the vi si t from
Pastor Bob Miner, fami-
ly and friends, and for
all the prayers.
Delmar Kley
*10Ea
Thursday, March 14: Golden Age Club, Senior
Citizen’s building at Four Seasons Park, noon
luncheon followed by meeting and entertainment.
New members welcome!
Friday, March 15: Arlington Veteran’s Organiza-
tion’s Steak Fry, Veteran’s building at fairgrounds,
5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
Monday, March 18: Arlington City Council, coun-
cil chambers, 6:30 p.m.
Sibley East School Board, room 149, Arlington
Campus, 6:30 p.m.
VFW Post, Veteran’s building at the fairgrounds,
8 p.m.
Tuesday, March 19: Knights of Columbus, St.
Mary’s Parish hall, 8 p.m.
Wednesday, March 20: Arlington Good Samari-
tan Auxiliary, Fairview Assisted Living dining room,
9 a.m.
Sibley County Partnering in Prevention meeting,
Sibley Medical Center conference room, 10 a.m.
Community
Calendar
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER
Arlington State Bank
(507) 964-2256
Fax (507) 964-5550
www.ArlingtonStateBank.com
MAIN BANK
Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (straight thru)
DRIVE THRU
Monday - Thursday, 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.,
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Member
FDIC
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 14, 2013, page 3
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Business & Professional
Directory
CALL TODAY TO BE INCLUDED IN OUR
BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY!
507-964-5547
Arlington
Chiropractic Clinic
JUSTIN E. DAVIS, D.C.
607 W. Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-2850
arlingtonchiropracticmn.com
Office Hours:
Mon. 9am-6pm; Tues. 9am-5pm;
Wed. 8am-6pm; Thurs. 1-6pm;
Fri. 8am-4pm; 1
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& 3
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Sat. 8am-11am
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Large Animal
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Ultrasound repro, Surgical,
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Small Animal House Call
by Appointment
Medical, Vaccination Services
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Dr. Robert G. Ovrebo
Office 507-964-2682
Cell 507-995-0507
Miller
Law
Office
RAPHAEL J. MILLER
ROXANN M. BERANEK
Attorneys at Law
332 Sibley Ave. 1042 First Ave.
Gaylord, MN Gibbon, MN
Tel. 507-237-2954 Fax: 507-237-2347
Wills - Taxes - Estate Planning
General Law Practice & Trials
Free consultation on personal injury claims
MESENBRING
CONSTRUCTION
(507) 964-2864
“Your local home builder and
remodeler for over 38 years”
Member: MN River Builders Assn.
MN License #4806
ROSS R. ARNESON
ATTORNEY AT LAW
302 West Main
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-5753
Real Estate, Estate Planning,
Probate and Business Law
Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Saturdays by Appointment
Farm – Residential
Commercial
Licensed - Bonded - Insured
• 24-Hour Emergency
Service
• Free Estimates
Tyler Kranz, Owner
507-964-2525
Klehr Grading
&
Excavating, Inc.
JEFF & WENDY KLEHR
Dozer, Grader, Basements,
Septic Systems, Driveways, Backhoe Work,
Hauling Gravel/Rock/Sand, Skidloader
Jeff cell: 612-756-0595
Wendy cell: 612-756-0594
640 E. BROOKS ST., ARLINGTON, MN 55307
1-507-964-5783 • FAX: 507-964-5302
Local LAWN
Enforcement
Arlington, MN
Licensed and Insured
Mowing, fertilizing and
weed control, dethatching,
garden tilling, core aeration
www.locallawnenforcement.com
Adam and David Hansen
Adam cell: 507-327-0917
507-964-5835
• 5” Seamless Gutters
• 6” Seamless Gutters
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PHIL GOETTL
612-655-1379
888-864-5979
www.mngutter.com
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Family Dentistry
Dr. John D. Gustafson, D.D.S
Dr. Jared Gustafson, D.D.S
COMPREHENSIVE CARE
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Office Hours: Monday–Friday
New Patients Welcome
Dr. Jason Anderson, D.D.S
Orthodontists
106 3
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Ave. NW,
Arlington
507-964-2705
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REPAIR LLC
HEAVY DUTY TRUCK
AND FARM EQUIPMENT
REPAIR
DOT INSPECTIONS
23315 HWY 5
ARLINGTON, MN 55307
PAUL PIEPER, OWNER
EMAIL: ppieper@ymail.com
Truck &
Farm Tire
Sales &
Service
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V I S I T U S O N L I N E A T
W W W . A R L I N G TO N M N N E W S . C O M
CURBSIDE GARBAGE
COLLECTION
NOTICE TO ARLINGTON RESIDENTS:
Due to the time of year, the graveled alleyways
are very soft and cannot handl e the l arge
garbage trucks driving on them. The City of Ar-
lington is asking all residents to place their
garage cans and recycling containers curbside.
We have also notified the garbage companies
and have asked them not to drive through the
graveled alleyways until such time as they have
had a chance to dry out. This will become
ef-
fective Mon., MARCH 18
th
and
continue until further notice.
Areas with cement alleyways
are excluded from this notice.
City of Arlington
Street Superintendent Dan Thomes
A10-11Ea
Green
Isle Irish
SAT., MARCH 23
HAM & TURKEY
BINGO
Club
New Yorker
7:00 P.M.
Sponsored by the GI Irish
Fire Dept. Lic#02584
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Arlington A’s
Baseball Team
Wooden Bat
Breakfast
Brunch
Sunday, March 17
Arlington
Community Center
8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Adul t:
$
6.50 Advance •
$
7 Door
Child 6-12:
$
4.50 Advance •
$
5 Door
Child 5 & Under: Free
Menu: Scrambled eggs,
sausages, potato bites,
cinnamon roll, milk, juice
and coffee.
Advance tickets available
at: Thomes Bros., DJ’s Shoes,
Board Members & Arl. Liquors
A8-9S,10Ea
PAPA
BOB!
Arriving just in
time to help
celebrate this
special day
is Bob’s first
grandchild
Grant Robert
Pichelmann
February 18, 2013
6 lbs., 8 oz.
19-1/2” long
BIRTHDAY HAPPY 50
th
BIRTHDAY
*10Ea
St. PatrickÊÊÊ

s
Day Party
St. Brendan
’Ê
s
Catholic Church
Green Isle
Admission:
$
6
Games,Prizes
& Lunch
*
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Sunday, March 17
1:30 p.m. •¶ Hall
Jordan D. Herd, Arlington,
recently earned the highest
advancement award the Boy
Scouts of America offers to
Scouts, the Eagle Award.
Herd was presented with
his Eagle Award at Zion
Lutheran Church in Arlington
on Sunday, Feb. 17.
As a member of Troop 140,
Herd is one of approximately
two percent of all Boy Scouts
who attain the Eagle Rank,
according to Scoutmaster
Keith Herd.
Each candidate must earn
21 merit badges and success-
fully complete a community,
church or synagogue related
service project to earn his
Eagle Award. Herd chose to
landscape the north side of
Amberfield Apartments in
Arlington.
Herd is a member of Zion
Lutheran Church and is ac-
tive in football, baseball,
choir, summer softball coach
and HOSA at the Sibley East
Senior High School where he
is a senior.
He is the son of Keith and
Stephanie Herd, Arlington.
Jordan Herd receives Eagle Scout
Submitted Photo
Left to right: Scott Sorenson, Lions
Charter representative; Jordan Herd,
Eagle Scout; and Nancy and Dan His-
lop, Lions representatives.
A 37-year-old Fairfax man
who is charged with multiple
counts of criminal sexual
conduct over allegations that
he sexually assaulted pre-teen
girls, has been charged with
another count after new evi-
dence surfaced recently, ac-
cording to the KNUJ Radio
website.
Troy M. Berger now faces
four counts of criminal sexual
conduct in Sibley County for
allegedly molesting three
young children over a period
of several years. The new
charge was added after one of
the alleged victims was ex-
amined at a local hospital and
told the staff about incidents
not mentioned previously.
The crimes also allegedly
occurred in Nicollet and
Renville counties and Berger
faces more than two dozen
felony counts altogether.
A court appearance sched-
uled in Sibley County for
Thursday March 7 has been
rescheduled for Thursday,
March 21.
His wife, Shelly Kay Berg-
er, faces one count of child
endangerment as well for al-
legedly knowing about the
sexual abuse and not report-
ing it.
Fairfax man charged with multiple
counts of criminal sexual conduct
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley Medical Center
has been mandated by the Of-
fice of Aeronautics at the
Minnesota Department of
Transportation to bring its he-
lipad into compliance, ac-
cording to SMC Facility
Manager John Zaske.
The Sibley Medical Center,
after a recent inspection, was
found to meet the Minnesota
Private Helicopter Licensing
criteria except for a number
of discrepancies.
As a result, at least three
trees and as many as six trees
will have to be removed in
Memorial Park. Several more
trees will have to be trimmed.
One tree will have to be re-
moved at the Good Samaritan
Society - Arlington while
other trees will have to be
trimmed.
The Sibley Medical Center
will replant new trees in those
areas, Zaske said.
The helipad area will have
to be painted with reflective
paint.
In addition, spotlights will
have to be directed at the bell
tower and cross at St. Mary’s
Catholic Church.
Furthermore, a red light
will have to be installed
above the light pole at the
corner of West Douglas Street
and Seventh Avenue North-
west.
The Sibley Medical Center
will also lose one parking
stall in its parking lot and one
parking stall along West Dou-
glas Street.
The Sibley Medical Center
can continue to use its “Ar-
lington Helipad” while the
projects are completed. The
deadline is Friday, April 5.
SMC mandated to bring
helipad into compliance
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington Fire Depart-
ment responded to a smoking
light pole along the 400 block
of West Main Street in Ar-
lington at 7:50 p.m. Friday,
March 8, according to Arling-
ton Fire Chief John Zaske.
An underground fire was
reportedly caused by the re-
cent installation of the four-
way stop sign by the Min-
nesota Department of Trans-
portation at the intersection
of West Main Street and
Highway 5, according to Ar-
lington Street Superintendent
Dan Thomes.
As a result, the plastic con-
duit and copper wire burnt up
and caused the nearby light
pole to smoke.
The plastic conduit and
copper wire will need to be
replaced.
The Arlington Fire Depart-
ment was on the scene for
nearly two hours.
The City of Arlington, Ar-
lington Police Department
and McLeod Power Coopera-
tive assisted at the scene.
Arlington Fire Department responds to
a smoking light pole in downtown area
Bookings, S.D. to Hampton,
Minn.
Julie testified before the
Minnesota House Energy
Committee last month.
The couple fears that stray
voltage and the electromag-
netic field from the power line
will harm their cows and
themselves. The couple wants
the utilities to buy a 160-acre
section of their farm so they
can relocate themselves and
their cows. The couple is not
satisifed with just selling the
150-foot right-of-way.
“They talk about a safe dis-
tance -- we don’t have a safe
distance,” Julie told members
of the committee. “We work
there and live there.”
