3--28-13 Arlington Enterprise

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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Serving the Communities of Arlington and Green Isle, Minnesota
www.arlingtonmnnews.com Volume 127 • Number 35 • Thursday, March 28, 2013 • Arlington, MN 55307
Single copy $1.00
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The City of Arlington has
received 48 applications for
the open city administrator
position, according to Mayor
Jim Kreft and Interim City
Administrator Cynthia Smith-
Strack.
The City Council will be
presented with applications
for 10 semi-finalists and will
select five finalists during its
regular meeting at 6:30 p.m.
Monday, April 1.
The finalists will be inter-
viewed on Friday, April 19
and Saturday, April 20.
The City Council hopes to
offer the position to the top
candidate on Saturday, April
20.
The ultimate goal is to have
the city administrator on
board by June 1.
History
The Arlington City Coun-
cil, during its regular meeting
on Tuesday night, Jan. 22,
unanimously approved a mo-
tion to approve a proposal
from Brimeyer Fursman,
LLC, Maplewood, to conduct
an executive search for a new
administrator for the City of
Arlington.
The City Council made the
move after it had earlier and
unanimously accepted the
resignation of City Adminis-
trator Matt Jaunich effective
Friday, Feb. 8. Jaunich was
hired as the first ever Sibley
County administrator.
The cost for the executive
search will be $18,875.
The City Council, inciden-
tally, used Brimeyer Furs-
man, LLC, to conduct its
search for a new city admin-
istrator during 2007. Jaunich
was hired as a result of that
search.
Guarantee
Brimeyer Fursman, LLC,
offers an 18-month guarantee
on the effectiveness of the
city administrator provided
the mayor and City Council
and Brimeyer Fursman agree
that all phases of the process
have been successfully com-
pleted. Should the mayor and
City Council determine it
necessary to terminate the
city administrator due to fail-
ure to adequately perform the
duties as specified in the pro-
file and as represented by the
process, the firm will refill
the position at no additional
fee and will charge for ex-
penses only.
Nearly 50 applications received
for city administrator position
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Dan “Buck” Thomes,
Street and Park Superin-
tendent for the City of Ar-
lington, died unexpectedly
at the Sibley Medical Cen-
ter in Arlington early Sat-
urday morning, March 23.
“Our entire community
has the Thomes family in
our thoughts this week,”
said Mayor Jim Kreft.
“With Buck’s passing, we
lost a great friend. Our
city is without a tremen-
dous employee who was
passionate about his job.
We miss him deeply. It is
difficult to imagine our
city without him.”
Said former Mayor
Dave Czech, “Many peo-
ple in Arlington observed
Dan Thomes doing his job
over the years. He really
was the face of the city in
the community. This kind,
considerate man would go
out of his way for all of
us. He was a good man.
The community will defi-
nitely miss him.”
In memory of Thomes,
Mayor Kreft postponed all
city meetings on Monday
and Tuesday nights,
March 25 and 26.
City employee Jeff
Paine hung flags along
Main Street and Highway
5 in memory of his co-
worker on Tuesday, March
26. This was a task
Thomes and Paine per-
formed together on a num-
ber of occasions.
The Arlington City Of-
fice was closed from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday,
March 27 to allow city
employees to attend the
funeral at St. Mary’s
Catholic Church in Arling-
ton at 11 a.m.
“He was a great friend
and fellow employee who
will be greatly missed,”
was the message posted on
the City of Arlington
Facebook page on Tues-
day, March 26.
A complete obituary ap-
pears on page 5 in this
week’s edition of the Ar-
lington Enterprise.
Arlington city employee
Dan Thomes passes away
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
After 10 years of operation,
the Minnesota Prairie Line
(MPL) rail is living up to its
long-term goal of being the
life blood to economic devel-
opment in Sibley County.
Mark Wegner, President of
MPL, reported to the Sibley
County board of commission-
ers at their meeting on Tues-
day, March 26.
“In October, we celebrated
our 10th anniversary of oper-
ating the rail line that goes
through the county,” said
Wegner. “I thought it would
be best to come and tell you
were we are at and where we
are going.”
MPL operates freight serv-
ice over 94 miles of track be-
tween Norwood-Young
America and Hanley Falls,
which is owned by the Min-
nesota Valley Regional Rail-
road Authority. MPL is a
wholly-owned subsidiary of
the Twin Cities & Western
Railroad.
Wegner said as of Decem-
ber the first 34 miles from
Norwood-Young America to
Winthrop has now been laid
with heavy rail.
”This allows us to increase
the speed limit of that portion
to 25 miles per hour,” said
Wegner. “There are two or
three bridges that need work,
where the money has already
been set aside.”
Once those bridges are op-
erating yet this summer, the
eastern line to Winthrop will
be able to have a higher
weight standard, which is
something the Winthrop
ethanol plant has been push-
ing. At the previous limit, the
train cars weigh out before
they can cube out, preventing
the line from being competi-
tive with all the other ethanol
plants in the country.
“There are 64 miles to go,
so we have been pushing the
Minnesota legislature to con-
tinue the bonding effort to get
the rest of the rail line up to
the same standard, ” said
Wegner. “In this legislative
session there is a bill in both
the house and the Senate for a
$10 million bonding request.
Should they decide to ap-
prove all of it that would get
the heavy rail all the way to
Franklin.”
Wegner explained the reali-
ty of how the legislature
tends to take all the bonding
requests, and then carve them
down. The rail authority was
successful in recent bonding
sessions, except for the last
one, in getting two, three and
four million dollars in bonds,
which got the rail line to
Winthrop.
“We at the railroad contin-
ue to try to foster more eco-
nomic development in the
area,” said Wegner. “It is
quite a challenge, but I think
your area has a lot to offer.
The work ethic here is great.”
Wegner pointed out that
shipping in the county has in-
creased, including from the
canning company in Arling-
ton, the ethanol plant in
Winthrop, the area dairy
farmers and United Farmers
Coop ships fertilizer. “That is
why this was done, to give
not only hope, but actual tan-
gible business growth in this
area,” proclaimed Wegner.
“We’re about business devel-
opment and about jobs.”
What this line can offer to
anyone who locates on it is
many options when the trains
get to the Twin Cities. There
are seven major rail systems
in North America and about
500 short lines like MPL.
“A lot of the short lines
connect to one carrier,” added
Wegner. “Where, if they lo-
cate on this line, they got op-
tions all over the North
American rail network. The
shippers here do take advan-
tage of it to determine where
their best value is and then
we bring it to them.”
The ethanol plant in
Winthrop shipped to Califor-
nia the first three years. Now
it goes to the eastern United
States or to the southern U.S.,
depending on the best deal
from the end market.
This line was abandoned in
MN Prairie Line
Continued on page 3
Minnesota Prairie Line
proving to be life blood
to economic development
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Passion Portrayal
A few hundred people enjoyed the Passion Portrayal
at the Arlington Community Center at 4 p.m. and 7
p.m. Sunday, March 24. The program began with the
Triumphal Entry into Jerusalem, the Last Supper and
the Foot Washing. Spectators visited the Garden of
Gethsemane and watched as Christ carried the cross
to His own crucifixion. The tomb was empty, but
Christ was alive. A narrator read the story from the
Scripture. Special music and congregational singing
were included in the program. (Right Photo) Mike
Bergs (depicting Jesus) welcomed the disciples to
the table for the Last Supper. (Top Photo) This picture
was taken during the Last Supper. Left to right: Jodi
Anderson (the disciple John), Mike Bergs (depicting
Jesus), Gary Kauffman (the disciple Thomas) and
Brad Strobel (the disciple James). Nearly $1,000 was
collected to cover expenses and to make a donation
to the Sibley County Food Shelf. Over 100 volunteers
were involved in the event. The director for the drama
was Hutchinson resident Jeni Forcier.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington City Coun-
cil, during its recent regular
meeting, discussed possible
amendments to its liquor li-
cense ordinance.
The City Council, during
its previous regular meeting,
had directed City Attorney
Ross Arneson to redraft the
current liquor license ordi-
nance and give the group
more flexibility in the penalty
phase of the document.
The City Council will hold
the first reading of the pro-
posed ordinance during its
next regular meeting at 6:30
p.m. Monday, April 1.
Other Business
The City Council was
scheduled to receive a presen-
tation from City Assessor
Laura Hacker on the recent
real estate sales data for the
City of Arlington.
Hacker, due to the in-
clement weather, was unable
to attend the regular meeting.
She will make her presenta-
tion at a future meeting.
The City Council, in anoth-
er move, unanimously ap-
proved a motion to authorize
the execution of a memoran-
dum of understanding amend-
ing the professional service
agreement for tax assessment
with the Sibley County As-
sessor’s Office. The cost will
rise from $9,800 to $10,300
for the 2014 assessment.
In other news, the City
Council unanimously ap-
proved a motion to approve
the Raceway Ambulance
Service Agreement between
the Arlington Raceway and
the Arlington Area Ambu-
lance Service. The Arlington
Raceway will pay $225 per
night to the Arlington Area
Ambulance Service to pro-
vide this service.
The City Council, in other
action, unanimously ap-
proved four requests from the
Arlington Area Chamber of
Commerce in connection
with the Town & Country
Days celebration on Friday,
June 14, Saturday, June 15
and Sunday, June 16.
First, the City Council ap-
proved the use of Four Sea-
sons Park for the celebration
on Saturday, June 15 and
Sunday, June 16.
Second, the City Council
granted a temporary 3.2
liquor license for Main Street
on Friday, June 14 and for
Four Seasons Park on Satur-
day, June 15 and Sunday,
June 16.
Third, the City Council ap-
proved the closing of the 200
and 300 blocks of West Main
Street during the afternoon
and evening on Friday, June
14.
Fourth, the City Council
granted the use of the city
parking lot on Friday, June
14.
In other action, the City
Council unanimously ap-
proved a motion to temporar-
ily close Chandler Street at
First Avenue Northwest for
the Sibley County Cancer
Cruise on Saturday, May 18.
The rain date is Sunday, May
19.
City Council to tweak local liquor
license ordinance at next meeting
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 28, 2013, page 2
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Come help us celebrate
the retirement of
after 20+ years!
Cake & Coffee will be served at
Morreim Pharmacy
Fri., March 29
11 a.m.-4 p.m.
MORREIM PHARMACY & GIFT CENTER
201 W. Main, Arlington • (507) 964-5228
Hours: Mon-Fri: 8 am-5:30 pm,
Sat: 8 am-1 pm
air
A11-12E,12Sa
Sibley Medical Center &
Sibley Medical Foundation Accepting Scholarship Applications
Sibley Medical Center and Sibley Medical Foundation are pleased
to announce we are offering scholarships to several
Sibley County 2013 graduating seniors who are pursuing
a career in the healthcare industry.
We would be honored to review your application.
Application deadline is April 16, 2013
Instructions and applications can be obtained from the following locations:
Sibley County High School Counselor offices,
SMC clinic locations in Arlington, Gibbon, Henderson or Winthrop
SMC website at www.sibleymedical.org,
Contacting Jeni at 507-964-8438.
Your Partner in Care for Life
A11-13E12-14Sj
Arlington
Chiropractic
607 W Chandler St.
964-2850
www.arlingtonchiropracticmn.com
Back Pain?
Neck Pain?
Headaches?
This is the perfect time
for you to start chiro-
practic care with us!
For a fee of only $20 we will
provide all new patients with:
• Consultation With the
Doctor
• Orthopedic &
Neurological Exam
• Report of Findings
Arlington Chiropractic
will donate your entire fee
of $20 to Relay For Life to
support cancer research!
Offer expires April 6, 2013.
Due to legal restrictions, this offer is
not available to patients with state
or federally funded health care,
such as Medicare or Medicaid.
A11-12E12-13Sj
Sunday, March 31: Easter Sunday
Monday, April 1: Arlington City Council, council
chambers, 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, April 2: Arlington Garden Club, 7:30
p.m.
Wednesday, April 3: Knights of Columbus offi-
cers, St. Mary’s Parish hall, 8 p.m.
Thursday, April 4: Arlington Ambulance Service,
7 p.m.
Arlington Lions Club, Arlington Haus, social 6
p.m., meeting 7 p.m.
Community
Calendar
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER
Arlington State Bank
(507) 964-2256
Fax (507) 964-5550
www.ArlingtonStateBank.com
MAIN BANK
Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (straight thru)
DRIVE THRU
Monday - Thursday, 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.,
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Member
FDIC
A-GI Women of Today
EASTER
EVENT
Sat., March 30
10 a.m.-Noon
Sibley East HS Small
Gym, Arlington
Ages: Toddler-2
nd
Grade
Games, Prizes, Crafts,
Cookies & Fun!
