3-6-14 Arlington Enterprise

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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Serving the Communities of Arlington and Green Isle, Minnesota
www.arlingtonmnnews.com Volume 130 • Number 35 • Thursday, March 6, 2014 • Arlington, MN 55307
Single copy $1.00
By Karin Ramige Cornwell
Manager
The Sibley East School
Board recently heard a report
from District Technology Co-
ordinator, Cathy Wills on the
current status of Project
Ed.21, the iPad project.
Wills reported that the dis-
trict has collected $28,393 in
technology fees and $5,472
for repairs and cases.
Wills has purchased 277
cases for $9,170.
There have been 56 iPads
sent into Apple for repairs
this year to date; seven of the
56 were covered under Ap-
pleCare Warranty. The dis-
trict had to pay a $49 Apple
Care charge totaling $2,352
in fees.
Wills added that last year,
there were 50 total damaged
iPads sent in for repairs. She
said that it is estimated that
around 80 will have to be
sent in by the end of the year.
She said that she is seeing
about two per week.
This year seven iPads have
been reported lost, stolen or
missing. The students/parents
are responsible for the cost of
the replacement.
The seven iPads that have
Project Ed.21
Continued on page 3
Sibley East School Board
discusses next steps in
Project Ed.21 at meeting
It’s a 3-peat for Nathan Rose
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Sibley East senior Nathan
Rose, for the third consecu-
tive year, captured first place
honors in the 195-pound
weight division during the
Minnesota State Class A
Wrestling Tournament at the
Xcel Energy Center in St.
Paul on Saturday, March 1.
Rose was the first Sibley
East wrestler to win a state
title two years ago and now is
the first Wolverine grappler to
win three consecutive state
championships.
“I was excited to win,” said
Rose. “I was a lot more nerv-
ous this year. I didn’t want to
disappoint everyone expect-
ing me to win. But if you
don’t wrestle smart and your
best anything can happen.”
Rose continued, “I’m re-
lieved that it’s over and I won
it again. It was a little hard
coming off the mat knowing
it was my last high school
match.”
Rose added, “I’ve enjoyed
my high school career and
I’m going to miss it. I’ve very
thankful to everyone that has
always supported me from
my family, friends, coaches,
team and community. They
have all been a great support
system.”
Rose pinned Atwater-Cos-
mos-Grove City senior Cody
Berghuis 0:38 in the opening
round.
In the quarter-final round,
Rose decisioned Triton senior
Lucas Etchason 10-4.
In the semi-final round,
Rose won by a major decision
over Grand Meadow-Kings-
land-LeRoy-Ostrander junior
Wyatt Richardson 9-1.
Rose, in the championship
match, won by a major deci-
sion over Windom-Mountain
Lake senior Vince Johnson
11-3.
“I was really happy for
Nathan to end his career the
way he did,” said Sibley East
head coach Chad Johnson.
“It’s horrible to lose a kid like
Nathan. For four years we ex-
pected him to win all the
time. You don’t replace a guy
like Nathan with another guy.
It takes about three to four
guys that give you all the
things that Nathan has given
this program.”
Johnson added, “I do look
forward to watching him
work at the next level.”
Rose concluded the season
with a 45-1 record overall. In
addition, he compiled a 135-1
record during the past three
seasons.
He is the son of Tony and
Jenny Rose, Arlington.
State Champs
The former Arlington-
Green Isle and Gaylord high
schools also produced state
champions in wrestling.
A-GI wrestler Darren Cain
won the state title as a junior
at 155 pounds in 1987.
Cain also won the state title
as a senior at 167 pounds in
1988.
Gaylord wrestler Greg Berg
captured the state title at 180
pounds in 1976.
Gaylord wrestler Paul Som-
mers also won the state title at
145 pounds in 1977.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
The referee raises the arm of Sibley East senior
Nathan Rose (195) moments after his victory in the
state championship match. It was his third consecu-
tive state championship at 195 pounds.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Junior Sweetheart & Hunk
Megan Elseth and Jonah Butler were
crowned as the Junior Sweetheart and
Hunk during a coronation ceremony at
the Sibley East Senior High School in
Arlington on Monday afternoon, March
3. Megan is the daughter of Greg and
Delaine Elseth. Jonah is the son of Bill
and Christine Butler.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington City Coun-
cil, during its regular meeting
on Monday night, March 3,
talked about the widespread
frozen water service lines in
some places.
Due to the continuous ex-
treme cold weather this win-
ter, the frost table is lower
than previous years, accord-
ing to City Administrator
Liza Donabauer. The city, as
a result, has been notified of
several water service lines
which have frozen in the
area.
The water service line, ac-
cording to Donabauer, runs
from the city-owned water
main to inside a home or
business and is the responsi-
bility of the property owner.
The risk of frozen service
lines could continue for sev-
eral weeks or even months.
“The most likely spot for
water lines to freeze is where
there is the least amount of
snow cover,” said Donabauer.
“A means to determine your
risk of a potential freeze up is
by taking the temperature of
the water from the nearest
fixture possible from the
service line coming into the
house. Run your cold water
for a couple minutes and then
take the temperature of the
water from this. If it is below
40 degrees Fahrenheit, you
are at an increased risk of
freeze up and should consider
letting your cold water run
from this faucet at a thickness
of a pencil.”
Running a constant stream
of water about the width of a
pencil is an effective method
to prevent freezing, according
to Donabauer. People who
run the water at this level will
average .25gpm or about one-
quarter gallon of water per
minute. This equals 10,800
gallons in 30 days. Property
owners should please note
that this minimal trickle of
water will increase a water
and sewer bill. In contrast,
the cost of thawing a service
line can be very expensive
and a big hassle.
Property owners who in-
tend to take the precaution
and run their water are en-
couraged to contact the city
staff, according to Don-
abauer. The City Council will
discuss how to reconcile the
additional water and sewer
costs to customers.
People who have any ques-
tions or believe they may
have incurred frozen service
should please contact the Ar-
lington City Office at 507-
964-2378.
Extreme cold weather has caused
some frozen water service lines
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 6, 2014, page 2
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Zion Lutheran Church
814 W. Brooks St., Arlington
Sunday, March 9
11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Menu: Chicken (prepared by Chef Craig), mashed potatoes,
corn, cole slaw, dinner roll, homemade dessert.
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THESE LOCAL BUSINESSES:
Cenex and Morreim Pharmacy
ADVANCE TICKETS: Adults
$
8.50, Kids (5-11)
$
4.50, 4 & Under Free
AT THE DOOR: Adults
$
9.50, Kids (5-11)
$
5.00, 4 & Under Free
PROCEEDS GO TOWARD OUR YOUTH BIBLE CAMP
A8-9Ea
22
nd
ANNUAL
Thursday, March 6: Arlington Ambulance Serv-
ice, 7 p.m.
Arlington Lions Club, Arlington Haus, social 6
p.m., meeting 7 p.m.
Friday, March 7: Arlington Veteran’s Steak Fry,
veteran’s building at fairgrounds, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Sunday, March 9: Arlington Conquerors 4-H
Club, senior citizens’ building at Four Seasons
Park, 5 p.m. Clover Buds meet at 4 p.m.
Monday, March 10: Arlington Chamber of Com-
merce, Emergency Services building, noon.
Sibley East School Board, room 149 at Arlington
Campus, 6:30 p.m.
VFW Post 6031, veterans building at fairgrounds,
8 p.m.
Tuesday, March 11: American Legion Post
#250, veterans building at fairgrounds, 7 p.m.
Red Cross Blood Mobile, Arlington Commuity
Center, 1-7 p.m.
Wednesday, March 12: The Minnesota River
Area Agency on Aging trained health insurance
counselors are available from 10:30-11:30 a.m. at
the Ridgeview Sibley Medical Center in Arlington.
To schedule help at a different time or location,
contact the Senior Linkage Line at 800-333-2433.
Community
Calendar
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER
MAIN BANK
Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (straight thru)
DRIVE THRU
Monday - Thursday, 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.,
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Member
FDIC
Arlington State Bank
(507) 964-2256
Fax (507) 964-5550
www.ArlingtonStateBank.com
Thank You
We have so many Thank
You’s. We the family of Harold
Engelmann have been truly
blessed with love shown to us
during his recent illness and
passing.
To our friends and family,
thank you for your prayers,
comforting words, visits and
most of all hugs. Our co-work-
ers for covering hours so we
could spend time with Daddy.
Oak Terrace of Gayl ord,
Daddy spent many years with
you. Thank you for making it a
home for him and his good
care. We know many of you
had a personal relationship
with, and we are grateful for
your friendship with him.
Ridgeview SMC - Oh Wow!
We just can’t sing your praises
enough! To Dr. Mohammed
and his nurses. The outstand-
i ng care Daddy recei ved
throughout the week and con-
cern for his comfort were first
class. We are truly blessed to
have him close to home. With-
out a doubt he was in the best
care he could possibly have.
God bless you all!
Gregg at Kol den Funeral
Home for your professionalism
and personal concern to make
sure we were satisfied. Pastor
Carlson for your prayers and
visits, Zion Lutheran women
for organizing the meal. Our
family friends Tiffany Podratz
and Barb Herrman for the
beautiful music.
At this difficult time we are
so overwhelmed, but we are
thankful for all of you. God’s
Blessings on you!
Daddy’s Mouses
Lisa Bertrand
Janet Deno
Denise Harris & families
*9Ea
Thank You • Thank You
The Arlington Lions Club would
like to thank everyone who helped
make our annual Fish Fry a suc-
cess.
Thanks to all our club members
that put in many hours.