Dan Lesher, the land rights
lead at Great River Energy,
told the committee that the
state’s “Buy the Farm” law,
which was passed in the
1970s, already goes beyond
similar laws in other states,
according to the article. He in-
dicated that higher project
costs could lead to higher
costs for customers of Great
River Energy which is one of
11 transmission-owning utili-
ties companies involved in the
CapX 2020 Project.
The meeting was strictly in-
formational and the Minneso-
ta House Energy Committee
took no action on the matter.
Testifies Continued from page 1
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 14, 2013, page 4
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Staff
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Pub-
lishers; Kurt Menk, Editor; Karin
Rami ge, Manager; Marvi n
Bulau, Production Manager;
Barb Mathwig, Office; Ashley
Reetz, Sales; and Jean Olson,
Proof Reading.
Letters
This page is devoted to opin-
ions and commentary. Articles
appearing on this page are the
opinions of the writer. Views ex-
pressed here are not necessarily
those of the Arlington Enter-
prise, unless so designated. The
Arlington Enterprise strongly
encourages others to express
opinions on this page.
Letters from our readers are
strongly encouraged. Letters for
publ i cati on must bear the
writer’s signature and address.
The Arlington Enterprise re-
serves the right to edit letters
for purpose of clarity and space.
Ethics
The editorial staff of the Arling-
ton Enterprise strives to present
the news in a fair and accurate
manner. We appreciate errors
being brought to our attention.
Pl ease bri ng any gri evances
against the Arlington Enterprise to
the attention of the editor. Should
differences continue, readers are
encouraged to take their griev-
ances to the Mi nnesota News
Council, an organization dedicated
to protecti ng the publ i c from
press inaccuracy and unfairness.
The News Council can be contact-
ed at 12 South Sixth St., Suite
940, Minneapolis, MN 55402, or
(612) 341-9357.
Press Freedom
Freedom of the press is guar-
anteed under the First Amend-
ment to the U.S. Constitution:
“Congress shall make no law
respecting an establishment of
religion, or prohibiting the free
exercise thereof; or abridging
the freedom of speech, or the
press…”
Ben Frankl i n wrote i n the
Pennsylvania Gazette in 1731:
“If printers were determined not
to print anything till they were
sure it would offend nobody
there would be very little print-
ed.”
Deadline for the Arlington
Enterprise news is 4 p.m., Mon-
day, and advertising is noon,
Tuesday. Deadl i ne for The
Gal axy adverti si ng i s noon
Wednesday.
Established in 1884.
Postmaster send address changes to:
Arlington Enterprise.
402 West Alden Street, P.O. Box 388,
Arlington, MN 55307.
Phone 507-964-5547 FAX 507-964-2423.
Hours: Monday-Wednesday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.;
Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 2 p.m.; and Friday closed.
Entered as Periodicals postal matter at Arlington,
MN post office. Postage paid at Arlington USPS No.
031-980.
Subscription Rates: Minnesota – $33.00 per year. Out-
side of state – $38.00 per year.
Arlington ENTERPRISE
SMC exploring potential
affiliation with Ridgeview
Our View: It’s an excellent
proactive move for the future
Opinions
Guest Column
Letters To The Editor
The Sibley Medical Center Board and the Arlington City
Council, based upon a goal set by Mayor Jim Kreft, initiated
exploratory discussions with several other healthcare systems
for the purpose of affiliation opportunities in 2012.
The Sibley Medical Center reached out to seven other
healthcare organizations and had preliminary dialogue with
three of the seven which expressed interest in a possible affili-
ation with the local healthcare facility. Each of the three
healthcare systems was asked to respond to a series of ques-
tions by the Sibley Medical Center Board.
Based on the responses to these questions, the Sibley Med-
ical Center Board decided to focus preliminary discussions on
a potential affiliation relationship between the Sibley Medical
Center and the Ridgeview Medical Center.
The potential affiliation with the Ridgeview Medical Center
makes sense for a number of reasons.
The Sibley Medical Center Board and the Arlington City
Council are being proactive and looking at the big picture.
The Sibley Medical Center is also in an excellent negotiating
position because it is a successful healthcare facility.
Affiliations, consolidations, cooperations and specializations
are the current trend in the healthcare industry. During the past
several decades, small town hospitals could survive and
thrive. That is not the case these days. Medical facilities in
small communities need to partner and affiliate with large
healthcare organizations in order to be successful in the future.
Without an affiliation in the future, the long-term success of
the Sibley Medical Center would be jeopardy.
The Sibley Medical Center already has an excellent relation-
ship with the Ridgeview Medical Center in the form of an ad-
ministrative contract, ambulance service and various special-
ists. The Sibley Medical Center, based upon this current rela-
tionship, knows and trusts the Ridgeview Medical Center. In
addition, it is also in the Ridgeview Medical Center’s long-
term plan to be affiliated with the Sibley Medical Center.
The Sibley Medical Center and the Arlington City Council
are on the right track and have proceeded with caution during
the past several months. The ultimate goal for this affiliation is
to enhance access to excellent healthcare services now and for
decades down the road. Two other important goals are to
maintain a local voice and a long-term healthcare presence in
Arlington and for the surrounding area.
-K.M.
Too Tall’s Tidbits
Happy Birthday and Happy An-
niversary to the following local and
area residents compliments of the
Arlington Lions Club Community
Calendar.
March 15
In Memory Of Darwin Mathwig,
Deb Haggenmiller, Ebony Roth,
Duane Brueggemeier, Katie Rauch,
Lilli Von Eschen, Mason DeVlaem-
inck and Rhonda Stien.
March 16
Brett Scharping, Brian Diehn,
Daniel Koch, Doug Schauer, Kassy
Schmidt Kranz and Larry Quast.
March 17
Barb Fransen, Bonnie Nagel, Sammi
Rose, Daniel Farniok, Shelby
Dieball, Lynette Rohlfing and
Robert Pichelmann.
March 18
Barry Mathwig, Brett Adams, Kay
Broin and Patty Duenow.
March 19
Ben Reilly, Joe Melsha, Lorraine
Neubarth, Madeline Kjellesvig,
Stephanie Schultz, and Mr. and Mrs.
Peter Arneson.
March 20
In Memory Of Ervin Fenske, Jr.,
Bailey DeVlaeminck, Eleanor Voigt,
Gillian Breyer, Jill Ruehling, Jim
Soeffker and Melissa Hendrycks.
March 21
Caleb Malarz, Charles Breyer, Krista
Kube, Lori Diekmann and Tim Rein-
ert.
*****
A pediatrician always puts his lit-
tle patients at ease by playing a
game with them. One day he pointed
to a little boy’s ear and asked him,
“Is this your nose?”
Immediately, the boy turned to
his mother and said, “Gosh, Mom,
I think we better find a new doc-
tor!”
*****
A man is recovering from minor
surgery when his nurse comes in to
check on him.
“How are you feeling?” she asks.
“I’m okay,” he says, “but I didn’t
like the four-letter word the doctor
used during surgery.”
“What did he say?” the nurse asks.
“Oops,” replies the man.
*****
What do you call a frog that cross-
es the road, jumps in a puddle of
mud and crosses the road again? A
dirty double crosser.
*****
A man decided to try skydiving.
He jumped out of the plane, pulled
the ripcord and nothing happened.
On the way down, he passed a guy
going up, so he hollered, “Hey, you
know anything about parachutes?”
“No,” the guy yelled back. “You
know anything about gas barbe-
ques?”
*****
A guy spots his doctor in the mall.
He stops him and says, “Six weeks
ago when I was in your office, you
told me to go home, get into bed and
stay there until you called. But you
never called.
“I didn’t,” the doctor replies.
“Then what are you doing out of
bed.”
*****
Most expressways have three
lanes: the left lane, the right lane,
and the one you’re trapped in
when you see your next exit.
*****
The downcast man said to his
friend, “My wife doesn’t understand
me, does yours?
The friend replied, “I don’t
know. I’ve never heard her men-
tion you.”
By U.S. Senator Al Franken
When the International Olympic
Committee (IOC) recently recom-
mended eliminating wrestling from
the games starting in 2020, it struck
me -- and I’m sure a great many
other Minnesotans -- as not only a
blow to Olympic tradition, but also
as just plain wrong.
As a former high school wrestler
from a state with a great wrestling
tradition, I think this ill-considered
decision should be reversed, and I
have joined a growing chorus of
people in the United States and
across the world who have called on
the IOC to reinstate the sport.
Wrestling taught me hard work,
discipline, and the ability to think on
my feet (and on the mat), just as it
has done for generations of athletes
from this country and the more than
70 other countries who send
wrestlers to the Olympics every four
years.
No doubt, the sport’s absence
would diminish the appeal of the
games for many observers, but to
me, much worse would be the loss
of a place for wrestlers to compete
at the highest level of international
competition.
In other sports -- like hockey, bas-
ketball, soccer, and tennis -- you can
go “pro” (we former wrestlers don’t
consider pro wrestling an actual
“sport”—more an “entertainment”).
In competitive wrestling, the
Olympic games are as good as it
gets. Stealing the gold-medal
dreams of so many hard-working
athletes across Minnesota and the
world seems almost unforgivable –
especially when sports with much
less Olympic tradition remain
Olympic sports.
Minnesota's Deep Olympic
Wrestling
Tradition Spans Decades
Former Minnesota Senator Paul
Wellstone attended the University of
North Carolina on a wrestling schol-
arship, where he was an undefeated
Atlantic Coast Conference champi-
on. He and his two sons – who also
excelled at wrestling – bonded over
the sport.
I’m sure Paul would join me in
opposing this decision, not simply
as a wrestling partisan, but because
he understood how much the sport
means to so many communities,
families and athletes in our state.
In Minnesota, our Olympic
wrestling tradition has spanned
many decades, with our state send-
Franken
Continued on page 5
Wrestling should remain an Olympic sport
To The Editor,
Last Thursday, the Senate voted to
pass the Democrats' insurance ex-
change plan as part of the Federal
Affordable Care Act (Obamacare),
which requires each state to set up
an internet portal (known as an “ex-
change”) for the purpose of provid-
ing access to health insurance.
Frankly, of the health exchange
plans I am aware of from across the
country, Minnesota’s is by far the
most flawed. Here are some of the
reasons why this bill is a dreadful
deal for my constituents:
• Growth of government; this bill
grows government by roughly 100
new state employees at an expected
cost of $60 million or more per year.
• The exchange will be run by a
seven-member board on which the
majority will rule; meaning four un-
elected people with almost complete
autonomy will run the insurance in-
dustry in Minnesota.
• Board members may be re-
moved only by a two-thirds vote of
board members. Basically, this
means the board can only remove
themselves.
• Initially, the board has super ex-
pedited rule making authority. This
power gives them complete autono-
my on making laws affecting the
health insurance industry with no
legislative or executive branch over-
sight.
• In the Senate’s bill, the board
will have unfettered access to the
health impact fund (cigarette tax),
equaling $200 million per year.
