3-21-13 Arlington Enterprise

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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Serving the Communities of Arlington and Green Isle, Minnesota
www.arlingtonmnnews.com Volume 127 • Number 34 • Thursday, March 21, 2013 • Arlington, MN 55307
Single copy $1.00
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington Area Ambu-
lance Service responded to
252 ambulance calls in 2012,
according to Manager Kevin
Sullivan.
The number of calls was
down from the record number
312 calls from last year.
In addition, the ambulance
service provides medical cov-
erage at 25 racing and rodeo
events in the area and numer-
ous school related events. Of
the 252 calls, 134 were in the
City of Arlington. There were
also 65 transfers from the
Sibley Medical Center to var-
ious hospitals.
The Arlington Area Ambu-
lance Service serves the cities
of Arlington and Green Isle,
Arlington Township and por-
tions of Green Isle, New
Auburn, Dryden, Kelso,
Jessenland, Washington Lake
and Henderson townships.
The ambulance service also
has mutual aid agreements
with Gaylord, Glencoe, Le
Sueur and Ridgeview ambu-
lances in the event that they
are already on a call or sever-
al calls in the area come in at
once. In addition, several fire
departments, including Ar-
lington, Green Isle, Hender-
son and New Auburn, provide
much needed assistance on
many of the calls. The Arling-
ton Area Ambulance Service
also receives needed support
on calls from the Arlington
Police Department and the
Sibley County Sheriff’s De-
partment.
The current members of the
Arlington Area Ambulance
Service include emergency
medical technicians Brent
Doetkott, Mary Halverson,
Wendy Kube, Bob Lueth,
Jason Marozik, Sue Mor-
risette, Jason Mueller, Jim
Pederson, Kim Quast, Lisa
Roseland, Matt Scharpe,
Brian Thomes, Angela Walter
and Aaron Wisch. The ambu-
lance service also has first re-
sponder Rickey Schmidt on
its roster. In addition, the am-
bulance service roster in-
cludes paramedics Doug
Kayser, Paula Noll, Steve
Noll, Dave Olson, Michele
Parpart and Kevin Pevestorf.
The Arlington Area Ambu-
lance Service is always look-
ing for new members. The
ambulance service saw the re-
tirement of three individuals
from the service. Emergency
medical technicians Dawn
Lueth, Tim Vos and Neal
Wisch all announced their re-
tirement from the ambulance
service.
“They will be tough to re-
place, especially because of
all the experience they had,”
said Sullivan.
Their departures have left a
void that needs to be filled.
Sullivan said that an EMT
class is starting in Waconia
on Tuesday, March 26 and it
would be a great opportunity
for individuals who are inter-
ested in becoming EMTs and
earn some extra income.
“The City of Arlington has
a great program where they
will pay for your tuition for
the course in exchange for
just one year of service on the
ambulance when you become
certified,” said Sullivan.
People who are interested
in the class or have questions
in regard to the ambulance
service are encouraged to call
Kevin Sullivan at 612-723-
3166.
Arlington Area Ambulance Service responded to 252 calls last year
By Lori Copler
McLeod County Chronicle
Staff Writer
Hoping to draw more ap-
plicants for open jobs, the
Trailblazer Transit Joint Pow-
ers Board on Thursday morn-
ing raised the base pay for its
driver and dispatcher posi-
tions.
The minimum driver pay
was raised to $15 an hour
from $13.85 per hour; and the
minimum dispatcher pay was
raised to $15.25 per hour
from $14.31 per hour.
Those drivers and dispatch-
ers who have not reached the
new base wages through
longevity will be brought up
to the new minimum, plus get
an additional 10 cents per
hour for each year they have
been with Trailblazer. As an
example, a driver who has
four years of employment
with Trailblazer will receive
$15.40 per hour.
The Joint Powers Board
had a meeting earlier this
month to try to address the
issue, but had failed to come
to a consensus on what
should be done.
Sibley County Commis-
sioner Bill Pinske, who chairs
the Trailblazer board, did
some investigating into what
Sibley and McLeod counties
pay their highway department
truck drivers.
Sibley County has been of-
fering drivers about $15.36
per hour as a starting wage
and McLeod has been offer-
ing about $15.18 an hour, al-
though their low range of
their salary schedules is
lower than that.
“I think we were all think-
ing in that $15 an hour
range,” said Pinske. But the
problem was that there could
be drivers with five years of
experience who could be
making less than a new driv-
er, which is why Pinske pro-
posed the 10-cents an hour
per year of service differen-
tial.
“The issue, according to
Gary (Trailblazer director
Gary Ludwig) is that he’s not
getting the drivers at $13.85,”
said Pinske.
Ludwig said that in the
early years of Trailblazer, he
had the option of offering
more than the minimum of
the salary range for a particu-
lar job if it was necessary to
attract good people because
of the job market. That is no
longer the case, he said,
which is why the matter came
before the Joint Powers
Board.
Pinske said the new
salaries will not apply to po-
sitions other than drivers or
dispatchers, such as the exec-
utive director, operations
manager, officer manager,
driver and fleet manager, lead
driver or facility mainte-
nance.
“We’re leaving manage-
ment out of this for now,”
said Pinske. “That can be a
budget item for next year.”
The increases in the mini-
mum salary ranges were ap-
proved by the Joint Powers
Board, effective April 1. The
increase in salaries will cost
Trailblazer about $44,600 for
the remainder of 2013, and
about $59,500 in 2014.
McLeod County Commis-
sioner Ron Shimanski asked
Ludwig if he feels that the in-
crease will help in filling
open positions.
“I think we’ll draw a better
pool of applicants,” said Lud-
wig. “We’ll make headway,
but we won’t really know
until the applications come
in.”
Trailblazer makes mid-year
salary adjustment in hopes
of attracting more applicants
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
The general consensus is
the Sibley County Board does
not want to get into the real
estate business in order to
keep three governmental enti-
ties in the same office space.
The county building com-
mittee asked the commission-
ers for an opinion on a direc-
tion to take at the March 12
board meeting.
County Administrator Matt
Jaunich brought the issue to
the board regarding interest
in potentially providing office
space to house the Sibley
County Soil & Water Conser-
vation District (SWCD),
USDA Natural Resources
Conservation Service
(NRCS) and the Farm Serv-
ice Agency (FSA).
Jaunich said SWCD is con-
cerned about a lack of space
at their current location and
the potential move of NRCS
and FSA due to size restric-
tions of their current building
in Gaylord. SWCD would
prefer to stay with the two
other agencies.
Jaunich met with April Sul-
livan, NRCS District Conser-
vationist, who is aware of
regulations guiding NRCS
and FSA. The administrator
passed on what he learned.
Based on the current size
of their office, the need is for
a space between 3, 300 to
3,500 square feet of office
space. Plus, NRCS and FSA
will be in the Gaylord area
for the foreseeable future and
are willing to sign a 10-year
lease.
For any site to be consid-
ered, the bidder would have
to go through a process to get
selected, including the adver-
tisements for bids. Sullivan
did not know when the
process would begin, hoping
it would be within the year.
Jaunich said the county
would likely have to conduct
a market study of Gaylord to
determine a competitive ask-
ing price if interested.
The building committee
noted that it would be diffi-
cult to build new since there
was no guarantee that a bid
from the county would be ac-
cepted. Another idea was to
move SWCD into a county
building since it partially
funds it.
County Commissioner Bill
Pinske did not like the idea of
a government entity bidding
against four or five private
ventures.
“If we have space available
right here, it would not make
a lot of sense for us to build
in hoping we would get the
bid,” said County Commis-
sioner Jim Swanson. “If we
have existing space and
would not get the bid, we are
not out anything.”
Jaunich said there does not
have to be a new building,
but if that was the goal, the
county would need a concep-
tual plan. He added there are
some space options to look at
that could potentially impact
SWCD.
Pinske said he would hope
that a private individual
would look into either build-
ing office space or do a re-
modeling to have all three
groups in the same place.
Jaunich said based on the
discussion he will tell the
groups the county is not inter-
ested in providing new office
space at the present time.
County not interested in building
new office space for its agencies
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Marv Pautsch, owner of the Cenex Conven-
ience Store in Arlington, examined one of the
drawings for the Highway 5 projects which are
scheduled for summer construction. A High-
way 5 construction meeting was held at the
Arlington Community Center on Tuesday
evening, March 19.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
A dozen residents and busi-
ness people attended an infor-
mational meeting on the pro-
posed Highway 5 projects on
Tuesday night, March 19.
The public meeting was host-
ed by officials from the Min-
nesota Department of Trans-
portation (Mn/DOT) and was
held at the Arlington Com-
munity Center.
Mn/DOT staff and assisting
consultants explained the two
projects.
The first project, which is
expected to start Monday,
May 6, is Highway 5 from
Gaylord to Arlington.
This project will include
mill and overlay resurfacing.
In addition, it will include
sidewalk reconstruction in
Arlington.
There will be lane closures
and delays in conjunction
with this project. There will
also be a short detour for
bridge repair work.
The project, which is ex-
pected to take 34 working
days, will be completed
around mid June.
Mn/DOT staff and consult-
ants assured people that there
will be adequate signage for
motorists to access the down-
town business area during the
construction period.
In addition, Mn/DOT staff
and consultants said that
there will be adaquate access
to local residences and busi-
ness throughout the construc-
tion.
The second project, which
is expected to start around
Monday, July 8, is Highway 5
from Sheila Drive in Arling-
ton to Green Isle.
This project will include
pavement replacement and
culvert work. Traffic will be
detoured in two stages to
county roads. The plan is to
first complete the stretch
from Sheila Drive to County
Road 12.
The project is expected to
be completed in early Sep-
tember.
Each project will cost
around $3 million and will
provide the motorists with a
smoother, safer ride, accord-
ing to Mn/DOT staff and con-
sultants.
Signal Light
Prior to the resurfacing
project from Gaylord to Ar-
lington, the traffic signal light
at the intersection of High-
way 5 and West Main Street
in Arlington will be deacti-
vated in April for a three-
month evaluation period.
In place of the signal light,
through-stop control (where
Highway 5 traffic does not
stop, but West Main Street
traffic does) will be imple-
mented and evaluated, ac-
cording to the Mn/DOT staff
and consultants.
If no adverse traffic im-
pacts are observed during the
evaluation period, the traffic
signal light will be removed
as part of the resurfacing
project, the Mn/DOT staff
and consultants said. They
added that an earlier engi-
neering study determined the
existing traffic signal light is
not needed now or in the fu-
ture.
A number of residents and
business people in attendance
repeatedly voiced their dis-
pleasure about the proposed
removal of the lone traffic
signal light along Highway 5
in Arlington.
These residents said the
elimination of the lone traffic
signal light will create an un-
safe intersection at Highway
5 and West Main Street.
The Mn/DOT staff and
consultants cited various
studies and said the proposed
elimination of the lone traffic
light will make for an even
safer intersection at Highway
5 and West Main Street.
The Mn/DOT staff and
consultants said there will be
LED flashing lights for mo-
torists and pedestrians travel-
ing along West Main Street,
but no flashing lights along
Highway 5. In addition, there
will be painted crosswalks
along Highway 5 at the inter-
sections of West Alden, West
Main and West Adams
streets.
In addition, the Mn/DOT
staff and consultants said the
move will save money in the
installation, operation and
maintenance of a new traffic
signal light along Highway 5.
Updates
The Mn/DOT staff and
consultants said its agency
will make every effort to up-
date the public on the
progress of the Highway 5
projects.
The updates will be pub-
lished in the weekly edition
of the Arlington Enterprise
from the start of the first proj-
ect through the completion of
the second project.
Residents voice concerns at
Highway 5 projects meeting
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 21, 2013, page 2
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Call us at:
507-964-5547
Arlington Enterprise
The Arlington
Enterprise
402 W. Alden St.
P.O. Box 388
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-5547
info@arlingtonMNnews.com
52 Weeks a Year!
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Sponsored by the GI Irish
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Wednesday, March 27: Arlington Fire Dept.
Relief Association, Arlington Fire Hall, 7:30 p.m.