Bring your camera and
get your picture taken
with the Easter Bunny!
Questions:
Sandy Klaers 964-
5464 or Sara Ziegler
507-326-3919
www.agiwomenoftoday.org
A12SEa
ARLINGTON DUGOUT BAR
310 W. Main St., Arlington • 507-964-2211
“The Local Area’s LOWEST Off Sale Prices”
FRIDAY, MARCH 29
BLURRED VISION
9 P.M.-1 A.M.
A12Ea
Card of Thanks
Thank you to everyone
for the kind expressions
of sympathy shown to our
family for the loss of our
father and brother, Don.
The cards, memorials,
hugs, food and kind
words of sympathy were
greatly appreciated.
The family of Don Sauter
*12Ea
News Briefs
Vehicle stolen in Arlington
Another vehicle was reportedly stolen in Arlington,
according to the Sibley County Sheriff’s Department.
A 1998 Mercury was stolen from the 700 block of
Chestnut Drive in Arlington on Thursday evening,
March 21.
Miranda Creech reported the theft to the sheriff’s de-
partment on Friday, March 22.
The vehicle is valued at approximately $1,800, ac-
cording to the sheriff’s department.
Mailboxes damaged in area
Four mailboxes were reportedly damaged southeast
of Gaylord last week, according to the Sibley County
Sheriff’s Department. Authorities received the com-
plaints on Sunday, March 24.
People who have any information about these inci-
dents are encouraged to contact the Sibley County Sher-
iff’s Department at 507-237-4330.
Accident in downtown Arlington
A two-vehicle accident reportedly occurred along the
300 block of West Main Street in Arlington at 9:45 a.m.
Friday, March 22, according to the Arlington Police De-
partment.
Lee P. Bernstein, 42, Green Isle, was backing a 2007
Chevrolet from a legal parking stall and struck a west-
bound 2004 Chrysler driven by Timothy A. Berger, 59,
Arlington.
Berger complained of some knee pain, but refused
medical treatment at the scene. Bernstein was not in-
jured.
There was moderate to heavy damage to the front
passenger side of the Berger vehicle. There was no visi-
ble damage to the Bernstein vehicle.
Board to hold special meeting
The Sibley East School Board will hold a special
meeting in Room 149 at the Arlington school site at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 2.
The special meeting was called because the regular
monthly meeting for Monday night, March 18 was post-
poned due to inclement weather.
Birth Announcements
Todd and Amanda Fisher,
Arlington, announce the birth
of their daughter, Emma Ann,
who was born at the
Ridgeview Medical Center,
Waconia, on Tuesday, March
12.
She weighed seven pounds,
eight ounces and measured
19 inches.
The grandparents are Tim
and Julie Jahr, and Roger
and Mary Fisher. The great
grandparents are Vivian
Kroells, Roger and Myra
Jahr, and Helma Hoerne-
mann.
Matthew and Rebecca
Molldrem, Fargo, S.D., an-
nounce the birth of their
daughter, Scout Phyllis Eliza-
beth Molldrem, who was
born on Saturday, Dec, 29,
2012.
She weighed five pounds,
nine ounces.
The grandparents are Dar-
win and Barb Muchow, Gay-
lord, and Brad and Judy
Molldrem, Moorhead.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
National Honor Society Induction
Twenty-one students were inducted into the National
Honor Society during a ceremony at the Sibley East
Senior High School in Arlington on Thursday night,
March 21. Front Row: (left to right) Erin Mesker,
Quintin Dalbec, Megan Eckberg, Jessica Garza, An-
drea Geib and Victoria Henry. Middle Row: (l to r)
Courtney Hildebrandt, Kelsey Klaustermeier, Kimberly
Kurtzweg, Heidi Milczark, Maren Miner, Melissa Otto
and Sara Peterson. Back Row: (l to r) Britany Reier-
son, Hayley Riebe, Sarah Shimota, Beau Swenson,
Mitchel Wentzlaff, Benjamin White and Anna Woehler.
Missing from the photo is Elizabeth Becker.
Emma Fisher
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
Sibley County residents
can benefit from funds made
available for energy assis-
tance and food support pro-
grams, it was announced at
the board of commissioners
meeting on Tuesday, March
26.
Vicki Stock, Public Health
and Human Services Direc-
tor, reported that energy as-
sistance funding from last
year’s heating season is avail-
able to those who qualify
through May. 31.
If eligible, residents can re-
ceive up to $500. Since appli-
cations for the funds to help
pay for home heating costs
were down, the amount avail-
able was not used up.
Stock said it may be be-
cause it was a warm winter or
because people thought they
were not eligible after re-
quirements were changed.
In other news, Stock said
the state has received $1.26
million from the federal gov-
ernment as a performance
bonus because they increased
the usage in the Supplemental
Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP – Food Support) by
14.7 percent.
“Last year the federal gov-
ernment was encouraging us
to do more outreach to the
public,” said Stock. “The feds
thought there were a lot of
people eligible who were not
taking advantage of the
USDA program.”
Minnesota was one of the
states that had a substantial
increase in usage and will
pass on 75 percent of the
money received by the feder-
al government to the coun-
ties.
Each county will get a base
of $5,000, utilizing a formula
worked out based on the food
program case load from 2008
to 2012.
“Sibley County had the
largest increase in the state
between 2008 and 2012,”
said Stock. “In 2008 we
added 198 average food sup-
port payments. In 2012 we
added an average of 407. We
had a very substantial in-
crease locally.”
However, the size of Sibley
County is small, impacting
the percentage of funds re-
ceived. Stock said the county
will be receiving $5,829.
“We have to use it towards
improving the food support
program or the quality of the
staff,” added Stock. “We have
received these dollars before
because of the quality of our
program.”
Other News
In other Public Health and
Human Services news, Stock
introduced to the board two
new staff, social workers
Becky Eustis and Krysten
Vinkemeier.
The board approved a reso-
lution proclaiming April as
Child Abuse Prevention
Month in the county.
The proclamation includes:
“Whereas, child abuse is an
issue that affects all members
of our community and find-
ing solutions depends on in-
volvement among people
throughout the community.
Whereas, child abuse pre-
vention works when partner-
ships are created between
parents, practitioners,
schools, faith communities,
health care organizations, law
enforcement agencies and the
business community.
Whereas, all citizens need
to be more aware of child
abuse and neglect and its pre-
vention within the communi-
ty, and be involved in sup-
porting parents to raise their
children in a safe, nurturing
society.
Therefore, the commission-
ers proclaim April as Child
Abuse Prevention Month in
Sibley County and call upon
all citizens, community
groups, religious organiza-
tions, medical facilities and
businesses to increase their
participation in efforts to pre-
vent child abuse and neglect,
thereby strengthening the
community in which we
live.”
Stock said the Child Abuse
Prevention Council, a sub-
committee of the Children’s
Collaborative, will tie blue
ribbons on trees in the county.
It will also put messages on
the electronic sign boards and
put pinwheels outside county
libraries.
Energy and food support dollars
are available to county residents
Sounds like
multiplication?
It’s newspaper
talk for a one
column by 2.5
inch ad.
Too small to be
effective? You’re
reading
this one!
Put your 1x2.5
in the
Arlington
Enterprise today.
507-964-5547
1
x
2
.
5
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 28, 2013, page 3
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Business & Professional
Directory
CALL TODAY TO BE INCLUDED IN OUR
BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY!
507-964-5547
Arlington
Chiropractic Clinic
JUSTIN E. DAVIS, D.C.
607 W. Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-2850
arlingtonchiropracticmn.com
Office Hours:
Mon. 9am-6pm; Tues. 9am-5pm;
Wed. 8am-6pm; Thurs. 1-6pm;
Fri. 8am-4pm; 1
st
& 3
rd
Sat. 8am-11am
VETERINARIAN
RG OVREBO DVM LLC
Large Animal
Veterinary Services
Ultrasound repro, Surgical,
Medical and Nutrition
Small Animal House Call
by Appointment
Medical, Vaccination Services
and Surgical Referral
Dr. Robert G. Ovrebo
Office 507-964-2682
Cell 507-995-0507
Miller
Law
Office
RAPHAEL J. MILLER
ROXANN M. BERANEK
Attorneys at Law
332 Sibley Ave. 1042 First Ave.
Gaylord, MN Gibbon, MN
Tel. 507-237-2954 Fax: 507-237-2347
Wills - Taxes - Estate Planning
General Law Practice & Trials
Free consultation on personal injury claims
MESENBRING
CONSTRUCTION
(507) 964-2864
“Your local home builder and
remodeler for over 38 years”
Member: MN River Builders Assn.
MN License #4806
ROSS R. ARNESON
ATTORNEY AT LAW
302 West Main
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-5753
Real Estate, Estate Planning,
Probate and Business Law
Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Saturdays by Appointment
Farm – Residential
Commercial
Licensed - Bonded - Insured
• 24-Hour Emergency
Service
• Free Estimates
Tyler Kranz, Owner
507-964-2525
Klehr Grading
&
Excavating, Inc.
JEFF & WENDY KLEHR
Dozer, Grader, Basements,
Septic Systems, Driveways, Backhoe Work,
Hauling Gravel/Rock/Sand, Skidloader
Jeff cell: 612-756-0595
Wendy cell: 612-756-0594
640 E. BROOKS ST., ARLINGTON, MN 55307
1-507-964-5783 • FAX: 507-964-5302
Local LAWN
Enforcement
Arlington, MN
Licensed and Insured
Mowing, fertilizing and
weed control, dethatching,
garden tilling, core aeration
www.locallawnenforcement.com
Adam and David Hansen
Adam cell: 507-327-0917
507-964-5835
• 5” Seamless Gutters
• 6” Seamless Gutters
• K-Guard Leaf-Free
Gutter System
(lifetime clog free guarantee)
PHIL GOETTL
612-655-1379
888-864-5979
www.mngutter.com
M
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tfn
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Gustafson
Family Dentistry
Dr. John D. Gustafson, D.D.S
Dr. Jared Gustafson, D.D.S
COMPREHENSIVE CARE
FOR ALL AGES
Office Hours: Monday–Friday
New Patients Welcome
Dr. Jason Anderson, D.D.S
Orthodontists
106 3
rd
Ave. NW,
Arlington
507-964-2705
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BODY REPAIR
See us for factory-trained
body repair work on
your vehicle.
• Free Estimates • Glass Replacement
• Collision Repair • Rust Repair
WINDSHIELD
REPLACEMENT
We install windshields
for all vehicles
We will contact the insurance company
for you and do all paperwork. See us
for professional glass installation.
BRAU
ARL I NGTON
www.braumotors.com
Local
507-964-5539
Toll Free
800-664-2728
PEEPS
612-719-4166
REPAIR LLC
HEAVY DUTY TRUCK
AND FARM EQUIPMENT
REPAIR
DOT INSPECTIONS
23315 HWY 5
ARLINGTON, MN 55307
PAUL PIEPER, OWNER
EMAIL: ppieper@ymail.com
Truck &
Farm Tire
Sales &
Service
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W W W . A R L I N G TO N M N N E W S . C O M
Arlington, MN
Licensed & Insured
- FERTILIZING & WEED CONTROL
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FEWER APPLICATIONS!
Adam & David Hansen
507-327-0917
CALL TODAY TO GET A FREE QUOTE!
PROFESSIONAL & PERSONAL LOCAL SERVICE
Local LAWN
Enforcement
www.LocalLawnEnforcement.com
A9-10Ea
The Arlington-Green Isle
Women of Today will spon-
sor an Easter event in the
small gym at the Sibley
East Senior High School in
Arlington from 10 a.m. to
noon Saturday, March 30.
The event is open to chil-
dren who are toddlers
through the second grade.
Children will have an op-
portunity to visit with the
Easter Bunny.
In addition, there will be
games, prizes, crafts, cook-
ies and more.
Parents, don’t forget to
bring your camera.
Easter event set for Saturday, March 30
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Peter Cottontail
Local and area children had the oppor-
tunity to meet and visit with Peter Cot-
tontail at the CornerStone State Bank in
Green Isle on Saturday morning, March
23. These youngsters also took their
turn. Audrey Ott is pictured on the left
while Henry Ott is pictured on the right.