Again, no legislative oversight in
controlling what the board spends
the money on.
• The board will have complete
control over the number of and
which insurance companies will be
licensed to do business in the state
of Minnesota. This means you could
well find a monopoly of one or two
companies from which to purchase
health insurance.
• It is likely health care will be-
come more expensive under the
health insurance exchange. The IRS
estimates the cheapest cost for a
family of four will be $20,000 per
year under the new plan.
• The exchange itself will cost ap-
proximately $332 million between
2011-2016 and will do nothing to
improve health insurance or health
care in Minnesota.
• Throughout the legislative
process, the Republican Caucus of-
fered dozens of amendments de-
signed to address the above prob-
lems. The DFL accepted no substan-
tive amendments to resolve these is-
sues. I believe this exchange effec-
tively eliminates the business rela-
tionship between insurance
agents/brokers and their customers
and substitutes in their place a new
government agency. The health in-
surance exchange brings to mind
those infamous words "I am from
the government and I'm here to help
you." There is no way that I can sup-
port this concept and the health ex-
change board will have to change
significantly coming out of the con-
ference committee before it will gar-
ner my vote.
Following is a link to the actual
bill (http://tinyurl.com/a666t68). I
urge you to compare the above bul-
let points to the actual text of the
bill.
Scott Newman
State Senator
District 18
Newman comments on insurance exchange plan
To The Editor,
Last Monday the House debated
and passed one of the largest over-
hauls of Minnesota's healthcare sys-
tem in recent history. The bill cre-
ates a $300 million dollar “super-
agency” that will be responsible for
selling insurance to approximately
1.2 million Minnesotans.
Simply put, it's ObamaCare com-
ing to Minnesota. HF05, the Health
Insurance Exchange bill is yet an-
other expansion of government and
does nothing to lower costs or im-
prove the doctor-patient relation-
ship. In fact, it does the opposite. An
unelected board of seven bureau-
crats has the ability to arbitrarily ex-
clude health plans from being sold
on the Exchange, limiting the ability
for you to make the best healthcare
decisions for you and your family. If
you like your current doctor, and
your employer opts to purchase in-
surance through the exchange, you
may be at risk of having to change
doctors if your clinic isn't covered
by the plans sold on the exchange.
Republicans made repeated at-
tempts to increase legislative over-
sight, bolster data privacy protec-
tions, and bring down the costs asso-
ciated with this bill, but nearly all of
the amendments offered were reject-
ed by DFLers on the floor who, like
Nancy Pelosi, want us to just pass
the bill so we can find out what's in
it. It didn't work for ObamaCare,
and it won't work for the Health In-
surance Exchange.
I strongly oppose this bill, be-
cause it does nothing to solve the
real problems facing the healthcare
industry. I gave a speech on the
House floor explaining some of my
biggest objections to the bill.
The bill was passed by the Senate
last week, and now heads to confer-
ence committee. I urge you to con-
tact DFL leaders and the Governor
and urge them to rethink this boon-
doggle of a bill.
Glenn Gruenhagen
State Representative
District 18B
ObamaCare coming to Minnesota
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 14, 2013, page 5
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Call us at: 507-964-5547
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Submitted Photo
SE Elementary Art-A-Thon
The third annual Sibley East Art-A-Thon was
held from 4 p.m. to midnight, Friday, March 1.
Thirty-five Sibley East sixth graders took part in
the late night event. Students created two clay
projects, painted vinyl records, helped with a
large canvas painting and turned plastic bottle
caps into mosaic art, according to art teacher
Amanda Feterl. Projects made during the Art-A-
Thon will be sold at the Elementary Spring Art
Show. Taylor Strand, left, worked on a clay proj-
ect. Eliezer Mendoza is pictured on the right.
In a few months, all nine
Dueber’s stores in Minnesota
will be closing including the
one in downtown Winsted,
according to the Herald Jour-
nal.
“We do not know the exact
dates, but as soon as as we
run out of merchandise, said
Chuck Dueber, the compa-
ny’s CEO/president.
Dueber said the decision to
close developed years ago
contingent on selling either
the Waconia store building or
the Young America
office/warehouse.
Dueber’s owns abut half its
store buildings and rents the
other helf, including the Win-
sted and Glencoe stores.
In addition to Winsted,
Dueber’s stores will be clos-
ing in Glencoe, Waconia,
Gaylord, St. James, Spring-
field, Madelia, Tracy and
Fairfax.
The Dueber’s office/ware-
house in Norwood Young
America is also closing.
All Dueber’s stores slated to close
By Kurt Menk
Editor
A number of committee re-
ports were presented during
the monthly meeting of the
Arlington Area Chamber of
Commerce on Monday after-
noon, March 11.
Arli-Dazzle
Kim Schneider, chairper-
son of the Arli-Dazzle Com-
mittee, reported that there
will be changes in the parade
route for the Arli-Dazzle Pa-
rade which is scheduled for
Saturday, Dec. 7.
The staging area will be
held down near the city shop
on the east end of Main
Street, according to Schnei-
der. This change has been
made to alleviate traffic con-
gestion near Highway 5 by
the parking lot at St. Paul’s
Lutheran Church.
To accommodate the large
group of parade goers, the
committee hopes to extend
the parade route to cross over
Highway 5 this year, said
Schneider.
If the group does not re-
ceive permission from the
Minnesota Department of
Transportation to cross over
Highway 5, the parade will
start in the residential area
along East Main Street, pro-
ceed down Main Street and
turn south at the City Parking
Lot where the parade will
end. This change in the pa-
rade exit has been suggested
to alleviate traffic congestion
near the Emergency Services
Building.
Schneider welcomes input
on possible new attractions to
keep the holiday celebration
fresh.
In other news, Royalty Pro-
gram Director Pam Wiest re-
ported that the Arlington
Royalty sponsored a table at
the Tour of Tables on Sunday
afternoon and night, March
10.
Wiest also said the group
raised about $265 during a re-
cent fundraiser at the Pizza
Ranch in Glencoe.
The group plans to mail out
a letter and seek donations to
help cover the costs of the
next coronation.
Marketing
In other business, Market-
ing Committee member Todd
Sandberg reported that 31
members responded to a re-
cent survey and favor a guest
speaker during the evening
this spring. The guest speaker
will talk about marketing
small business in today’s
world and optimizing social
media for your organization.
Sandberg also reported that
he and committee member
Kathy Homme are working
on a new resident packet.
Chamber President Steve
Gillaspie did some research
and found out that approxi-
mately 45 new people move
to Arlington each year.
Membership
Membership Committee
chairperson Terry Klages re-
ported that he and Gillaspie
are working to persuade
about 20 members from last
year to join again this year.
As a pet project, Klages re-
ported that he plans to contact
two businesses who have not
been Chamber members in
years.
Banquet
Gillaspie reported that 40
people attended the Chamber
Banquet at the Arlington
Haus Too on Thursday night,
March 7.
Five awards were also pre-
sented during the evening, ac-
cording to Gillaspie.
Celebration
Klages reported that the
Town & Country Days Com-
mittee was scheduled to meet
that evening.
He also reported that the
group is working on the
Town & Country Days poster.
The event will be held Fri-
day night, June 14; Saturday,
June 15; and Sunday, June
16.
Breakfast
Lyle Rud, chairperson of
the Breakfast on the Farm
Committee, reported that
“Marv & Friends” have been
reserved to provide musical
entertainment at the event
this year.
The committee still has to
visit with two families and
secure a farm site for this
year’s event.
Chamber hears committee reports
The annual Board of Ap-
peal and Equalization for the
City of Arlington will meet,
by appointment, at the Sibley
County Assessor’s Office in
Gaylord from 3 p.m. to 8
p.m. Tuesday, April 23.
The purpose of the meeting
is to determine whether tax-
able property within the City
of Arlington has been proper-
ly valued and classified by
the assessor, and to determine
whether or not corrections are
needed to be made for the
year 2013, according to the
City of Arlington Newsletter.
If people believe the value
or classification of their prop-
erty is incorrect or if they
wish to voice that the proper-
ty of another is valued too
low, they should contact the
Sibley County Assessor’s Of-
fice during normal business
hours to discuss those con-
cerns.
If people are still not satis-
fied with the valuation or
classification after the discus-
sion with the assessor, people
may appear before the Board
of Appeal and Equalization
on Tuesday, April 23.
The board will review the
valuation, classification or
both if necessary under an
open-book style meeting and
shall correct it as needed.
Generally, an appearance
before the Board of Appeal
and Equalization is required
by law before an appeal can
be taken to the County Board
of Appeal and Equalization.
Board of Appeal and Equalization to meet April 23
History
80 Years Ago
March 16, 1933
Louis Kill, Editor
The Arlington High School
basketball team came through
the annual district basketball
tournament with runner-up hon-
ors. The squad won all its games
by a three point margin and lost
the championship title to
LeSueur. The LeSueur victory
brought its first district champi-
onship.
Children picking pussy wil-
lows along the highway south of
Shakopee last Sunday afternoon
discovered a mail pouch under a
culvert, and the contents of the
bag proved to be part of the loot
taken from the Arlington post
office when it was robbed Feb-
ruary 5th.
The Arlington High School
Glee Clubs, under the direction
of Miss Eileen Larson, will
present “Tulip Time,” an op-
eretta in two acts, on Friday,
March 17, at the Community
Hall. Members of the cast are
Donald Soeffker, Carol Martin,
Virginia Schafer, Orlen Wie-
mann, Florine Baker, Robert
Mueller, Joseph Moormann and
Lyle Stoefen.
60 Years Ago
March 12, 1953
Louis Kill, Editor
Ivan Nagel, who recently dis-
posed of his dray business,
closed a deal with Steve Burtyk
last week through which he
takes over the Standard Oil Sta-
tion on T.H. 5. Ivan is already
on the job. We understand Mr.
Burtyk will go into the trucking
business.
Charles Woehler & Sons,
local breeders of Poland China
hogs, returned from New Ulm
Wednesday of last week with
the highest cash of the state
show. Their bred sow won grand
champion honors in a field of 37
animals and was sold for $195
to the FFA chapter of Okebena.
If the sow had been sold at mar-
ket it would have brought about
$75.
See what one dollar will buy
at Kruger’s Dollar Days. Every
item a budget builder! Shop
now and save! Kruger’s, Arling-
ton.
40 Years Ago
March 15, 1973
Val Kill, Editor
Speech contest season has
begun and Arlington-Green Isle
students are off to a solid start.
Coaches Christopher Moore and
Marie Kreft report that over 60
students are preparing for the
local tournament to be held later
this month.
Approximately 75 landown-
ers who oppose the building of
an NSP power plant in Sibley
County attended the meeting of
the county commissioners at the
courthouse in Gaylord Tuesday.
They asked for a one-year mora-
torium on the siting of a power
plant. The county board again
stuck by their original position
in favor of the siting of a plant
in the county.
Dennis Schultz, a guard on
the A-GI High School basketball
team during the past season, has
been named to the Minnesota
River All-Conference basketball
team for the 1972-73 season.