Community
Calendar
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER
Arlington State Bank
(507) 964-2256
Fax (507) 964-5550
www.ArlingtonStateBank.com
MAIN BANK
Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (straight thru)
DRIVE THRU
Monday - Thursday, 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.,
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Member
FDIC
OPEN HOUSE
Please join us for
coffee and treats at the
Arlington State Bank
to honor the retirement of
Kay Schumacher on
THURSDAY, MARCH
Arlington State Bank
230 W. Main (507) 964-2256
Fax No. 964-5550
www.ArlingtonStateBank.com
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER A11E12Sa
Come help us celebrate
the retirement of
after 20+ years!
Cake & Coffee will be served at
Morreim Pharmacy
Fri., March 29
11 a.m.-4 p.m.
MORREIM PHARMACY & GIFT CENTER
201 W. Main, Arlington • (507) 964-5228
Hours: Mon-Fri: 8 am-5:30 pm,
Sat: 8 am-1 pm
air
A11-12E,12Sa
SPAGHETTI
DINNER
Silent Auction & Bake Sale
Benefit for John Karau
(husband of Terry Bauer)
Sat., March 23
3-7 p.m.
Gaylord Am. Legion
329 Main Ave.
Free Will Donation
For Silent Auction & Bake
Sale donations or more info,
contact Dani at 507-380-3497.
Checks can be made to
The John Karau Benefit
Funds provided by Thrivent for Lutherans.
*11SEa
We would like to thank
Steve Gillaspie and Justin
Ni ssen of Steve’s Copy
Shop and More for the
printer and Tablet PC that
we won at the Chamber
Banquet on March 7.
Janet Hansen
Pam Wiest
Thank You
*11Ea
Sibley Medical Center &
Sibley Medical Foundation Accepting Scholarship Applications
Sibley Medical Center and Sibley Medical Foundation are pleased
to announce we are offering scholarships to several
Sibley County 2013 graduating seniors who are pursuing
a career in the healthcare industry.
We would be honored to review your application.
Application deadline is April 16, 2013
Instructions and applications can be obtained from the following locations:
Sibley County High School Counselor offices,
SMC clinic locations in Arlington, Gibbon, Henderson or Winthrop
SMC website at www.sibleymedical.org,
Contacting Jeni at 507-964-8438.
Your Partner in Care for Life
A11-13E12-14Sj
News Briefs
Vehicle enters ditch in town
A one-vehicle accident without injuries reportedly oc-
curred along Highway 5 just inside the Arlington city
limits at 8:25 a.m. Saturday, March 16, according to the
Sibley County Sheriff’s Department.
Maycte R. Castillo, 22, Gaylord, was driving a 2002
Chrysler Town and Country van eastbound on Highway
5 when she reportedly lost control of the vehicle due to
icy road conditions. The vehicle entered the ditch.
The vehicle was not damaged, according to the sher-
iff’s department.
Accident on County Road 13
A one-vehicle accident without injuries reportedly oc-
curred along County Road 13 in New Auburn Township
at 7:10 a.m. Tuesday, March 19, according to the Sibley
County Sheriff’s Department.
Jesus Savala, 42, Arlington, was driving a 1995
Dodge pickup northbound on County Road 13 when he
reportedly lost control of his vehicle. The vehicle en-
tered the ditch and rolled over.
The vehicle sustained moderate damage, according to
the sheriff’s department.
Van involved in rollover crash
A one-vehicle accident without injuries reportedly oc-
curred along Highway 19 near the County Road 3 inter-
section in Bismarck Township at 6:38 p.m. Tuesday,
March 12, according to the Sibley County Sheriff’s De-
partment.
Carol Jacoby, 52, Clements, was driving a Ford cargo
van and pulling an enclosed trailer westbound on High-
way 19 when she reportedly lost control of the vehicle
on the snow and ice covered roadway. The van and
trailer crashed into the ditch.
Jacoby, who was wearing her seatbelt, was not in-
jured. There was moderate damage to the van and trail-
er, according to the sheriff’s department.
Crash in Severance Township
A two-vehicle accident without injuries reportedly oc-
curred along the 315 block of County Road 2 in Sever-
ance Township at 7:38 a.m. Monday, March 18, accord-
ing to the Sibley County Sheriff’s Department.
A 2009 Chevrolet driven by Todd Sievert, 29, Gib-
bon, collided with a 2007 Mitsubiski drivn by Gaetan
Lemyre, 51, Gibbon.
Both vehicles sustained major damage, according to
the sheriff’s department.
Riebe named to Dean’s List
Victoria Riebe, a 2012 graduate of the Sibley East
Senior High School, was recently named to the Dean’s
List at Bemidji State University.
She is the daughter of Dean and Deedee Riebe, Ar-
lington.
Nominations are sought
Nominations are being sought for the Outstanding
Family Child Care Providers in each county of the state
of Minnesota.
If you know of a family child care provider who is
deserving of this award please go to Minnesota Li-
censed Family Child Care Association website at
www.mlfcca.org to obtain a nomination form or call
their office directly at 800-652-9704.
The Family Child Care Providers selected will be
honored during a banquet at the Kahler Grand Hotel &
Rochester Marriott in Rochester on Saturday, May 4.
God’s Backyard Bible Camp
God's Backyard Bible Camp (mid week kids club)
will be held at the Creekside Community Church from
6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays, April 3 through May
1. Four-year-olds through sixth graders are invited to
experience the Bible story, talk about ways to serve,
enjoy music, crafts, games and snacks. But most im-
portantly, they will learn about Jesus Christ and grow in
their faith in Him. Please arrive to register at 6 p.m.
Wednesday April 3.
Engagement
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Chamber Awards
The Arlington Area Chamber of Commerce presented
awards to five individuals during its annual Chamber
Banquet at the Arlington Haus Too on Thursday night,
March 7. Left to right: Terry Klages (Outstanding
Chamber Award), Jane Scharpe (Outstanding Com-
munity Member Award), Kim Schneider (Past Presi-
dent Award) and Kathy Homme (Outstanding Cham-
ber Award). Missing from the photo is Pam Wiest
(Outstanding Chamber Award).
By Kurt Menk
Editor
One hundred six units of
blood were collected during a
blood drive at the Arlington
Community Center on Tues-
day, March 12, according to
Coordinator Kay Schumach-
er.
“You all so willingly
stepped up to the plate and
did what had to be done,”
said Schumacher. “It was
very much appreciated and
many people will be helped
by the thoughtfulness of all
the donors.”
Frank Schwope received a
17-gallon pin while Debra
Stenzel netted a 12-gallon
pin. Therese Ott received an
eight-gallon pin while Pam
White netted a seven-gallon
pin. Marie Schneider re-
ceived a six-gallon pin while
Elvera Winter netted a four-
gallon pin. Joan Brockhoff
received a two-gallon pin.
Five young students also
donated blood including first-
time donors Levi Pfarr and
Samanatha Acevedo.
The Arlington VFW Auxil-
iary donated and served the
lunch.
Locher Brothers, Green
Isle, donated the refresh-
ments.
Wendy Kube donated eggs
for egg salad sandwiches for
all the vounteers and donors.
The next blood drive will
be held at the Arlington Com-
munity Center on Tuesday,
May 28.
Over 105 units donated at blood drive
John and Linda Franzen of
Belle Plaine, and Robert and
Cynthia Berg of Howard
Lake, are excited to an-
nounce the upcoming mar-
riage of their children
Michele Lynn Franzen and
Timothy William Berg.
The marriage ceremony
will take place on Saturday,
April 6, at the First Presbyte-
rian Church of Howard Lake
with the reception following
in Hamburg.
Franzen - Berg
A fundraiser to benefit
Jared Allen’s Homes 4
Wounded Warriors will be
held at the Arlington Dugout
on Saturday, March 23.
A 48-team double elimina-
tion bean bag tournament will
start at noon. Teams can reg-
ister at 11 a.m.
The Eddie Mac Band will
perform immediately follow-
ing the bean bag tournament.
The Devon Worley Band
will provide musical enter-
tainment from 9 p.m. to 1
a.m.
A raffle will be held for
great prizes. Free will dona-
tions will be appreciated at
the door.
The event will raise money
to help build handicap acces-
sible homes for United States
military veterans.
Allen is a defensive end for
the Minnesota Vikings. Allen
played college football for
Idaho State University, and
was drafted by the Kansas
City Chiefs in the fourth
round of the 2004 National
Football League Draft. A
five-time Pro Bowl selection
and four-time All-Pro, Allen
has tallied 117 sacks during
his career which began in
2004.
For more information, con-
tact Matt Scharping at phe-
nomgenetics@hotmail.com.
Fundraiser for Jared Allen’s Homes 4 Wounded Warriors
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 21, 2013, page 3
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Business & Professional
Directory
CALL TODAY TO BE INCLUDED IN OUR
BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY!
507-964-5547
Arlington
Chiropractic Clinic
JUSTIN E. DAVIS, D.C.
607 W. Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-2850
arlingtonchiropracticmn.com
Office Hours:
Mon. 9am-6pm; Tues. 9am-5pm;
Wed. 8am-6pm; Thurs. 1-6pm;
Fri. 8am-4pm; 1
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& 3
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Sat. 8am-11am
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Large Animal
Veterinary Services
Ultrasound repro, Surgical,
Medical and Nutrition
Small Animal House Call
by Appointment
Medical, Vaccination Services
and Surgical Referral
Dr. Robert G. Ovrebo
Office 507-964-2682
Cell 507-995-0507
Miller
Law
Office
RAPHAEL J. MILLER
ROXANN M. BERANEK
Attorneys at Law
332 Sibley Ave. 1042 First Ave.
Gaylord, MN Gibbon, MN
Tel. 507-237-2954 Fax: 507-237-2347
Wills - Taxes - Estate Planning
General Law Practice & Trials
Free consultation on personal injury claims
MESENBRING
CONSTRUCTION
(507) 964-2864
“Your local home builder and
remodeler for over 38 years”
Member: MN River Builders Assn.
MN License #4806
ROSS R. ARNESON
ATTORNEY AT LAW
302 West Main
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-5753
Real Estate, Estate Planning,
Probate and Business Law
Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Saturdays by Appointment
Farm – Residential
Commercial
Licensed - Bonded - Insured
• 24-Hour Emergency
Service
• Free Estimates
Tyler Kranz, Owner
507-964-2525
Klehr Grading
&
Excavating, Inc.
JEFF & WENDY KLEHR
Dozer, Grader, Basements,
Septic Systems, Driveways, Backhoe Work,
Hauling Gravel/Rock/Sand, Skidloader
Jeff cell: 612-756-0595
Wendy cell: 612-756-0594
640 E. BROOKS ST., ARLINGTON, MN 55307
1-507-964-5783 • FAX: 507-964-5302
Local LAWN
Enforcement
Arlington, MN
Licensed and Insured
Mowing, fertilizing and
weed control, dethatching,
garden tilling, core aeration
www.locallawnenforcement.com
Adam and David Hansen
Adam cell: 507-327-0917
507-964-5835
• 5” Seamless Gutters
• 6” Seamless Gutters
• K-Guard Leaf-Free
Gutter System
(lifetime clog free guarantee)
PHIL GOETTL
612-655-1379
888-864-5979
www.mngutter.com
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Gustafson
Family Dentistry
Dr. John D. Gustafson, D.D.S
Dr. Jared Gustafson, D.D.S
COMPREHENSIVE CARE
FOR ALL AGES
Office Hours: Monday–Friday
New Patients Welcome
Dr. Jason Anderson, D.D.S
Orthodontists
106 3
rd
Ave. NW,
Arlington
507-964-2705
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BODY REPAIR
See us for factory-trained
body repair work on
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• Free Estimates • Glass Replacement
• Collision Repair • Rust Repair
WINDSHIELD
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We install windshields
for all vehicles
We will contact the insurance company
for you and do all paperwork. See us
for professional glass installation.