Thanks to all the community
volunteers that put in numerous
hours.
Thanks to the City of Arlington
for having such a fine facility to
hold this event.
Thanks to the St. Arthur’s Coun-
cil Knights of Columbus for the
“remodeled fry trailer.” A special
thanks to Tony Kloeckl and
Wayne McCormick for their work
on the deep fry units. Also, thanks
to the “3 Fry Daddy’s.” Great Job!
Thanks to the Leo Clubs and the
Sibley East band members and
parents. They were a big help.
Without the help of all of these
people, our fundraiser would not
have been this successful.
Also, thanks to the New Auburn
Lions Club for selling us some
fish so we were able to serve peo-
ple until our planned closing time.
Thanks to the Ho-Ho Shriners
for the great potato salad. If there
were people who had to wait at
various times when we could not
keep enough fish fried, we apolo-
gize for your need to wait. Anyone
who had any problems or con-
cerns about the fry, please contact
us so we can correct any problems
for 2015.
Once again,
thank you one and all.
Co-chairs Dan Hislop & Pat Liebl,
and the Arlington Lions Club
*9Ea
NOTICE TO PET OWNERS
In accordance with the terms of Ordinance No. 283:
— PETS ARE NOT PERMITTED TO RUN AT
LARGE WITHIN THE ARLINGTON CITY LIM-
ITS. They must either be leashed or cabled/chained, ken-
neled or in a fenced yard and not allowed to roam freely.
— All domesticated pets (dogs and cats) must be li-
censed. All licenses issued in 2013 will EXPIRE
MARCH 31. Please stop by the City Office before
April 1
st
to obtain a 2014 pet license. The cost for a pet li-
cense is $5.00. A health certificate showing that the pet is
current on its rabies vaccination is required. (Due to the
Spring vaccination schedule, your pet may not be due for
vaccinations until after April 1, you should still license
your pet in March to avoid late fees. You will be permitted
to bring the health certificate in at a later date.)
— Licensing your pet assures that it will be taken care of
and returned safely if it gets loose and then picked up by
the Police Department.
— Due to a revision within the pet ordinance, a total of 3
adult (includes spayed or neutered) pets are allowed per
household (i.e. 3 dogs, 3 cats, or a combination thereof).
— If you have lost (ran away, gave away, died) a pet
within the last year, please notify the City Office so we
can remove the pet from our current listing. We will be
following up on our listing of pets again this year with the
help of our local Police Department.
— Any person or entity found to be in
violation of this Ordinance shall be
guilty of a misdemeanor, punishable
by a fine, plus all veterinary impound-
ment and boarding charges, and in the
case of destruction of an animal, any
veterinary charge for said service.
By Order of the
Arlington City
Council
A9-10Ea
Happy 50
th
Birthday
*9Ea
News Briefs
Accident on County Road 8
A one-vehicle rollover accident reportedly occurred
along County Road 8 about one mile west of Le Sueur
at 3:20 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 26, according to the Sib-
ley County Sheriff’s Department.
Carly E. Krippner, 18, Buffalo Lake, was driving a
2001 Ford Focus eastbound on County Road 8 when
she lost control of the vehicle on the icy roadway, ac-
cording to the report. The vehicle entered the north
ditch and rolled.
Krippner and a passenger, Kayla A. Taylor, 16,
Hutchinson, were able to exit the vehicle with little to
no injuries, according to the report. The vehicle sus-
tained moderate damage.
The Le Sueur Fire Department and Le Sueur Ambu-
lance assisted at the scene.
SE choir concert is March 10
The Sibley East High School choirs, under the direc-
tion of Lenore Strouth, will perform their winter concert
in the Arlington gymnasium at 7 p.m. Monday, March
10.
The concert will feature the Concert Choir, Sopho-
more Choir, Show Choir and Men’s Choir. Soloists and
small ensembles will also perform. The choirs will per-
form the selections they sang at large group contest in-
cluding Mozart’s Dies Irae, A Red Red Rose by James
Mulholland, We Sail the Ocean Blue by Ruth Artman,
and Tell My Father from the musical The Civil War.
St. Paul’s receives $2,000
Students at St. Paul’s Lutheran in Arlington are living
healthier thanks to funds awarded by Midwest Dairy
Council, Minnesota Vikings and Coborn’s.
St. Paul’s Lutheran School received $2,000 to Sup-
port Fuel Up To Play 60, in-school tuition and physical
activity program.
“We are thrilled to be selected as recipients of the
funding,” said Principal Eric Kaesermann. “Thanks to
the funding, St. Paul’s can continue implementing Fuel
Up To Play 60 initiatives to help our students under-
stand the role good nutrition and physical activity play
in their lives.
St. Paul’s Lutheran School will use the grant monies
to purchase a curriculum for activities during classroom
breaks, family fitness workshops, new healthy food
choices for its lunch program and a field trip to
Coborn’s in Glencoe.
Walker earns college degree
Gaylord resident Brenda Walker graduated from the
University of Wisconsin at Eau Claire during recent
commencement exercises.
Walker received an Arts and Sciences Degree, MSE,
in School Psychology.
Blood drive set for March 11
The American Red Cross will hold a blood drive at
the Arlington Community Center from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Tuesday, March 11.
To make an appointment or for more information,
please call Kay Schumacher at 507-964-5700.
SE band concert is March 11
The Sibley East High School Band and The Wolver-
ine Jazz Band will perform in the big gym at the Arling-
ton school site at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 11.
The Concert band will perform a wide variety of
repertoire including Rossano Galante’s Beyond The
Horizon and Capt. Jimmy Howe’s Pentland Hills
The Wolverine Jazz Band will perform some great
jazz standards including Glenn Miller’s arrangement of
Joe Garland’s In the Mood, and Jerry Gray’s A String
of Pearls, which was also performed by the Glenn
Miller Orchestra.
Timothy Kemp of Troop 38
in Minneapolis earned his
Eagle Scout rank on Dec 9,
2013.
His eagle project was a
bike drive for Cycles For
Change, a non-profit that re-
pairs and distributes bikes to
people who need them for
transportation, but cannot af-
ford them. Kemp raised 150-
plus bikes and over $500 for
repairs.
His Court of Honor was
held on Sunday, March 2.
He is the son of Mark and
Karen Kemp, Minneapolis,
and the grandson of Jerry
Kemp, Arlington.
Kemp earns Eagle Scout Award
Submitted Photo
GICS Science Fair
Nine students participated in the Science Fair at the
Green Isle Community School on Tuesday, Feb. 25.
These four students will advance to the regional sci-
ence fair. Left to right: Trevor Parrott (third grade),
Lauren Menne (third Grade), Gregory Pollack (sixth
grade) and Samuel Menne (fifth grade).
Timothy Kemp
By Kurt Menk
Editor
A one-vehicle rollover ac-
cident reportedly occurred
along Highway 19 about
three miles west of Hender-
son at 9:ll a.m. Wednesday,
March 5, according to the
Minnesota State Highway Pa-
trol.
Brandon H. Brinkman, 30,
Arlington, was driving a
1997 Ford Supercab east-
bound on Highway 19 when
he swerved to avoid a colli-
sion and lost control of the
vehicle, according to the re-
port. The vehicle entered the
ditch and rolled.
Brinkman and a passenger,
Sydney S. Haggenmiller, 21,
Arlington, suffered non-life
threatening injuries, accord-
ing to the report.
Rollover accident near Henderson
occurs on Wednesday morning
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 6, 2014, page 3
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Business & Professional
Directory
Call TODAY
to be included in our
BUSINESS &
PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY!
507-964-5547
Arlington
Chiropractic Clinic
JUSTIN E. DAVIS, D.C.
607 W. Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-2850
arlingtonchiropracticmn.com
Office Hours:
Mon. 9am-6pm; Tues. 9am-5pm;
Wed. 8am-6pm; Thurs. 1-6pm;
Fri. 8am-4pm; 1
st
& 3
rd
Sat. 8am-11am
VETERINARIAN
RG OVREBO DVM LLC
Large Animal
Veterinary Services
Ultrasound repro, Surgical,
Medical and Nutrition
Small Animal House Call
by Appointment
Medical, Vaccination Services
and Surgical Referral
Dr. Robert G. Ovrebo
Office 507-964-2682
Cell 507-995-0507
Miller
Law Office
RAPHAEL J. MILLER
Attorney at Law
332 Sibley Avenue, Gaylord, MN 55334
Tel. (507) 237-2954
Wills - Family Law
Taxes - Estate Planning
General Law Practice & Trials
Free consultation on personal injury claims
MESENBRING
CONSTRUCTION
(507) 964-2864
“Your local home builder and
remodeler for over 38 years”
Member: MN River Builders Assn.
MN License #4806
ROSS R. ARNESON
ATTORNEY AT LAW
302 West Main
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-5753
Real Estate, Estate Planning,
Probate and Business Law
Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Saturdays by Appointment
Farm – Residential
Commercial
Licensed - Bonded - Insured
• 24-Hour Emergency
Service
• Free Estimates
Tyler Kranz, Owner
507-964-2525
Klehr Grading
&
Excavating, Inc.