Selection to the All-Conference
team is made by coaches of the
conference.
20 Years Ago
March 18, 1993
Kurt Menk, Editor
Pat Arneson was presented
with the Sub-Section 4A AAA
Award prior to the Sibley East
boys’ basketball game at Gus-
tavus Adolphus College in St.
Peter last Saturday night. Arne-
son is a senior at the Sibley East
Senior High School in Arling-
ton.
Craig and Linnea Bullert of
Arlington are proud to announce
the birth of their first child.
Michael Craig Bullert arrived on
February 18, 1993 at 1:09 p.m.
at Waconia’s Ridgeview Med-
ical Center. He weighed 8 lbs.,
15 ozs. and measured 21 inches
long.
The Sibley East Varsity Boys’
Basketball team, under the di-
rection of head coach Darrell
Kreun, collected two wins last
week and captured the Sub-Sec-
tion 4A Boys’ Basketball title
for the second consecutive year.
Sibley East defeated LeSueur-
Henderson 72-49 to win the
title.
ing at least one wrestler to
every Olympics since 1968.
In fact, in 1972, Minnesota
was chosen to host the U.S.
Olympic wrestling trials at
Anoka High School. Three
U.S. wrestlers competing in
those trials, including the leg-
endary Dan Gable, won gold
medals at the Munich
Olympic games later that
year.
Keeping with our state’s
reputation for groundbreaking
leadership, the University of
Minnesota Morris, led by
wrestling coach Doug Reese,
was the first college in the na-
tion to make women’s
wrestling a varsity sport. By
opening that door of opportu-
nity in the 1990s, several of
the school’s women wrestlers
were able to compete and win
national and international
events. And it paved the way
for New Ulm native Ali
Bernard to compete in both
the 2008 and 2012 Olympic
games.
Outside of Minnesota,
many other states also have
proud wrestling traditions and
I have teamed up with a bipar-
tisan group of Senators from
those states to introduce a
Resolution urging the IOC to
reverse its decision to elimi-
nate wrestling. In the U.S.
House, Congressman Tim
Walz from Minnesota is lead-
ing a similar effort.
The good news is that the
recent IOC vote is only a pre-
liminary recommendation.
The final decision will not be
made until September, when
the entire IOC will weigh in
on the matter.
Between now and then, I
hope that the voices raised –
both in the United States and
internationally -- will help re-
store wrestling to the Olympic
games, where it has always
been, and where it should
stay. I know that a great many
Minnesotans - who under-
stand our state’s great
Olympic wrestling tradition --
would agree.
Franken Continued from page 4
The Minnesota Adult and
Teen Challenge Choir will
perform at the Creekside
Community Church, 114
Shamrock Drive in Arling-
ton, at 10:30 a.m. Sunday,
March 24.
Minnesota Adult and
Teen Challenge is a unique
faith-based recovery pro-
gram serving both teens
and adults struggling with
chemical dependency and
other life controlling be-
haviors. Come and hear
about how hope is being re-
stored, and individual lives
are being transformed
through the power of Jesus
Christ.
A love offering will be
taken.
Everyone is invited for
lunch following the wor-
ship service.
MN Adult and Teen Challenge Choir will
perform at Creekside Community Church
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 14, 2013, page 6
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Sports
By Kurt Menk
Editor
McKenzie Sommers, a
sophomore post player on the
Sibley East varsity girls bas-
ketball team, was recently
named to the Minnesota
River Conference All Confer-
ence Girls Basketball Team.
Sommers, a first-year
starter, averaged nearly eight
points and almost 6. 5 re-
bounds per game this season.
She also averaged over one
assist and one steal. In addi-
tion, Sommers blocked an av-
erage of four shots per game.
“McKenzie had a really
nice season for us,” said Sib-
ley East head coach Doug
Flieth. “She led us in scoring
and blocked shots and was
tied for the lead in rebounds.
McKenzie put in a lot of time
in the offseason last year and
it really showed this season.”
Sibley East junior point
guard Jessica Garza, a two-
year starter, was selected as
honorable mention to the all
conference team.
Garza averaged over six
points and nearly three re-
bounds per game this season.
She also averaged nearly
three steals and over two as-
sists per game this year.
“Jessica led our team in
steals and assists and was
third in scoring,” said Flieth.
“She was slowed by a couple
of injuries this season, but
still put up good numbers.”
In addition to Sommers,
the remaining all conference
selections were Madison
Dean, Makayla Lambrecht,
and Alex Hancock, Jordan;
Brooke Willemsen, Lexi Er-
penbach and Kaylie Brazil,
Norwood Young America;
Lauren Manteuffel, Nico
Schmidt and Ashlyn Hucky,
Mayer Lutheran; Kate
Theisen and Hannah Johnson,
Watertown-Mayer; Haley
Fogarty and Claire Otto,
Belle Plaine; and Alyshia
Angileno, Tri-City United.
In addition to Garza, the re-
maining honorable mention
selections were Hallie Ander-
son, Jordan; Sami Jo
Brinkman, Norwood Young
America; Christina Brugg-
man, Mayer Lutheran; Claire
Killian, Watertown-Mayer;
Mariena Hayden, Belle
Plaine; Courtney Hentges,
Tri-City United; and Carlie
Brandt, Le Sueur-Henderson.
Madison Dean, Jordan, and
Lexi Erpenbach, Norwood
Young America, were named
by the MRC coaches as their
Co-Most Valuable Players.
Greg Dietel, Jordan, and
Gary Lemke, Norwood
Young America, were named
by the MRC coaches as their
Co-Coaches of the Year.
Sommers named all conference,
Garza chosen honorable mention
Enterprise photos by Kurt Menk
Sibley East lost to HL-W-
W 84-83 in overtime dur-
ing the opening round of
the Sub-Section 5AA
South Boys Basketball
Tournament at Howard
Lake on Thursday night,
March 7. (Top Photo)
Sibley East sophomore
Zac Weber tries to drive
the baseline against HL-
W-W during the second
half on Thursday night,
March 7. Weber finished
with 10 points. (Left
Photo) Sibley East sen-
ior Max Grabow goes up
for a shot against HL-W-
W during the second
half. Grabow scored
nine points in the loss.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The visiting Sibley East
varsity boys basketball team
lost to Howard Lake-Waver-
ly-Winsted (HL-W-W) 84-83
during the opening round of
the Sub-Section 5AA South
Boys Basketball Tournament
on Thursday night, March 7.
The Wolverines, who
trailed 31-30 at halftime, built
a 51-43 lead on a three-point
shot by senior Tyler Bates
with 10:41 left in the second
half.
After HL-W-W tied the
game at 53-53, Sibley East
eventually built a 61-53 ad-
vantage on another Tyler
Bates three-point shot with
5:52 remaining in regulation.
Tyler Bates, who was
plagued with foul trouble in
both halves, fouled out with
3:11 left in regulation.
Sibley East, which missed
four free throws in the final
three minutes of regulation,
eventually held a 70-67 lead
with just 10 seconds left in
the game.
HL-W-W missed a three-
point shot with about six sec-
onds left in regulation, but
guard Joe Aalid rebunded the
ball, dribbled out to the arc
and hit a desperation bomb
which tied the score at 70-70
and sent the game into over-
time. The Wolverines held a
two-point lead on three sepa-
rate occasions in the overtime
sessions.
The Wolverines, however,
lost another frontline player
when senior Max Grabow
fouled out of the game with
1:10 left in overtime.
HL-W-W, after that point,
eventually built an 84-81 lead
with just five seconds left in
overtime.
Junior Brody Rodning,
who was fouled with 1.2 sec-
onds remaining, was off the
mark on his first free throw
shot and intentionally missed
his second free throw at-
tempt. Senior Sam Harrison
rebounded the missed free
throw and sank a short short
as Sibley East pulled within
84-83 at the buzzer.
Harrison and Rodning led
the Wolverines with 23 and
22 points respectively in the
loss. Tyler Bates hit for 18
points while sophomore Zac
Weber netted 10 points.
Grabow scored nine points
while senior Steve Haefs
added one point.
Sibley East hit 17 of 37
shots from two-point range
for 46 percent and eight of 15
long bombs for 53 percent.
The Wolverines also sank 25
of 35 charity tosses for 71
percent.
Cody Painschab sparked
HL-W-W with 37 points.
The winners and host team
connected on 23 of 40 shots
from two-point distance for
58 percent and seven of 23
shots from three-point land
for 30 percent. HL-W-W also
hit 17 of 24 foul shots for 71
percent.
Sibley East, which allowed
a number of second chance
baskets throughout the game,
was out-rebounded by a 34-
26 margin.
Grabow pulled down nine
boards while Tyler Bates and
Harrison collected seven and
six rebounds respectively.
Weber added three caroms.
Rodning also contributed
five assists and two steals
while Harrison had three
dishes and three thefts. Haefs
added three assists.
The Wolverines conclude
the season with a 7-7 mark in
the Minnesota River Confer-
ence and a 13-12 record over-
all.
SE boys basketball team falls
to HL-W-W 84-83 in overtime
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Sophomore McKenzie Sommers, left, and junior Jessica Garza, right.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Tyler Bates, a senior on
the Sibley East varsity boys
basketball team, was re-
cently chosen as the KNUJ
Player of the Week.
Bates averaged nearly 20
points and almost 10 re-
bounds per game during the
final eight games of the
season.
Bates was interviewed on
KNUJ Radio on Saturday
morning, March 9.
He is the son of Eric and
Kris Bates, Arlington.
Bates is KNUJ Player of the Week
A new 10,581-acre conser-
vation easement in Lake
County, in northeastern Min-
nesota, next to thousands of
acres of state, county and na-
tional forests, will boost the
state’s role as a national
leader in protecting private,
working forests, according to
officials with the Department
of Natural Resources (DNR).
The DNR and Marlow
Timberland, a privately-held
timberland holding company
in Duluth, recently reached
agreement on the easement,
which stays in place perma-
nently.
The agreement requires
public access to the land for
hunting, fishing and other
outdoor recreation. While
Marlow Timberland main-
tains ownership of the land,
the company must manage it
using sustainable forest man-
agement methods. The forest
land contains diverse, north-
ern forest types and wetlands
with nearly one mile of
shoreline on three lakes and
almost nine miles of stream
and river miles.
“Fragmentation of Min-
nesota’s north woods is one
of the most significant threats
to wildlife, especially species
that need large blocks of for-
est such as moose, bears,
wolves and many neotropical
migratory songbirds,” said
Forrest Boe, DNR Forestry
Division director. “This proj-
ect will keep the land intact
so that it continues to provide
essential habitat for wildlife.”
Conservation easements
protect millions of acres of
wildlife habitat and open
space throughout the U.S.,
and are an important tool in
keeping working forests as
forest land.
“The conservation ease-
ment the state has undertaken
with Marlow Timberland is a
great investment in Minneso-
ta’s future,” said DNR Com-
missioner Tom Landwehr.