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Local
507-964-5539
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612-719-4166
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AND FARM EQUIPMENT
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DOT INSPECTIONS
23315 HWY 5
ARLINGTON, MN 55307
PAUL PIEPER, OWNER
EMAIL: ppieper@ymail.com
Truck &
Farm Tire
Sales &
Service
A
2
0
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2
5
E
l
CURBSIDE GARBAGE
COLLECTION
NOTICE TO ARLINGTON RESIDENTS:
Due to the time of year, the graveled alleyways
are very soft and cannot handl e the l arge
garbage trucks driving on them. The City of Ar-
lington is asking all residents to place their
garage cans and recycling containers curbside.
We have also notified the garbage companies
and have asked them not to drive through the
graveled alleyways until such time as they have
had a chance to dry out. This will become
ef-
fective Mon., MARCH 18
th
and
continue until further notice.
Areas with cement alleyways
are excluded from this notice.
City of Arlington
Street Superintendent Dan Thomes
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By Kurt Menk
Editor
A vehicle was stolen in
the City of Arlington late
last week, according to the
Arlington Police Depart-
ment.
A gray 2002 Chevrolet
Tahoe was reportedly
stolen from the John and
JoLene Scheer residence
along the 200 block of
Fourth Avenue Northwest
sometime between 12:30
a.m. and 6:30 a.m. Friday,
March 15, according to
the police department.
The Chevrolet Tahoe
was unlocked, but the
keys were not left inside
the vehicle, police said.
The license plate num-
ber on the vehicle is
176AHA, according to po-
lice.
People who have any in-
formation about this inci-
dent are encouraged to call
the Arlington Police De-
partment at 507-964-5200.
Vehicle stolen in Arlington
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
The Sibley East Senior High Knowledge Bowl Team concluded
its season at the sub-regional meet at Minnesota State Univer-
sity, Mankato, on Monday, March 11. The team competed in
four invitational meets and the sub-regional meet. Front Row:
(left to right) Marissa Eckberg, Nick Bruss, Allison Larson,
Frances Zuniga and Sara Peterson. Back Row: (l to r) Katelyn
Reid, Matt Weber, Maren Miner, Heidi Milczark, Hayley Riebe
and Lindsay Fasching. The coach was Vikki Louwagie.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Arlington is featured in a
current Minnesota Twins
video advertisement.
The name of the video ad-
vertisement is “The excite-
ment is building in towns
across Twins Territory for the
return of Twins baseball in
2013.”
A clip shows a picture of a
snow-covered dugout and
grandstand at the Arlington
Baseball Park. A clip also
shows a picture of the local
baseball water tower.
Arlington is featured
in Twins Territory ad
This Lenten season in the
Arlington community people
can experience the drama of
Christ’s crucifixion and resur-
rection beginning with the
Triumphal Entry into
Jerusalem. Various scenes de-
picting the events of Holy
Week will be presented. The
audience is seated as the dra-
mas unfold around them.
People are invited to attend
one of two performances at
the Arlington Community
Center on Palm Sunday,
March 24. The first perform-
ance will be at 4 p.m. and the
second performance will be at
7 p.m. People are encouraged
to enter the west door so they
can see the first scene of the
Portrayal.
The program begins with
the Triumphal Entry into
Jerusalem, the Last Supper
and the Foot Washing. People
will visit the Garden of Geth-
semane and watch as Christ
carries the Cross to His own
Crucifixion. The Tomb is
empty but Christ is alive! A
narrator reads the story from
the Scripture. Special music
and congregational singing
are included in the program.
During the presentation, an
offering will be taken to de-
fray expenses for the event
and for the food shelf. March
is Food Shelf Month and the
shelves need to be filled so
help fill their shelves by
bringing nonperishable food
items.
The director for the drama
is Jeni Forcier from Hutchin-
son. Forcier is active ecu-
menically in her own com-
munity but is employed in
Arlington. Over 100 volun-
teers are involved in this
event. The program is spon-
sored by Arlington Christian
Community committee which
is a group of volunteers from
local churches. This group
also sponsors the Drive-by
Living Nativity. At the 2012
Living Nativity, 756 pounds
of food was collected and
over $680 was collected for
the Sibley County Food
Shelf.
Passion Portrayal scheduled
for Palm Sunday, March 24
A 12-year-old boy was ar-
rested Wednesday after police
say he falsely reported a
shooting at New Prague Mid-
dle School, according to Min-
nesota Public Radio.
Some dozen law enforce-
ment agencies responded to
the incident only to find that
it was a false alarm.
“In this day and age you
have to take these things very
seriously,” New Prague Po-
lice Chief Mark Vosejpka
said during a news confer-
ence.
Students were dismissed
early to “relieve anxiety,” Su-
perintendent Larry Kau-
zlarich said. Parents were al-
lowed to pick up their chil-
dren, and buses took other
students home.
12-year-old arrested in
New Prague school hoax
The Arlington-Green Isle
Women of Today will spon-
sor an Easter event in the
small gym at the Sibley
East Senior High School in
Arlington from 10 a.m. to
noon Saturday, March 30.
The event is open to chil-
dren who are toddlers
through the second grade.
Children will have an op-
portunity to visit with the
Easter Bunny.
In addition, there will be
games, prizes, crafts, cook-
ies and more.
Parents, don’t forget to
bring your camera.
Easter event set for Saturday, March 30
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 21, 2013, page 4
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Staff
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Pub-
lishers; Kurt Menk, Editor; Karin
Rami ge, Manager; Marvi n
Bulau, Production Manager;
Barb Mathwig, Office; Ashley
Reetz, Sales; and Jean Olson,
Proof Reading.
Letters
This page is devoted to opin-
ions and commentary. Articles
appearing on this page are the
opinions of the writer. Views ex-
pressed here are not necessarily
those of the Arlington Enter-
prise, unless so designated. The
Arlington Enterprise strongly
encourages others to express
opinions on this page.
Letters from our readers are
strongly encouraged. Letters for
publ i cati on must bear the
writer’s signature and address.
The Arlington Enterprise re-
serves the right to edit letters
for purpose of clarity and space.
Ethics
The editorial staff of the Arling-
ton Enterprise strives to present
the news in a fair and accurate
manner. We appreciate errors
being brought to our attention.
Pl ease bri ng any gri evances
against the Arlington Enterprise to
the attention of the editor. Should
differences continue, readers are
encouraged to take their griev-
ances to the Mi nnesota News
Council, an organization dedicated
to protecti ng the publ i c from
press inaccuracy and unfairness.
The News Council can be contact-
ed at 12 South Sixth St., Suite
940, Minneapolis, MN 55402, or
(612) 341-9357.
Press Freedom
Freedom of the press is guar-
anteed under the First Amend-
ment to the U.S. Constitution:
“Congress shall make no law
respecting an establishment of
religion, or prohibiting the free
exercise thereof; or abridging
the freedom of speech, or the
press…”
Ben Frankl i n wrote i n the
Pennsylvania Gazette in 1731:
“If printers were determined not
to print anything till they were
sure it would offend nobody
there would be very little print-
ed.”
Deadline for the Arlington
Enterprise news is 4 p.m., Mon-
day, and advertising is noon,
Tuesday. Deadl i ne for The
Gal axy adverti si ng i s noon
Wednesday.
Established in 1884.
Postmaster send address changes to:
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Arlington, MN 55307.
Phone 507-964-5547 FAX 507-964-2423.
Hours: Monday-Wednesday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.;
Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 2 p.m.; and Friday closed.
Entered as Periodicals postal matter at Arlington,
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Arlington ENTERPRISE
Public meeting held
on Highway 5 projects
Our View: Excitement about refurbished
highway is lost in the discussion
Opinions
Guest Columns
A dozen residents and business people attended an infor-
mational meeting on the Highway 5 projects scheduled for
summer construction at the Arlington Community Center
on Tuesday evening, March 19.
The proposed removal of the lone traffic signal light
along Highway 5 in Arlington understandably dominated
the informal question and answer session with officials
from the Minnesota Department of Transportation
(Mn/DOT).
These residents and business people argued that the pro-
posed removal of this lone signal light will create unsafe
traffic conditions for motorists and pedestrians at the inter-
section of Highway 5 and Main Street in Arlington.
Mn/DOT officials, on the other hand, did not dodge any
questions and repeatedly stated that the proposed removal
of the lone signal light will create a safer intersection plus
save money in the installation, operation and maintenance
of a new structure.
The results from a three-month evaluation, after the deac-
tivation of the lone traffic signal light this spring, may
prove or disprove the various arguments from both sides.
In the long run, however, only time will tell if the intersec-
tion is more or less safe.
Although the potential removal of the lone traffic signal
light in Arlington is no doubt the hot topic at this moment,
residents and business people should not forget that High-
way 5 will get refurbished seven miles to the east and west
from Arlington. The construction will no doubt cause some
inconveniences for motorists, pedestrians, residents and
business people this summer, but a refurbished highway
will be worth the wait.
Minnesota spends millions of dollars on numerous road
construction projects each summer. It is nice to finally see
some of that money spent on a major highway in this area.
-K.M.
Too Tall’s Tidbits
Happy Birthday and Happy An-
niversary to the following local and
area residents compliments of the
Arlington Lions Club Community
Calendar.
March 22
Bob Goheen, Brandon Barth, Eileen
Pieschke, Jonathan Felmlee, Ra-
mona Evenson and Ronda Brau.
March 23
Charlie Thomes, Taylor Van Hout,
Francis Bigaouette, Jr. and Mr. and
Mrs. Will Allison.
March 24
Mitch Koepp, Duncan Schmig and
Madelyn McKinnon.
March 25
Cullen Arneson, Darla Dols, Jamie
Halverson, Stephanie Baumgarten
and Stephanie Herd.
March 26
Hunter Otto, Brent Farber, Donna
Wolter, Jennifer Pasek and Sharon
Shimota.
March 27
Annette Bergersen, Brenda Soren-
son, Brittany Giesen, Hunter Nelson
and Irene Bulau.
March 28
Anna Rae Meyer, Betty Rud, Chad
Kleist, David Hansen, Joseph Aguil-
era, Mason Wendinger and Scott
Zeiher.
*****
Smith goes to see his supervisor in
the front office. “Boss,” he says,
“we’re doing some heavy house
cleaning at home tomorrow, and my
wife needs me to help with the attic
and the garage, moving and hauling
stuff.”
“We’re short-handed, Smith,” the
boss replies. “I can’t give you the
day off.”
“Thanks, boss,” says Smith. “I
knew I could count on you!”
*****
A police officer in a small town
stopped a motorist who was speed-
ing down Main Street.
“But officer,” the man said. “I can
explain.”
“Just be quiet!” snapped the offi-
cer, “or I’m going to let you cool off
in jail until the chief gets back.”
“But officer, I just wanted to
say...”
“I said be quiet! Now you’re
going to jail!”
A few hours later, the officer
checked up on his prisoner and said,
“Lucky for you that the chief’s at his
daughter’s wedding. He’ll be in a
good mood when he gets back.”
“Don’t count on it,” said the
man in the cell. “I’m the groom!”
*****
A man was in a hurry taking his
eight-year-old son to school and
made a turn at a red light where it
was prohibited. “Oh no, I just made
an illegal turn!” the man said out
loud.
“Don’t worry Dad, it’s okay,”
the son replied. “The police car
right behind us did the same
thing.”
*****
During a medical examination, a
man was asked to stretch out his
arms in front of him. His hands
trembled.
“Good heavens, how much do you
drink?” asked the doctor.
“Hardly anything at all,” an-
swered the man. “I spill most of
it.”
*****
How many telemarketers does it
take to change a light bulb? One,
but he has to do it while you’re
eating dinner.
*****
Visiting the psych ward, a man
asked how doctors decide to institu-
tionalize a patient.
“Well,” the doctor said, “we fill a
bathtub, then offer a teaspoon, a
teacup and a bucket to the patient
and ask him to empty the tub.”
“I get it,” the visitor replied. “A
normal person would use the bucket,
because it’s the biggest.”
“No,” the doctor said. “A nor-
mal person would pull the plug.”
*****
By Lee H. Hamilton
Over the last few weeks, as the
deadline for the congressionally
mandated budget cuts known as the
“sequester” came and went, we got a
taste of how difficult cutting federal
spending actually turns out to be.