JEFF & WENDY KLEHR
Dozer, Grader, Basements,
Septic Systems, Driveways, Backhoe Work,
Hauling Gravel/Rock/Sand, Skidloader
Jeff cell: 612-756-0595
Wendy cell: 612-756-0594
640 E. BROOKS ST., ARLINGTON, MN 55307
1-507-964-5783 • FAX: 507-964-5302
Local LAWN
Enforcement
Arlington, MN
Licensed and Insured
Mowing, fertilizing and
weed control, dethatching,
garden tilling, core aeration
www.locallawnenforcement.com
Adam and David Hansen
Adam cell: 507-327-0917
507-964-5835
• 5” Seamless Gutters
• 6” Seamless Gutters
• K-Guard Leaf-Free
Gutter System
(lifetime clog free guarantee)
PHIL GOETTL
612-655-1379
888-864-5979
www.mngutter.com
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Gustafson
Family Dentistry
Dr. John D. Gustafson, D.D.S
Dr. Jared Gustafson, D.D.S
COMPREHENSIVE CARE
FOR ALL AGES
Office Hours: Monday–Friday
New Patients Welcome
Dr. Jason Anderson, D.D.S
Orthodontists
106 3
rd
Ave. NW,
Arlington
507-964-2705
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BODY REPAIR
See us for factory-trained
body repair work on
your vehicle.
• Free Estimates • Glass Replacement
• Collision Repair • Rust Repair
WINDSHIELD
REPLACEMENT
We install windshields
for all vehicles
We will contact the insurance company
for you and do all paperwork. See us
for professional glass installation.
BRAU
ARL I NGTON
www.braumotors.com
Local
507-964-5539
Toll Free
800-664-2728
Liberty
Station
Corner of Hwy. 5 & Chandler
Arlington, MN
507-964-5177 or
Toll-Free 866-752-9567
www.LibertyStationAutoSales.com
Jim
Heiland’s
Affordable Used Cars
BRAZIL
AUTOMOTIVE
36833 200
TH
ST.
GREEN ISLE, MN 55338
Tires, Air Conditioning
& Maintenance
507-326-5751
MONDAY-FRIDAY 8-5
BEN BRAZIL,
Owner/Technician
brazilautomotive@gmail.com
ATTENTION ALL 2014
Preschool & Kindergarten Students!
YOU’RE INVITED!
Green Isle Community School’s
Preschool &
Kindergarten Roundup
*3-5 Year Old PreK *Small Class Sizes
*11:1 Student:Teacher Ratio*
Registration information will be available.
Meet the teacher and GICS Staff. Tour the building.
***Children must be 5 by Sept. 1
st
to enter Kindergarten.
www.greenislecommunityschool.org
E-mail: info@greenislecommunityschool.org
507.326.7144
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a
Thurs., March 13
th
6:30-8:00 pm
L'églisedelaMadeleine, siteof first performanceof theFauréRequiemin1888 www.flickr.com/photos/maralinga/5734021679/
CHARLES GOUNOD
AVE MARIA&
STABAT MATER
GABRIELFAURÉ
REQUIEM
Soloists: James Bohn & Melody Johnson
Sunday, March 9, 2014, 2:30 p.m.
Union Presbyterian Church, Saint Peter
and
Sunday, March 16, 2014, 2:30 p.m.
Church of the Sacred Heart, Waseca
Tickets: $10 advance, $15 at door. Students free.
Swedish Kontur, St. Peter & Waseca Music Company, Waseca
This activity is made possible by the voters of Minnesota
through a grant fromthe Prairie Lakes Regional Arts Council,
thanks to a legislative appropriation from the Arts and
Cultural Heritage Fund, and by the generosity of the Carl and
Verna Schmidt Foundation, Davisco/Cambria, and friends of
the Saint Peter Choral Society.
Saint Peter Choral Society&Orchestra
SARA MCKAY, director
A
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been reported total $4,417 to
the district. Of that amount,
$150 has been recouped from
the parents/students.
Police reports are filed on
each lost, stolen or missing
iPad.
Keeping track of the fees
owed by students has been a
challenge for the tech team.
There are a number of options
that were selected by the par-
ents/students when it comes to
damages.
Option one is to pay the
tech fee and the $35 for the
damaged case. The second op-
tion is to continue to use the
damaged case and if there is
damage to the iPad, the par-
ents would be billed for that
damage.
Wills also reported that
most of the damage that the
team sees is from drops and
broken cases, with more com-
ing from the junior high in
Gaylord.
The tech team began billing
parents/students through Infi-
nite Campus earlier this
month. This streamlines the
process for collecting and
tracking what is owed and
what has been paid.
Next year will be the third
year of the project. The Ap-
pleCare, the warranty plan,
will start to expire in May.
The question is what is Sib-
ley East going to do in the up-
coming years.
Up to now, the district has
self insured the project, col-
lecting a technology fee for
each student, paired with the
AppleCare warranty.
After this year, the district
will have to pay the full cost
of any repairs or replace-
ments. Now they only pay
$49.
Wills presented the board
with an insurance quote from
Worth Avenue Group, the
same company that Gibbon
Fairfax Winthrop (GFW)
uses.
GFW has a similar iPad
project.
The insurance policy would
cover accidental damage in-
cluding drops, cracked screen
and spills; liquid submersion,
theft, fire/flood damage, van-
dalism, natural disaster, and
power surge due to lightning.
The deductible would be
$50 per claim. Policy rates are
$36-79 per iPad depending on
a one or two year plan.
There would be a little
more leg work for the district,
going with the independent
insurance.
The repairs would be done
through Apple and the district
would be billed directly. The
district would then have to
submit a claim to the insur-
ance company for reimburse-
ment.
Another issue for the board
to start to consider is the re-
placement of the current stock
of iPads.
The district has a three-year
lease on the current iPads in
use. After the three-year peri-
od the district will own the
iPads.
Wills reported that the pres-
ent day trade-in value of the
current iPads is $206. This is
estimated to be around $150
in the next year.
The iPads cost $479 apiece
when the district purchased
them two years ago.
The technology committee
will meet in the next couple of
weeks to start to talk about
what next steps for district
should be.
The board will likely hold a
work session to make the best
decisions concerning the dis-
trict and the overall project.
Project Ed.21 Continued from page 1
At 2 a.m. on the morning of
Sunday, March 9, people will
be springing their clocks for-
ward, and losing an hour of
the day, for Daylight Saving
Time. The good news: sunsets
will be an hour later.
People may have noticed
the annual tradition of Day-
light Saving Time has crept
forward a bit. People used to
spring forward on the first
Sunday in April and fall back
on the last Sunday in October.
But a couple years ago, Con-
gress changed the date and
added more Daylight Saving
Time to the calendar.
Daylight Saving Time is at 2 a.m. Sunday, March 9
Submitted Photo
Alive & Kickin’
Alive & Kickin’ provided the musical en-
tertainment during the spring fundrais-
er event sponsored by the Ridgeview
Sibley Medical Foundation at the Ar-
lington Community Center on Saturday
night, March 1. Money raised at the
event will go toward the purchase of
furniture at the newly remodeled RSMC
Clinic in Gaylord. Foundation members
are Mary Seeman, Deb Brinkman, Alex
Fredin, Kim Quast, Chris Paulsen, Jim
Pederson, Jeri Odenthal, Tom Frank
and Gail Estenson. Todd Sandburg is
the hospital administrator.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington Fire Depart-
ment responded to a dump-
ster fire inside Scott Equip-
ment at 9:04 p.m. Friday,
Feb. 28, according to Fire
Chief John Zaske.
A system inside the build-
ing alerted authorities about
the fire, John Zaske said.
There was minor damage.
The local fire department
was on the scene for approxi-
mately 50 minutes, according
to Zaske.
The local fire department,
according to Zaske, already
has responded to 20 calls in
2014.
Minor dumpster fire inside Scott Equipment
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington City Coun-
cil, during its regular meeting
on Monday night, March 3,
unanimously approved a mo-
tion to authorize the discipli-
nary action of a three-day
suspension without pay for
Maintenance Supervisor
Jason Lovaas for using city
equipment for personal gain.
City Council members
James Jaszewski, Jennifer
Nuesse, Curt Reetz, Jason
Ruehling and Galen Wills all
voted in favor of the motion.
The recommendation was
made by the Employee Rela-
tions Committee which con-
sists of Nuesse and Reetz.
The City Council initially
discussed the topic during a
closed session on Monday
evening, March 3. The City
Council later reconvened the
regular meeting and took the
official vote.
In light of the winter
weather conditions and con-
cern for proper attention to
street maintenance, the three-
day unpaid suspension will
be completed in a timely but
appropriate fashion, accord-
ing to City Administrator
Liza Donabauer.
“Staff and council do rec-
ognize that the maintenance
of our city streets is a priority.
The disciplinary action will
be fulfilled accordingly,” said
Donabauer.
Lovaas offered explana-
tions for using the city equip-
ment/vehicle.
Lovaas said, “I got a last
minute notice that my wife
couldn’t make it to town to
get our son from his after
school program. He was al-
ready waiting for a parent to
come so I picked him up and
brought him home.”
Lovaas continued, “My
wife had to bring our son to
the doctor for a bad ear infec-
tion. I was suppose to clear
the driveway for her as the
snow was too heavy for her
to shovel. I was running be-
hind because I was pulling an
employee out of alleys be-
cause the snow was too heavy
for the truck to plow.”
City Council votes 5-0 to suspend
employee for 3 days without pay
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Clean up efforts continue
in the metals shop at the Sib-
ley East Senior High School
after the fire on Tuesday
morning, Feb. 25, according
to Superintendent Jim Ams-
den.
Service Master Recovery
Management has been hired
to handle the clean up after
the fire, according to Mainte-
nance Supervisor Bob Pichel-
mann. The company has been
working seven days a week to
complete the job. The hope is
to have the clean up complet-
ed within two to three weeks.
Pichelmann said it is difficult
to specify a definite date be-
cause Sibley East does not
know how much can be
cleaned and how much needs
to be replaced.