“They will maintain access
for hunting and fishing and
other outdoor pursuits, while
guaranteeing that lands re-
main available for timber har-
vest.”
Marlow Timberland is the
fourth largest owner of forest
lands in northern Minnesota,
with a focus on long-term
preservation of natural re-
sources.
“For more than five years,
we have been working with
the Minnesota DNR, U.S.
Forest Service and Lake
County Land Department, as
well as other private interests,
to find the ultimate compro-
mise to allow responsible
economic benefits while se-
curing the long-term health
and integrity of these parcels
of land,” said Roy Marlow,
CEO of Marlow Timberland.
“Portions of the eased proper-
ty are located in the heart of
one of the most pristine areas
of the Superior National For-
est.”
The $5.67 million transac-
tion was made possible
through funds provided by
the Outdoor Heritage Fund,
created after voters approved
the Clean Water, Land and
Legacy Amendment in No-
vember 2008, which in-
creased sales tax by three-
eighths of 1 percent. The
fund receives some of the tax
money. Additional funding
came from state capital bond-
ing and Reinvest in Minneso-
ta.
Land transaction will protect working forest
Nine new conservation of-
ficers with the Minnesota De-
partment of Natural Re-
sources (DNR) are on the job
following 16 weeks of field
training.
“Through their training,
they’ve proven that they have
the desire, the skill and the
professionalism to uphold the
laws and regulations to pro-
tect and preserve Minnesota’s
natural resources,” said Col.
Jim Konrad, DNR Enforce-
ment Division director.
The new officers and their
field stations are: Lucas Bel-
gard, Albert Lea; Steven Chi-
hak, Spring Valley; Chad
Davis, Owatonna; Brent
Grewe, Osseo; Brian Holt,
Bemidji; Demosthenes
Regas, Blackduck; Caleb Sil-
gjord, Sauk Centre; Christo-
pher Tetrault, Isle; and Sean
Williams, Ely. All have previ-
ous law enforcement experi-
ence.
New conservation officers begin their assignments
24” x 36”
Photo
Posters
$
18
.00
+ tax
Call 507-964-5547 to place your order
or stop in at the
Arlington Enterprise / Sibley Shopper office.
402 W. Alden St., Arlington
*Photo can be from the Arlington Enterprise, The Sibley Shopper or one of your own digital files.
**Embellishments extra (ie.: borders, logos, text, etc.) at an extra cost of
$
10-20, depending on time.
Scenery Photos,
Sports Photos,
Kid Photos,
Graduation,
Birthdays & MORE!
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 14, 2013, page 7
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
w w w . a r l i n g t o n m n n e w s . c o m
PET LICENSES DUE
NOTICE TO PET OWNERS
In accordance with the terms of Ordinance No. 206:
—PETS ARE NOT PERMITTED TO RUN AT LARGE
WITHIN THE ARLINGTON CITY LIMITS. They must
either be leashed or cabled/chained, kenneled or in a fenced
yard and not allowed to roam freely.
—All domesticated pets (dogs and cats) must be licensed.
All licenses issued in 2012 will EXPIRE MARCH 31
ST
.
Please stop by the City Office before April 1
st
to obtain a 2013
pet license. The cost for a pet license is
$
5.00. A health
certificate showing that the pet is current on its rabies
vaccination is required. (Due to the Spring vaccination
schedule, your pet may not be due for vaccinations until after
April 1
st
, you should still license your pet in March to avoid
late fees. You will be permitted to bring the health certificate
in at a later date.)
— Licensing your pet assures that it will be taken care of and
returned safely if it gets loose and picked up by the Police
Department.
— Due to a revision within the pet ordinance, a total of 3
adult (includes spayed or neutered) pets are allowed per
household (i.e. 3 dogs, 3 cats, or a combination thereof).
— If you have lost (ran away, gave away, died) a pet within
the last year, please notify the City Office so we can remove
the pet from our current listing. We will be following up on
our listing of pets again this
year with the help of our local
Police Department.
— Any person or entity found to
be in violation of this Ordinance
shall be guilty of a misdemeanor,
punishable by a fine, plus all
veterinary impoundment and
boarding charges, and in the case
of destruction of an animal, any
veterinary charge for said service.
By Order of the
Arlington City
Council
A10-11Ea
Ladies & Gentlemen...
Children of all ages!
Please join us!
St. Paul’s Lutheran School
Round-up & Open House
Thursday, March 21
st
6-8 p.m.
• Round-Up for 3- and 4-year old
PreK & Kindergarten
• Open House for all potential
students PreK - 8
th
Grade
For more information visit our website:
www.stpaularlington.com
510 W. Adams St.,
Arlington, MN 55307
(one block south of stoplight)
RSVP to Eric Kaesermann or Judy Petzel
by March 19 at 507-964-2397 or e-mail
eric.kaesermann@stpaularlington.com
A10-11SEa
McLane Minnesota, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Berkshire-Hathaway, is currently seeking
qualified candidates to join our team! McLane, a wholesale grocery distributor, has been in
business for over 100 years and continues to grow each year! Our Minnesota location has
recently added to our portfolio of outstanding customers and must fill the following positions
immediately.
• DRIVERS – Class A CDL required. Must meet all DOT requirements. Recent graduates
encouraged to apply!!
• Full Case Grocery Selectors M-F 7:30 am start $13.30/hr
• Sanitation Lead – Various shifts and hours, 4 yr degree and sup exp req, $13.80/hr
• Selectors (Candy/GMP) – M-F 6:00 am start $11.25/hr
• Cooler/Freezer selectors- M-F 5:30 am start $.35 extra premium/hr
We are seeking candidates with a good work history and a great attendance record. Must pass
drug test, physical screening and background check. Some positions require additional skills. If
you are interested in joining the McLane Team please email or fax your resume, or stop in to
fill out an application.
McLane Minnesota • 1111 5th Street West • Northfield, MN 55057
Fax (507) 664-3042 • mnhr@mclaneco.com EOE/M/F/D
combined
The Sibley East FFA Farm
Management Team placed
first at the FFA Region Con-
test on Thursday, March 7.
The team was led by
Mitchel Wentzlaff (second
high individual), Liz Thies
(eighth high individual) and
Trevor Diehn (11th high indi-
vidual).
Other team individuals
were Logan Jorgenson and
Megan Eckberg.
In addition, Liz Thies was
named as the Region 7 treas-
urer next year.
FFA Farm Management Team
places first at region contest
By Marisa Kroells
With the rain and setting
our clocks ahead this week, it
once again reminded us that
spring is coming. After spring
comes summer and that can
only mean one thing, the fair.
Even though it seems like a
long time away, the Arlington
Conquerors were already
starting to talk about it at
their meeting on March 10.
We welcomed two new
members, Sara and Emily.
Everyone is encouraged to
take advantage of the
add/drop deadline on May 15
if you would like to not do a
project or pick up a different
one. We heard reports of how
our members did in their
project bowls. A big thank
you to everyone who sold
and bought fruit. We sold 153
boxes. Please check the
newsletter for information
about the job interview con-
test and 4-H camp.
Our next meeting will be
held at the Senior Citizens
Building on Sunday, April 14.
Cloverbuds will begin at 4
p.m. and regular 4-H will
begin at 5 p.m..
Arlington Conquerors spring ahead
Submitted Photo
St. Patrick’s Day Snowstorm In 1965
Orville Fisher and his sons, Larry and Roger, resorted
to the “old reliable” team and wagon method to get
their milk to the Arlington Creamery on Friday, March
19, 1965. A heavy snowstorm, which started on
Wednesday, March 17, 1965, and lasted through
Thursday, March 18, 1965, stopped traffic along High-
way 5.
Spring truck weight restric-
tions on state highways will
begin on Friday, March 15 for
Minnesota's south, southeast
and Twin Cities Metro area
frost zones.
Winter load increases and
overweight permits remain in
place for the state's central,
north-central and north frost
zones.
The Minnesota Department
of Transportation limits truck
weights to prevent damage to
roads weakened during the
spring thaw.
Spring load restriction
dates and the six frost zones
in Minnesota are listed at
www. mrr. dot. state. mn. us.
Click on "Seasonal Load
Limits," then click on “Spring
Load Restrictions” for the
most up-to-date information.
The information also is
available toll-free by calling
1-800-723-6543 in the United
States and Canada or by call-
ing 651-366-5400 in the Twin
Cities Metro area.
Ending dates for spring
load restrictions get decided
by monitoring road strength
as weather conditions change.
All changes are made with a
minimum three-day notice.
Travelers in Minnesota can
get up-to-date information on
road conditions, construction
and weather reports from
MnDOT's 511 traveler infor-
mation service at
www.511mn.org.
Spring truck weight restrictions begin March 15
Agriculture Commissioner
Dave Frederickson and Com-
merce Commissioner Mike
Rothman today issued a con-
sumer alert encouraging Min-
nesota farmers to consider
purchasing crop insurance
ahead of this year’s growing
season. The standard deadline
for purchasing crop insurance
is right around the corner.
Farmers must finalize a crop
insurance plan with their in-
surance agent by Friday,
March 15.
“Minnesota farmers may
stand to benefit from that
wisdom this growing sea-
son, ” said Commissioner
Rothman, the state’s top in-
surance regulator. “If dry
conditions persist in the
weeks and months ahead,
having proper crop insurance
coverage could be crucial. We
encourage all farmers to re-
view their crop insurance
needs this month.”
The threat of drought is
real again this year. Accord-
ing to the National Weather
Service, “extreme drought
conditions remain in place
across most of west central
and south central Minnesota”
and “severe drought condi-
tions” continue across the
bulk of the remainder of the
southern half of Minnesota.
“Risk comes in many
forms when you’re a farmer,
from commodity prices to
input costs to weather,” Com-
missioner Frederickson said.
“Crop insurance is an impor-
tant tool for managing that
risk, and I encourage farmers
to review their options care-
fully.”
According to the U.S. De-
partment of Agriculture’s
Risk Management Agency
(RMA), before purchasing
crop insurance farmers
should consider how a policy
will work in conjunction with
their other risk management
strategies to ensure the best
possible outcome each crop
year. Crop insurance agents
and other agri-business spe-
cialists can assist farmers in
developing a good manage-
ment plan. A list of crop in-
surance agents by county can
be found on the RMA website
a t
http://www3.rma.usda.gov/ap
ps/agents/.
RMA provides policies for
more than 100 crops. Crop
insurance policies typically
consist of general crop insur-
ance provisions, specific crop
provisions, policy endorse-
ments and special provisions.
Minnesota farmers are en-
couraged to review RMA's
county crop program listings
at http://www.rma.usda.gov-
/data/cropprograms.html for
more information about crop
policies available in their
home county. Policies are
available for most commodi-
ties.
Farmers with questions
about crop and livestock in-
surance are encouraged to
visit the Minnesota Depart-
ment of Commerce website at
http://mn.gov/commerce/in-
surance/consumers/farmers.-
jsp.