The news is disconcerting: thou-
sands fewer food safety inspections,
some 70,000 fewer kids in early ed-
ucation programs, people with men-
tal illness losing access to treatment,
civilian employees of the military
furloughed, ships and aircraft going
without maintenance... It’s a long
and dispiriting list.
Yet as painful as the sequester
might be, most policy-makers know
that it is not the main event when it
comes to our fiscal challenges. Dis-
cretionary spending, the kind getting
cut in the sequester, amounts to less
than a third of federal spending.
That’s not what many people be-
lieve, of course. Whenever I give
talks about the federal budget I’m
taken aback by where my listeners
think most of our money gets spent.
At two meetings recently, members
of the audience stood up to com-
plain that if we just cut what we
give away to other countries in for-
eign aid, we could resolve our budg-
et issues. This isn’t even close to the
truth: altogether, we spend well less
than 1 percent of the federal budget
on foreign aid.
If you think of federal spending as
a pie, by far the biggest slices go to
Social Security and unemployment
support, Medicare, Medicaid, and
other health programs, which alto-
gether make up well over half. Mili-
tary spending accounts for about an-
other quarter, while the next biggest
slice, about 7 percent, is for interest
on the federal debt — a figure that
will explode in upcoming years.
Everything else we think of as the
federal government — spending on
highways and the aviation system,
money for student loans and other
education programs, housing, food
stamps, medical research and, yes,
foreign aid — comes in at under
one-fifth of the total.
The biggest driver of growth in
federal spending, as Nate Silver of
The New York Times pointed out in
a thoughtful analysis in January, is
entitlements: Medicare, Medicaid,
Social Security and other social in-
surance programs. This is especially
true of health-care, which accounted
for about half of the increase in fed-
eral spending relative to the econo-
my over the last 40 years. We cannot
get control of federal spending with-
out reining in health-care spending
— and though its rate of increase
has slackened over the last few
years, no one knows whether it’s a
permanent or temporary change.
So if Congress and the White
House are serious about tackling
federal spending, then the piece they
left out of the sequester —entitle-
ment reform — must be on the
table. But it’s been hard to tell from
their actions that they’re really seri-
ous. Members of Congress have
been taking to the airwaves for
weeks to decry the sequester’s meat-
cleaver approach to budget-cutting,
yet most of them voted for it. That’s
because it’s simpler to impose
across-the-board cuts than to make
discriminating judgments about in-
dividual programs. Members find it
easy to demand cuts in federal
spending in the abstract, but painful-
ly difficult to cut specific programs.
Americans as a whole do, too: a
recent Pew Center poll found they
approve cutting government spend-
ing in general, but when asked about
specific programs, they want to
boost funding or keep it the same.
Americans are demanding that gov-
ernment cut spending without cut-
ting actual programs.
This is why it takes extraordinary
leadership to address our fiscal is-
sues. Americans may bear some re-
sponsibility, but our leaders have not
leveled with us about what it takes
to get a sensible budget and put the
economy on a path to recovery. I am
hard-pressed to think of an example
of government failure to match our
political leaders’ inability to lead us
to a solution.
Their prolonged fighting is caus-
ing businesses to hesitate, workers
to remain in limbo, and an economy
that needs a boost to continue to
stutter. They are denying us the abil-
ity to invest in our future, promote
economic growth, and deal with the
many other challenges our nation
faces. Let’s stop the blame game and
get to work.
Lee Hamilton is Director of the
Center on Congress at Indiana Uni-
versity. He was a member of the
U.S. House of Representatives for
34 years.
Where our money goes
By U.S. Senator Al Franken
As Congress digs into federal
farm policy this year, “job one”
should be enacting a five-year Farm
Bill that will give farmers and
ranchers in Minnesota and across
the country the certainty they need
to plan for the future.
At recent Farm Bill meetings I've
held all over Minnesota, I've heard
over and over again how important
it is to Minnesota producers -- and
to our state’s economy -- that we
finish this job.
That’s why I’ve cosponsored leg-
islation nearly identical to the five-
year measure that passed the Senate
in 2012 with overwhelming biparti-
san support. The measure, intro-
duced as a top priority in the Senate,
will not only reform and modernize
our agriculture programs and
strengthen the farm safety net, but
also create jobs and economic vitali-
ty in communities across our state.
Just as importantly, by reforming
our agriculture programs, we can
save money – tens of billions of dol-
lars – to reduce our budget deficit.
I’m optimistic that in 2013, we
won’t see a repeat of last year, when
House leaders refused to allow a
vote and saddled Minnesota farmers
and ranchers with a short-term ex-
tension that only runs through Sep-
tember.
One key problem with the tempo-
rary Farm Bill is that it shortchanges
investments in conservation and en-
ergy programs, assistance for begin-
ning farmers and ranchers, and a
number of other important programs
that help spur jobs and economic de-
velopment in communities across
Minnesota. This year, I will be
pushing to fund those important in-
vestments until a permanent Farm
Bill is enacted.
I hope that after hearing from
farmers and farm leaders from
across the country in the past several
months, the House leadership now
understands how important it is that
we put a five-year Farm Bill in
place.
Farm Policy Uncertainty Makes
Planning Difficult
Just last month, a top Minnesota
farm credit official outlined for me
some of the difficulties that uncer-
tainty over future farm policy poses
for producers in Minnesota and
across the country. He said farmers
are facing the rising cost of inputs
like land, machinery, and equip-
ment, as well as another year of pos-
sible weather disasters, making it
important for them to have certainty
about farm policy and about the
farm safety net before they invest
thousands, even millions, of dollars
in their operations.
He also said the lack of a five-
year Farm Bill is hurting young and
beginning farmers, many of whom
have seen their applications for
guarantees at their local Farm Serv-
ice Agency (FSA) office go un-
processed due to the uncertainty of
federal farm funding.
In short, it’s time for Congress to
finish the job of passing a five-year
Farm Bill.
New Energy Subcommittee
Chairmanship Provides
Opportunity For
Minnesota
One of my top priorities during
the Farm Bill debate has been to
fight for programs that support in-
vestment in Minnesota’s energy
economy. In fact, the recently intro-
duced Senate Farm Bill includes my
Rural Energy for America (REAP)
provision, which will help farmers
and small businesses save money
and earn income by investing in re-
newable energy and energy efficient
technology. This program is used in
Minnesota more than in almost any
other state and is another example of
how our state is a leader in energy
innovation.
As a member of the Senate Ener-
gy and Natural Resources Commit-
tee, I was pleased to be named chair-
man of a key subcommittee this
month. Leading this panel will pro-
vide opportunities to promote Min-
nesota’s and the nation’s renewable
energy efforts and to create good
Franken
Continued on page 5
It’s time for Congress to finish job on farm bill
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 21, 2013, page 5
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Death Notice
Obituaries
History
Ronald Maurice Noack, 84,
of Buford, Ga., died on Sun-
day, Feb. 24.
Memorial services were
held at the Prince of Peace
Catholic Church in Flowery
Branch, Ga., at 11 a.m. Satur-
day, March 9.
Ronald was born to the late
Maurice and Ruth Noack of
Arlington, on Feb. 29, 1928.
Ronald attended St. Mary’s
College of Calif. and graduat-
ed from Mankato State Uni-
versity in 1952. He then
served in the U.S. Naval Air
Cadets for two years. From
1955 to 1984, he worked for
the Tennant Company, start-
ing in sales and ending his
career as a District Manager
in Grand Rapids, Mich.
Ronald was married to Bar-
bara (Even) Noack for 56
years. They were married in
St. Paul on April 21, 1956.
They shared the love of travel
and to see them on the dance
floor together was a vision of
happiness.
Ronald is survived by five
children, Lisa Noack of
Chicago, Ill., Gregory Noack
of Wilmette, Ill., Terri Morrin
of Columbus, N.C., Elizabeth
(Daniel) Busch of Saline,
Mich., and Amy Noack of
Decatur, Ga.; grandchildren,
August and Charles Busch of
Saline, Mich.; and Natalie
Noack of Wilmette, Ill.; and
brothers, Barry and David
Noack.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions may be made to the
Alzheimer ’s Association,
www.alz.org.
To express condolences,
please sign the online guest
book at www.flaniganfuneral-
home.com.
Arrangements by Junior E.
Flanigan of Flanigan Funeral
Home and Crematory, Bu-
ford, Ga.
Ronald M. Noack, 84, Buford, Ga.
Eleanor Fries, age 83, of
Green Isle, passed away at
Abbott Northwestern Hospi-
tal in Minneapolis on Friday,
March 15.
F u n e r a l
service was
held at St.
P a u l ’ s
L u t h e r a n
Church in
Green Isle at
2 p.m. Tues-
day, March
19. Rev. Don Andrix officiat-
ed.
Visitation was held from 11
a.m. until the time of the
service at the church on Tues-
day, March 19.
Interment was in the
church cemetery.
Eleanor was born to August
and Emma (Brueshoff)
Schaefer at home in Green
Isle on July 14, 1929. She
grew up in Green Isle and
graduated from Glencoe High
School. She married Ray-
mond Fries at St. Paul’s
Lutheran Church in Green
Isle on Dec. 16, 1950. They
lived in Green Isle all their
married life. Eleanor worked
at Fingerhut for many years.
She loved reading, watching
movies, sewing, crocheting
and playing cards. She also
enjoyed the Minnesota Twins.
Eleanor also loved camping
and snowmobiling.
Eleanor is survived by her
son, Rick (Nancy) Fries of
Pequot Lakes; daughter-in-
law, Bonnie Fries of Sarasota,
Fla.; brothers-in-law, Gilbert
(Jeanie) Fries of Jordan, and
Art (Shirley) Fries of Delano;
sisters-in-law, Judy Fries of
Bloomington, Alice Gruhot
of Crookston, and Bev Fries
of Plymouth, and many
nieces and nephews.
She is preceded in death by
her parents; husband, Ray, in
2008; son, Gerald; and
daughter, Linda Mathews.
Eleanor Fries, 83, Green Isle
Grab that band instrument,
dust it off and join the Min-
nesota Over 60 Band.
Playing music is a lifelong
activity, and a group of Min-
nesotans who perform around
the state are a testament to
that reality.
The Minnesota Over 60
Band is made up primarily of
members who are 60 and
older (men and women) and
who perform in numerous pa-
rades, at county fairs and in a
variety of other venues dur-
ing the summer.
There are openings in
every section of the band.
The band even has a few
members younger than 60.
While the group started in
Gaylord back in 1953 as the
Sibley County Senior Citi-
zens Hobby Band, the group
continued to expand. Six
decades later the group in-
cludes people from a wide
variety of communities and
walks of life, and who have a
mutual interest in music as a
hobby.
The Minnesota Over 60
Band was inducted into the
Minnesota Music Hall of
Fame in 2003.
The Minnesota Over 60
Band is having rehearsals at
the Arlington Community
Center on May 3, 10, 17 and
31. Each rehearsal includes
two practices from 10 a.m. to
11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. to 2:30
p.m. Performances begin in
June and continue into Sep-
tember.
For more information
about the Minnesota Over 60
Band, call 507-550-4096.
Join the Minnesota Over 60 Band
80 Years Ago
March 23, 1933
Louis Kill, Editor
The Sibley County Fair will
be held this year on August 11-
12-13. Keep those dates in
mind, and here is another impor-
tant thing to remember: One of
the big numbers on the program
at the fair will be a public wed-
ding. It will be an honest-to-
goodness nuptial event with two
young people of the county act-
ing as the principals, a genuine
clergyman tying the knot, thou-
sands of witnesses, a collection
of beautiful and costly gifts on
display such as was never seen
in the county before, and all em-
bellished by a most elaborate
ceremony.
60 Years Ago
March 19, 1953
Louis Kill, Editor
Tuesday was perhaps the dri-
est St. Patrick’s Day ever expe-
rienced in our neighboring vil-
lage of Green Isle since emi-
grants from the old Emerald Isle
started settling there a century
or more ago. Reason for the ex-
treme dryness last Tuesday was
the fact that the city well went
out of commission early in the
morning and citizens were with-
out water all day. Even the
schools had to be closed be-
cause of the unexpected
drought.