They are the children of Nate and
Heather Ott, Green Isle. They are also
the grandchildren of Ron and Mary Ott,
Green Isle, and Ian and Kim Sing, Gay-
lord.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley County Sher-
iff ’s Department and the
Minnesota Bureau of Crimi-
nal Apprehension arrested
Jose L. Acevedo, 51, Gay-
lord, at the Gaylord Motel on
Tuesday, March 26.
The arrest was the result of
a several month long investi-
gation where an undercover
officer allegedly purchased a
total of about 30 grams of
methamphetamine during the
course of three separate pur-
chases.
Acevedo was charged with
two counts of first degree sale
of a controlled substance and
one count of second degree
sale of a controlled substance.
The Gaylord Police De-
partment also assisted with
the arrest and investigation.
Gaylord resident arrested on drug charges
By Kurt Menk
Editor
A vehicle stolen in the City
of Arlington has been recov-
ered in the City of Glencoe
with a bit of a twist.
John and JoLene Scheer,
Arlington, initially reported
that a vehicle was stolen from
their residence along the 200
block of Fourth Avenue
Northwest sometime between
12:30 a.m. and 6:30 a.m. Fri-
day, March 15.
Their other vehicle, a gray
2002 Chevrolet Tahoe, was
incorrectly listed as stolen on
the police report and, there-
fore, reported in last week’s
edition of the Arlington En-
terprise.
The vehicle that was actu-
ally stolen was a tan 1999
Chevrolet Tahoe. That vehi-
cle was ticketed in a parking
lot in the City of Glencoe on
Sunday, March 17, and even-
tually towed to an impound
lot in that community.
John and JoLene Scheer
learned about the recovery on
Tuesday, March 19.
The vehicle, at the time of
its recovery, was not fully op-
erational. In addition, a wallet
and its contents left in the ve-
hicle are missing.
Stolen vehicle recovered in Glencoe
1982 and bought by the Min-
nesota Valley Regional Rail
Authority. Since then, several
railroads have attempted to
acquire and operate the line
without success.
The most recent operator,
Minnesota Central Railroad
Co., filed bankruptcy in Au-
gust of 2000. No service had
been provided until MPL
started operation in October
of 2002.
“We worked with the rail
authority to come up with a
long-term plan,” recalled
Wegner. “We knew that oper-
ating at the previous 10 mile
per high standard would be at
a loss. Getting it to 25 mile
per hour means your rail oper-
ator will become viable as
well. We are optimistic about
the future, but it has been with
your help, which we appreci-
ate very much.”
By 2000, the number of
train cars on the line per year
was probably down to about
400, said Wegner. In the mid-
1990’s they were maybe
doing 4,000 to 6,000 cars per
year.
The big shipper on the line
was for the clay in Redwood
Falls. The market changed
where the end user went from
clay to something else to
manufacture their concrete
and the clay went away.
“When we started in 2002,
2,500 cars had basically dis-
appeared,” said Wegner. “The
6,000 cars per year we are
doing now has all generated
new business.”
MN Prairie Line Continued from page 1
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
Dr. A. Quinn Strobl, Sibley
County Chief Medical Exam-
iner, presented her 2012 re-
port at the Sibley County
board meeting on Tuesday,
March 26.
The report sums up med-
ical examiner involvement
for deaths occurring in Sibley
County during the past year.
In 2012 the office investigat-
ed 65 deaths, a slight increase
from 57 in each of the previ-
ous two years.
Of those, 19 were regis-
tered as hospice patients
where no death investigation
is done because they are ex-
pected to die at home. This is
the most hospice cases in the
past five years. There were 12
last year and only six in 2008.
The examiner approved 38
cremations, also the most in
five years. There were 34 last
year and 32 the year before.
Some 22 of the deaths re-
quired a scene investigation,
compared to 18 last year and
28 in 2010.
“If someone passes away in
the home or along a roadway,
someone from our office will
respond and investigate
alongside a local law enforce-
ment official,” notes Strobl.
Seven autopsies were per-
formed, an increase from just
three last year, but down from
eight in 2010.
Two deaths requiring an
examination were due to nat-
ural causes.
Six deaths were classified
as accidents. Three died of
complications from falls that
were from standing height,
mainly because the victims
were frail.
The one car crash death
compares to no deaths the
year prior in Sibley County
that were due to motor vehi-
cle crashes. In 2010, there
were four motor vehicle fatal-
ities.
The five non-vehicle acci-
dents were the most in five
years, up from two last year
and four in each of the three
previous years.
County has slight increase
in loss of life during 2012
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 28, 2013, page 4
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Staff
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Pub-
lishers; Kurt Menk, Editor; Karin
Rami ge, Manager; Marvi n
Bulau, Production Manager;
Barb Mathwig, Office; Ashley
Reetz, Sales; and Jean Olson,
Proof Reading.
Letters
This page is devoted to opin-
ions and commentary. Articles
appearing on this page are the
opinions of the writer. Views ex-
pressed here are not necessarily
those of the Arlington Enter-
prise, unless so designated. The
Arlington Enterprise strongly
encourages others to express
opinions on this page.
Letters from our readers are
strongly encouraged. Letters for
publ i cati on must bear the
writer’s signature and address.
The Arlington Enterprise re-
serves the right to edit letters
for purpose of clarity and space.
Ethics
The editorial staff of the Arling-
ton Enterprise strives to present
the news in a fair and accurate
manner. We appreciate errors
being brought to our attention.
Pl ease bri ng any gri evances
against the Arlington Enterprise to
the attention of the editor. Should
differences continue, readers are
encouraged to take their griev-
ances to the Mi nnesota News
Council, an organization dedicated
to protecti ng the publ i c from
press inaccuracy and unfairness.
The News Council can be contact-
ed at 12 South Sixth St., Suite
940, Minneapolis, MN 55402, or
(612) 341-9357.
Press Freedom
Freedom of the press is guar-
anteed under the First Amend-
ment to the U.S. Constitution:
“Congress shall make no law
respecting an establishment of
religion, or prohibiting the free
exercise thereof; or abridging
the freedom of speech, or the
press…”
Ben Frankl i n wrote i n the
Pennsylvania Gazette in 1731:
“If printers were determined not
to print anything till they were
sure it would offend nobody
there would be very little print-
ed.”
Deadline for the Arlington
Enterprise news is 4 p.m., Mon-
day, and advertising is noon,
Tuesday. Deadl i ne for The
Gal axy adverti si ng i s noon
Wednesday.
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Arlington ENTERPRISE
Wasteful spending
by Congress adds to
the national debt
Our View: People would be surprised
where their tax dollars go
Opinions
Guest Column
Letters To The Editor
The federal government has a spending problem. It is projected to
spend close to $10 billion a day or about $3.6 trillion in 2013. How-
ever, it is projected to take in only $2.7 trillion in taxes this year.
The math is simple. At the current pace, the federal government will
have a projected $900 billion deficit this year which will be added to
the nearly $17 trillion debt.
The problem is not just the spending, but the wasteful spending in
Washington, D.C.
Every year Republican Senator Tom Coburn, R-Oklahoma, releases
a document called the “Waste Book” which shows numerous exam-
ples of wasteful government spending.
Coburn estimates that the federal government could save almost
$300 billion a year if it cut out waste in duplicate programs.
But it gets much worse. Here are just a few examples of wasteful
spending at the federal government level.
Taxpayers may be losing $91 million each year after professional
sports leagues, which generate billions of dollars annually in profits,
take advantage of tax loopholes.
The Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission voted to keep the barely
used Lake Murray Park Airport open simply to receive $150,000 in
federal funds it can transfer to other airports. The airport has just one
landing per month.
The National Institutes of Health awarded $1.5 million to a Boston
hospital to study why many lesbians are overweight and most gay
men are not. The federal government calls this a significant public
health issue.
NASA, at a cost of $947,000, is studying what food astronauts
could eat on Mars by simulating a Mars outpost at a barren location in
Hawaii.
An NSF grant of $1.6 million was used to creat a robot squirrel to
study how squirrels and rattlesnakes interact. Previous research on
this relationship already exists.
The U.S. Postal Service overproduces commemorative stamps
every year which is a $2 million waste in printing and distribution
costs. In 2009, it printed one billion commemorative Simpsons
stamps and sold only 318 million.
The Department of Treasury could cut penny production and save
$70 million annually. It now costs 2.4 cents to manufacture one
penny.
The examples of wasteful federal government spending go on and
on. What is worse than the wasteful spending is that President Barack
Obama and Congress, in general, do not seem to care.
-K.M.
Too Tall’s Tidbits
Happy Birthday and Happy An-
niversary to the following local and
area residents compliments of the
Arlington Lions Club Community
Calendar.
March 29
Brad Krueger and Connie Campa.
March 30
Cathy Kerber, Connie Wills, Sean
Dietel and Richard Luepke.
March 31
Liz Schrupp, Nicki Young, Mark
Manther and Pat Grabitske.
April 1
In Memory Of Regina Bening,
Heather Thomes, Jamie Schiller, Lee
Sauter, Michael Hennies, Stan Bat-
ten, Tanner Sommers and Wayne
McCormick, Sr.
April 2
Judy Liebl, Lauren Halverson, Ley-
ton Brau, Leyton Dose, Linnea
Bullert, Lorie Standinger, Michael
Geib and Sally Mae Thomes.
April 3
Anna Pinske, Atley Strack, David
Hennies, Josephine Voigt, Macken-
zie Pomplun, Paul Trocke and Ryan
Halverson.
April 4
Adam Hansen, Ann Zingsheim, Jim
Dieball and Nicholas Johnson.
*****
After a worker drowned in a vat of
beer at the brewery, a co-worker
commented that he never had a
chance.
“I wouldn’t say that,” said a
witness. “He got out twice to go to
the bathroom.”
*****
A proud father called the local
newspaper to report the birth of
twins. The operator didn’t quite un-
derstand the message and asked,
“Will you repeat that?”
“Not if I can help it!” replied the
new dad.
*****
A young girl came home from a
date looking sad. She told her moth-
er, “Dan proposed to me a few min-
utes ago.”
“Then why are you so sad?” her
mother asked.
“Because he also mentioned he
was an atheist,” the girl replied. “He
doesn’t believe in hell!”
Her mother shot back, “Marry
him anyway. Between the two of
us, we’ll show him how wrong he
is.”
*****
A husband read an article to his
wife about how many words women
use a day...30,000 to a man’s 15,000.
The wife replied, “The reason for
that is because we have to repeat
everything to men.
The husband then turned to his
wife and asked, “What?”
*****
The man said to his bride, “Dar-
ling, now that we are married, do
you think you will be able to live on
my small income?”
“Of course, dear,” she replied.
“But what will you live on?”
*****
Two Army recruits were waiting
in line to be inoculated. One turned
to his pal and said, “Boy, what an
outfit. We’ve been in the Army 15
minutes and already we’re pre-
senting arms.”
*****
A young and foolish pilot wanted
to sound cool on the aviation fre-
quencies. This was his first time ap-
proaching a runway at night.
Instead of making any official re-
quests to the tower, he said: “Guess
who?”
The controller switched the run-
way lights off and replied: “Guess
where?”
To The Editor,
The Sibley County Economic De-
velopment Commission (SEDCO)
recently approved a resolution of
support for the RS Fiber and Rural
Fiber Communications Cooperative.
The Commission, made up of repre-
sentatives from the county’s seven
cities and five rural districts, recog-
nizes the economic development po-
tential of both projects on county
residents and businesses.
The resolution reads as follows:
WHEREAS: Fiber optics is recog-
nized as a future-proof technology
capable of providing nearly unlimit-
ed bandwidth to customers in the
communities and rural areas of Sib-
ley County. And because most coun-
ties in Minnesota and Rural America
are served by disparate phone and
cable providers that operate copper
networks with known bandwidth
limitations; and
WHEREAS: It is a recognized
fact that access to bandwidth will be
a leading economic indicator for
economic development; and
WHEREAS: It is a recognized
fact that tomorrow’s technology in-
novations in the areas of education,
health care and agri-business will
depend on affordable and reliable
access to large amounts of band-
width; and
WHEREAS: RS Fiber and the
Rural Fiber Communication Coop-
erative have agreed to work together
and share resources to bring world
class telecommunication service to
the cities and farms of Sibley Coun-
ty; and
WHEREAS: RS Fiber and Rural
Fiber Communication Cooperative
have an opportunity to participate in
the national US-Ignite program and
a national rural showcase that will
result in the development of ad-
vanced applications in the areas of
education, health care, senior citi-
zens and agri-business; and
WHEREAS: The RS Fiber and
Rural Fiber Communication Coop-
erative have conducted a marketing
campaign that has resulted in grass-
roots support for both projects that
can be measured by the fact that 62
percent of county farm households
and 52 percent of city households
have indicated their support for both
projects;
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RE-
SOLVED that the Sibley County
Economic Development Commis-
sion provides its support and ap-
proval to the RS Fiber and Rural
Fiber Communication Cooperative
projects. Passed and approved this
18th day of March, 2013.