Pichelmann added that a
variety of local contractors
will be used to complete elec-
trical and ventilation work
along with roof inspections.
The nearby FFA classroom
is already back in use, ac-
cording to Pichelmann. He
indicated that the nearby
woods shop could be ready in
about a week.
Aside from the deductible,
insurance will cover all clean
up and replacement costs.
Materials ignited in the
metals shop as students were
working on classroom proj-
ects when the fire occurred
on Tuesday morning, Feb. 25.
Clean up efforts continue after Sibley East fire
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 6, 2014, page 4
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Staff
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Pub-
lishers; Kurt Menk, Editor; Karin
Ramige, Manager; Barb Math-
wig, Office; Ashley Reetz, Sales;
and Jean Olson, Proof Reading.
Letters
This page is devoted to opin-
ions and commentary. Articles
appearing on this page are the
opinions of the writer. Views ex-
pressed here are not necessarily
those of the Arlington Enter-
prise, unless so designated. The
Arlington Enterprise strongly
encourages others to express
opinions on this page.
Letters from our readers are
strongly encouraged. Letters for
publ i cati on must bear the
writer’s signature and address.
The Arlington Enterprise re-
serves the right to edit letters
for purpose of clarity and space.
Ethics
The editorial staff of the Arling-
ton Enterprise strives to present
the news in a fair and accurate
manner. We appreciate errors
being brought to our attention.
Pl ease bri ng any gri evances
against the Arlington Enterprise to
the attention of the editor. Should
differences continue, readers are
encouraged to take their griev-
ances to the Mi nnesota News
Council, an organization dedicated
to protecti ng the publ i c from
press inaccuracy and unfairness.
The News Council can be contact-
ed at 12 South Sixth St., Suite
940, Minneapolis, MN 55402, or
(612) 341-9357.
Press Freedom
Freedom of the press is guar-
anteed under the First Amend-
ment to the U.S. Constitution:
“Congress shall make no law
respecting an establishment of
religion, or prohibiting the free
exercise thereof; or abridging
the freedom of speech, or the
press…”
Ben Frankl i n wrote i n the
Pennsylvania Gazette in 1731:
“If printers were determined not
to print anything till they were
sure it would offend nobody
there would be very little print-
ed.”
Deadline for the Arlington
Enterprise news is 4 p.m., Mon-
day, and advertising is noon,
Tuesday. Deadl i ne for The
Gal axy adverti si ng i s noon
Wednesday.
Established in 1884.
Postmaster send address changes to:
Arlington Enterprise.
402 West Alden Street, P.O. Box 388,
Arlington, MN 55307.
Phone 507-964-5547 FAX 507-964-2423.
Hours: Monday-Wednesday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.;
Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 2 p.m.; and Friday closed.
Entered as Periodicals postal matter at Arlington,
MN post office. Postage paid at Arlington USPS No.
031-980.
Subscription Rates: Minnesota – $33.00 per year. Out-
side of state – $38.00 per year.
Arlington ENTERPRISE
Local newspaper
includes plenty of school
news and information
Our View: Rural communities
revolve around their schools
Opinions
Letters To The Editor
The Arlington Enterprise tries very hard to have a bal-
ance of community and school news and pictures in its
newspaper every week throughout the year. Aside from
the monthly School Board meetings, however, it can be
very difficult to include school news during the summer
months. On the other side of the coin, school news and
pictures can dominate the newspaper at times from Sep-
tember through June.
This week’s edition of the Arlington Enterprise is a
good example of how school news and pictures can fill
most of the newspaper. That is a good problem though be-
cause schools are so important in a rural community.
Rural communities, like Arlington, Green Isle and Gay-
lord, tend to revolve around their schools. In addition to
the obvious role of educating children, schools also serve
as centers for civic education, community employment
and a variety of activities and events. They are the heart of
a rural community.
These schools also create a lot of positive news. And
when that happens, this newspaper will be there to cover
it.
-K.M.
Too Tall’s Tidbits
Happy Birthday and Happy An-
niversary to the following local and
area residents compliments of the
Arlington Lions Club Community
Calendar.
March 7
In Memory Of Sandy Revier, April
Schmidt, Doug Johnson, Emily Mc-
Carthy, Madison Rechtzigel,
Zachary Garza, and Mr. and Mrs.
Sean Drexler.
March 8
Larry Gieseke, Meigan Malarz,
Mitchell Nelson, Richard Jasken,
and Dr. and Mrs. John Gustafson.
March 9
Mr. and Mrs. Terry Deno.
March 10
Curt Schmidt and Father Keith Salis-
bury.
March 11
Barb Pichelmann, Jean Jackels, Leah
Myhro, Lisa Aguilera, Lori Jackels,
Mark Standinger, Paul Pichelmann
and Will Feterl.
March 12
George Kley, Kayla Trocke, Maria
Andrade, Peter Archer, Rick Quast,
and Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Huso.
March 13
Jake Schmidt, Sue Schultz, and Mr.
and Mrs. Tim Bratsch.
*****
An old farmer is inconsolable after
his dog goes missing. He takes out
an ad in the newspaper, but two
weeks later, there’s still no sign of
the mutt.
“What did you write in the ad?”
his wife asks. “
“Here, boy,” he replies.
*****
A man walks into a restaurant and
says, “How do you prepare your
chickens?”
The cook replies, “Nothing spe-
cial. We just tell ‘em they’re gonna
die.”
*****
A couple of dog owners are argu-
ing about whose pet is smarter.
“My dog is so smart,” says the
first owner, “that every morning he
waits for the paperboy to come
around. He tips the kid and then
brings the newspaper to me, along
with my morning coffee.”
“I know,” says the second owner.
"How do you know?" the first
owner asks.
“My dog told me.” replies the
second owner.
*****
A couple couldn’t decide which
jacket to buy their granddaughter, so
they asked the young salesman.
“If you were buying a jacket for
your girlfriend,” the man said, “what
would you get?”
“A bulletproof one,” the sales-
man replied. “I’m married.”
*****
The new family in the neighbor-
hood overslept and their six-year-old
daughter missed her school bus. Her
father had to drive her. Since he did
not know the way, he said that she
would have to direct him to the
school.
They rode several blocks before
she told him to turn left, several
more before she indicated a right
turn. This went on for 20 minutes -
left, right, right, left - but they final-
ly reached the school. Then her fa-
ther realized they were only five
blocks from home.
Much annoyed, the father asked
his daughter why she’d led him
around in such a circle.
“That's the way the school bus
goes, Daddy,” the child explained.
“It's the only way I know.”
*****
Mary announced that she was
going to start a diet to lose a few
pounds she had put on recently.
“Great,” Eva exclaimed. “I' m
ready to start a diet too. We can be
dieting buddies and help each other
out. And when I feel the urge to
drive out and get a burger and fries,
I'll call you first.”
“Wonderful,” Mary replied. “I'll
go with you!”
*****
A young man hired by a supermar-
ket reported for his first day of work.
The manager greeted him with a
warm handshake and a smile, gave
him a broom and said, “Your first
job will be to sweep out the store.”
“But I'm a college graduate!” the
young man replied indignantly.
“Oh, I'm sorry. I didn't know
that,” said the manager. “Give me
the broom and I'll show you how.”
*****
Bert took his Saint Bernard to the
vet.
“Doctor,” he said sadly, “I' m
afraid I'm going to have to ask you
to cut off my dog's tail.”
The vet stepped back, “Bert, why
should I do such a terrible thing?”
“Because my mother-in-law’s
arriving tomorrow, and I don't
want anything to make her think
she’s welcome,” Bert said.
*****
Patient: “Doctor! I have a serious
problem. I can never remember what
I just said.”
Doctor: “When did you first notice
this problem?”
Patient: “What problem?”
*****
To The Editor,
After-Prom or Post-Prom, as some
may refer to it, has had a lengthy
tradition of providing a safe, fun and
free event hosted by parents of sen-
ior high students and community
groups in our three communities.
Seniors, juniors and sophomores (as
invited guests of upper-classmen)
are invited and encouraged to at-
tend. One does not need to attend
prom in order to attend After-Prom.
Activities have included a banquet
prior to the grand march, and an en-
joyable party after the prom dance
that includes a hypnotist, games ga-
lore, prizes, food, and inflatables to
run, jump and crawl through. The
evening concludes early Sunday
morning. The banquet, grand march
and dance are held in Arlington, and
the After-Prom party is held in the
gymnasiums at the Gaylord School.
However, we are in need of much
man power in order to carry out this
endeavor.
A group of parents have worked
tirelessly since August of last year,
making plans for a fun-filled event
on site this year. Last year’s After-
Prom event was a destination event
because we simply did not have the
parental support and commitment
we needed to pull off such an under-
taking. It is our hope that parents
(and community groups ) will step
forward and offer assistance by
serving on planning committees
such as the banquet/decorating com-
mittee, fund-raising committee,
prizes committee, games committee,
food committee, and clean-up com-
mittee. To date, three mailings have
been sent to each high school fami-
ly’s home with information in regard
to After-Prom meetings and organi-
zational events that have been hap-
pening monthly as we near the two
month mark before prom arrives on
May 3. We still need help.
Your child needs your support and
help to make After-Prom a reality
now and for future classes. If you
have not volunteered to help, please
email one of us and we will be
happy to add your name to a com-
mittee of your choice. Can we
count on you? Thank you.
Ann Eckberg
Senior Parent Co-Chair, aeck-
berg@sibley-east.k12.-mn.us
Linnea Bullert
Junior Parent Co-Chair,
Linneabullert@icloud.com
Sophomore Parent
CoChair
still unfilled
Volunteers are needed for After-Prom
To The Editor,
Thank you to the Arlington Lions
Club for their wonderful service to
our Arlington community and espe-
cially their annual Fish Fry which
was held last Friday, Feb. 28. It is a
great event and always nice to see
all the area people who attend and
enjoy the delicious dinner .