As drought continues, farmers urged
to review their crop insurance needs
Washington Lake Town-
ship recently completed its
annual charity drive, ac-
cording to chairpersons
Mary and Darcy Kroells.
The following is a list of
organizations and contri-
butions: American Red
Cross ($235), Courage
Center ($106), ARC Min-
nesota ($71), The Salva-
tion Army ($160), Ameri-
can Cancer Society
($258), Children’s Home
Society ($50), March of
Dimes ($46), Mental
Health ($74), Minnesota
Heart Association ($253),
Mankato Rehabilitation
Center ($50), National
Parkinson’s Center ($176),
Sibley County Develop-
mental Achievement Cen-
ter ($233), Diabetes Asso-
ciation ($158) and Good
Samaritan Center - Arling-
ton ($193).
Washington Lake Township
holds annual charity drive
Call us to
place your
HAPPY ad.
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
964-5547
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(952) 467-3705 or (952) 467-2805.
Per son al Care As sis tant po si tion
i n Hen der son. Thurs days and
wee kends, 4 hours/day; in Ar ling -
ton, M/W/F, 2 hours/day. Cal l
Steve at (507) 359-2756. Gold en
Home Care Plus, Inc.
Ren ville area farm op er a tion seek -
ing full and part time em ployees
wi th me chan i cal abi l i ty and/or
truck ing ex peri ence. Sal ary/ ben e -
fits/ va ca tion DOE. Must pass drug
test. Please call (320) 329-3536.
HAND Y MAN: Will do re mo del ing
of kitch ens, bath rooms, hang ing
doors and wi nd ows, pai nt i ng,
sheet rock ing, tex tur iz ing or any
minor re pairs in side or out side.
Wi l l al so do cl ean i ng of base -
ments/ga rag es. Call (320) 848-
2722 or (320) 583-1278.
Spe cial- 95% Good man gas fur -
nace and pro gram ma ble ther mo -
stat $2,200 in stalled or AC unit
$1,900 in stalled. J&R Plumb ing
Heat ing AC, Lester Prair ie (320)
510-5035.
Ko dak al l -i n-one pri nt er, $25.
(320) 327-2541.
Min ne so ta Twins sea son tick ets
for 2013 sea son. Sec ti on 121
seats. Pack age in cludes 2 seats.
5, 10 or 15 game pack ag es avail -
able. Con tact Rick at (952) 224-
6331 for more in for ma tion.
Want ed to buy: Junk cars and
trucks. Com peti tive pric ing with
friend ly serv ice. Tow ing avail able.
Call an y time (320) 296-2253.
JUNK BAT TER IES WANT ED
We buy used bat ter ies and lead
weights. Pay ing top dol lar for junk
bat ter ies. Pay ing $8 to $24/bat -
tery. We pick up. Call 800-777-
2243. Ask for Dana.
Reg is tered Sim men tal bulls for sale.
Year ling, both red and black. Diehn
Sim men tals (507) 766-0313.
Gib bon: 5BR home, 2 car ga rage,
barns for far row ing and fin ish ing
hogs, grain bin, shed. Exsted Re -
al ty (320) 864-5544.
OPEN HOUSE SUN DAY, MARCH
17, 1-3 p.m. Zero down RHA fi -
nanc ing is avail able for this prop -
er ty. 11798 155th St., Glen coe.
Hob by farm for sale. 6 +/- acr es,
beau ti ful 4BR home. Very new
out bui l d i ngs. MLS# 4338091,
$275,000. Con tact me for a pri -
vate show ing. Paul Krueg er, Edi na
Re al ty, (612) 328-4506, Paul -
Krueg er@edi nare al ty.com.
Hutchi n son: Large 3BR home
com plete ly re mo deled with large 3
car ga rage. Exsted Re al ty (320)
864-5544.
Well kept 3BR home, 2 miles from
Glen coe. For mal liv ing/din ing, and
fam i ly room on main lev el. Tons of
built-in cab i nets and stor age. 26x32
shop. Brian O’Don nell, Pri or i ty One
Met ro west Re al ty (320) 864-4877.
1120 Grove Ave., Bi rd Is l and.
4BR, 3BA home on 2 l ots.
$119,000. (320) 296-1603.
3 Acr es. Two-story brick home,
High way 7, Hutchin son. Close to
town with coun try feel. 3BR, 2BA.
Exsted Re al ty (320) 864-5544.
601 12th St. S, Oli via. 2BR, 1BA,
large din ing/liv ing room. Cen tral
air, at tached 2-car ga rage, steel
sid ing. (320) 522-1593, af ter 6
p.m. (320) 765-2331.
Coun try home for sale by own er.
4BR, 3BA, at tached dou ble in su lat -
ed ga rage, 1 acre, 3 sheds, right of
High way 15. (320) 587-7746.
Ar ling ton: Great start er home. 2BR,
2BA, new kitch en, fur nace wa ter
heat er, new heat ed ga rage. Con -
tract for deed pos si bl e, FSBO,
$70,000/BO. (952) 486-3342.
Big Swan Lake, 390 ft. lakeshore.
Form er Kram er Re sort. Old ca -
bi ns, re pai r abl e 4BR ram bl er.
Exsted Re al ty (320) 864-5544.
23.08 Par cel next to Pla to city lim -
its. Ap prox imate ly 20 acr es til lable
with great fu ture de vel op ment po -
ten tial. Brian O’Don nell, Pri or i ty
One (320) 864-4877.
11 Acr es, Glen coe. Wil dlife and
new pond, per fect place to build
new home. $99,500. Exsted Re al -
ty (320) 864-5544.
13+ Acr es, near Glen coe, beau ti ful
spot to build new home. New dri -
ve way, pri vate pond. $99,500.
Exsted Re al ty (320) 864-5544.
2 Par cels, 14.5 acr es, Hutchin son,
2 build ing eli gi bil i ties, new dri ve -
way, great for wal k-out home.
$129,000 each. Exsted Re al ty.
(320) 864-5544.
26 Acr es, Hutchin son, 2 ponds,
wil dlife, new dri ve way, pri vate!
WRP, RIM Pro grams. Ide al for
home. $129,000. (320) 864-5544.
Se cl ud ed 14 acr es, $126,000
and/or 11 acr es for $99,900 near
Hutchin son. Build ing eli gibil i ty, wil -
dlife area. Exsted Re al ty (320)
864-5544.
Todd Lake, 26 Acr es near Hutchin -
son, 800 ft. lakeshore. Very pri -
vate. $229,000. Exsted Re al ty
(320) 864-5544.
155 Acr es North east of Gay lord.
$5,700 per acre. Exsted Re al ty
(320) 864-5544.
Re mo deled spa cious 1BR up per
in Glen coe. Off-street park ing,
wash er/dry er hook ups, $400 plus
elec tric i ty. Avail able im me diate ly.
(612) 802-3533, (320) 864-3835.
AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
AUTOMOTIVE
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
Work Wanted
FOR SALE
Heating/Air Cond.
Household Goods
Miscellaneous
Wanted To Buy
LIVESTOCK, PETS
Cattle
REAL ESTATE
Farms
Hobby Farm
Houses
Lake Homes
Land
FOR SALE
Wanted To Buy
REAL ESTATE
Houses
REAL ESTATE
Land
RENTAL REAL ESTATE
Land Apartment
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 14, 2013, page 8
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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AGRICULTURE AUTOMOTIVE EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE LIVESTOCK
& PETS
LIVESTOCK
& PETS
REAL ESTATE SERVICES RENTAL RENTAL
All ads appear online
at GlencoeNews.com
Enterprise
To place an ad: Call: 507-964-5547; Fax: 507-964-2423; E-Mail: info@ArlingtonMNnews.com; Mail: P.O. Box 388, Arlington, MN 55307
Advertising
Deadlines
The McLeod County Chronicle Mondays at Noon
The Arlington Enterprise & The Silver Lake Leader Tuesdays at Noon
The Glencoe Advertiser, The Sibley Shopper
& The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
EARN $500 A DAY:
Insurance agents needed; Leads, no cold
calls; Commissions paid daily; Com-
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Life license required. Call 888/713-6020
OTR DRIVERS
Sign on bonus $1,000-$1,200. Up to 45
CPM. Full-time positions with benefits. Pet
policy. O/O’s welcome! deBoer Transporta-
tion 800/825-8511 www.deboertrans.com
OTR DRIVERS
& Owner Operators for small com-
pany in SW MN. Most runs turn-
arounds. Competitive pay & ben-
efits. Traildust Trucking 800/619-0037
CASH FOR CARS:
All cars/trucks wanted. Running or not! Top
dollar paid. We come to you! Any make/
model. Call for instant offer: 800/871-9145
GUN SHOW
March 15/16/17. Onalaska Omni Cen-
ter, 255 Riders Club Road, Onalas-
ka, WI. Fri 3pm-8, Sat 9-5, Sun
9-3. Admission $6. Buy/sell/trade.
608/752-6677 www.bobandrocco.com
DISH NETWORK
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
high speed internet starting at $14.95/month
(where available). Save! Ask about same
day installation! Call now! 866/785-5167
CANADA DRUG CENTER
Canada Drug Center is your choice for
safe and affordable medications. Our li-
censed Canadian mail order pharmacy
will provide you with savings of up to
90% on all your medication needs. Call
today 800/259-1096, for $10.00 off
your first prescription and free shipping.
DONATE YOUR CAR
Truck or Boat to heritage for the blind. Free
3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing,
all paperwork taken care of 888/485-0398
EVER CONSIDER A
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MISCELLANEOUS AUTOS WANTED
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HELP WANTED - SALES
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HELP WANTED - DRIVERS
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advertisement here!
HELP WANTED:
The City of Arlington is accepting applications for the fol-
lowing seasonal positions:
Mowing/Weed Trimming Positions. The season will
start tentatively May 1
st
and run approximately 24 weeks,
subject to growing season (dryness, wetness, early/late
frost). The hours for lawn mowing/trimming are Monday-
Friday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Areas mowed/trimmed include the
parks, cemetery, and around City buildings. No weekend
or evening mowing/trimming will be permitted. Approxi-
mately 32 hours per week will be spent mowing/trimming
and maintaining equipment (oil changes, clean out decks,
etc.). Seasonal Part-Time Wage is
$
8.75 per hour. Appli-
cants must be 18 years or older to apply and have a valid
driver’s license.
The City is preferably looking for individuals to
mow/trim for the entire season. Applications will be ac-
cepted for backup mowers to help with the first half
(April-May) and second half (August-October) of the sea-
son.
Contact the City Office for an application, 507-964-
2378.
DEADLINE: All applications must be returned by
4:00 p.m. on Monday, March 25, 2013.
A9-10Ea
A10-11Ea
Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington
is seeking the following positions:
• LPN/RN Charge Nurse – every other
weekend, with Resource hours during
the week
• Certified Nursing Assistant – every other
weekend with potential to pick up more hours
• Benefit eligible LPN/RN – evening shifts with every
other weekend
• LPN/RN - every other weekend with potential to pick
up more hours
• Part-Time Dietary – willing to train all shifts and positions
• Resource Universal Worker – Assisted Living facility,
on call as needed
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information,
call Tiffany Brockhoff,
Human Resource Director at
507-964-2251 or email:
tbrockof@good-sam.com
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap Drug-Free Workplace
Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life.