Dave Tesch
SEDCO Board Chair
SEDCO supports fiber optics project
To The Editor,
I don’t know if this qualifies as a
letter to the editor, but I would like
to share some thoughts with you
(and your readers) about the town of
Arlington:
My mother, Charlotte Kopischke,
moved from Arlington on March 6.
She and my step dad, Marvin Kopis-
chke, moved there in 1976 after
being married. She was a widow.
Marvin was a widower.
She was living in St. Paul, he was
living in Morgan, MN. They chose
Arlington as a half-way point,
knowing it would be equally easy
for friends and family to visit from
each town.
I was 24 when Marvin & Char-
lotte moved to Arlington, and I am
60 now. Over the course of all those
years, I grew to have a great appre-
ciation of small-town Minnesota in
general, and Arlington in particular.
Marvin died in January of this
year, and my mom moved to be
closer to me. But we will both miss
what a special place Arlington is.
From the businesses on Main Street
to the Sibley Medical Center, Ar-
lington had everything they needed.
Particularly as they got older, neigh-
bors always stepped up to help
them.
I also want the people of Arling-
ton to know what a treasure they
have in the Good Samaritan facility.
For the last year of Marvin’s life, he
was in the nursing home and Char-
lotte was a short (indoor) walk away
in one of the assisted living apart-
ments. They were able to spend
quality time together each day, and
the staff on both sides of “Good
Sam’s” knew them as a couple.
With email and phone calls, I was
able to stay quite involved with their
care, even though I work full-time
and live 65 miles from Arlington.
Staff people even came to Marvin’s
funeral, on a very cold day.
I have worked in television news
since 1975, so I like to think I know
a good story when I see one. I think
the way my mom and step dad were
received and cared for in Arlington
is, indeed, a very good story.
Gordy Leach
Minneapolis
Reader has a great appreciation of Arlington
To The Editor,
I wanted to write and tell you
about a bill making its way through
the committee process that I have
deep concerns about. HF950, the
Childcare Unionization bill takes the
unprecedented step of attempting to
unionize individual small business
owners.
It is disturbing how Democrat ma-
jorities put union interests ahead of
the wishes of citizens. A recent sur-
vey shows more than 86 percent of
the providers themselves oppose
forming a union. This is clearly a
union-led power grab to add money
to their coffers for political purpos-
es. Advocates of unionization sug-
gest that $300 per year is minimal
for union dues.
With 11,000 providers being
forced to pay dues, that would mean
-- at minimum -- $3.3 million for
unions. That is money that is being
funneled to unions rather than to the
providers to take care of our chil-
dren.
Day care decisions should be be-
tween parents and their provider
without union interference. Min-
nesota’s providers should continue
working together in opposition of
this legislation and even ramp up the
effort while there is still time to stop
it.
If you are a childcare provider
from District 18B, I want to hear
from you, and I hope you'll either
share your thoughts with me via
email at
Rep.Glenn.Gruenhagen@house.mn
or by calling my office at 651-296-
4229.
Glenn Gruenhagen
State Representative
District 18B
Gruenhagen concerned about potential bill
By Lee H. Hamilton
Wherever you stood on Senator
Rand Paul’s 13-hour filibuster to
delay John Brennan’s confirmation
as CIA director, or on the Senate’s
confirmation hearings for Brennan
and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel,
they all serve as a reminder of just
how feeble Congress has proven to
be when it comes to foreign policy.
This wasn’t immediately obvious,
of course. Paul’s speech questioned
whether there are limits on the Pres-
ident’s power to use drones to kill
Americans who’ve been declared
“enemy combatants.” But the CIA
and military have been using drones
overseas for years and this was the
first time Congress really pondered
the issue. That’s a measure of its
dereliction, not of stepping up to the
plate. Why has it taken so long to
see significant congressional review
of the President’s power to use
Hamilton
Continued on page 5
Congress falls short on national security
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 28, 2013, page 5
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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Obituaries
History
Daniel A. “Buck” Thomes,
53, Arlington, died unexpect-
edly at the Sibley Medical
Center in Arlington on Satur-
day, March
23.
A Memo-
rial Mass
was held at
St. Mary’s
C a t h o l i c
Church in
Arlington at
11 a.m.
Wednesday,
March 27.
F a t h e r
Keith Salisbury officiated.
Visitation was held at St.
Mary’s Catholic Church from
4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday,
March 26 and continued one
hour prior to the Memorial
Mass on Wednesday, March
27.
Interment will be at a later
date.
Buck was born to Ralph
and Marilyn (Neubarth)
Thomes on Jan. 30, 1960. He
graduated from the Arlington-
Green Isle High School in
1978. He married Lorie
Coney at St. Mary’s Catholic
Church in Arlington on Aug.
8, 1981. He began working
for Thomes Bros. at age 16
and went to work for the City
of Arlington in 1999. He was
dedicated to the Arlington
Sportsman’s Park, both play-
ing softball and serving as its
president for more than 20
years. He enjoyed coaching
his son’s youth baseball team
and walking his dog, Buddy.
He was also involved with
the St. Arthur Council
Knights of Columbus. Most
of all, he enjoyed spending
quality time with his family,
two grandsons and his best
friend, Rick Rose, Jr.
He is survived by his wife,
Lorie; his children, Jessica
(Scott) Pepin of Indianapolis,
Jason (Becky) Thomes of Ar-
lington, Michelle (significant
other, Derick Ruff) Thomes
of Henderson, Lindsay (sig-
nificant other, Sean Dietz)
Thomes of Arlington and
Nathan Thomes of Arlington;
siblings, Richard (Carol)
Thomes of Arlington, Margo
(Harlan) Otto of Henderson,
Susan (Michael) McCarthy of
Arlington, Norma (Scott
Wheeler) Thomes of Eden
Prairie, David (Brenda)
Thomes of Arlington, Barry
(Connie) Thomes of Bran-
don, S.D. , John (Amy)
Thomes of Arlington and
Robert (Gail) Thomes of Ar-
lington; two grandchildren,
Chase Thomes and Nolan
Pepin; many nieces and
nephews; father and mother-
in-law, Charles and Hannah
Coney of Ames, Iowa; many
more relatives and friends.
He is preceded in death by
his parents.
Daniel A. ‘Buck’ Thomes, 53, Arlington
Daniel ‘Buck’
Thomes
Rosella Draeger, age 87, of
Arlington, passed away at
Abbott Northwestern Hospi-
tal in Minneapolis on Thurs-
day, March 21.
Funeral services were held
at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church
in Arlington at 2:30 p.m. Sun-
day, March 24. Rev. Bruce
Hanneman officiated.
Visitation were held one
hour prior to the service time
at the church on Sunday,
March 24.
Interment was at the Ar-
lington Public Cemetery.
Rosella was born to Henry
W. and Emma (Eickhoff)
Hardel in Green Isle Town-
ship on Nov. 9, 1925. She re-
ceived the sacrament of Bap-
tism from Rev. R. Heidmann
at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church
in Arlington on Nov. 22,
1925. She was also confirmed
at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church
on April 2, 1939.
On Sept. 30, 1945, Rosella
and Alvin Mielke were united
in marriage by Rev. J. G.
Bradtke at St. Paul’s Lutheran
Church. Their marriage was
blessed with two daughters,
and they made their home
near Arlington, where they
farmed.
Rosella was a lifelong and
devoted member of St. Paul’s
Lutheran Church, and also
loved gardening and playing
cards. She was an active
member of the Garden Club,
and the Women’s Missionary
Society.
Rosella is survived by her
daughters: Diane (Larry) Al-
sleben of Glencoe, and
Lynette (David) Coleman of
Savage; grandchildren: Tamra
(Wade) Rolf, Teresa (Andy)
Giesen, Matthew (Amber)
Alsleben, Danielle Coleman
and Cassandra Stigsell; and
great–grandchildren: Haley,
Josiah, Payton, Aaron,
Aubrey, Isaiah, Zachery and
Colton.
Rosella was preceded in
death by her parents and her
husband Alvin, on December
30, 1965.
Kolden Funeral Home of
Arlington handled the
arrangements.
Rosella Draeger, 87, Arlington
Barbara M. Reierson, age
33 of Arlington, died at her
home after battling Leukemia
for several months on Tues-
day, March
19.
F u n e r a l
service was
held at Peace
L u t h e r a n
Church in
Arlington at
11 a.m. Sat-
urday, March
23.
Visitation
was held at
the Kolden Funeral Home in
Arlington from 4 p.m. to 8
p.m. Friday, March 22 and
continued one hour prior to
the service at the church on
Saturday, March 23.
Interment was in the Ar-
lington Public Cemetery.
Barbara was born to Don
and Diane (Goehl) Goethke
in Arlington on May 22,
1979. She graduated from the
Sibley East Senior High
School in 1997. She married
Brent Reierson at Peace
Lutheran Church in Arlington
on Oct. 3, 1998. She enjoyed
teaching Sunday school and
was the president of the Ar-
lington-Green Isle Women of
Today. She was an avid
scrapbooker and enjoyed
doing crafts.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Brent Reierson; chil-
dren, Benjamin and Bethany
Reierson; parents, Don and
Diane Goethke of Arlington;
sister, Kim (Ethan) Mork of
Norwood Young America;
grandmother, Audrey Goehl
of Arlington; in-laws, Diane
(Gary) Wood of Lester Prairie
and Douglas (Nan) Reierson
of Aberdeen, S.D.; and many
nieces and nephews.
She is preceded in death by
her grandparents, Gust “Bud”
Goehl, and Wallace and De-
lores Goethke.
Barbara M. Reierson, 33, Arlington
Barbara
Reierson
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Wolverines of the Month
The following students were recently
selected as Wolverines of the Month at
the Sibley East Junior High School in
Gaylord. Front Row: (left to right) Bren-
dan Dabek, Chloey Kellermann and
Jacob Strack. Back Row: (l to r) Zach
Utendorfer and Caitlin Schmidt. Miss-
ing from the photo is Kiana Montes.
Hamilton Continued from page 4
drones?
Meanwhile, if you followed
the confirmation hearings,
you’d have to conclude that
Congress thinks U.S. foreign
policy centers on Israel, Cuba,
and the destroyed consulate in
Benghazi, Libya. On the long
list of significant foreign poli-
cy issues confronting the
White House — the rise of
China, a war looming with
Iran, increased tensions on the
Korean peninsula, the frag-
mentation of Syria, Libya, the
spread of Al Qaeda to north-
ern Africa — there’s mostly
been silence from the Con-
gress. Our strategic frame-
work agreement with Iraq?
The agreement we’re negoti-
ating with Afghanistan? The
key issue of when, where, and
how we commit American
forces abroad? Congress has
been missing in action.
This is not how it’s sup-
posed to be. Our Constitution
gives Congress strong levers
for dealing with foreign poli-
cy. It has oversight of the ex-
ecutive branch, and can hold
hearings and demand infor-
mation. It has the power of
the purse, and with it the abil-
ity to explore key issues of
behavior and policy before
approving the budget. It has
the power to declare war, and
to raise and maintain an army
and navy. In the Senate, it has
the confirmation process,
which allows senators to
probe and evaluate policies.
Yet for the most part, Con-
gress prefers deference to ex-
ecutive power. Most of its
members, who know that their
re-election rests on domestic
issues, don’t bother to gain
the expertise or develop the
political will to become potent
and valuable foreign policy
contributors, as the Constitu-
tion intended. Institutionally,
Congress likes leaving deci-
sions to the President and then
blaming him if they turn out
to be wrong — or it tries to
have it both ways, as with
Benghazi, cutting funds for
State Department security and
then criticizing the depart-
ment for not having enough
security.
The executive branch is
hardly blameless. The White
House, whether under Repub-
lican or Democratic control,
typically sees Congress as a
nuisance and an obstacle to be
overcome, not a partner.
Yet that’s a reason for Con-
gress to try harder, not to fold.