I enjoyed being there and working
with all of you and seeing all the
work that goes on to make it a suc-
cessful event. The dinner is organ-
ized and prepared by the Lions Club
members.
I feel hurt when I hear comments
such as “I had to wait 20 minutes
for fish” and “The fish were crum-
bly,” etc. What restaurant can you
go to and be served immediately and
find everything to your individual
liking? For $10.00 and “all you can
eat fish,” no one should complain.
The Lions Club was running low
on fish at approximately 4:30 p.m.
so two members drove to a neigh-
boring city to purchase more fish,
thereby creating a slight wait in the
serving line. They did this to make
sure they would have fish till the
very end of the Fish Fry and not
have to shut down early. The crowd
was more than they had planned for.
Let’s be grateful that we have an
Arlington Lions Club organization
that works diligently to put on
events such as this and then donates
the profits to very worthwhile proj-
ects. Last year, the Arlington Fire
Department purchased a much need-
ed piece of equipment, “Jaws of
Life,” and was presented with a
check from the Lions Club for the
entire cost. The fire department
made use of this special equipment
on the first day they purchased it
and have used it several times in the
past year.
This year the Arlington Lions
Club is donating portions of their
profits from the Fish Fry to the Sib-
ley East Marching Band Program
for special drums and equipment
and also to the boulevard trees for
“Safe School Routes” in Arlington.
These are very worthwhile projects
that will benefit our Arlington com-
munity and Sibley East Schools.
Thank you to the Arlington Lions
Club for all your donations to these
worthwhile projects. Looking for-
ward to next year’s Fish Fry and
being there to work with all of you.
And thank you to all the other com-
munity members (teachers, students,
business people, senior citizens and
lot of friends of the Lions Club) who
helped the Arlington Lions Club
members to again make this a won-
derful event.
Marge Kloeckl
Arlington
Friend of the
Arlington Lions Club
Lions Fish Fry is a wonderful event
SHARE YOUR OPINION
THROUGH A
LETTER TO THE EDITOR.
EMAIL YOUR LETTER TO
KURTM@ARLINGTONMNNEWS.COM
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 6, 2014, page 5
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
History
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Front Row: (left to right) Jaylyn Sutton,
Cody Schauer, Carlos Arredondo, Matt
Wood, Emma Lenertz, Landon Fisher
and Miguel Cruz. Middle Row: (l to r)
Mylin Farias, Iliana Trevino, Lilli Miller,
McKenna Glawe, Ady Beneke and
Mo’nique Alvarado. Back Row: (l to r)
Garrett Stegeman, Ashley Garcia, Anna
Colling, Carson Bartyzal, Aidan McCue,
Jaden Klancke and Ximena Sanchez.
Missing from the photo is Yakelin
Calderon.
COLUMBIA, MO—Two-
thirds of residents in small
towns across America depend
upon their local newspaper
for news and information, ac-
cording to the National
Newspaper Association’s
most recent newspaper read-
ership survey.
NNA, founded in 1885,
represents 2,200 members
across the U.S. Its mission is
to protect, promote and en-
hance America’s community
newspapers. Most of its
members are weekly or small
daily newspapers in smaller
or niche communities.
The survey noted that more
readers are using mobile de-
vices to shop, read and com-
municate. The number with
smartphones jumped from 24
percent to 45 percent and 39
percent said they used the
phones to access local news.
Newspaper websites re-
mained the leading provider
of local news, followed dis-
tantly by a local TV station’s
site and then by national ag-
gregators, such as Google and
Yahoo.
The annual NNA Commu-
nity Newspaper Readership
survey was completed in
2013 in partnership with the
Center for Advanced Social
Research of the Reynolds
Journalism Institute at the
University of Missouri. Sur-
veyors reached 508 house-
holds in communities where a
local newspaper of circula-
tion of 15,000 or less served
the communities.The survey
began in 2005. It has consis-
tently shown the community
newspaper to be the informa-
tion leader in smaller com-
munities.
Trust in the local newspa-
per remains high, the survey
found.
Overall, readers in the
2013 survey gave high rat-
ings to the accuracy, cover-
age, quality of writing and
fairness of news reporting of
the local print newspapers. In
“coverage of local news,”
“quality of writing” and “fair-
ness of reporting,” their com-
bined ratings were higher
than in 2012.
• 94 percent of readers
agreed that the newspapers
were informative.
• 80 percent said that they
and their families looked for-
ward to reading the newspa-
pers.
• 78 percent relied on the
newspapers for local news
and information.
• 72 percent said the news-
papers entertained them.
Local readers also like to
share their newspaper with
others. The “pass-along rate”
of the primary subscriber’s
sharing with others rose in
2013 to 2.48, compared to
2.18 in 2012 and 2.33 in
2011, possibly indicating
continued economic pressure
from the fallout of the Great
Recession as families econo-
mize by purchasing fewer in-
dividual copies.
Striking was the finding
that nearly one-third of
households still do not have
Internet access at home. The
finding parallels similar con-
clusions from the U.S. Cen-
sus Bureau and others that
continue to report slow
growth in Internet penetration
across smaller, and particular-
ly rural communities.
NNA President Robert M.
Williams Jr., publisher of the
Blackshear (GA) Times, re-
marked that the RJI research
consistently shows the com-
munity newspaper as the
dominant information medi-
um in their communities.
“We know that it is very
difficult for a good communi-
ty to survive without a good
newspaper and vice versa,”
Williams said. “The high lev-
els of trust, the consistent
pass-along rate and the desire
to find the newspaper in
whatever medium the reader
wishes to use—whether mo-
bile, print or Web—demon-
strate the value of good com-
munity journalism.”
Williams’ theme during his
presidency has been the inter-
dependency of local commu-
nities and local newspapers.
“As I often say, if you want
a Big Mac, you go to Mc-
Donald’s. If you want local
news in Blackshear, you go to
the Blackshear Times. That
high quality news franchise is
replicated across America—
particularly in smaller com-
munities—in ways that elec-
tronic media can only en-
hance, not supplant. As our
electronic mission develops,
we remain strong in print and
proud of it. We are thankful
for America’s readers, who
use our news and information
and make our communities
strong,” he said.
Jerry Lyles with Athlon
Media Group, said "Newspa-
pers are the eyes, ears and
hearts of communities across
America. They provide local
news and information impor-
tant to their residents that
can' t be found anywhere
else."
Interlink founder and
owner Bill Garber said, “This
year ’s NNA research con-
firms that the newspaper it-
self remains, by a wider mar-
gin, the most preferred and
trusted source for local news
and information as well as
advertising.”
“Like readers everywhere,
Interlink values community
newspapers; and like publish-
ers everywhere, we value
community newspaper read-
ers, too.
“That is why this year, and
well before the U.S. Postal
Service regroups to require it,
we will bring proven Full-
Service Intelligent Mail® de-
livery superiority to every
newspaper subscriber that
every one of our clients mail
to wherever they live and
work,” Garber added.
“As the NNA study also
proves, newspapers today
don’t need to be different or
better to attract more sub-
scribers. People like the paper
well enough just the way it
is! Not that better isn’t—well,
better. And not that with more
readers publishers aren’t like-
ly to invest in making their
papers better for both their
readers and their advertisers.
As the study proves and as
publishers are proving every
week, new subscribers are
signing up every day.”
Interlink President Brad
Hill concurs: “We salute
NNA and its member pub-
lishers for being truly suc-
cessful under what has been
for some time less than an
ideal economy,” Hill said,
adding that Interlink is proud
to be an NNA Partner and
proud to help support NNA’s
readership survey.
“Interlink believes in the
strength of community news-
papers. Nothing connects the
people of a small community
like their local newspaper,”
added Hill, who is an NNA
representative on the Post-
master General’s Mailers’
Technical Advisory Commit-
tee.
The Executive Summary of
the Readership Survey is at-
tached. Full survey results are
available to NNA member
newspapers at
www.nnaweb.org.
NNA survey: Small town residents
depend on their community paper
Sibley County Court
The following misdemeanors,
petty misdemeanors and gross
misdemeanors were heard in Dis-
trict Court February 21-28: Min-
nesota State Patrol (MSP); Sher-
iff’s Office (SO); Department of
Natural Resources (DNR); MN
Department of Transportation
(MNDOT):
Logan W. Kistner, 20, Arling-
ton, vehicle registration required,
$115, Arlington PD; Jason C.
Hansen, 41, Watertown, driving
after suspension, $150, Gaylord
PD; Andrew P. Hose, 34, Coon
Rapids, expired plates, $115,
Gaylord PD; Laroy L.A. Pittman,
21, Gaylord, domestic assault-
commits act with intent to cause
fear of immediate bodily harm or
death, local confinement 90 days,
$85, Gaylord PD; Jason M.
Schooler, 38, Hutchinson, failure
to drive in a single lane, $135,
Gaylord PD; Levi R. Allen, 33,
Green Isle, driver must carry
proof of insurance when operat-
ing vehicle, dismissed, Gibbon
PD; Robert D. Bussler, 54,
Winthrop, driver must carry
proof of insurance when operat-
ing vehicle, dismissed, Gibbon
PD; Gail K. Halliburton, 33,
Hopkins, driver must carry proof
of insurance when operating ve-
hicle, dismissed, Gibbon PD;
Jack C. Petersen, 42, Brookings,
S.D. duty to drive with due care-
speed greater than reasonable,
$125, Gibbon PD; Kimberly S.