A
1
0
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1
1
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Available...
1-Bedroom
Apartment
All utilities,
except electric
Income based
Must be 62 or older
or handicapped
Highland Commons
Arlington
507-964-5556 HANDICAP
ACCESSIBLE
A
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1
5
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1
6
S
A
G
a
Good Buyer looking
for 2+ bdrm home in
Arlington, or home
w/small acreage,
outside of Arlington.
WANTED
EXSTED REALTY
2124 10
th
St E Glencoe
(320) 864-5544
www.exstedrealty.com
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1
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2
S
a
Commercial
Building and
Business
Opportunity
Call (507) 964-2256
A10-13E,11-14Sa
CALL CENTER
REPRESENTATIVES!
Great job opportunities at Heartland America! We’re
conveniently located in Chaska between Hwy 5 & 41!
Heartland America is a Direct Marketing company offer-
ing brand name and other quality merchandise at value
prices via catalog and internet sales. No
Outbound calling! Great pay and benefits!
Send resume/application or apply in person:
Heartland America Attn: Pam
8085 Century Blvd., Chaska, MN 55318
Email:chaskaemployment@heartlandamerica.com
Website: www.heartlandamerica.com/application
Ph: 952-361-5671 Fax: 952-361-3656 K
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HELP WANTED:
The City of Arlington is accepting applications for the
following position:
THREE (3) SUMMER RECREATION POSITIONS:
(1) DIRECTOR ($2,715 flat rate)
(1) ASSISTANT BASEBALL COACH ($8.75 per hour)
(1) ASSISTANT SOFTBALL COACH ($8.75 per hour)
Applicants must be 16 years or older to apply and have
a valid driver’s license. The program is approximately 6
weeks long (starts early June – mid July) and is for chil-
dren in grades K-9
th
. The City Council will review all
applications and make their final decision in April.
Contact the Arlington City Office at or call 507-964-
2378 for an application.
DEADLINE: All applications must be returned by 4:00
p.m. Monday, March 25, 2013.
A9-10Ea
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 14, 2013, page 9
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
OAK TERRACE
Healthcare Center of Gaylord
has openings in the following positions:
OAK TERRACE HEALTH CARE SKILLED NURSING FACILITY
RN/LPN:
• 64 hours a pay period combination evening and
over night shifts.
• Benefit eligible position.

$
2.00 eve. and
$
3.00 over night shift differential.
OAK TERRACE DIETARY
COOK/AIDE:
• 69.5 hours a pay period combination position as
evening cook and dietary aide.
• Hours include some days and some evenings.
Please contact us for more information.
Cook experience preferred.
OAK TERRACE ASSISTED LIVING FACILITY
NAR:
• 39 hours a pay period, evening float.
Combination hours of 5-9:30 p.m. and 4-10 p.m.
• 28 hours a pay period, day float.
Hours are 6-10 a.m.
Applications are available at:
640 Third St., Gaylord, MN
Or online at www.oakterraceliving.com
For further information, contact
Human Resources at 507-237-8703.
EOE
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McGraw Monument
Works, Inc., LeSueur
Local Representative
Leah Schrupp
Arlington, MN 55307
612-308-8169
3 miles North of LeSueur
on Highway 169
30945 Forest Prairie Road
(507) 665-3126
HOURS: M-F 8-5
Weekends by appointment.
Visit our
INDOOR AND OUTDOOR
DISPLAYS
M31-30Ea
Blessings
And we know that in all things God works for the good of those
who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.
Romans 8:28 NIV
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN (WELS), Arlington
Pastor Bruce W. Hanneman
8:45 a.m. Sunday School, 9:00 a.m. Adult Bible Study
10:00 a.m. Worship
Commercial and Industrial Builders
Green Isle, MN 55338
ph. 507.326.7901 fax: 507.326.3551
www.vosconstruction.com
Arlington State Bank
Serving the Community Since 1895
BANKING SERVICES
964-2256
Arlington
A & N Radiator Repair
Allen & Nicki Scharn, Owners
23228 401 Ave., Arlington
877-964-2281 or 507-964-2281 Bus.
Certified ASE Technician on Staff
Also distributor for Poxy Coat II
Industrial Grade Coatings/Paint
MID-COUNTY
CO-OP
700 W. Lake St., Box 177
Cologne, MN 55322
(952) 466-3700
or TOLL FREE: 1-888-466-3700
HUTCHINSON CO-OP
AGRONOMY
LEON DOSE,
Arlington Branch Manager
411 7
th
Ave. NW • (507) 964-2251
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
402 W. Alden, Arlington
507-964-5547
Online at
www.Arlington
MNnew.com
Arlington Haus
Your Hometown Pub & Eatery
1986-2009
Arlington • 1-507-964-2473
STATE BANK OF
HAMBURG
100 Years. 100 Reasons.
Phone 952-467-2992
statebankofhamburg.com
CONVENIENCE
STORE
Hwy. 5 N., Arlington
507-964-2920
Homestyle Pizza
Real or Soft Serve Ice Cream
Gas – Diesel – Deli – Videos
(507)
964-2212
www.
chefcraigs
.com
23180 401 Ave., Arlington Phone 507-964-2264
EQUAL
HOUSING
LENDER
CRAIG BULLERT
ARLINGTON, MN
23189 Hwy. 5 North,
Arlington, MN 55307
arlington@hutchcoop.com
Office (507) 964-2283
Cell (320) 583-4324
HC
FUNERAL SERVICE
P.O. Box 314
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-2201
Member
FDIC
Church News
EVANGELICAL
COVENANT CHURCH
107 W. Third St., Winthrop
Pastor Kyle Kachelmeier
507-647-5777
Parsonage 507-647-3739
www.wincov.org
Saturday, March 16: 9:00
a.m. to noon - clothes closet
open. 10:00 a.m. to noon - food
cupboard open.
Sunday, March 17: 9:30 a.m.
Worship. 10:45 a.m. Sunday
school.
Monday, March 18: 5:00 p.m.
Exercise.
Wednesday, March 20: 9:00
a.m. Prayer coffee. 6:00 p.m.
AWANA awards night. 7:30
p.m. Senior high youth group.
Thursday, March 21: 9:30
a.m. Women’s Bible study. 4:30
p.m. Exercise. 6:00 p. m.
MOPS.
ST. PAUL LUTHERAN
(WELS),
Arlington
Bruce Hannemann, Pastor
WEBSITE:
www.stpaularlington.com
EMAIL:
Bruce.Hannemann@stpaul
arlington.com
Friday, March 15: 6:30 p.m.
Family movie night at church.
Sunday, March 17: 8:45 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:00 a.m. Fami-
ly Bible study. 10:00 a.m. Wor-
ship. Devotion book door offer-
ing. Fellowship - CES.
Tuesday, March 19: 8:45 a.m.
M.O.M.’s at school. 10:00 a.m.
Good Sam service. 3:45 p.m.
Public school confirmation
class. 7:00 p.m. Adult Bible
course at school.
Wednesday, March 20: 2:30
p.m. Bible study. 3:45 and 7:00
p.m. Lenten service. 5:00 p.m.
Lenten supper. 8:00 p.m. Choir
practice.
Thursday, March 21: 10:00
a.m. Bulletin information due.
11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Serv-
ice on cable TV channel 8. 6:00
p.m. School open house.
GAYLORD ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
Gaylord
Bob Holmbeck, Pastor
Friday, March 15: 4:00 p.m.
Leave church for Shakopee
women’s prison visit. 6:30 p.m.
Thomas Bible study, 8510 Penn
Ave., Bloomington.
Sunday, March 17: 9:00 a.m.
Sunday school. 10:00 a.m. Sun-
day worship service.
Wednesday, March 20: 6:30
p.m. Evening Bible classes and
Youth Focused.
ST. PAUL’S EV.
REFORMED CHURCH
15470 Co. Rd. 31, Hamburg
Dan Schnabel, Pastor
952-467-3878
www.stpaulsrcus.org
Sunday, March 17: 8:30 a.m.
Sunday school and adult Bible
study. 9:30 a.m. Worship serv-
ice. Choir practice after wor-
ship.
Wednesday, March 20: 6:00
p.m. Confirmation class. 7:30
p.m. Lenten service.
Tuesday, March 19: 7:30 p.m.
Men’s Brotherhood.
ORATORY OF
ST. THOMAS
THE APOSTLE
Jessenland
507-248-3550
Fr. Sam Perez
Thursday: Weekly Mass at
5:00 pm.
ST. PAUL’S UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Henderson
(507) 248-3594 (Office)
Rev. Brigit Stevens, Pastor
Find us on Facebook:
St. Paul’s UCC - Henderson
Friday, March 15: 7:00 to
9:00 p.m. Family fun night!
Sunday, March 17: 10:00 a.m.
Worship with confirmation pre-
sentations. 10:20 a.m. Sunday
school (Preschool to 6th). Dead-
line for Easter basket donations.
Wednesday, March 20: 5:30
p.m. Easter program practice
and supper. 7:00 p.m. Lenten
worship. 7:45 p.m. Confirma-
tion with parents.
ST. MARY, MICHAEL
AND BRENDAN AREA
FAITH COMMUNITY
Fr. Keith Salisbury, Pastor
Friday, March 15: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar).
Saturday, March 16: 5:00
p.m. Mass (Mar).
Sunday, March 17: 7:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre). 9:00 to 10:15 a.m.
Elementary religious education
and Mass (Mar). 9:00 a.m. Mass
(Mic). 9:45 to 10:30 a.m. Ele-
mentary religious education,
PreK/K/1st grade (Mic). 10:30
a. m. Mass (Mar). 1:00 p. m.
Penance service (Mar). 1:30
p. m. CCW bingo and raffle
(Bre).
Monday, March 18: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre); Word and Com-mu-
nion (Mar). 8:00 p.m. AA and
AlaNon (Mar).
Tuesday, March 19: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre). 7:30 p.m. Mass
(Mar). 8:00 p.m. St. Arthur’s
KC meeting (Mar).
Wednesday, March 20: 7:30
a. m. Mass (Mar). 9:00 a. m.
Word and Communion (Oak
Terrace). 3:15 to 4:30 p.m. Ele-
mentary religious education,
second - fifth grade (Mic). 6:00
p.m. Mass/Stations of the Cross
(Bre). 7:00 p.m. Junior and sen-
ior class meeting (Mar); Stations
of the Cross (Mar and Mic); Sta-
tions of the Cross /Junior and
senior high religious education
(Mar). 7:00 to 8:00 p.m. Sta-
tions of the Cross/Junior and
senior high religious education
(Mic).
Thursday, March 21: 7:30
a. m. Mass (Mar). 8:30 a. m.