Our system is based on the
premise that better policy
emerges if the President and
Congress work together. It de-
pends on Congress to hold ex-
ecutive policies up to the light
and to weigh in with its own
concerns.
To do this, members need to
be fully informed both about
the complexities of foreign is-
sues and about what the ad-
ministration is doing. They
need to make robust oversight
commonplace, asking execu-
tive-branch policymakers to
spell out and justify policies
and their implementation.
They need to use the power of
the purse to grant or deny
funds if their views are not
taken into account. They need
to develop the expertise —
both among themselves and
on staff — that would allow
them to be both critic and
partner in the development of
foreign policy.
And above all, those mem-
bers who do understand the
ins and outs of foreign matters
need to press Congress to set
aside its reluctance to affect
foreign policy. That is where
the real failings lie — not
with individual members, but
with how Congress acts as an
institution in the formulation
of American foreign policy.
Developing American for-
eign policy is complicated,
confusing, and sometimes
frustrating. But our country is
at its strongest when it is uni-
fied and speaks with the voice
not just of the President, but
of the American people’s rep-
resentatives in Congress. It’s
time for Congress to shoulder
its responsibilities on foreign
policy.
Lee Hamilton is Director of
the Center on Congress at In-
diana University. He was a
member of the U.S. House of
Representatives for 34 years.
80 Years Ago
March 30, 1933
Louis Kill, Editor
At a meeting held at the City
Hall Monday evening the princi-
pal subject was the national pas-
time, and the result was that Ar-
lington will have a baseball
team in the field this season.
The balloting resulted in the
election of John Olson as man-
ager and Paul Mueller as assis-
tant manager. Ray Gasta and
Augie Mueller will share the du-
ties of captaining the team.
The record of births and
deaths as complied by clerk of
court Grover C. Beatty for 1932
shows a total of 289 births and
111 deaths for Sibley County.
Green Isle Township heads the
list with 27 births and only one
death, while Arlington Town-
ship is a close second with 26
births and six deaths.
Diedrich Stockman of Ham-
burg met with an unfortunate
accident yesterday afternoon
while visiting his son, Carl, who
recently took possession of the
Jasken farm north of town. Mr.
Stockmann and son were plac-
ing a window in the gable of the
barn, the former standing on a
ladder in the loft. He lost his
footing in some manner and fell
a considerable distance to the
floor, striking on his side with
great force and being rendered
unconscious. A doctor’s exami-
nation disclosed no serious in-
jury but he may have several
fractured ribs.
60 Years Ago
March 26, 1953
Louis Kill, Editor
Early season tornadoes swept
down on southern Minnesota
Saturday afternoon and created
millions of dollars of damage
and took two lives. The storm
passed over the Arlington area
at about four o’clock that after-
noon. While little or no damage
was done in the immediate
vicinity of Arlington, the funnel
evidently took a dip about five
miles northeast of town, where
the Marvin Teschendorf farm-
stead was hit. The cattle barn,
silo, hog barn, machine shed,
sheep barn and garage were
wrecked and the chimney was
blown off the home. A farmer
near Gibbon and a 16-year-old
youth at St. Cloud were killed as
a result of the storm.
A bolt of lightning struck a
tree in the wood lot on the
Scheer farm north of town just
before the storm broke Saturday
afternoon. Members of the
Scheer and Boerner families
were cutting wood on the lot
that afternoon and the bolt
struck very close to the group.
The tree was split from top to
bottom by the impact of the
bolt.
40 Years Ago
March 29, 1973
Val Kill, Editor
A groundbreaking service
was held at Arlington United
Methodist Church Sunday,
March 25, at 10:30 a.m. The
service began in the Fellowship
Hall and concluded at the site of
the new building. Several mem-
bers of the congregation were
called upon to turn the ceremo-
nial shovel. Construction is
scheduled to begin March 28
with E. J. Pinske, builder, Gay-
lord, as the general contractor.
Ron Fenske, who has been
the owner of Fenske Furniture
and Carpet Center since Novem-
ber 1st, is holding a grand open-
ing sale March 26 through
March 31. The business was for-
merly owned by Ed and Vivian
Tjosvold.
Movies showing at the Lido
Theatre during the week include
“Mash” starring Donald Suther-
land, Elliot Gould and Tom
Skerritt and “They Only Kill
Their Masters” starring Harry
Guardino, Hal Holbrook and
June Allyson.
20 Years Ago
April 1, 1993
Kurt Menk, Editor
Four generations of the Roy
Berger family gathered last Fri-
day afternoon to cut down a
huge ash tree at the Joe Berger
Jr. residence located along the
200 block of East Alden Street
in Arlington. Present were Joe
Berger Jr., Derek Berger, Drew
Berger, Joe Berger Sr. and Roy
Berger.
The Arlington Lions Club re-
cently made the final payment
on their $12,000 pledge to the
City of Arlington for the pur-
chase and remodeling of what is
now the public library. The
Lions were the organization that
spearheaded the drive to enlarge
the library.
The City of Arlington recent-
ly received a commendation as
one of Minnesota’s best-run
wastewater treatment plants.
The Minnesota Pollution Con-
trol Agency (MPCA) said that a
record-breaking 156 facilities
received Certificates of Com-
mendation this year. The com-
mendation recognized outstand-
ing performance during 1992.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley County Senior
Expo will be held at the Ar-
lington Community Center
from 9 a.m. to 2:15 p.m.
Tuesday, April 16.
“Discover The Magic” will
be the theme for this year’s
event.
The event will feature ma-
gician Gary Tyson, author
Scott Gottschalk and musi-
cian Lyndon Peterson.
In addition, there will be
display booths, craft vendors
and a dinner.
Tickets are available at the
Sibley East Community Edu-
cation Office and Morreim
Pharmacy.
Transportation is also
available.
Discover The Magic at the
Sibley County Senior Expo
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 28, 2013, page 6
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Sports
The Valley Elite
Freestyle/Greco Wrestling
Club has had a great start to
the season with freestyle
wrestling competition at open
tournaments in Eagan and
Owatonna.
The Valley Elite Wrestling
Club is open to all area youth
and is comprised of members
from the Le Sueur Henderson
area as well as athletes from
Sibley East, St. Peter, Tri-
City school district.
Competitors and placings
at Eagan on Saturday, March
16 included Brogan McMil-
lan, first place; Wyatt
Gillette, Talen Schwandt, Jor-
dan Carlson, Chris Pfarr,
Dylan Pfarr and Kolton Duff,
all second place; Logan
Klockmann, Chris Pettis and
Andrew Genelin, all third
place; and Jason Rabaey,
Connor Boettcher, Luke Wil-
son, Clayton Colling and
Tucker Colling, all fourth
place. Competing without
placing in the top four were
Ethan Genelin and Keon
Naranjo.
The Owatonna Open Tour-
nament, which was held on
Saturday, March 23, consist-
ed of both Greco-Roman and
Freestyle competition. Greco-
Roman finishes went to Tan-
ner Pasvogel, Caleb Radloff,
Jordan Carlson and Andy
Genelin, all first place; Luke
Wilson, Connor Boettcher,
Jayson Rabaey and Clayton
Colling, all second place;
Dylan Pauly, Kyle Thele-
mann and Dalton Pauly, all
third place; and Ethan
Genelin and Tucker Colling,
both fourth place.
The same pairing groups
then wrestled in Freestyle.
Jordan Carlson, Tanner
Pasvogel, Andy Genelin and
Clayton Colling placed first
while Luke Wilson, Jayson
Rabaey and Connor Boettch-
er placed second. Dylan
Pauly, Tucker Colling, Kyle
Thelemann, Dalton Pauly and
Caleb Radloff placed third
while Ethan Genelin placed
fourth.
The next competition will
be held at the Eastview High
School in Apple Valley on
Saturday, March 30.
Freestyle wrestling competition underway
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
boys track team placed sixth
during the Minnesota River
Conference Indoor Meet at
Minnesota State University,
Mankato, on Saturday, March
23.
Belle Plaine/Holy Family
Academy captured top honors
with 154.37 team points. Jor-
dan (137.87), Mayer Luther-
an (100), Tri-City United
(93.7), Le Sueur-Henderson
(65.5), Sibley East (58.87)
and Norwood Young America
(45.62) rounded out the field.
Nick Bruss captured top
honors in both the 55 meter
high hurdles and the 55 meter
intermediate hurdles with
times of 8.77 seconds and
8.60 seconds respectively.
Sibley East did not have a
second or third place winner.
Fourth place winners for
the Wolverines were Nick
Bruss (triple jump), Aaron
Kapke (high jump), Cole
Bruhn (800 meter run), 4 X
200 meter relay team (Ben
White, Aaron Kapke, Nick
Bruss and Julius Asmussen)
and 4 X 800 meter relay
team (Korban Strand, Justin
Bennett, Chris Johnson and
Sam Thies).
Thies added a fifth place
finish in the 1600 meter run.
Sixth place winners for
Sibley East were Miah
DuFrane (shot put), Justin
Bennett (1000 meter run),
1600 sprint medley relay
team (Julis Asmussen, Ben
White, Sam Bullert and Bran-
don Stoeckman) and 4 X 400
meter relay team (Sam
Bullert, Julius Asmussen,
Sam Thies and Connor
Kranz).
Kalab Stoeckman added
an eighth place finish in the
55 meter intermediate hur-
dles.
Boys track team places
6th at MRC indoor meet
Regulations that will limit
the harvest of walleye and
potentially increase the har-
vest of northern pike and
smallmouth bass will be im-
plemented on Mille Lacs
Lake this spring as part of a
multi-year effort to rebuild
the lake’s legendary walleye
population.
When the walleye season
opens May 11, anglers will be
able to keep walleye only be-
tween 18 and 20 inches or
longer than 28 inches. All
others must be immediately
released. The possession limit
is two, with only one longer
than 28 inches.
Last year, anglers could not
keep walleye 17 to 28 inches
in length. They could keep up
to four walleye shorter than
17 inches, with one longer
than 28 inches allowed.
“We want Mille Lacs to
continue to be a world-class
walleye fishing destination,”
said Dirk Peterson, Depart-
ment of Natural Resources
fisheries chief. “Currently,
the size and structure of the
walleye population isn’t
where we want it. We are
committed to remedying the
situation as quickly as possi-
ble through regulations that
are designed to increase sur-
vival of the lake’s younger
and smaller walleye.”
The agency is particularly
interested in conserving the
lake’s large 2008 year-class
of walleye because no strong
year-class is coming up be-
hind these fish despite ample
spawning stock and good
hatches of young fish. Fish in
this year-class are 15 to 17
inches in length.
In addition to new walleye
regulations, the lake’s 27 to
40-inch protected slot regula-
tion for northern pike will be
narrowed to a 33 to 40-inch
protected slot, with only one
pike longer than 40 inches.
The possession limit is three.
Similarly, the smallmouth
bass bag limit and slot limit
will be broadened to allow
for more harvest. The new
regulation is a 17 to 20-inch
protected slot. The possession
limit is six, with only one
longer than 20 inches in pos-
session. Previously, all small-
mouth bass less than 21 inch-
es had to be immediately re-
leased and the possession
limit was one.
“The smallmouth bass and
northern pike regulations are
designed to protect smaller
walleye until we have better
information on what these
predator species are eating,”
said Peterson. “We’ll be start-
ing a predator diet study this
spring. Meanwhile, the regu-
lations will allow anglers
some additional non-walleye
harvest opportunities while
also retaining solid numbers
of trophy-sized fish.”
The new regulations aim to
keep the total walleye kill
below the combined state-
tribal 2013 safe harvest level
of 250,000 pounds. Fishing
regulations may be adjusted
if angler kill is expected to be
either too high or lower than
the anticipated. This year’s
safe harvest level is the low-
est established since treaty
management began in 1997.
Tom Jones, Mille Lacs
Lake coordinator, said the
agency modeled 33 different
walleye regulations before
determining the 18 to 20-inch
harvest slot regulation was
the best option for this an-
gling season. “It protects
males from the 2008 walleye
year-class, it meets the goal
of being small fish friendly, it
allows anglers to keep a meal
of fish, and given normal
fishing conditions it should
keep harvest within the
state’s allocation.”
The DNR discussed a vari-
ety of potential regulations
with the Mille Lacs Lake
public input group during a
Feb. 27 meeting and solicited
email comments from the
general public.