“Date Bait,” a three-act com-
edy, will be presented by the
senior class at the high school
auditorium March 26 and 27 at
8:15 p.m. Members of the cast
include: Alice Kuznia, Douglas
Breitkreutz, Ramona Rucks,
Roger Mueller, Charlotte
Knapp, Marlys Buckentine,
Lolly Kill, Floyd Boerner, Ger-
ald Steffer, Lowell Thomas,
Roger Wahldick, John Quinn
and Merlin Battcher.
The Arlington High School
placed two winners in the dis-
trict speech contests held Mon-
day evening in LeCenter and
Belle Plaine. Roger Mueller
took first place in original orato-
ry and Douglas Breitkreutz
placed in original oratory.
40 Years Ago
March 22, 1973
Val Kill, Editor
The St. Ann’s Altar and
Rosary Society held a mother-
daughter potluck in the church
hall on March 13, at 7:00 p.m.
The meal and program were at-
tended by 248 ladies and girls.
The following awards were
given: Oldest mother present
with a daughter - Kate Hensler;
youngest mother present with a
daughter - Margaret Haupt;
mother with the most daughters
- Lila Hartmann.
A Girl Scout troop is being
organized here. The first organi-
zational meeting will be held
Monday, April 2, at 7:30 p.m. at
the Arlington Community Hall.
Three young women who are
organizing the troop are Char-
lotte Kleist and Marge Karg of
Arlington and Mary Ott of
Green Isle.
20 Years Ago
March 25, 1993
Kurt Menk, Editor
Local and area residents may
have noticed a semi-truck
parked in front of the Arlington
Municipal Hospital last Friday.
The vehicle was not there to un-
load medical equipment or prod-
ucts. The vehicle is a mobile
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
(MRI) unit. It will start to visit
the local facility on an on-call
basis.
Sara Pinske and Steven
Czech were united in marriage
on October 10 at Peace Luther-
an Church in Arlington. Sara is
the daughter of Bill and Faye
Pinske and Steve is the son of
Dave and Dee Czech, both of
Arlington. They now live in
Backus where they are both
teachers.
Eleanor Fries
jobs across the state and the
nation. I believe growth in
these sectors is critical to U.S.
energy independence and to
our future economic competi-
tiveness.
As I’ve traveled across
Minnesota, I’ve seen the ener-
gy innovations that are
spurring jobs and economic
growth, especially in rural
communities. I plan to use
this new chairmanship to bol-
ster those kinds of emerging
technologies by bringing
those Minnesota ideas to
Washington, D.C.
There’s a lot happening on
federal farm and energy poli-
cy, and I’m not going to stop
fighting until we give produc-
ers the certainty and the tools
they need to keep our farm
economy strong.
Franken Continued from page 4
Barbara M. Reierson, age
33, of Arlington, died at her
home on Tuesday, March 19,
after several months of bat-
tling Leukemia.
Funeral service will be held
at Peace Lutheran Church in
Arlington at 11 a.m. Satur-
day, March 23.
Visitation will be held at
the Kolden Funeral Home in
Arlington from 4 p.m. to 8
p.m. Friday, March 22 and
will continue one hour prior
to the service at the church on
Saturday, March 23.
Interment will be in the Ar-
lington Public Cemetery.
A complete obituary will
be published in next week’s
edition of the Arlington En-
terprise.
Barbara M. Reierson, 33, Arlington
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 21, 2013, page 6
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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Sports
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Sibley East junior and de-
fending state champion
Nathan Rose was recently se-
lected as one of the three All-
Journal Wrestlers of the Year.
Rose recently reeled off his
second consecutive undefeat-
ed season with a 45-0 record.
He also earned his second
straight Class A title at 195
pounds.
Madelia-Truman-Martin
Luther’s Adam Cooling, 44-
0, won the Class A title at 160
pounds. It was his second
straight state championship.
River Valley’s Lance Bri-
ard, 37-0, won his first Class
A championship at 285
pounds.
Alhough Rose has always
found time for additional
training throughout his ca-
reer, his recipe for success
has been that when things get
tougher, he trains even harder
than he did before, according
to the article in the New Ulm
Journal.
“I've been at Sibley East
for three years, and he’s al-
ways been that way,” Sibley
East head coach Chad John-
son said in the article. “He
wrestles all year long, has
practices when practice is
done. He wrestles 365 days a
year in some capacity. It’s his
thing - everybody in the
world has their thing, and
wrestling is his. There’s not a
day that goes by that
wrestling isn’t a part of a
conversation or a plan.”
He is the son of Tony and
Jenny Rose, Arlington.
Nathan Rose selected as 1 of 3
All-Journal Wrestlers of the Year
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Mike Feterl recently sub-
mitted a letter of resignation
from his duties as the head
coach for the Sibley East var-
sity boys basketball team.
Feterl said resigning basi-
cally “came down to not
being able to balance out time
for my family, classroom du-
ties and basketball duties.”
He added, “I hope to coach
again in the future, but for
now I hope to help out the
program in the younger lev-
els.”
Feterl was hired as the
head coach for the Sibley
East varsity boys basketball
team three years ago. In his
three seasons at the helm,
Feterl’s teams posted an 18-
24 mark in the Minnesota
River Conference and a 32-
39 record overall.
The Sibley East School
Board will act upon the resig-
nation during its next regular
meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday,
April 2.
Feterl resigns as boys basketball coach
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Ten letterwinners return for the Sibley East
varsity girls track team this spring. Front Row:
(left to right) Sarah Shimota, Sydney Fogarty
Busch, McKayla Stumm, Sara Peterson and
Karina Robeck. Back Row: (l to r) Megan Eck-
berg, Courtney Eibs, Megan Krentz, Alyssa
Weber and Maren Miner.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
The Sibley East varsity boys track team re-
turns 10 letterwinners this season. Front Row:
(left to right) Erik Danielson, Mitchel Went-
zlaff, Joe Hansen, Alexander Pedraza an
Shayne Danielson. Back Row: (l to r) Sam
Bullert, Sam Thies, Nick Bruss, Ben White
and Aaron Kapke.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Six athletes from the Sib-
ley East Senior High
School will be honored dur-
ing the annual KNUJ Play-
er of the Year Banquet at
the Holiday Inn, New Ulm,
at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March
26.
KNUJ will also be nam-
ing a Player of the Year in
girls and boys basketball
and wrestling.
The guest speakers at the
banquet will be past Players
of the Year.
The local athletes include
Sibley East girls basketball
player Megan Eckberg;
Sibley East boys basketball
players Tyler Bates and
Max Grabow; and Sibley
East wrestlers Aaron Bates,
Hunter Retzlaff and Nathan
Rose.
Sibley East athletes will be honored
at KNUJ Player of the Year Banquet
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Forty athletes in grades 7-
12 turned out for the first day
of girls track practice last
week, according to Sibley
East head coach Jill
Warzecha.
“We have great numbers
this year and look forward to
a fun season” said Warzecha.
The returning letterwinners
include juniors Megan Eck-
berg, Courtney Eibs, Maren
Miner, Sara Peterson and
Sarah Shimota; sophomore
Karina Robeck and freshmen
Sydney Fogarty Busch,
Megan Krentz, McKayla
Stumm and Alyssa Weber.
“We have great leadership
amongst the upper class
ladies who have a great deal
of experience,” said
Warzecha. “For example,
Megan Eckberg is a top point
scorer in the hurdles, relays
and long jump. Courtney
Eibs and Maren Miner bring
their expertise in the middle
distance events. We have a
great freshmen crew who ex-
perienced varsity meets last
year and will again be fun to
watch this spring.”
The remaining senior high
athletes include seniors
Samantha Lane and Silje
Lango; juniors Lea Miller
and Frances Zuniga; and
sophomores Karley Lind,
Kelli Martens, Jean Sickman
and Elizabeth Zuniga.
The remaining junior high
athletes consist of freshman
Sarah Malinowski and Natal-
ie Mesker; eighth graders
Abigail Butler, Katie Daniel-
son, Alison Eibs, Brooke
Klehr, Perla Lopez, Ella
Lundstrom, Ashley
Rechtzigel, Emily Raddatz,
Jenny Rovinsky, Emma Sam-
letzka, Jenna Schuft and Ana
Zuniga; and seventh graders
Taylor Brinkman, Tamara
Ehrich, Lindsey Flieth, Madi-
son Krueger, Madilyn Latzke,
Ellie Messner, Hayley Rohw-
er and Ali Stock.
The manager is eighth
grader Alexus Kreft.
“We do have a great deal of
junior high athletes which is
always fun,” said Warzecha.
“They are young, but willing
to work hard and be part of a
team.”
Warzecha said assistant
coach Mike Vrklan has been
working exclusively with the
hurdlers while assistant coach
Dan Meier is working with
the distance runners/high
jumpers and and assistant
coach Carrie Pioske is again
working with the throwers.
Boys head coach Chuck
Hartman and Warzecha will
take the sprinters and hori-
zontal jumpers.
“The weather continues to
set us back making it difficult
to access equipment and use
the outdoor track and field,”
said Warzecha. “There is
only so much we can do in-
doors at this point. We con-
tinue to condition but I am
worried about prolonged in-
door running.”
The Lady Wolverines will
open their season at the Min-
nesota River Conference In-
door Meet at Minnesota State
University, Mankato, on Sat-
urday, March 23.
Sibley East, weather per-
mitting, will open their out-
door season on Tuesday,
April 9.
Sibley East girls track team
has great numbers this year
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Sibley East head football
coach Chuck Hartman is the
new head coach for the Sib-
ley East varsity boys track
team.
Hartman replaces former
head track coach Travis
Raske who resigned after last
season.
Thirty-nine athletes, in-
cluding 10 returning letter-
winners, greeted Hartman on
the first day of practice last
week.
The returning letterwinners
include seniors Nick Bruss,
Joe Hansen and Shayne
Danielson; juniors Erik
Danielson, Sam Bullert,
Aaron Kapke, Alexander Pe-
draza, Mitchel Wentzlaff and
Ben White; and sophomore
Sam Thies.
The remaining senior high
athletes include seniors Miah
DuFrane, Tyler Kratzke, Dan
Rodriguez and Brandon
Stoeckman; juniors Ben
Ahlstrand, Julius Asmussen,
Cordell Bates, Francisco
Guzman, Kody Klopfleisch,
Arvin Latchman, Billy
Rovinsky and Kalab Stoeck-
man; and sophomores Cole
Bruhn, Jon DuFrane, Chase
Ellwood, Isaac Elseth, Zack
Klaers, Eric Moreno, Zach-
ery Peterson and Korban
Strand.
The junior high athletes in-
clude freshmen Zac Latzke
and Juan Rodriguez; eighth
graders Roberto Cardenas,
Mason Latzke, Gilberto
Mareno and Patrick Spell-
man; and seventh graders
Logan Tesch, Cameron
Thurn, Logan Wagenius and
Xavier Wassather.
“It is hard to tell much of
anything right now because
we have only had a week of
practice inside,” said Hart-
man.  “They are a good group
of boys who want to work
hard.  You can tell the boys
who have been out in the past
have a good foundation down
from prior coaching. That's
definitely a compliment to
the coaching staff and Travis
Raske for the work they’ve
done.”
The Wolverines will open
their season at the Minnesota
River Conference Indoor
Meet at Minnesota State Uni-
versity on Saturday, March
23.  
Hartman is new head coach for
the Sibley East boys track team
24” x 36”
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 21, 2013, page 7
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
WE’RE ALL EARS
Questions? Comments?
Story Ideas?
Let us know how we're doing.
402 W Alden St. • Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-5547
info@arlingtonmnnews.com • www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Arlington ENTERPRISE
Your opinion is something we
always want to hear.
Contact us with feedback.
PET LICENSES DUE
NOTICE TO PET OWNERS
In accordance with the terms of Ordinance No. 206:
—PETS ARE NOT PERMITTED TO RUN AT LARGE
WITHIN THE ARLINGTON CITY LIMITS. They must
either be leashed or cabled/chained, kenneled or in a fenced
yard and not allowed to roam freely.