Berry, 34, Morton, driver must
carry proof of insurance when
operating vehicle, dismissed,
Henderson PD; Michael P. Schaf-
fer, 26, Cologne, driver must
carry proof of insurance when
operating vehicle, dismissed,
Henderson PD; Sandy L. Arm-
strong, 42, Arlington, speed,
$135, MSP; James D. Bach, 20,
Henderson, seat belt required,
$110, MSP; Giesi Colchado, 35,
Gaylord, driving without a valid
license or vehicle class type,
speed, continued, unsupervised
probation one year, pay costs, no
driver license violations, remain
law-abiding, $245, MSP; Scott J.
Corrow, 48, Hutchinson, speed,
$135, MSP; Devin G. Devos, 28,
Minneota, exceed working load
limit on tiedown, $385, MSP;
Patrick, D. Domeier, 46, Apple
Valley, speed. $125. MSP; Brian
J. Heater, 42, Glencoe, driver
fails to stop at entrance of
through highway, stay of imposi-
tion, unsupervised probation one
year, sentence to service 40 hours
for indeterminate, remain law-
abiding, no misdemeanor moving
violations, no driver license vio-
lations, no driving without insur-
ance, $85, MSP; Cristina M. Her-
nandez, 23, Gibbon, speed, con-
tinued, unsupervised probation
one year, pay costs, no moving
violations, remain law-abiding,
$135, MSP; Rebecca J. King, 30,
Mankato, speed, $125, MSP;
Ryan W. Lewis, 33, Gaylord,
seatbelt violation in a commercial
vehicle, no load securement,
$410, MSP; Gregory A. Nelson,
49, Dassel, driver fails to stop at
entrance to through highway,
$150, annual inspection of com-
mercial vehicles required, driver
fails to secure load, dismissed,
MSP; Jeremy M. Olson, 29, Fair-
fax, annual inspection of com-
mercial vehicles required, $185,
MSP; Suzanne E. Pichotta, 51,
Winthrop, uninsured vehicle-
owner violation, $285, MSP;
Pamela J. Ruschmeyer, 40, Gib-
bon, failure to obtain new driv-
er’s licence after changing name
or address, $105, MSP; Amber
M. Scherer, 24, Prior Lake,
speed, $135, MSP; Viorel S.
Sucio, 48, Deux-Montagnes PQ
Quebec, traffic regulation-rail-
road crossing, $185, MSP; Jody
M. Voges, 33, Eagan, driver falls
to stop at entrance to through
highway, $135, MSP; Brian S.
Williams, 47, Waconia, speed,
$135, MSP; Bernard A. Wojcik
Jr., 48, Belle Plaine, speed, $145,
MSP; Myo M. Zaw, 18, Huron,
S.D., speed, $225, MSP; Lynette
M. Foster, 46, Marshall, driving
after revocation, $85, SO; Sonia
M. Garcia, 18, Le Sueur, liquor
consumption by persons under
21, $185, SO; Michael D. Gun-
ther, 59, Arlington, operate un-
registered vehicle/without plates
displayed on public St./Hwy.,
$185, driver must carry proof of
insurance when operating vehi-
cle, dismissed, SO; Timothy P.
Hassing, 30, Fairmont, driving
after revocation, continued, unsu-
pervised probation six months,
obtain driver’s license, provide
proof to court administration, pay
costs, no driver license viola-
tions, remain law-abiding, $50,
SO; Phyllis, D. Lepp, 60, Butter-
field, speed, $125, SO; Nancy V.
Morales, 40, San Benito, Texas,
driving after revocation, $200,
speed, dismissed, SO; Thomas S.
Nesvig, 60, Gaylord, speed,
$145, SO; David D. Schwartz,
35, Fairfax, driver must carry
proof of insurance when operat-
ing vehicle, dismissed, SO;
Hunter R. Solomonson, 18, New
Auburn, theft-take/use/transfer
movable property-no consent,
stay of imposition, unsupervised
probation one year, sentence to
service 40 hours for indetermi-
nate, pay restitution, follow all
instructions of probation, sign
probation agreement, sign all re-
leases of information, $145, SO;
Corey D. Harris-Peterson, 21,
Winthrop, liquor-
purchase/sell/barter/furnish/give
to under 21 years, stay of imposi-
tion, supervised probation two
years, sentenced to service 10
days for indeterminate, remain
law-abiding, contact with proba-
tion, follow all conditions set
forth in probation agreement, fol-
low all instructions of probation,
sign probation agreement, sign all
releases of information, $360,
Winthrop PD.
The following felonies were
heard in District Court February
21-28:
Daniel J. Carlson, 36, Gaylord,
domestic assault, dismissed, Gay-
lord PD; Benjamin A. Babekuhl,
20, DWI-operate motor vehicle
under influence of alcohol, stay
of imposition, supervised proba-
tion two years, local confinement
two days, credit for time served
two days, sentence to service 40
hours for indeterminate, contact
with probation, follow all condi-
tions set forth in the probation
agreement, follow all instructions
of probation, sign probation
agreement, chemical dependency
evaluation/treatment, follow rec-
ommendations of evaluation, sign
all releases of information, no al-
cohol/controlled substance use,
no possession of alcohol or
drugs, random testing, victim im-
pact panel. remain law-abiding,
no contact with victim(s), $485,
burglary, DWI-operate motor ve-
hicle-alcohol concentration 0.08
within two hours, dismissed, SO;
David A. Buck, 26, Prior Lake,
theft-take/use/transfer moveable
property-no consent, continued,
supervised probation five years,
local confinement 15 days, credit
for time served four days, sen-
tence to service 20 days for inde-
terminate, contact with probation,
follow all instructions of proba-
tion, sign probation agreement,
follow all conditions set forth in
probation agreement, sign all re-
leases of information, chemical
dependency evaluation/treatment,
follow recommendations of eval-
uation, random testing, mental
health screening, assessment, no
same or similar, no controlled
substance use or possession,
$135, SO.
85 Years Ago
March 7, 1929
Louis Kill, Editor
The Wm. Boettcher farm in
Green Isle township, which was
recently purchased by Aug.
Huckenpoehler and Martin
Hillemann, changed hands again
last week, when Wm. Koester
became the owner. The 120
acres were sold for $125 per
acre.
The auction held at the Ed
Bach place last week was well
attended and proved a profitable
venture for the owner. Over
$4,000 was realized from the
sale.
65 Years Ago
March 10, 1949
Louis Kill, Editor
A pretty wedding ceremony
was solemnized Monday after-
noon, February 21st at 2 o’clock
at the St. Paul’s Lutheran
Church when Miss Marion
Voight, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Albert Voight was married.
Miss Marion became the bride
of Ervin Schuft, a triplet of three
boys, son of Mr. Alvin Schuft of
Brownton.
Mr. Farmer! We have a new
Dearborn Woods Brothers Com-
bine on display. We would like
to have you come in and see it. -
Spannaus & Mueller.
45 Years Ago
March 6, 1969
Val Kill, Editor
Mary McCarthy, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mc-
Carthy, will be among the 42 of-
ficers in 14 Minnesota districts
attending the 24th annual meet-
ing of the Future Homemakers
of America (FHA) March 7 and
8 in St. Paul. Mary, vice presi-
dent of District IV, will hear
Mrs. Hubert H. Humphrey
speak at the general session.
Kenneth Werner, printer for
the Arlington Enterprise, an-
nounced this week that he has
purchased the newspaper at
Mapleton, Minn. He will take
over the publication of the Blue
Earth County Enterprise on
April 1st.
Mr. and Mrs Orville Rickard
of Arlington wish to announce
the engagement of their daugh-
ter, Roseann Elaine, to Richard
W. Nagel, son of Mrs. Frieda
Nagel, also of Arlington. A July
wedding is being planned.
25 Years Ago
March 9, 1989
Kurt Menk, Editor
An Arlington-Green Isle High
School senior’s play received
first place honors in th Gaylord
High School Drama Club Play
Writing Contest. Christina Kelly
wrote the play “Boxes,” about a
family struggling to get out of
an economic rut. Miss Kelly re-
ceived $50 for her entry. The
contest was open to the Gaylord
Community as well as the area
school’s English students.
Allen and Robin Giesen of
Arlington wish to announce the
birth of their son, Nate Allen
born on Feb. 26. He weighed 8
lbs. 1 oz.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
St. Paul’s Lutheran
School in Arlington will
celebrate Lutheran Elemen-
tary School Week from
Monday, March 10 through
Sunday, March 16.
Grandparents Day will be
held on Monday, March 10.
Grandparents will have the
opportunity to spend the
day or part of the day with
their grandchildren in class-
es or at lunch.
Amanda Fisher will also
hold a Family Fitness Night
at 6:30 p. m. Monday,
March 10.
Students will take a field
trip to Coborn’s in Glencoe
on Tuesday, March 11. The
student will later take a
field trip to the arboretum
and learn about maple
syrup.
Students will have an Ac-
tivity Day on Wednesday,
March 12. Students will
take an art trip around the
world by mixing up the
classrooms that morning.
A
Parent/Congregation/Visi-
tor Day will be held on
Thursday, March 13. These
people are encouraged to
visit the classrooms for all
or part of the day or just
stop by for lunch.
A church service will be
held at St. Paul’s Lutheran
Church in Arlington at 10
a.m. Sunday, March 16.
Families will sing with the
children in grades PreK-8.
In addition, there will be an
art gallery in the basement
of the church.