Jones said a 2-inch walleye
harvest slot is not unprece-
dented on Mille Lacs, having
been implemented in 2001,
2002 and 2007. He added the
state’s walleye harvest has
been below this year’s alloca-
tion level of 178,500 pounds
four of the last 10 years and
in 2005 the harvest was
below 200,000 pounds.
The fundamental concern
for fish managers is that not
enough walleye are becoming
big walleye because of in-
creased mortality rates. A sec-
ondary concern is that mature
male walleye numbers have
decreased.
The lake is also becoming
increasingly complex and un-
predictable. This is due large-
ly to changes in the aquatic
community, including the
presence of unwanted aquatic
invasive species such as
zebra mussel, spiny water
flea and Eurasian watermill-
foil.
These factors, plus a state
and tribal harvest manage-
ment strategy that focused
largely on walleyes in the 14
to 18-inch range, all have
contributed to a declining
walleye population.
Jones said despite the de-
clining walleye population,
winter walleye fishing was
good, which typically sug-
gests good fishing in spring,
too.
For more information
about Mille Lacs Lake fish-
eries management, go to
www.mndnr.gov/millelac-
slake.
Regulations are changed to help boost
walleye population on Mille Lacs Lake
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
girls track team placed fourth
during the Minnesota River
Conference Indoor Meet at
Minnesota State University,
Mankato, on Saturday, March
23.
Belle Plaine captured top
honors with 205.5 team
points. Mayer Lutheran
(87.5), Jordan (79.5), Tri-City
United (79.5), Sibley East
(74), Le Sueur-Henderson
(73) and Norwood Young
America (48) rounded out the
field.
Megan Eckberg sparked
the Lady Wolverines with
first place finishes in both the
55 meter intermediate hurdles
and the 55 meter high hur-
dles.
The 4 X 200 meter relay
team placed second. The
foursome included Megan
Eckberg, Mikayla Stumm,
Alyssa Weber and Sydney
Fogarty Busch.
Third place winners for
Sibley East included Sydney
Fogarty Busch (55 meter high
hurdles), Megan Eckberg
(long jump) and Alyssa
Weber (high jump).
Fourth place winners for
the Lady Wolverines were
Kelli Martens (400 meter
dash), sprint medley relay
team (Alyssa Weber, Sara Pe-
terson, Sydney Fogarty
Busch and Courtney Eibs)
and 4 X 800 meter relay team
(Karina Robeck, Karley Lind,
Lea Mueller and Maren
Miner).
The 4 X 400 meter relay
team placed fifth. The four-
some included Alyssa Weber,
Lea Mueller, Kelli Martens
and Courtney Eibs.
Sixth place winners for
Sibley East were Maren
Miner (1600 meter run) and
Elizabeth Zuniga (shot put).
Seventh place winners for
the Lady Wolverines included
Mikayla Stumm (55 meter
high hurdles) and Karley
Lind (1000 meter run).
Girls track team places
4th at MRC indoor meet
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Cheerleading Awards
The following Sibley East cheerleaders
received their first time varsity letters
during an awards night event in Arling-
ton on Sunday night, March 24. Left to
right: Joni Schmidt, Jerrica Rosenlund,
Kyla Schlueter and Kaitlyn Quast.
The Arlington
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Arlington ENTERPRISE
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 28, 2013, page 7
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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Legals
Advertisement for Quotes
Washington Lake Township
Washington Lake Township will
be accepting quotes for roadside
mowing and (or) for road grading
for the 2013 season. Interested
parties should bid as separate
jobs. The township contains 39.1
miles of roadway. Quotes will be
accepted by the clerk until 5 p.m.
on Monday, April 8, 2013.
All quotes must be accompa-
nied by a certificate of insurance.
Diana Kroells, Clerk
17891 158th St
Hamburg, MN 55339
Publish March 28, 2013
Advertisement for Quotes
Washington Lake Township
Washington Lake Township,
Sibley County, will be accepting
quotes for 3,500 cu. yards of
class 5 gravel to be hauled any-
where in Washington Lake Twsp.
by July 1, 2013. Quotes will be
accepted by the township clerk
until 5 p.m. on Monday, April 8,
2013.
The township reserves the right
to accept or reject any or all bids.
Diana Kroells, Clerk
17891 158th St.
Hamburg, MN 55339
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Girls Basketball Awards
The following members of the Sibley East varsity girls
basketball team received major awards during a year-
end awards night event in Arlington on Sunday
evening, March 24. Front Row: (left to right) Courtney
Schwirtz (Senior Award and Co-Most Spirited Player
Award), Jessica Garza (Give and Take Award) and
Shelby Voight (Most Improved Player Award). Back
Row: (l to r) Alyssa Weber (Defensive Player of the
Year Award), Jordan Thomes (Senior Award and Co-
Most Spirited Player Award), McKenzie Sommers
(Leading Scorer Award and Co-Leading Rebounder
Award) and Megan Eckberg (Co-Leading Rebounder
Award and Most Valuable Player Award). Missing from
the photo is Briana Reierson (Senior Award).
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Boys Basketball Awards
The following members of the Sibley East varsity
boys basketball team received major awards during a
year-end awards night event in Arlington on Sunday
evening, March 24. Front Row: (left to right) Cordell
Bates (Wolverine Award), Andrew Grack (Wolverine
Award), Zac Weber (Most Improved Player Award) and
Brody Rodning (Free Throw Award). Back Row: (l to r)
Steve Haefs (Sixth Man Award), Max Grabow (Most
Rebounds Award and Defensive Player of the Year
Award), Sam Harrison (Most Inspirational Award) and
Tyler Bates (Offensive Player of the Year Award and
Most Valuable Player Award). Missing from the photo
is Logan Highland (Wolverine Award).
Bald eagles are migrating
back to Minnesota and may
be seen in large numbers
across parts of the state over
the next few weeks, accord-
ing to the Minnesota Depart-
ment of Natural Resources
(DNR).
“It’s definitely time for
folks to keep their eyes out,”
said Lisa Gelvin-Innvaer,
DNR regional nongame
wildlife specialist. “It all de-
pends on the weather. It’s
typical to see eagles coming
through our area in mid-to-
late March, as waters begin to
open up and snow melts.”
Only two states, Florida
and Alaska, have greater nest-
ing populations of bald eagles
than Minnesota. In 2005, re-
searchers estimated there are
more than 1,300 active nests
in Minnesota.
Fall migration typically oc-
curs as lakes and rivers freeze
over, since most eagles prefer
a diet of fish. Bald eagle win-
tering grounds ideally contain
open water, ample food, lim-
ited human disturbance and
protective roosting sites.
Not all bald eagles migrate
southward in the fall, Gelvin-
Innvaer said. In southern
Minnesota, it’s common for
some eagle pairs to stay the
winter, especially during
milder winters.
“This winter has been a
mixed bag,” she said. “We’ve
had more snow and cold tem-
peratures than last year, mak-
ing carrion a bit harder for ea-
gles to find. However, this
has been interspersed with
periods of thawing and some
open water.”
Bald eagles that stay local
may begin courting and nest-
ing as early as December or
January. Other bald eagles re-
turn to their breeding territo-
ries, as soon as a food source
is available.
“Eagle migration hotspots
are a bit of a moving target,
so it’s hard to say where the
eagles are right now,” Gelvin-
Innvaer said. “In Minnesota,
the biggest migrations tend to
be along the Minnesota River
corridor, the north shore of
Lake Superior and around
Lake Pepin in southeastern
Minnesota.”
Adult bald eagles are easily
identified by a white head
and tail contrasting with a
dark brown body. Bald eagles
attain full adult plumage in
their fourth or fifth year. In
flight, bald eagles are some-
times confused with turkey
vultures. However, bald ea-
gles have a tendency to soar
on flat, board-like wings,
while turkey vultures fly with
their wings in a v-shape.
Bald eagles are an example
of how they and many other
wildlife species benefit di-
rectly from donations made
to the nongame wildlife
checkoff on Minnesota tax
forms. Checkoff dollars fund
research, surveys and educa-
tion for more than 700
nongame wildlife species.
Bald eagles on spring migration back to MN
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 28, 2013, page 8
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
McGraw Monument
Works, Inc., LeSueur
Local Representative
Leah Schrupp
Arlington, MN 55307
612-308-8169
3 miles North of LeSueur
on Highway 169
30945 Forest Prairie Road
(507) 665-3126
HOURS: M-F 8-5
Weekends by appointment.
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My salvation and my honor depend on God;
he is my mighty rock, my refuge. Psalm 62:7 NIV
St. Mary’s Catholic Church
504 Northwest 7
th
Avenue, Arlington
Pastor Keith Salisbury
Sunday Mass: 10:30 a.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Commercial and Industrial Builders
Green Isle, MN 55338
ph. 507.326.7901 fax: 507.326.3551
www.vosconstruction.com
Arlington State Bank
Serving the Community Since 1895
BANKING SERVICES
964-2256
Arlington
A & N Radiator Repair
Allen & Nicki Scharn, Owners
23228 401 Ave., Arlington
877-964-2281 or 507-964-2281 Bus.
Certified ASE Technician on Staff
Also distributor for Poxy Coat II
Industrial Grade Coatings/Paint
MID-COUNTY
CO-OP
700 W. Lake St., Box 177
Cologne, MN 55322
(952) 466-3700
or TOLL FREE: 1-888-466-3700
HUTCHINSON CO-OP
AGRONOMY
LEON DOSE,
Arlington Branch Manager
411 7
th
Ave. NW • (507) 964-2251
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
402 W. Alden, Arlington
507-964-5547
Online at
www.Arlington
MNnew.com
Arlington Haus
Your Hometown Pub & Eatery
1986-2009
Arlington • 1-507-964-2473
STATE BANK OF
HAMBURG
100 Years. 100 Reasons.
Phone 952-467-2992
statebankofhamburg.com
CONVENIENCE
STORE
Hwy. 5 N., Arlington
507-964-2920
Homestyle Pizza
Real or Soft Serve Ice Cream
Gas – Diesel – Deli – Videos
(507)
964-2212
www.
chefcraigs
.com
23180 401 Ave., Arlington Phone 507-964-2264
EQUAL
HOUSING
LENDER
CRAIG BULLERT
ARLINGTON, MN
23189 Hwy. 5 North,
Arlington, MN 55307
arlington@hutchcoop.com
Office (507) 964-2283
Cell (320) 583-4324
HC
FUNERAL SERVICE
P.O. Box 314
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-2201
Member
FDIC
Menus
Church News
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Concert At Peace Lutheran Church
The Symphonic Band and Konzertchor (choir) from
the Sheboygan Lutheran High School in Sheboygan,
Wis., presented a concert at Peace Lutheran Church
in Arlington at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 22. A few
weeks ago, a music teacher from Wisconsin contact-
ed Peace Lutheran Church in Arlington with this mes-
sage: “We are going on tour with our musicians and
one of our churches cancelled. Would it be possible
for us to perform at your church?” After a few phone
calls, the people of Peace Lutheran Church made it
clear that enough overnight housing would be avail-
able for the 50 musicians. Pastor Kurt Lehmkuhl
called back and told the leader, “Yes, we will host
your group.”
SENIOR DINING
Call 326-3401 for a meal
Suggested Donation $3.85
Monday: Swedish meatballs,
paprika potatoes, spinach, bread
with margarine, ice cream, low fat
milk.
Tuesday: Liver or pepper steak,
buttered boiled potatoes, peas,
bread with margarine, apricots,
low fat milk.
Wednesday: Pork chow mein,
rice, chow mein noodles, oriental
vegetables, mandarin oranges,
cookie, low fat milk.
Thursday: Roast beef, mashed
potatoes, carrots, dinner roll with
margarine, pudding dessert, low
fat milk.
Friday: Chef salad with turkey,
ham and cheese on lettuce with
salad dressing, tomato and cu-
cumber slices, muffin with mar-
garine, brownie, low fat milk.
SIBLEY EAST ELEMENTARY
BREAKFAST MENU
Arlington and Gaylord
Breakfast i s served at 8:00
a.m. daily. A 1/2 pint of milk is
served wi th each meal dai l y.
Menu is subject to change.
Monday: No school.
Tuesday: Cracker sti cks,
seeds, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Frudel, juice, milk.
Thursday: Muffin, cheese stick,
juice, milk.
Friday: oatmeal bar, seeds,
juice, milk.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Arlington
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served
with each meal. Additional milk is
available for 40 cents each. Menu
is subject to change.
Monday: No school.
Tuesday: Sea shapes, oven
fries, peas and carrots, fruit. Alter-
nate: Ravoli.