—All domesticated pets (dogs and cats) must be licensed.
All licenses issued in 2012 will EXPIRE MARCH 31
ST
.
Please stop by the City Office before April 1
st
to obtain a 2013
pet license. The cost for a pet license is
$
5.00. A health
certificate showing that the pet is current on its rabies
vaccination is required. (Due to the Spring vaccination
schedule, your pet may not be due for vaccinations until after
April 1
st
, you should still license your pet in March to avoid
late fees. You will be permitted to bring the health certificate
in at a later date.)
— Licensing your pet assures that it will be taken care of and
returned safely if it gets loose and picked up by the Police
Department.
— Due to a revision within the pet ordinance, a total of 3
adult (includes spayed or neutered) pets are allowed per
household (i.e. 3 dogs, 3 cats, or a combination thereof).
— If you have lost (ran away, gave away, died) a pet within
the last year, please notify the City Office so we can remove
the pet from our current listing. We will be following up on
our listing of pets again this
year with the help of our local
Police Department.
— Any person or entity found to
be in violation of this Ordinance
shall be guilty of a misdemeanor,
punishable by a fine, plus all
veterinary impoundment and
boarding charges, and in the case
of destruction of an animal, any
veterinary charge for said service.
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Phone: 507-964-2030
Metro: 952-594-1333
Fax: 507-964-2203
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E-mail: troysrepairservice@gmail.com
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Menus
SENIOR DINING
Call 326-3401 for a meal
Suggested Donation $3.85
Monday: Cranberry gl azed
chicken, baked potato, California
blend vegetables, bread with mar-
garine, fruit cocktail, low fat milk.
Tuesday: Hamburger tomato
casserole, green beans, mandarin
orange whi p, bread wi th mar-
garine, cookie, low fat milk.
Wednesday: Salisbury steak,
mashed potatoes, creamed corn,
bread with margarine, blushing
pears, low fat milk.
Thursday: Ham, augratin pota-
toes, California blend vegetables,
dinner roll with margarine, pie, low
fat milk.
Friday: Baked fish, brown rice,
cole slaw, mixed vegetables, din-
ner roll with margarine, raspberry
parfait dessert, low fat milk.
SIBLEY EAST ELEMENTARY
BREAKFAST MENU
Arlington and Gaylord
Breakfast i s served at 8:00
a.m. daily. A 1/2 pint of milk is
served wi th each meal dai l y.
Menu is subject to change.
Monday: Crunchmania, juice,
milk.
Tuesday: Mini pancakes, juice,
milk.
Wednesday: Cereal bar,
cheese stick, juice, milk.
Thursday: No school.
Friday: No school.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Arlington
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served
with each meal. Additional milk is
available for 40 cents each. Menu
is subject to change.
Monday: Sloppy Joe, oven po-
tatoes, peas, frui t. Al ternate:
Ravoli.
Tuesday: Chi cken nuggets,
seasoned rice, cooked broccoli,
carrot sti cks, frui t. Al ternate:
Soup.
Wednesday: Hot dog on whole
grain bun, oven potatoes, cole
sl aw, frui t. Al ternate: Cooks’
choice.
Thursday: No school.
Friday: No school.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Gaylord
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served
with each meal. Additional milk is
available for 40 cents each. Menu
is subject to change.
Monday: Sloppy Joe on whole
grain bun, oven potatoes, peas,
mixed fruit. Alternate: Fishburger.
Tuesday: Chi cken nuggets,
seasoned rice, broccoli, carrot
sticks, peaches, Alternate: Cold
cut sandwich.
Wednesday: Hot dog on whole
grain bun, oven potatoes, cole
slaw, fruit. Alternate: Ravioli.
Thursday: No school.
Friday: No school.
Enterprise photo courtesy of Megan Bennett
St. Paul’s “A” Basketball Team
The “A” basketball team at St. Paul’s Lutheran School in Ar-
lington recently concluded a fun and successful season. The
team placed second at the Martin Luther College Tournament
and fourth at the Greenfield Tournament. Front Row: (left to
right) Manager Connor Johnson, Caleb Dose, Leyton Brau, Ben
Johnson, Trystan Duck and manager Kadin Seeman. Back
Row: (l to r) Coach Hayley Riebe, coach Brian Bullert, Lucas
Dose, Anthony Bullert, Audrey Ziegler, Ryan Wendland, Austin
Weckwerth and coach Eric Kaesermann.
Submitted Photo
St. Paul’s “B” Basketball Team
The “B” basketball team at St. Paul’s Lutheran School
in Arlington recently concluded its season with a 16-5
record overall. The team captured the championship
at the Hutchinson Tournament and placed second at
the Redwood Falls Tournament. Front Row: (left to
right) Caleb Dose, Connor Johnson, Kadin Seeman,
and Ylijah Rendon. Back Row: (l to r) Coach Brian
Bullert, Trystan Duck, Anthony Bullert, Lucas Dose,
Leyton Brau, coach Eric Kaesermann and coach
Caleb Seeman.
Church News
Wedding
The Minnesota Adult and
Teen Challenge Choir will
perform at the Creekside
Community Church, 114
Shamrock Drive in Arling-
ton, at 10:30 a.m. Sunday,
March 24.
Minnesota Adult and Teen
Challenge is a unique faith-
based recovery program
serving both teens and
adults struggling with
chemical dependency and
other life controlling behav-
iors. Come and hear about
how hope is being restored,
and individual lives are
being transformed through
the power of Jesus Christ.
A love offering will be
taken.
Everyone is invited for
lunch following the worship
service.
MN Adult and Teen Challenge Choir will
perform at Creekside Community Church
Michelle Hardel and
Nathan Dording were united
in marriage at Peace Lutheran
Church in Arlington on Satur-
day September 15. Pastor
William Postel officiated. A
reception was held at the Ar-
lington Community Center.
Parents of the couple are
Jeff and Julie Hardel of Ar-
lington and Dennis and Joan
Dording of Winthrop. Grand-
parents of the bride are
LeRoy and Joanne Woehler
of Arlington and the late
Lawerance and Helen Hardel.
Grandmother of the groom is
Florence Gangelhoff of
Sleepy Eye.
Matron of Honor was Kacy
Honl. Bridesmaids were Ash-
ley Shneider, Amanda Kre-
mer, Angela Wiltscheck, An-
nette Kremer and Amy Regn-
er. Personal Attendant was
Kara Dose.
Best Man was Ryan Dord-
ing. Groomsmen were Jason
Fritz, Justin Wiltscheck, Josh
Byro, Cody Honl and Adam
Christensen. Ring Bearer was
Lane Wingen. Ushers were
John Hardel, Mitchell Hardel,
Ross Dolly and Luke Hansen.
Organist was Joann Rosen-
feld and soloist was Ben Wie-
man.
After a wedding trip to
Two Harbors, the couple re-
sides in Albertville.
Hardel - Dording
Nathan and Michelle Dording
ST. PAUL LUTHERAN
(WELS),
Arlington
Bruce Hannemann, Pastor
WEBSITE:
www.stpaularlington.com
EMAIL:
Bruce.Hannemann@stpaul
arlington.com
Sunday, March 24: 8:45 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:00 a.m. Fami-
ly Bible study. 10:00 a.m. Wor-
ship with communion, pre-K- 8
sing. 6:30 p.m. Youth group
meeting.
Monday, March 25: 10:00
a.m. Calendar information due.
7:30 pm. Mission Society. Food
taken to Food Shelves.
Tuesday, March 26: 6:00 p.m.
Counting Committee. 7:00 p.m.
Adult Bible course at school.
Wednesday, March 27: 2:30
p.m. Bible study. 3:45 p.m. Pub-
lic school confirmation class.
8:00 p.m. Choir practice; Fi-
nance Board.
Thursday, March 28: No
school. 10:00 a.m. Bulletin in-
formation due. 11:00 a.m. and
3:00 p.m. Service on cable chan-
nel 8. 7:00 p.m. Maundy Thurs-
day Communion service.
Friday, March 29: No school.
7:00 p.m. Good Friday Com-
munion service.
ST. PAUL’S EV.
REFORMED CHURCH
15470 Co. Rd. 31, Hamburg
Dan Schnabel, Pastor
952-467-3878
www.stpaulsrcus.org
Sunday, March 24: 8:30 a.m.
Sunday school and adult Bible
study. 9:30 a.m. Worship serv-
ice. Choir practice after wor-
ship.
Wednesday, March 27: 6:30
to 8:00 p.m. Confirmation class.
ORATORY OF
ST. THOMAS
THE APOSTLE
Jessenland
507-248-3550
Fr. Sam Perez
Thursday: Weekly Mass at
5:00 pm.
ST. PAUL’S UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Henderson
(507) 248-3594 (Office)
Rev. Brigit Stevens, Pastor
Find us on Facebook:
St. Paul’s UCC - Henderson
Sunday, March 24: 10:00 a.m.
Palm Sunday worship and con-
firmation. 10:20 a.m. Sunday
school (Preschool to 6th).
Wednesday, March 27: 5:30
p.m. Easter program practice
and supper.
Thursday, March 28: 7:00
p.m. Maundy Thursday worship
with Communion.
ST. MARY, MICHAEL
AND BRENDAN AREA
FAITH COMMUNITY
Fr. Keith Salisbury, Pastor
Friday, March 22: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar). 4:30 to 8:00 p.m.
Jump for Joy. 5:00 p.m. Spanish
Stations of the Cross (Mic).
Saturday, March 23: 5:00
p.m. Mass (Mar).
Sunday, March 24: 7:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre). 9:00 to 10:15 a.m.
Elementary religious education
(Mar). 9:00 a.m. Mass (Mic).
10:30 a.m. Mass (Mar). 1:00
p.m. Penance service (Bre).
Monday, March 25: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar). 8:00 p.m.
AA and AlaNon (Mar).
Tuesday, March 26: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar). 7:00 p.m.
Administrative Council (Mic).
Wednesday, March 27: No
Junior and senior high religious
education (Mar and Mic). 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m. Word
and Communion (Oak Terrace).
3:15 to 4:30 p.m. Elementary re-
ligious education, second - fifth
grade, (Mic). 7:00 p.m. Stations
of the Cross (Mar and Mic); Sta-
tions of the Cross/party, last
class (Mic).
Thursday, March 28: 7:00
p.m. Holy Thursday (Mar). 7:30
p. m. Narcotics Anonymous
(Mic).
Friday, March 29: 7:00 p.m.
Good Friday.
TRINITY LUTHERAN
32234 431st Ave., Gaylord
Rev. James Snyder,
Interim Pastor
Saturday, March 23: 3:00 to
7:00 p.m. Spaghetti dinner bene-
fit for John Karau at the Ameri-
can Legion, Gaylord.
Sunday, March 24: 9:30 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:45 a.m. Fel-
lowship. 10:30 a.m. Palm Sun-
day worship.
Monday, March 25: 9:00 a.m.
to 3:00 p.m. Quilting.
Tuesday, March 26: 9:00 a.m.
to 3:00 p.m. Quilting.
Wednesday, March 27: 7:15
p.m. Trinity men’s fellowship.
Thursday, March 28: 7:00
p.m. Maundy Thursday worship
at Trinity.
Friday, March 29: 7:00 p.m.
Good Friday worship at St.
Paul’s.
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Pastor William Postel
Phone 507-964-2400
Sunday, March 24: 9:00 a.m.
Bible class. 10:00 a.m. Worship
with Holy Communion. Potluck
dinner. Ladies Aid meeting.
Thursday, March 28: 5:30
p.m. Deadline for bulletin infor-
mation. 7:00 p. m. Maundy
Thursday worship with Holy
Communion.
Friday, March 29: 7:00 p.m.
Good Friday worship.
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN
Green Isle
Friday, March 22: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, March 24: 7:45 a.m.
Palm Sunday worship with
Communion. Pastor Bob Hines.
8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Pancake
breakfast. 9:00 a.m. Sunday
school.
Wednesday, March 27: 3:45
p. m. Confirmation class at
Peace Lutheran, Arlington.