Mass (Bre and Mic). 9:00 a.m.
Scripture study (Srs. residence
in Gaylord). 7:30 p.m. Narcotics
Anonymous (Mic).
TRINITY LUTHERAN
32234 431st Ave., Gaylord
Rev. James Snyder,
Interim Pastor
Sunday, March 17: 9:30 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:45 a.m. Fel-
lowship. 10:30 a.m. Worship.
Monday, March 18: 9:00 a.m.
to 3:00 p.m. Quilting.
Tuesday, March 19: 9:00 a.m.
to 3:00 p.m. Quilting.
Wednesday, March 20: 6:00
p.m. Community meal at Trinity.
7:00 p.m. Service.
Thursday, March 21: 7:00
a.m. Men’s/Boys’ Lenten break-
fast at American Lutheran.
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Pastor William Postel
Phone 507-964-2400
Sunday, March 17: 9:00 a.m.
Bible class. 10:00 a.m. Worship.
Wednesday, March 20: 6:00
p.m. Supper. 6:30 p.m. Men’s
Club. 7:00 p.m. Lenten worship.
Thursday, March 21: 5:30
p.m. Deadline for bulletin and
calendar information.
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN
Green Isle
Friday, March 15: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, March 17: 7:45 a.m.
Worship without Communion.
Pastor Bob Hines. 9:00 a.m.
Sunday school.
Tuesday, March 19: 7:00 p.m.
LWML Ladies Aid. 8:00 p.m.
Joint Elders meeting at St.
Paul’s.
Wednesday, March 20: 3:45
p. m. Confirmation class at
Peace Lutheran, Arlington. 5:00
p.m. Lenten service. 6:00 p.m.
Potluck lunch. 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday school for grades 1-
5. Lenten offering for Mayer
Lutheran High School.
Thursday, March 21: Private
Communions. 6:00 p.m. Dead-
line for April activities calendar.
PEACE LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Kurt Lehmkuhl, Pastor
Sunday, March 17: 8:15 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:30 a.m. Wor-
ship service with Holy Com-
munion.
Monday, March 18: 11:30
a.m. “Feeding of the 500 Club.”
Wednesday, March 20: 3:45
p.m. Catechism. 5:00 p.m. Jun-
ior Bell Choir. 6:00 p.m. Lenten
supper. 7:00 p.m. Lenten wor-
ship service.
Thursday, March 21: 7:30
p.m. Church Council meeting.
ZION LUTHERAN
814 W. Brooks St.
Arlington – (507) 964-5454
James Carlson, Pastor
Sunday, March 17: 8:00 a.m.
Choir. 9:00 a.m. Worship. 10:00
a.m. Sunday school and fellow-
ship.
Tuesday, March 19: 9:00 a.m.
Newsletter deadline. 6:00 to
7:00 p.m. TOPS in church base-
ment.
Wednesday, March 20: 3:45
p.m. 9th grade confirmation.
6:00 p.m. Lenten supper. 6:50
p.m. 7th grade confirmation.
7:00 p.m. Lenten service.
Thursday, March 21: 9:00
a.m. and 1:00 p.m. Zion service
on cable TV.
ZION LUTHERAN
Green Isle Township
Friday, March 15: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, March 17: 9:00 a.m.
Worship with Communion. Pas-
tor Bob Hines.
Tuesday, March 19: 8:00 p.m.
Joint Elders meeting at St.
Paul’s.
Wednesday, March 20: 3:45
p. m. Confirmation class at
Peace Lutheran, Arlington. 5:00
p.m. Lenten service at St. Paul’s.
6:00 p.m. Potluck lunch at St.
Paul’s. 6:30 to 7:30 p. m.
Wednesday school for grades 1-
5 at St. Paul’s. Lenten offering
for Mayer Lutheran High
School.
Thursday, March 21: Private
Communions. 6:00 p.m. Dead-
line or April activities calendar.
CREEKSIDE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Christian & Missionary
Alliance
Ben Lane, Pastor
114 Shamrock Drive
Arlington – 507-964-2872
www.creekside-church.com
email: creeksidecc@media-
combb.net.
Thursday, March 14: 6:30
p.m. Men’s Bible study of Luke
at Oak Terrace nursing home.
7:00 p.m. Women’s Bible study
of Ephesians.
Friday, March 15: 7:00 p.m.
Crazy Love study at the Lane’s.
Saturday, March 16: 10:00
a.m. to 12:00 noon - HTM Food
Shelf.
Saturday and Sunday, March
16 and 17: REACH youth group
- FAST for 24.
Sunday, March 17: 10:00 a.m.
Prayer. 10:30 a. m. Worship
service with Sunday school.
Wednesday, March 20: 7:00
to 8:30 p. m. REACH youth
group at Shogren’s.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
(507) 304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
507-234-6770
Saturday: Church services at
9:30 a.m. Bible study at 11:00
a.m. Fellowship dinner at 12:00
p.m. All are welcome.
UNITED METHODIST
Arlington
Wayne Swanson, Pastor
wwwarlingtonunited
methodist.org
Saturday, March 16: 8:00
a.m. A-Men men’s group. 10:00
a.m. Women’s Bible study at
Bette Nelson’s.
Sunday, March 17: 9:00 and
11:00 a.m. Worship. 10:10 a.m.
Sunday school. 6:30 p.m. Mar-
riage series.
Tuesday, March 19: 6:30 p.m.
SPPRC. 7:30 p.m. Ad. Council.
Wednesday, March 20: 7:00
p.m. Confirmation; choir
Thursday, March 21: 10:00
a.m., 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. Wor-
ship on cable TV. 7:00 p.m.
Bible study at Jean Olson’s.
2BR Apart ment with ga rage, wa -
ter/sew er/gar bage i n cl ud ed.
$450/mo. New Au burn (320) 327-
2928.
Newly remodeled apartments for
rent i n Renvi l l e. Water, heat,
garbage included. New appliances,
air conditioners. (320) 564-3351.
Com mer cial Build ing avail able
now! 900 sq. ft. down town Gay -
lord. Call Sar ah at (507) 237-5339
days, (507) 237-4166 even ings.
New er 2BR, 1BA ram bler in Ar ling -
ton, at tached heat ed dou ble ga -
rage, stove re frig era tor, dish wash -
er, wash er/dry er in clud ed. Call for
show ing. (612) 245-3103.
Young farm er look ing for pro duc -
tive farm land for 2013 and be-
yond. Com peti tive rates and ref er -
enc es. Call Aus tin Blad at (320)
221-3517.
Li censed day care has open ings for
child ren of all ages. open 5:30 a.m.-6
p.m. Food pro gram, large back yard,
sen sory play and week ly crafts. Con -
tact Becky (952) 873-9882.
CUS TOM LOG SAW ING- Cut
your place or ours. Give Vir gil a
call. Schau er Con struc tion, Inc.
(320) 864-4453.
Need trans por ta tion for your next
ev ent? We can help with our limo
bus. Wed dings, busi ness, sports,
bi rth days, etc. Check us out
www.theur ba nex press.com or call
Dina (612) 940-2184, Glen coe
busi ness. DOT 375227.
Plas tic re pair. Don’t throw it. Let
me weld it. Call Mike, Bird Is land,
an y time (320) 579-0418.
Per son al and small busi ness in -
come tax pre pa ra ti on and ac -
count ing serv ic es. Ran dy Mart ti -
nen (952) 210-8721. Email: blu -
mark@Live.com.
Tax Preparation
Misc. Service
Want To Rent
SERVICES
Child Care
Business, Office
House
RENTAL
Apartment
Equal Opportunity Employer
Christensen Farms is hiring
Animal Care Workers for our farms
in the Renville and Olivia area.
We offer:
$13.00/hr starting pay
Benefits Package including Health and more!
Opportunity for Monthly Production Bonuses
Opportunity to Advance, Team Approach
Full Time Schedule – Day Time Hours
Daily care of animals in a modern facility which may
include feeding, vaccinations, breeding,
sanitation and care of new born pigs.
Please apply online at
www.christensenfarms.com
Under Herdsperson-Renville/Olivia listing
If you have any questions, call 800-889-8531.
Now Hiring
F9-10Zj
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 14, 2013, page 10
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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ST. PATRICK’S DAY
S
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To celebrate
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offering 3 MONTHS
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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Subscription Rates
Minnesota –
$
33.00 per year.
Outside of state –
$
38.00 per year.
ST. PATRICK’S - 3 months free
Arlington ENTERPRISE
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2013
Menus
SENIOR DINING
Call 326-3401 for a meal
Suggested Donation $3.85
Monday: Hamburger, oven
brown potatoes, corn, bun with
margarine, scalloped apples, low
fat milk.
Tuesday: Irish stew with pota-
toes, cabbage and carrots, lime
gelatin with pineapple, biscuit with
margarine, poke cake, milk.
Wednesday: Italian meat sauce,
spaghetti noodles, lettuce with
dressing, mixed vegetables, garlic
bread with margarine, ice cream,
low fat milk.
Thursday: Pork l oi n, whol e
parslied potatoes, carrots, dinner
roll with margarine, dessert, low
fat milk.
Friday: Vegetable soup, egg
salad sandwich, peaches, crack-
ers with margarine, bar, low fat
milk.
SIBLEY EAST ELEMENTARY
BREAKFAST MENU
Arlington and Gaylord
Breakfast i s served at 8:00
a.m. daily. A 1/2 pint of milk is
served wi th each meal dai l y.
Menu is subject to change.
Monday: Cereal, cheese stick,
fruit, milk.
Tuesday: Cracker stick, seeds,
juice, milk.
Wednesday: Mini cinnis, juice,
milk.
Thursday: Gripz, yogurt, juice,
milk.
Friday: Oatmeal bar, cheese
stick, juice, milk.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Arlington
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: Soup, hot ham and
cheese, crackers, pickles, veggie
sti x, frui t. Al ternate: Mi ni corn
dogs.
Tuesday: French toast, sau-
sage, hash browns, applesauce,
cucumbers. Alternate: Chicken
patty.
Wednesday: Ri b wi th bun,
brown beans, fresh broccoli, fruit.
Alternate: Pork chop.
Thursday: Pork wi th gravy,
mashed potatoes, corn, frui t,
dessert. Alternate: Cold sandwich.
Friday: Cheese pizza, romaine
lettuce, green beans, fruit. Alter-
nate: Cooks’ choice.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Gaylord
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: Chicken noodle soup,
hot ham and cheese sandwich on
whole grain bun, veggie sticks,
pickles, peaches. Alternate: Fajita.
Tuesday: French toast sticks,
sausage, oven potatoes, cucum-
bers, applesauce. Alternate: Pizza
burger.
Wednesday: Rib on bun, brown
beans, fresh broccoli, mandarin
oranges. Alternate: Egg omelet.
Thursday: Pork and gravy,
mashed potatoes, carrots, pineap-
ple. Alternate: Cold cut sandwich.
Friday: Cheese pizza, romaine
salad, green beans, pear slices.
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