Wednesday: Mexi can
haystack, fixi ngs, ri ce, green
beans, sal sa, frui t. Al ternate:
Meatballs.
Thursday: Mi ni corn dogs,
oven fries, baked beans, fruit. Al-
ternate: Cold sandwich.
Friday: Sub sandwich, chips,
tomatoes, lettuce, pickles, onions,
fruit. Alternate: None.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Gaylord
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served
with each meal. Additional milk is
available for 40 cents each. Menu
is subject to change.
Monday: No school.
Tuesday: Sea shapes, oven
potatoes, peas and carrots, fruit,
whole grain bread slice. Alternate:
Roast beef sandwich.
Wednesday: Taco, tomatoes
wi th romai ne l ettuce, refri ed
beans, green beans, applesauce.
Alternate: Baked chicken.
Thursday: Mi ni corn dogs,
oven potatoes, baked beans, pear
slices. Alternate: Mostaccioli.
Friday: Sub sandwich, toma-
toes with romaine lettuce, pickles,
onions, corn, peaches. Alternate:
Cooks’ choice.
GAYLORD ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
Gaylord
Bob Holmbeck, Pastor
Sunday, March 31: 8:30 a.m.
Easter Sunday breakfast, pot
blessing. 9:30 a. m. Sunday
school. 10:00 a.m. Sunday wor-
ship service.
Wednesday, April 3: 6:30
p.m. Evening Bible classes and
Youth Focused.
ST. PAUL’S EV.
REFORMED CHURCH
15470 Co. Rd. 31, Hamburg
Dan Schnabel, Pastor
952-467-3878
www.stpaulsrcus.org
Sunday, March 31: 8:30 a.m.
Sunday school and adult Bible
study. 9:30 a.m. Worship serv-
ice. Choir practice after wor-
ship.
Wednesday, April 3: 6:30 to
8:00 p.m. Confirmation class.
Thursday, April 4: 6:30 p.m.
Women’s Guild.
ORATORY OF
ST. THOMAS
THE APOSTLE
Jessenland
507-248-3550
Fr. Sam Perez
Thursday: Weekly Mass at
5:00 pm.
ST. PAUL’S UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Henderson
(507) 248-3594 (Office)
Rev. Brigit Stevens, Pastor
Find us on Facebook:
St. Paul’s UCC - Henderson
Thursday, March 28: 7:00
p.m. Maundy Thursday worship
with Communion.
Sunday, March 31: 6:30 a.m.
Sunrise worship. 7:30 a.m. East-
er breakfast - free will donations
accepted. 9:00 a.m. Worship
with Communion.
Tuesday, April 2: 7:00 p.m.
Finance Ministry team.
Wednesday, April 3: 7:00
p.m. HS Youth Group.
Thursday, April 4: 2:00 p.m.
Women’s Guild.
ST. MARY, MICHAEL
AND BRENDAN AREA
FAITH COMMUNITY
Fr. Keith Salisbury, Pastor
Thursday, March 28: 7:00
p.m. Holy Thursday (Mar). 7:30
p.m. Narcotics Anonymous
(Mic).
Friday, March 29: 7:00 p.m.
Good Friday.
Saturday, March 30: 8:30
p.m. Holy Saturday (Mar).
Sunday, March 31: No ele-
mentary religious education.
7:30 a.m. Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m.
Mass (Mic). 9:45 to 10:30 a.m.
Pre-K/K/First grade elementary
religious education (Mic). 10:30
a.m. Mass (Mar).
Monday, April 1: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre); Word and Com-
munion (Mar). 8:00 p.m. AA
and AlaNon (Mar).
Tuesday, April 2: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar). 9:30 a.m.
Mass (Arlington Good Sam).
3:30 p.m. Region I priest meet-
ing (Winthrop).
Wednesday, April 3: 7:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar). 8:30 a.m. Mass
(Bre). 9:00 a.m. Word and Com-
munion (Oak Terrace). 7:00
p.m. Jr./Sr. high religious educa-
tion (Mar); KC officers meeting
(Mar).
Thursday, April 4: 7:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar). 8:30 a.m. Mass
(Bre). 9:00 a.m. Mass (Oak Ter-
race). 7:00 p.m. Administrative
Council meeting (Mar). 7:30
p.m. Narcotics Anonymous
(Mic).
TRINITY LUTHERAN
32234 431st Ave., Gaylord
Rev. James Snyder,
Interim Pastor
Thursday, March 28: 7:00
p.m. Maundy Thursday worship
at Trinity.
Friday, March 29: 7:00 p.m.
Good Friday worship at St.
Paul’s.
Sunday, March 31: 6:00 a.m.
worship.
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Pastor William Postel
Phone 507-964-2400
Thursday, March 28: 5:30
p.m. Deadline for bulletin infor-
mation. 7:00 p. m. Maundy
Thursday worship with Holy
Communion.
Friday, March 29: 7:00 p.m.
Good Friday worship.
Sunday, March 31: 7:00 a.m.
Easter sunrise service. Easter
breakfast.
Thursday, April 4: 5:30 p.m.
Deadline for bulletin informa-
tion.
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN
Green Isle
Thursday, March 28: 5:00
p.m. Maundy Thursday service
with communion at St. Paul’s.
Pastor Bob Hines.
Friday, March 29: 9:00 a.m.
Good Friday service at Zion.
Pastor Bob Hines. 7:00 p.m.
Good Friday service at St.
Paul’s. Pastor Bob Hines.
Sunday, March 31: 9:00 a.m.
Easter Sunday Worship without
communion and Sunday school.
Guest Pastor Martin Teigen.
Wednesday, April 3: 3:45
p. m. Confirmation at Peace
Lutheran, Arlington. 6:30 to
7:30 p.m. Wednesday school for
grades 1 to 5 at St. Paul’s. 8:00
p.m. Joint choir practice at St.
Paul’s.
PEACE LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Kurt Lehmkuhl, Pastor
Thursday, March 28: 7:00
p.m. Maundy Thursday worship
service with Holy Communion.
Friday, March 29: 7:00 p.m.
Good Friday worship service.
Sunday, March 31: 7:00 a.m.
Easter Sunday sunrise service
with Holy Communion. 8:00
a.m. Easter breakfast. 9:30 a.m.
Easter Sunday worship service
with Holy Communion.
Wednesday, April 3: 3:45
p.m. Catechism. 5:00 p.m. Jun-
ior Bell Choir.
ZION LUTHERAN
814 W. Brooks St.
Arlington – (507) 964-5454
James Carlson, Pastor
Thursday, March 28: 9:00
a.m. and 1:00 p.m. Zion service
on cable TV. 7:00 p.m. Maundy
Thursday service with Holy
Communion.
Friday, March 29: 7:00 p.m.
Good Friday service.
Sunday, March 31: 6:30 a.m.
Worship with Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m. Worship with Holy
Communion.
[ ZION LUTHERAN
Green Isle Township
Thursday, March 28: 5:00
p.m. Maundy Thursday service
with Communion at St. Paul’s.
Pastor Bob Hines.
Friday, March 29: 9:00 a.m.
Good Friday service at Zion.
Pastor Bob Hines. 7:00 p.m.
Good Friday service at St.
Paul’s. Pastor Bob Hines.
Sunday, March 31: 7:00 a.m.
Easter sunrise service at Zion.
Guest Pastor Martin Teigen.
8:00 a.m. Easter breakfast at
Zion.
CREEKSIDE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Christian & Missionary
Alliance
Ben Lane, Pastor
114 Shamrock Drive
Arlington – 507-964-2872
www.creekside-church.com
email: creeksidecc@media-
combb.net.
Thursday, March 28: No
men’s or women’s studies this
week. Resumes April 4.
Friday, March 29: 6:30 p.m.
Good Friday worship service.
Sunday, March 31: 9:15 a.m.
Easter breakfast. 10:30 a.m.
Easter worship celebration.
Wednesday, April 3: 6:30 to
8:00 p.m. Kids club for 4-year-
olds - 6th graders. Registration
begins at 6:00 p.m. 7:00 to 8:30
p.m. REACH youth group at
Shogren’s.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
(507) 304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
507-234-6770
Saturday: Church services at
9:30 a.m. Bible study at 11:00
a.m. Fellowship dinner at 12:00
p.m. All are welcome.
UNITED METHODIST
Arlington
Wayne Swanson, Pastor
www.arlingtonunited
methodist.org
Thursday, March 28: 10:00
a.m., 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. Wor-
ship on cable TV; 7:00 p.m.
Maundy Thursday worship.
Friday, March 29: 7:00 p.m.
Good Friday worship.
Saturday, March 30: 8:00
a.m. A-Men men’s group. 10:00
a.m. Women’s Bible study at
Bette Nelson’s.
Sunday, March 31: 9:00 and
11:00 a.m. Easter worship. No
Sunday school.
EVANGELICAL
COVENANT CHURCH
107 W. Third St., Winthrop
Pastor Kyle Kachelmeier
507-647-5777
Parsonage 507-647-3739
www.wincov.org
Thursday, March 28: 9:30
a.m. Women’s Bible study. 4:30
p.m. Exercise. 7:00 p.m. Maun-
dy Thursday service.
Friday, March 29: 7:00 p.m.
Good Friday service at St. Fran-
cis.
Sunday, March 31: Sunrise
service. 9:30 a.m. Worship.
ST. PAUL LUTHERAN
(WELS),
Arlington
Bruce Hannemann, Pastor
WEBSITE:
www.stpaularlington.com
EMAIL:
Bruce.Hannemann@stpaul
arlington.com
Thursday, March 28: No
school. 10:00 a.m. Bulletin in-
formation due. 11:00 a.m. and
3:00 p.m. Service on cable chan-
nel 8. 7:00 p.m. Maundy Thurs-
day Communion service.
Friday, March 29: No school.
7:00 p.m. Good Friday Com-
munion service.
Sunday, March 31: 6:30 a.m.
Sunrise service. 7:30 a.m. Easter
breakfast. 9:00 a.m. Easter serv-
ice.
Monday, April 1: No school.
7:00 p.m. Elders’ meeting.
Tuesday, April 2: No school.
8:45 a.m. M.O.M.’s at school.
7:00 p.m. Adult Bible course at
school.
Wednesday, April 3: 2:00
p.m. Bible study. 3:45 p.m. Pub-
lic school confirmation class.
Thursday, April 4: 10:00 a.m.
Bulletin information due. 11:00
a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Service on
cable TV, channel 8. 3:30 p.m.
KFC at school. 6:30 p.m. Wor-
ship Committee.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 28, 2013, page 9
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LIES KE TRAC TOR
Want ed: Your OLD TRAC TORS,
any con di tion, make or mod el. We
also spe cial ize in new and used
TRAC TOR PARTS AND RE PAIR.
Call Kyle. Lo cat ed west of Hen -
der son. (612) 203-9256.
Need peo ple to iden ti fy Brock -
off/Brockh off pic tures. Call Del-
phine Do bratz (320) 587-9250,
Hutchin son, MN.
$$ DOL LARS PAID $$ Junk ve -
hi cl es, re pai r abl e cars/trucks.
FREE TOW ING. Flatbed/ wreck er
serv ice. Im me diate pick up. Mon -
day-Sun day, serv ing your area
24/7. (952) 220-TOWS.
CON KLIN® DEAL ERS NEED ED!
Life time ca reer in mar ket ing, man -
age ment and ap ply ing “Green”
pro ducts made in Amer i ca. Full
time/ part time. For a free cat a log,
call Franke’s Con klin Serv ice now
at (320) 238-2370. www.frank e -
mar ket ing.com.
Ren ville area farm op er a tion seek -
ing full and part time em ployees
wi th me chan i cal abi l i ty and/or
truck ing ex peri ence. Sal ary/ ben e -
fits/ va ca tion DOE. Must pass drug
test. Please call (320) 329-3536.
HAND Y MAN: Will do re mo del ing
of kitch ens, bath rooms, hang ing
doors and wi nd ows, pai nt i ng,
sheet rock ing, tex tur iz ing or any
minor re pairs in side or out side.
Wi l l al so do cl ean i ng of base -
ments/ga rag es. Call (320) 848-
2722 or (320) 583-1278.
Ko dak al l -i n-one pri nt er, $25.
(320) 327-2541.
Spe cial- 95% Good man gas fur -
nace and pro gram ma ble ther mo -
stat $2,200 in stalled or AC unit
$1,900 in stalled. J&R Plumb ing
Heat ing AC, Lester Prair ie (320)
510-5035.