St. Paul’s will celebrate Lutheran Elementary Week
Students in the kinder-
garten classroom of Jolene
Harms at the Sibley East Ele-
mentary School in Arlington
recently celebrated their first
100 days in school.
The following is a list of
kindergarten students and the
things they have learned dur-
ing their first 100 days.
*****
“I learned the ABCs.” -
Mo’nique Alvarado
*****
“I learned how to write my
name.” - Carlos Arredondo
*****
“I learned how to work
hard.” - Carson Bartyzal
*****
“I learned how to read.” -
Ady Beneke
*****
“I learned how to count to
100.” - Anna Colling
*****
“I learned how to rhyme.” -
Miguel Cruz
*****
“I learned how to count.” -
Mylin Farias
*****
“I learned how to play “Go
Fish.” - Landon Fisher
*****
“I learned all the colors.”
Ashley Garcia
*****
“I learned how to make
shapes.” - McKenna Glawe
*****
“I learned all the shapes.” -
Emma Lenertz
*****
“I learned how to write my
last name.” - Jaden Klancke
*****
“I learned how to make
heart animals. ” - Aidan
McCue
*****
“I learned numbers.” - Lilli
Miller
*****
“I learned how to draw
people.” - Ximena Sanchez
*****
“I learned how to write to
100.” - Cody Schauer
*****
“I learned how to write
numbers.” - Garrett Stege-
man
*****
“I learned how to write the
ABCs.” - Jaylyn Sutton
*****
“I learned how to spell
words.” - Iliana Trevino
*****
“I learned how to do word
hunts.” - Matt Wood
*****
Yakelin Calderon was ab-
sent.
*****
Kindergarteners celebrate 100 days
at the Sibley East Elementary School
Call us at:
507-964-5547
Arlington Enterprise
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 6, 2014, page 6
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Sports
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
wrestling team captured four
medals during the Minnesota
State Class A Individual
Wrestling Tournament at the
Xcel Energy Center in St.
Paul on Friday, Feb. 28 and
Saturday, March 1.
In addition to the state
championship won by Nathan
Rose at 195 pounds, senior
Hunter Retzlaff (145) and
freshman Tanner Pasvogel
(106) both placed third. Jun-
ior Jason Meyer (132) placed
fifth.
Other state participants
were senior Mitch Wentzlaff
(152), junior Austin Brock-
hoff (138) and sophomore
Jake Wentzlaff (160).
“As for the individuals who
placed at state, I was proud of
our individual effort,” said
Sibley East head coach Chad
Johnson. “Hunter Retzlaff
and Tanner Pasvogel were
both 8-1. Jason Meyer was 7-
2. It was an overall good ef-
fort by our individuals.”
Johnson said, “I was really
happy for Hunter to end his
career the way he did. I’m
also glad to have Jason and
Tanner’s placing experience
back in the room next year.”
Johnson continued, “As for
the other three qualifiers, I
think they would like to retry
some of the matches over. It’s
tough to wrestle at that level
in every match.”
Hunter Retzlaff
145-pounds: Hunter Ret-
zlaff (SE) decisioned sopho-
more Noah Landrus, Aitkin,
3-2 in the opening round. In
the quarter-final round, Ret-
zlaff decisioned senior Dylan
Herman, United South Cen-
tral, 10-5. In the semi-final
round, Retzlaff lost by a
major decision to senior
Larry Bomstad, Atwater-Cos-
mos-Grove City, 12-1. In the
wrestlebacks, Retzlaff deci-
sioned senior A. J. Riley,
Chatfield, 5-0. In the third-
place match, Retzlaff deci-
sioned junior Dylan Herman,
Minneota, 5-3.
Atwater-Cosmos-Grove
City senior Larry Bomstad
won the championship at 145
pounds.
Retzlaff concluded the sea-
son with a 43-4 record over-
all. It was his fourth state
tournament appearance.
He is the son of Nathan
and Terry Grant, Gaylord.
Tanner Pasvogel
106-pounds: Tanner Pasvo-
gel (SE) decisioned freshman
Jake Nohre, West Central
Area-Ashby-Evansville, 7-0
in the opening round. In the
quarter-final round, Pasvogel
decisioned sophomore Ethan
Cota, Kenyon-Wanamingo, 7-
5. In the semi-final round,
Pasvogel was decisioned by
sophomore Skylar Hieron-
imus, Adrian Area, 7-4. In the
wrestlebacks, Pasvogel deci-
sioned junior Anthony Kern,
Bertha-Hewitt-Verndale, 9-2.
In the third-place match,
Pasvogel decisioned fresh-
man Caleb Kreitter,
Crosby/Ironton 2-0.
Adrian Area sophomore
Skylar Hieronimus won the
championship at 106 pounds.
Pasvogel concluded the
season with a 44-5 record
overall. It was his first state
tournament appearance.
He is the son of Lisa
Pasvogel, Arlington, and Burt
Pasvogel, Belle Plaine.
Jason Meyer
132-pounds: Jason Meyer
(SE) decisioned sophomore
Michael Preuss, Adrian Area,
7-3 in the opening round. In
the quarter-final round,
Meyer won by a major deci-
sion over senior Kole Lefeb-
vre, Mahnomen-Waubun, 8-
0. In the semi-final round,
Meyer was decisioned by
senior Mason Moreno, Hay-
field, 4-3. In the wrestle-
backs, Meyer was pinned by
junior Cody Weiland, Crook-
ston, 4:19. In the fifth-place
match, Meyer decisioned
sophomore Ted Androli,
Kenyon-Wanamingo, 7-2.
Kimball Area junior Quin-
ten Berres won the champi-
onship at 132 pounds.
Meyer concluded the sea-
son with a 40-8 record over-
all. It was his third state tour-
nament appearance.
He is the son of Jeff and
Deb Meyer, Gaylord.
Austin Brockhoff
138-pounds: Austin Brock-
hoff (SE) decisioned senior
Jace Clawiter, Kenyon-
Wanamingo, 8-5 in overtime
in the opening round. In the
quarter-final round, Brock-
hoff lost by a major decision
to sophomore Bryce Bruner,
Minneota, 10-2. In the
wrestlebacks, Brockhoff was
decisioned by junior Austin
Skillings, Frazee, 6-4 in over-
time.
Chatfield junior Hank
Friederichs won the champi-
onship at 138 pounds.
Brockhoff concluded the
season with a 39-5 record
overall. It was his third state
tournament appearance.
He is the son of Dave and
Laurie Brockhoff, Arlington.
Mitch Wentzlaff
152-pounds: Mitch Went-
zlaff (SE) was pinned by jun-
ior Paden Moore, Jackson
County Central, 1:24 in the
opening round. In the
wrestlebacks, Wentzlaff lost
by a major decision to sopho-
more Jerod Novak, Aitkin,
17-3.
Atwater-Cosmos-Grove
City senior Logan Peterson
won the championship at 152
pounds.
Wentzlaff concluded the
season with a 29-16 record
overall. It was his second
state tournament appearance.
He is the son of John and
Kelli Wentzlaff, Arlington.
Jake Wentzlaff
160-pounds: Jake Went-
zlaff (SE) won by an injury
default over senior Blake
Bergeron, Crookston. In the
quarter-final round, Wentzlaff
lost by a major decision to
senior Andrew Dayland, St.
Charles, 11-1. In the wrestle-
backs, Wentzlaff was deci-
sioned by junior Cole Hen-
nen, Minneota, 8-4.
Royalton-Upsala senior
Mitch Lange won the cham-
pionship at 160 pounds.
Wentzlaff concluded the
season with a 29-14 record
overall. It was his first state
tournament appearance.
He is the son of John and
Kelli Wentzlaff.
SE wrestlers bring home 4 medals
Senior Mitch Wentzlaff, top, lost both of his matches
in the 152-pound division at the state tournament. He
concluded the season with a 29-16 record overall.
Junior Austin Brockhoff, top, posted a 1-2 record in
the 138-pound division at the state tournament. He
concluded the season with a 39-5 record overall.
Sophomore Jake Wentzlaff, top, posted a 1-2 record
in the 160-pound division at the state tournament. He
concluded the season with a 29-14 record overall.
Senior Hunter Retzlaff, top, placed third
in the 145-pound division at the state
tournament. He concluded the season
with a 43-4 record overall.
Junior Jason Meyer, top, placed fifth in
the 132-pound division at the state
tournament. He concluded the season
with a 40-8 record overall.
Freshman Tanner Pasvogel, top, placed
third in the 106-pound weight division
at the state tournament. He concluded
the season with a 44-5 record overall.
Arlington Enterprise photos by Kurt Menk
Senior Nathan Rose held the 195-pound bracket dur-
ing the awards ceremony at the Xcel Energy Center
in St. Paul on Saturday night, March 1. It was the
third consecutive state championship for Rose.
Wells Fargo, the premier
corporate sponsor of the Min-
nesota State High School
League (MSHSL), announced
that Sibley East senior
Nathan Rose and Sibley East
freshman Tanner Pasvogel
have been named to the Class
A Boys’ Wrestling All-Tour-
nament Team.
The awards recognize stu-
dent athletes who demon-
strate exceptional sportsman-
ship, team commitment, ath-
letic ability and leadership
during the state high school
tournaments. Athletes are se-
lected to the Wells Fargo All-
Tournament Team by a panel
of coaches attending the tour-
nament. Boys’ Wrestling pro-
vides 14 awards for this class
of competition.
Rose and Pasvogel both
posted 3-0 records during the
team tournament at the Xcel
Energy Center in St. Paul on
Thursday, Feb. 27.
Rose wrestled at both 195
and 220 pounds during the
team tournament. He is the
son of Tony and Jenny Rose,
Arlington.