Thursday, March 28: 5:00
p.m. Maundy Thursday service
with communion at St. Paul’s.
Pastor Bob Hines.
Friday, March 29: 9:00 a.m.
Good Friday service at Zion.
Pastor Bob Hines. 7:00 p.m.
Good Friday service at St.
Paul’s. Pastor Bob Hines.
PEACE LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Kurt Lehmkuhl, Pastor
Friday, March 22: 7:30 p.m.
Sheboygan Lutheran High
School’s “I Know My Redeemer
Lives” concert.
Sunday, March 24: 8:15 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:30 a.m. Palm
Sunday worship service.
Monday, March 25: 6:00 p.m.
Guild potluck and prayer serv-
ice.
Wednesday, March 27: 3:45
p.m. Catechism. 5:00 p.m. Jun-
ior Bell Choir.
Thursday, March 28: 7:00
p.m. Maundy Thursday worship
service with Holy Communion.
Friday, March 29: 7:00 p.m.
Good Friday worship service.
[ ZION LUTHERAN
Green Isle Township
Friday, March 22: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, March 24: 9:00 a.m.
Contemporary worship.
Wednesday, March 27: 3:45
p. m. Confirmation class at
Peace Lutheran, Arlington.
Thursday, March 28: 5:00
p.m. Maundy Thursday service
with Communion at St. Paul’s.
Pastor Bob Hines.
Friday, March 29: 9:00 a.m.
Good Friday service at Zion.
Pastor Bob Hines. 7:00 p.m.
Good Friday service at St.
Paul’s. Pastor Bob Hines.
CREEKSIDE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Christian & Missionary
Alliance
Ben Lane, Pastor
114 Shamrock Drive
Arlington – 507-964-2872
www.creekside-church.com
email: creeksidecc@media-
combb.net.
Thursday, March 21: 6:30
p.m. Men’s Bible study of Luke
at Oak Terrace nursing home.
7:00 p.m. Women’s Bible study
of Ephesians.
Friday, March 22: 7:00 p.m.
Crazy Love study at the Lane’s.
Sunday, March 24: 10:00 a.m.
Prayer. 10:30 a.m. Worship
service with MN Adult and Teen
Challenge Choir. Lunch served
following the service.
Wednesday, March 27: 7:00
to 8:30 p. m. REACH youth
group at Shogren’s.
UNITED METHODIST
Arlington
Wayne Swanson, Pastor
wwwarlingtonunited
methodist.org
Saturday, March 23: 8:00
a.m. A-Men men’s group.
Sunday, March 24: 9:00 and
11:00 a.m. Palm Sunday wor-
ship. 10:10 a.m. Sunday school.
6:30 p.m. Marriage series.
Monday, March 25; Deadline
for April newsletter items.
Wednesday, March 27: 7:00
p.m. Confirmation; choir
Thursday, March 28: 10:00
a.m., 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. Wor-
ship on cable TV; 7:00 p.m.
Maundy Thursday worship.
Friday, March 29: 7:00 p.m.
Good Friday worship.
A few weeks ago, a music
teacher from Wisconsin con-
tacted Peace Lutheran Church
in Arlington with this mes-
sage: “We are going on tour
with our musicians and one
of our churches cancelled.
Would it be possible for us to
perform at your church?”
After a few phone calls, the
people of Peace Lutheran
Church made it clear that
enough overnight housing
would be available for the 50
musicians.
Pastor Kurt Lehmkuhl
called back and told the
leader, “Yes, we will host
your group.”
The Symphonic Band and
Konzertchor (choir) from the
Sheboygan Lutheran High
School in Sheboygan, Wis.,
will present a concert at
Peace Lutheran Church in Ar-
lington at 7:30 p.m. Friday,
March 22.
Pastor Lehmkuhl invites
everyone to “come and enjoy
this accidental musical treat.”
Admission is free. An of-
fering will be received.
Peace Lutheran Church to the rescue
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
(507) 304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
507-234-6770
Saturday: Church services at
9:30 a.m. Bible study at 11:00
a.m. Fellowship dinner at 12:00
p.m. All are welcome.
ZION LUTHERAN
814 W. Brooks St.
Arlington – (507) 964-5454
James Carlson, Pastor
Saturday, March 23: Practice
for passion portrayal.
Sunday, March 24: 8:00 a.m.
Choir. 9:00 a.m. Worship. 10:00
a.m. Sunday school and fellow-
ship. 4:00 and 7:00 p.m. Passion
portrayal at Community Center.
Tuesday, March 26: 9:00 a.m.
Newsletter deadline. Pastor
leads Good Sam worship. 6:00
to 7:00 p.m. TOPS in church
basement.
Thursday, March 28: 9:00
a.m. and 1:00 p.m. Zion service
on cable TV. 7:00 p.m. Maundy
Thursday service with Holy
Communion.
Friday, March 29: 7:00 p.m.
Good Friday service.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 21, 2013, page 8
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
McGraw Monument
Works, Inc., LeSueur
Local Representative
Leah Schrupp
Arlington, MN 55307
612-308-8169
3 miles North of LeSueur
on Highway 169
30945 Forest Prairie Road
(507) 665-3126
HOURS: M-F 8-5
Weekends by appointment.
Visit our
INDOOR AND OUTDOOR
DISPLAYS
M31-30Ea
We offer traditional funeral options and cremation as well
as honoring all family wishes. Did you know that some
families have a traditional visitation and funeral and then
cremation? We also provide Irrevocable Funeral Trusts so the
monies can be sheltered in the event of an extended nursing
home stay.
Feel free to contact us for a no obligation visit. Pre-
planning and possibly pre-funded final expenses can relieve
family stress and even save money.
Visit our web site at www.koldenfuneralhome.com for
more information and current obituaries.
Directors:
Darrell Kolden, owner
Shawn Kirby, Greggory Borchert,
Karl Kolden and Rosemary Kolden
507-964-2201
www.koldenfuneralhome.com
Blessings
Like newborn babies, crave pure spiritual milk, so that by it
you may grow up in your salvation, now that you have tasted
that the Lord is good. 1 Peter 2:2-3 NIV
United Methodist, Arlington
Pastor Wayne Swanson
Worship: 9:00 & 11:00 a.m., Sunday School: 10:15 a.m.
Worship on cable channel 8: Sundays 10:00 a.m. & 8:00 p.m
Website: www.arlingtonunitedmethodist.org
Commercial and Industrial Builders
Green Isle, MN 55338
ph. 507.326.7901 fax: 507.326.3551
www.vosconstruction.com
Arlington State Bank
Serving the Community Since 1895
BANKING SERVICES
964-2256
Arlington
A & N Radiator Repair
Allen & Nicki Scharn, Owners
23228 401 Ave., Arlington
877-964-2281 or 507-964-2281 Bus.
Certified ASE Technician on Staff
Also distributor for Poxy Coat II
Industrial Grade Coatings/Paint
MID-COUNTY
CO-OP
700 W. Lake St., Box 177
Cologne, MN 55322
(952) 466-3700
or TOLL FREE: 1-888-466-3700
HUTCHINSON CO-OP
AGRONOMY
LEON DOSE,
Arlington Branch Manager
411 7
th
Ave. NW • (507) 964-2251
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
402 W. Alden, Arlington
507-964-5547
Online at
www.Arlington
MNnew.com
Arlington Haus
Your Hometown Pub & Eatery
1986-2009
Arlington • 1-507-964-2473
STATE BANK OF
HAMBURG
100 Years. 100 Reasons.
Phone 952-467-2992
statebankofhamburg.com
CONVENIENCE
STORE
Hwy. 5 N., Arlington
507-964-2920
Homestyle Pizza
Real or Soft Serve Ice Cream
Gas – Diesel – Deli – Videos
(507)
964-2212
www.
chefcraigs
.com
23180 401 Ave., Arlington Phone 507-964-2264
EQUAL
HOUSING
LENDER
CRAIG BULLERT
ARLINGTON, MN
23189 Hwy. 5 North,
Arlington, MN 55307
arlington@hutchcoop.com
Office (507) 964-2283
Cell (320) 583-4324
HC
FUNERAL SERVICE
P.O. Box 314
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-2201
Member
FDIC
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 21, 2013, page 9
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
LIES KE TRAC TOR
Want ed: Your OLD TRAC TORS,
any con di tion, make or mod el. We
also spe cial ize in new and used
TRAC TOR PARTS AND RE PAIR.
Call Kyle. Lo cat ed west of Hen -
der son. (612) 203-9256.
$$ DOL LARS PAID $$ Junk ve -
hi cl es, re pai r abl e cars/trucks.
FREE TOW ING. Flatbed/ wreck er
serv ice. Im me diate pick up. Mon -
day-Sun day, serv ing your area
24/7. (952) 220-TOWS.
Ar ling ton au thor is look ing for a re -
li able per son to ass ist with book
proof read ing. Ap plic ant needs to
have their own lap top com put -
er/print er and lots of free time.
(507) 964-2550.
CON KLIN® DEAL ERS NEED ED!
Life time ca reer in mar ket ing, man -
age ment and ap ply ing “Green”
pro ducts made in Amer i ca. Full
time/ part time. For a free cat a log,
call Franke’s Con klin Serv ice now
at (320) 238-2370. www.frank e -
mar ket ing.com.
Per son al Care As sis tant po si tion
i n Hen der son. Thurs days and
wee kends, 4 hours/day; in Ar ling -
ton, M/W/F, 2 hours/day. Cal l
Steve at (507) 359-2756. Gold en
Home Care Plus, Inc.
Ren ville area farm op er a tion seek -
ing full and part time em ployees
wi th me chan i cal abi l i ty and/or
truck ing ex peri ence. Sal ary/ ben e -
fits/ va ca tion DOE. Must pass drug
test. Please call (320) 329-3536.
HAND Y MAN: Will do re mo del ing
of kitch ens, bath rooms, hang ing
doors and wi nd ows, pai nt i ng,
sheet rock ing, tex tur iz ing or any
minor re pairs in side or out side.
Wi l l al so do cl ean i ng of base -
ments/ga rag es. Call (320) 848-
2722 or (320) 583-1278.
Min ne so ta Twins sea son tick ets
for 2013 sea son. Sec ti on 121
seats. Pack age in cludes 2 seats.
5, 10 or 15 game pack ag es avail -
able. Con tact Rick at (952) 224-
6331 for more in for ma tion.
Spe cial- 95% Good man gas fur -
nace and pro gram ma ble ther mo -
stat $2,200 in stalled or AC unit
$1,900 in stalled. J&R Plumb ing
Heat ing AC, Lester Prair ie (320)
510-5035.
Ko dak al l -i n-one pri nt er, $25.
(320) 327-2541.
JUNK BAT TER IES WANT ED
We buy used bat ter ies and lead
weights. Pay ing top dol lar for junk
bat ter ies. Pay ing $8 to $24/bat -
tery. We pick up. Call 800-777-
2243. Ask for Dana.
Want ed to buy: Junk cars and
trucks. Com peti tive pric ing with
friend ly serv ice. Tow ing avail able.
Call an y time (320) 296-2253.
Reg is tered Sim men tal bulls for
sale. Year ling, both red and black.
Di ehn Si m men tal s (507) 766-
0313.
Gib bon: 5BR home, 2 car ga rage,
barns for far row ing and fin ish ing
hogs, grain bin, shed. Exsted Re -
al ty (320) 864-5544.
Zero down RHA fi nanc ing is avail -
able for this prop er ty. 11798 155th
St., Glen coe. Hob by farm for sale.
6 +/- acr es, beau ti ful 4BR home.
Very new out bui l d i ngs. MLS#
4338091, $275,000. Con tact me
for a pri vate show ing. Paul Krueg -
er, Edi na Re al ty, (612) 328-4506,
Paul Krueg er@edi nare al ty.com.
Hutchi n son: Large 3BR home
com plete ly re mo deled with large 3
car ga rage. Exsted Re al ty (320)
864-5544.
1120 Grove Ave., Bi rd Is l and.
4BR, 3BA home on 2 l ots.
$119,000. (320) 296-1603.