1995 John Deere 345, 18 hp liq uid
cooled Ka wa sa ki, only 550 hours,
54” deck, pow er flow bag ging sys -
tem, ti re chai ns wi th bl ade.
$2,950/BO. (320) 510-2181.
Min ne so ta Twins sea son tick ets
for 2013 sea son. Sec ti on 121
seats. Pack age in cludes 2 seats.
5, 10 or 15 game pack ag es avail -
able. Con tact Rick at (952) 224-
6331 for more in for ma tion.
JUNK BAT TER IES WANT ED
We buy used bat ter ies and lead
weights. Pay ing top dol lar for junk
bat ter ies. Pay ing $8 to $24/bat -
tery. We pick up. Call 800-777-
2243. Ask for Dana.
Reg is tered Sim men tal bulls for
sale. Year ling, both red and black.
Di ehn Si m men tal s (507) 766-
0313.
Zero down RHA fi nanc ing is avail -
able for this prop er ty. 11798 155th
St., Glen coe. Hob by farm for sale.
6 +/- acr es, beau ti ful 4BR home.
Very new out bui l d i ngs. MLS#
4338091, $275,000. Con tact me
for a pri vate show ing. Paul Krueg -
er, Edi na Re al ty, (612) 328-4506,
Paul Krueg er@edi nare al ty.com.
1120 Grove Ave., Bi rd Is l and.
4BR, 3BA home on 2 l ots.
$119,000. (320) 296-1603.
601 12th St. S, Oli via. 2BR, 1BA,
large din ing/liv ing room. Cen tral
air, at tached 2-car ga rage, steel
sid ing. (320) 522-1593, af ter 6
p.m. (320) 765-2331.
Ar l i ng ton: Great start er home.
2BR, 2BA, new kitch en, fur nace
wa ter heat er, new heat ed ga rage.
Con tract for deed pos si bl e,
FSBO, $70,000/BO. (952) 486-
3342.
Well kept 3BR home, 2 miles from
Glen coe. For mal liv ing/din ing, and
fam i ly room on main lev el. Tons of
bui l t-i n cab i nets and stor age.
26x32 shop. Brian O’Don nell, Pri -
or i ty One Met ro west Re al ty (320)
864-4877.
23.08 Par cel next to Pla to city lim -
its. Ap prox imate ly 20 acr es til lable
with great fu ture de vel op ment po -
ten tial. Brian O’Don nell, Pri or i ty
One (320) 864-4877.
2BR Apart ment with ga rage, wa -
ter/sew er/gar bage i n cl ud ed.
$450/mo. New Au burn (320) 327-
2928.
Newly remodeled apartments for
rent i n Renvi l l e. Water, heat,
garbage i ncl uded. New appl i -
ances, air conditioners. (320) 564-
3351.
Com mer cial Build ing avail able
now! 900 sq. ft. down town Gay -
lord. Call Sar ah at (507) 237-5339
days, (507) 237-4166 even ings.
Sacred Heart, 205 Har ri son St.
Ni ce 2BR, 1BA, si n gl e fam i l y
1,359 sq. ft. , de tached ga rage.
Lease op tion or cash. $250 down,
$217/mo. (803) 978-1542.
Young farm er look ing for pro duc -
tive farm land for 2013 and be-
yond. Com peti tive rates and ref er -
enc es. Call Aus tin Blad at (320)
221-3517.
Spring Junk Alert SALE. Thurs day,
April 4, 10 a.m.- 6 p.m.; Fri day,
April 5, 10 a.m.- 6 p.m.; Sat ur day,
April 6, 9 a.m- 12 p.m. Lots of Gar -
den Junk thi s ti me!! 317 Mai n
Street, Ar ling ton, MN.
Li censed day care has open ing for
all ages, with flexi ble sched ul ing,
large play yard with healthy meals
and snacks. We are lo cat ed only
minutes from town. Call Mel is sa
(507) 351-1743.
CUS TOM LOG SAW ING- Cut at
your place or ours. White oak lum -
ber deck ing and fire wood. Give
Vir gil a call. Schau er Con struc tion,
Inc. (320) 864-4453.
Need trans por ta tion for your next
ev ent? We can help with our limo
bus. Wed dings, busi ness, sports,
bi rth days, etc. Check us out
www.theur ba nex press.com or call
Dina (612) 940-2184, Glen coe
busi ness. DOT 375227.
Plas tic re pair. Don’t throw it. Let
me weld it. Call Mike, Bird Is land,
an y time (320) 579-0418.
AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Notices
AUTOMOTIVE
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
Work Wanted
FOR SALE
Heating/Air Cond.
Lawn, Garden
Miscellaneous
Wanted To Buy
LIVESTOCK, PETS
Cattle
REAL ESTATE
Hobby Farm
Houses
Land
RENTAL
Apartment
Business, Office
House
Want To Rent
SALES
Garage Sales
SERVICES
Child Care
Misc. Service
Household Goods
FOR SALE
Houses
REAL ESTATE RENTAL
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Enterprise
To place an ad: Call: 507-964-5547; Fax: 507-964-2423; E-Mail: info@ArlingtonMNnews.com; Mail: P.O. Box 388, Arlington, MN 55307
Advertising
Deadlines
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OTR DRIVERS
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CASH FOR CARS:
All cars/trucks wanted. Running or not! Top
dollar paid. We come to you! Any make/
model. Call for instant offer: 800/871-9145
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Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington
is seeking the following positions:
• Certified Nursing Assistant – every other
weekend with potential to pick up more
hours
• Benefit eligible LPN/RN – evening shifts
with every other weekend
• LPN/RN - every other weekend with potential to pick
up more hours
• Universal Worker – Assisted Living facility,
5 shifts per pay period, must be 18 years of age to apply
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information,
call Tiffany Brockhoff,
Human Resource Director at
507-964-2251 or email:
tbrockof@good-sam.com
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap
Drug-Free Workplace
Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life.
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 28, 2013, page 10
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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www.raisetherouf.webs.com
PRESENTED BY:
FRIENDS CARE–HEARTS SHARE, INC.
Saturday, Sept. 8 2012
Club New Yorker
Green Isle, MN
3 p.m.-12:30 a.m.
• 1 Indoor Band
• Acoustic Music Outside
• Food Available
• Silent Auction/Raffle
Present ticket at
the door for entry $10
C
MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM C. RAMIGE
REQUEST THE HONOR OF YOUR PRESENCE
AT THE MARRIAGE OF THEIR DAUGHTER
Karin Lynn
TO
Michael David
SON OF MR. AND MRS. RALPH R. CORNWELL
ON SATURDAY, THE SIXTH OF OCTOBER
TWO THOUSAND TWELVE
AT THREE-THIRTY IN THE AFTERNOON
CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH
1820 KNIGHT AVENUE NORTH
GLENCOE, MINNESOTA
THE PLEASURE OF YOUR COMPANY IS REQUESTED AT THE SOCIAL HOUR AND DINNER IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING THE CEREMONY
CROW RIVER COUNTRY CLUB
915 COLORADO STREET NORTHWEST HUTCHINSON, MINNESOTA
REGISTERED AT:
MACY’S, TARGET,
& MENARDS
High Island Bottom Feeders
Ducks Unlimited
Banquet
27th Annual Banquet
September 10, 2011
Quacking Hour – 5:00 p.m.
Dinner – 7:00 p.m.
Program
Welcome...............................................................David Brockhoff
Auctioneer .....................................................................Bill Pinske
Clerk.....................................................................Dean Bergersen
HIBF Committee Members
Co-Chairmen ............................Dennis Overson, Chad Carpenter
Treasurer .............................................................Dean Bergersen
Keith Eggersgluess
Dale Meyer
David Brockhoff
Travis Tuchtenhagen
John Schauer
Eric Bergersen
Jerry Narr
Corey Carpenter
Jason Stiller
Spencer Haggenmiller
Scott Dose
Jake Lucas
1
Drs. Tim & Wendy Goldsmith
OPTOMETRISTS
NOW ACCEPTING
VSP
(Vision Service Plan)
Call us about
other insurance plans
Receive a
$25 Gift
Certificate
for bringing in your old
prescription glasses
(To be given to the Lions Club)
No other vision plans, discounts
safety program, or value package apply.
Limit one per person.
Valid for one year supply of contacts or frame and lenses.
If you were previously seen at
Minnesota Eye Consultants -
Gaylord location, your charts are
now back in Gaylord at
Goldsmith Eye Care.
214 Fourth St. N. • Gaylord, MN
Mon., Wed., Turs., Fri. 9-5, Tues. 9-6
www.goldsmitheye.com
507-237-2015
A11-14E,12-15Sa
Arlington resident Dan Schrupp, left, was awarded a
trip to Cape Coral, Fla., where he received the 2012
Presidents Club Award from Wells Enterprises CEO
Mike Wells, right. The Presidents Award is given to
the Regional Manager that over achieved sales and
profits for the company. Wells Enterprises - Le Mars,
Iowa, manufactures Blue Bunny ice cream which is
distributed throughout the United States.
Submitted Photo
Presidents Club Award
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
The bid of $628,284.75 for
the 2013 Sibley County bitu-
minous sealcoat and crack
sealing project came in at
26.37 percent under estimate,
according to Public Works
Director Darin Mielke. He re-
layed the news to the county
board of commissioners dur-
ing the meeting on Tuesday
morning, March 26.
The contract was awarded
to Morris Sealcoat, a compa-
ny the county has worked
with in the past. The engi-
neer ’s estimate was
$864,000.25. Three other
companies bid on the project
and all were under the esti-
mate.
Mielke said the sealcoat
project will be 10 percent
under his budget and added,
“We expected a seven to
eight percent increase in the
cost. The low bid was less
than last year ’s pricing,
which surprised us.”
Residents can go to the
county website to see what
roads will be seal-coated over
the next five years.
Debate
Plans and specs were ap-
proved by the board for the
2013 bituminous overlays
project and for a bridge con-
struction project in New
Auburn Township. An adver-
tisement for bids was ordered
with an opening date of May
9 for both projects.
Prior to approval of the bi-
tuminous overlay improve-
ment project, there was a dis-
cussion in regard to how
much to spend on CSAH 8.
County Administrator Matt
Jaunich said the transporta-
tion committee reviewed the
possible plans and decided to
look for guidance from the
board.
One option is to spend
about $1.3 million on CSAH
8, including a two-inch over-
lay of existing driveways on a
14-mile stretch. The other op-
tion is to do a road reclama-
tion project that would great-
ly increase the cost.
County Commissioner
Harold Pettis said he would
like to see the bigger recy-
cling project because it would
double the life of the road.
Jaunich said the recycle
project would not be in the
current budget and the board
could opt to hold off until it
gets into budget discussions.
County Commissioner Bill
Pinske said the county tax
levy cannot support a big in-
crease in one year.
The board agreed that the
road needs to be improved
now and voted for the two-
inch overlay project.
Parking Lot
Mielke was asked to look
into the possibility of putting
in a parking lot on the west
side of the county food shelf
in Gaylord.
Pinske said he was told that
clients use the door on the
side where there is no hard
surface and mud gets dragged
into the facility. He added
that the volunteer workers do
not want to spend time clean-
ing mud off the floor.
The size of the parking lot
is estimated to be 20 feet
wide by 80 feet long. Mielke
estimated a cost of under
$10,000.
Mielke will bring back in-
formation about the driveway
possibility at the next meet-
ing.
Other Business
In other public works busi-
ness, the board approved an
agreement with Imperial
Porta Palace to provide coun-
ty parks with portable rest-
rooms at a cost of $2,511.57.
Refuse in the parks will be
picked up by Waste Manage-
ment at a cost of $495.00,
plus tax.
Public works expenditures
included $6,946.87 for the
purchase of a Kuhn ditch
mower from Arnolds of Glen-
coe and $22,745.00 for the
purchase of a Bobcat tracked
skid loader from Lano’s, Inc.
of Norwood-Young America.
Approved was a road relo-
cation agreement for CSAH
6/60 with Leroy Chard, who
can bring plans to the board
for approval.
The board entered into a
master partnership agreement
with the Minnesota Depart-
ment of Transportation that
runs for five years.
Commissioners supported a
grant application for the local
trail program that will cover
the remaining $140,000 in
costs left from the county
match.
Meeting
The Sibley County Com-
missioners will hold their
next regular meeting at 9 a.m.
Tuesday, April 9.
Sibley County is surprised by
low bids for sealcoat project
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