3 Acr es. Two-story brick home,
High way 7, Hutchin son. Close to
town with coun try feel. 3BR, 2BA.
Exsted Re al ty (320) 864-5544.
601 12th St. S, Oli via. 2BR, 1BA,
large din ing/liv ing room. Cen tral
air, at tached 2-car ga rage, steel
sid ing. (320) 522-1593, af ter 6
p.m. (320) 765-2331.
Coun try home for sale by own er.
4BR, 3BA, at tached dou ble in su -
lat ed ga rage, 1 acre, 3 sheds,
right of High way 15. (320) 587-
7746.
Ar l i ng ton: Great start er home.
2BR, 2BA, new kitch en, fur nace
wa ter heat er, new heat ed ga rage.
Con tract for deed pos si bl e,
FSBO, $70,000/BO. (952) 486-
3342.
Well kept 3BR home, 2 miles from
Glen coe. For mal liv ing/din ing, and
fam i ly room on main lev el. Tons of
bui l t-i n cab i nets and stor age.
26x32 shop. Brian O’Don nell, Pri -
or i ty One Met ro west Re al ty (320)
864-4877.
Big Swan Lake, 390 ft. lakeshore.
Form er Kram er Re sort. Old ca -
bi ns, re pai r abl e 4BR ram bl er.
Exsted Re al ty (320) 864-5544.
11 Acr es, Glen coe. Wil dlife and
new pond, per fect place to build
new home. $99,500. Exsted Re al -
ty (320) 864-5544.
13+ Acr es, near Glen coe, beau ti ful
spot to build new home. New dri -
ve way, pri vate pond. $99,500.
Exsted Re al ty (320) 864-5544.
2 Par cels, 14.5 acr es, Hutchin son,
2 build ing eli gi bil i ties, new dri ve -
way, great for wal k-out home.
$129,000 each. Exsted Re al ty.
(320) 864-5544.
26 Acr es, Hutchin son, 2 ponds,
wil dlife, new dri ve way, pri vate!
WRP, RIM Pro grams. Ide al for
home. $129,000. (320) 864-5544.
Se cl ud ed 14 acr es, $126,000
and/or 11 acr es for $99,900 near
Hutchin son. Build ing eli gibil i ty, wil -
dlife area. Exsted Re al ty (320)
864-5544.
Todd Lake, 26 Acr es near Hutchin -
son, 800 ft. lakeshore. Very pri -
vate. $229,000. Exsted Re al ty
(320) 864-5544.
155 Acr es North east of Gay lord.
$5,700 per acre. Exsted Re al ty
(320) 864-5544.
23.08 Par cel next to Pla to city lim -
its. Ap prox imate ly 20 acr es til lable
with great fu ture de vel op ment po -
ten tial. Brian O’Don nell, Pri or i ty
One (320) 864-4877.
2BR Apart ment with ga rage, wa -
ter/sew er/gar bage i n cl ud ed.
$450/mo. New Au burn (320) 327-
2928.
Newly remodeled apartments for
rent i n Renvi l l e. Water, heat,
garbage i ncl uded. New appl i -
ances, air conditioners. (320) 564-
3351.
Com mer cial Build ing avail able
now! 900 sq. ft. down town Gay -
lord. Call Sar ah at (507) 237-5339
days, (507) 237-4166 even ings.
Young farm er look ing for pro duc -
tive farm land for 2013 and be-
yond. Com peti tive rates and ref er -
enc es. Call Aus tin Blad at (320)
221-3517.
Spri ng Junk Al ert SALE
Thurs., April 4, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.;
Fri., April 5, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sat.,
April 6, 9 a.m.-Noon. Lots of gar-
den junk this time! 317 Main St.,
Arlington, MN.
AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
AUTOMOTIVE
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
Work Wanted
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE
Heating/Air Cond.
Household Goods
Wanted To Buy
LIVESTOCK, PETS
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REAL ESTATE
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Hobby Farm
REAL ESTATE
Houses
Lake Homes
REAL ESTATE
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REAL ESTATE
Land
RENTAL
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RENTAL
Want To Rent
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Sale
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All ads appear online
at GlencoeNews.com
Enterprise
To place an ad: Call: 507-964-5547; Fax: 507-964-2423; E-Mail: info@ArlingtonMNnews.com; Mail: P.O. Box 388, Arlington, MN 55307
Advertising
Deadlines
The McLeod County Chronicle Mondays at Noon
The Arlington Enterprise & The Silver Lake Leader Tuesdays at Noon
The Glencoe Advertiser, The Sibley Shopper
& The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
A10-11Ea Available...
1-Bedroom
Apartment
All utilities,
except electric
Income based
Must be 62 or older
or handicapped
Highland Commons
Arlington
507-964-5556 HANDICAP
ACCESSIBLE
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outside of Arlington.
WANTED
EXSTED REALTY
2124 10
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(320) 864-5544
www.exstedrealty.com
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Call (507) 964-2256
A10-13E,11-14Sa
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DRIVERS/OWNER OPERATORS
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FT/PT OPENING
for die-cutting equipment specialist.
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preferred. Jobs@octoberafternoon.com
CASH FOR CARS:
All cars/trucks wanted. Running or not! Top
dollar paid. We come to you! Any make/
model. Call for instant offer: 800/871-9145
WINTER IN ARIZONA FOR $6000
14x52 Mobile home in 55+ Park. Newly
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sunscreens, handicap ramp, furniture, and
appliances. azmhp.info 520/424-5847
DONATE YOUR CAR
Truck or Boat to heritage for the blind. Free
3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing,
all paperwork taken care of 888/485-0398
DISH NETWORK
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
high speed internet starting at $14.95/month
(where available). Save! Ask about same
day installation! Call now! 866/785-5167
CANADA DRUG CENTER
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A11-12Ej
Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington
is seeking the following positions:
• Certified Nursing Assistant – every other
weekend with potential to pick up more
hours
• Benefit eligible LPN/RN – evening shifts
with every other weekend
• LPN/RN - every other weekend with potential to pick
up more hours
• Part-Time Dietary – willing to train all shifts and positions
• Resource Universal Worker – Assisted Living facility,
on call as needed
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information,
call Tiffany Brockhoff,
Human Resource Director at
507-964-2251 or email:
tbrockof@good-sam.com
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap Drug-Free Workplace
Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life.
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A11-14E12-15Sj
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 21, 2013, page 10
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401 W. Alden St.
PO Box 388
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-5547
Fax: 507-964-2423
info@ArlingtonMNnews.com
GLENCOE:
716 E. 10
th
St.
PO Box 188
Glencoe, MN 55336
320-864-5518
Fax: 320-864-5510
advertising@glencoenews.com
SILVER LAKE:
104B Lake Avenue
PO Box 343
Silver Lake, MN 55381
320-327-2216
Fax: 320-327-2530
slleader@embarqmail.com
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P h o n e
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www.raisetherouf.webs.com
PRESENTED BY:
FRIENDS CARE–HEARTS SHARE, INC.
Saturday, Sept. 8 2012
Club New Yorker
Green Isle, MN
3 p.m.-12:30 a.m.
• 1 Indoor Band
• Acoustic Music Outside
• Food Available
• Silent Auction/Raffle
Present ticket at
the door for entry $10
C
MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM C. RAMIGE
REQUEST THE HONOR OF YOUR PRESENCE
AT THE MARRIAGE OF THEIR DAUGHTER
Karin Lynn
TO
Michael David
SON OF MR. AND MRS. RALPH R. CORNWELL
ON SATURDAY, THE SIXTH OF OCTOBER
TWO THOUSAND TWELVE
AT THREE-THIRTY IN THE AFTERNOON
CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH
1820 KNIGHT AVENUE NORTH
GLENCOE, MINNESOTA
THE PLEASURE OF YOUR COMPANY IS REQUESTED AT THE SOCIAL HOUR AND DINNER IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING THE CEREMONY
CROW RIVER COUNTRY CLUB 915 COLORADO STREET NORTHWEST HUTCHINSON, MINNESOTA
REGISTERED AT:
MACY’S, TARGET,
& MENARDS
High Island Bottom Feeders
Ducks Unlimited
Banquet
27th Annual Banquet
September 10, 2011
Quacking Hour – 5:00 p.m.
Dinner – 7:00 p.m.
Program
Welcome...............................................................David Brockhoff
Auctioneer .....................................................................Bill Pinske
Clerk.....................................................................Dean Bergersen
HIBF Committee Members
Co-Chairmen ............................Dennis Overson, Chad Carpenter
Treasurer .............................................................Dean Bergersen
Keith Eggersgluess
Dale Meyer
David Brockhoff
Travis Tuchtenhagen
John Schauer
Eric Bergersen
Jerry Narr
Corey Carpenter
Jason Stiller
Spencer Haggenmiller
Scott Dose
Jake Lucas
1
Li censed day care has open ing for
all ages, with flexi ble sched ul ing,
large play yard with healthy meals
and snacks. We are lo cat ed only
minutes from town. Call Mel is sa
(507) 351-1743.
CUS TOM LOG SAW ING- Cut
your place or ours. Give Vir gil a
call. Light oak lum ber deck ing and
fire wood. Schau er Con struc tion,
Inc. (320) 864-4453.
Need trans por ta tion for your next
ev ent? We can help with our limo
bus. Wed dings, busi ness, sports,
bi rth days, etc. Check us out
www.theur ba nex press.com or call
Dina (612) 940-2184, Glen coe
busi ness. DOT 375227.
Plas tic re pair. Don’t throw it. Let
me weld it. Call Mike, Bird Is land,
an y time (320) 579-0418.
Misc. Service
Child Care
SERVICES SERVICES
Misc. Service
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Students of the Month
The following students were recently chosen as Students of
the Month at the Sibley East Senior High School in Arlington
for the month of January. Front Row: (left to right) Darin
Neisen, Mitchell Heibel, Andrea Geib and Ben White. Back
Row: (l to r) Elizabeth Densmore, Breann Walsh, Shelby
Voight, Stephanie Shimota and Samantha Acevedo. Missing
from the photo is Brandon Becker.
Drs. Tim & Wendy Goldsmith
OPTOMETRISTS
NOW ACCEPTING
VSP
(Vision Service Plan)
Call us about
other insurance plans
Receive a
$25 Gift
Certificate
for bringing in your old
prescription glasses
(To be given to the Lions Club)
No other vision plans, discounts
safety program, or value package apply.
Limit one per person.
Valid for one year supply of contacts or frame and lenses.
If you were previously seen at
Minnesota Eye Consultants -
Gaylord location, your charts are
now back in Gaylord at
Goldsmith Eye Care.
214 Fourth St. N. • Gaylord, MN
Mon., Wed., Turs., Fri. 9-5, Tues. 9-6
www.goldsmitheye.com
507-237-2015
A11-14E,12-15Sa
Sibley East Public Schools
Kindergarten Roundup
Monday, March 25
th
500 Court StreetGaylord Campus
Tuesday, March 26
th
202 NW Third AvenueArlington Campus
Information packets will be mailed.
Please call if you do not receive
a packet or for more info:
507-964-8222 or 507-237-3312
Register for
Fall 2013
All Day,
Every Day
Kindergarten
5:30-7:00 p.m. each evening
Escuelas Públicas Sibley East
Reunión de Kindergarten
Lunes, el 25 de marzo
500 Court StreetEscuela de Gaylord
Martes, el 26 de marzo
202 NW Third AvenueEscuela de Arlington
Paquetes de información serán enviados por correo.
Por favor llame si no recibe
un paquete o para recibir más información:
507-964-8222 o 507-237-3312
Inscripción para
el otoño 2013
Kínder Todos
Los Días,
Todo el Día
5:30-7:00 p.m. cada noche
A9,11E, 10,12Sa A9,11E, 10,12Sa
Call us to
place your
HAPPY ad.
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
964-5547
Sounds like
multiplication?
It’s newspaper
talk for a one
column by
3.75 inch ad.
Too small to
be effective?
You’re
reading
this one!
Put your
1x3.75 in the
Arlington
Enterprise
today.
507-964-5547
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This document is © 2013 by admin - all rights reserved.