Pasvogel wrestled at both
106 and 113 pounds during
the team tournament. He is
the son of Lisa Pasvogel, Ar-
lington, and Burt Pasvogel,
Belle Plaine.
Wells Fargo is the premier
corporate sponsor of the
MSHSL. This sponsorship
helps offset the costs associ-
ated with tournaments and
fine arts events for Minnesota
students. It also supports pro-
grams such as the MSHSL
High School Hall of Fame,
along with the Challenge
Cup, a program which selects
the best Minnesota schools in
Class A, Class AA and Class
AAA for athletic and fine arts
competitions.
Rose and Pasvogel named to all tournament team
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 6, 2014, page 7
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
wrestling team placed sixth
during the Minnesota State
Class A Team Wrestling Tour-
nament at the Xcel Energy
Center in St. Paul on Thurs-
day, Feb. 27.
The Wolverines lost to At-
water-Cosmos-Grove City
43-20 during the opening
round of the tournament.
In the consolation, Sibley
East rebounded with a 31-24
win over Minneota.
The Wolverines, in the con-
solation championship, sur-
rendered a lead and lost to
Pierz 35-26.
“If you asked us in the be-
ginning of the year if we
would be happy going to state
and taking sixth, we would
have said yes,” said Sibley
East head coach Chad John-
son. “You always want more.
I think we did okay. Not
great, not poor. But you can’t
be just okay to try to win a
state title or place higher than
we did.”
The Wolverines conclude
the season with a 22-9 record
overall
A-C-GC 43
Sibley East 20
106-pounds: Tommy Went-
zlaff (SE) was pinned by
Shane Whitcomb (A-C-GC)
3:45.
113-pounds: Tanner Pasvo-
gel (SE) won by a major de-
cision over Rylan Molinaro
(A-C-GC) 11-2.
120-pounds: Mitch Heibel
(SE) was decisioned by Bren-
nan Holien (A-C-GC) 4-3.
126-pounds: Mason Voight
(SE) was decisioned by Jacob
Whitcomb (A-C-GC) 10-6.
132-pounds: Jason Meyer
(SE) decisioned Cameron
Whitcomb (A-C-GC) 2-0.
138-pounds: Austin Brock-
hoff (SE) decisioned Jeremy
Nelson (A-C-GC) 6-0.
145-pounds: Quinlan Riff-
enburg (SE) lost by a techni-
cal fall to Tyler Berghuis (A-
C-GC) 17-1.
152-pounds: Hunter Ret-
zlaff (SE) won by a major de-
cision over Derek Dengerud
(A-C-GC) 14-4.
160-pounds: Mitch Went-
zlaff (SE) lost by a technical
fall to Larry Bomstad (A-C-
GC) 22-7.
170-pounds: Jake Went-
zlaff (SE) was decisioned by
Jase Peterson (A-C-GC) 6-5.
182-pounds: Austin Kube
(SE) was pinned by Jordan
Nelson (A-C-GC) 1:11.
195-pounds: Nathan Rose
(SE) pinned Daniel Hender-
son (A-C-GC) 1:39.
220-pounds: Jon DuFrane
(SE) was pinned by Lucas
Damm (A-C-GC) 3:10.
285-pounds: Jaden Podratz
(SE) was pinned by Jordan
Fester (A-C-GC) 1:28.
Sibley East 31
Minneota 24
106-pounds: Tommy Went-
zlaff (SE) was pinned by
Austin DeVlaeminck (M)
0:15.
113-pounds: Tanner Pasvo-
gel (SE) decisioned Brock
Buysse (M) 6-2.
120-pounds: Mitch Heibel
(SE) was decisioned by Bren-
dan Reiss (M) 6-3.
126-pounds: Mason Voight
(SE) was decisioned by Eric
Hauswedell (M) 8-6.
132-pounds: Jason Meyer
(SE) won by a major decision
over Landyn VanOverbeke
(M) 13-4.
138-pounds: Austin Brock-
hoff (SE) pinned Kolin Drietz
(M) 3:13.
145-pounds: Hunter Ret-
zlaff (SE) decisioned Bryce
Bruner (M) 7-3.
152-pounds: Quinlan Riff-
enburg (SE) lost by a techni-
cal fall to Leo Buysee (M)
18-1.
160-pounds: Mitch Went-
zlaff (SE) decisioned Kael Ja-
cobson (M) 2-1 in four over-
times.
170-pounds: Jake Went-
zlaff (SE) decisioned Cole
Hennen (M) 9-4.
182-pounds: Cody Voight
(SE) was decisioned by
Everett VanHecke (M) 9-3.
195-pounds: Nathan Rose
(SE) pinned Nathan Bueltel
(M) 1:02.
220-pounds: Jon DuFrane
(SE) lost by a major decision
to Trent Esping (M) 17-8.
285-pounds: Jaden Podratz
(SE) decisioned Ryan Twedt
(M) 8-7.
Pierz 35
Sibley East 26
106-pounds: Tanner Pasvo-
gel (SE) decisioned Brandon
Ortman (P) 9-7.
113-pounds: Tommy Went-
zlaff (SE) won by a forfeit.
120-pounds: Mitch Heibel
(SE) was decisioned by Bran-
don Sullivan (P) 6-4.
126-pounds: Mason Voight
(SE) lost by a technical fall to
Christopher Ortman (P) 16-0.
132-pounds: Jason Meyer
(SE) decisioned Andrew
Tomala (P) 20-9.
138-pounds: Austin Brock-
hoff (SE) won by a major de-
cision over Evan Woitalla (P)
8-0.
145-pounds: Hunter Ret-
zlaff (SE) decisioned Kolton
Eischens (P) 12-6.
152-pounds: Mitch Went-
zlaff (SE) was decisioned by
Brett Kapsner (P) 4-2.
160-pounds: Jake Went-
zlaff (SE) was decisioned by
Matt Kummet (P) 12-7.
170-pounds: Paul Schmidt
(SE) was pinned by Teddy
Dehler (P) 0:29.
182-pounds: Austin Kube
(SE) lost by a technical fall to
Jordon Goebel (P) 4:31.
195-pounds: Cody Voight
(SE) was pinned by Ryley
Smude (P) 3:13.
220-pounds: Nathan Rose
(SE) pinned Austin Gall (P)
2:44.
285-pounds: Jon DuFrane
(SE) lost by a major decision
to Curtis Brisk (P) 10-2.
Sibley East wrestling team places
6th at state tournament in St. Paul
Legals
City of Green Isle
Public Hearing Notice
The City Council of the City of
Green Isle will conduct a public
hearing on Tuesday, March 11th
at 6:30 p.m. or as soon thereafter
as possible. The hearing will take
place at Green Isle City Hall, 310
McGrann Street, Green Isle, MN,
55338.
The purpose of the hearing is
to accept public input on the re-
peal and repl acement of the
Green Isle Zoning Ordinance.
The proposed Zoni ng Ordi -
nance will replace the existing or-
dinance which dates back to the
1970’s. The proposed Zoning Or-
dinance will be enacted to pro-
mote the health, safety, morals,
and general welfare of the inhabi-
tants of the City of Green Isle.
The proposed Zoning Ordinance
assigns rules and regulations for
land uses; defines certain terms;
establishes procedures for the
approval and recording of land
uses; establishes land use dis-
tricts; identifies permitted and
conditional uses allowed within
each district; includes provisions
for overlay districts; and, assigns
ordinance administration stan-
dards.
A copy of the proposed Ordi-
nance is available in its entirety
for review at Green Isle City Hall.
The public is invited to attend the
public hearing. If you are unable
to attend, but wish to comment,
please send written comments to:
Mr. Bert Panning, City Clerk/Trea-
surer, City of Green Isle, P.O. Box
275, Green Isle, MN, 55338.
Bert Panning
City Clerk/Treasurer
Publish: March 6, 2014
STATE OF MINNESOTA
COUNTY OF SIBLEY
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
JOINT DITCH AUTHORITY –
SIBLEY-CARVER
In the matter of Joint Ditch #@
SC
Petitioners Robert Kloth, et-al
hereby
Request formal approval to be re-
moved
From Joint Ditch #2 SC Drainage
System
NOTICE OF HEARING ON
THE PETITION FOR
REMOVAL OF PROPERTY
FROM JOINT DITCH #2SC
DRAINAGE SYSTEM
WHEREAS, on the 3rd day of
January, 2014 a Petition for the
removal of property from the Joint
Ditch #2 Sibley and Carver Coun-
ties was filed in the office of the
County Auditor of Sibley County,
Minnesota, and
WHEREAS, the Sibley County
Attorney has reviewed the Peti-
tion and finds that it is proper and
pursuant to the provisions con-
tained in Minnesota State Statute
103E.
NOW, THEREFORE, TAKE
NOTICE, That the hearing to dis-
cuss the Petitioner’s request will
be held before the Joint County
Di tch Authori ty on Tuesday,
March 11, 2014 at 1:30 p.m. in
the Commissioner’s Room of the
Courthouse in the City of Gay-
lord, Minnesota. All interested
persons are invited to attend and
be heard in this matter. Items to
be discussed and considered in-
clude:
1. Receive the Petition for the
Removal of Property
2. Consider accepting the Peti-
tion for the Removal of Property
3. Consider appointment of
viewers
4. Other items of business as
deemed necessary.
If you have any questi ons,
please contact the Sibley County
Auditor’s Office at 507-237-4070
or PropertyTax@co.sibley.mn.us
Dated: February 11, 2014
Lisa Pfarr,
Sibley County Auditor
Publish: February 20, 27 and
March 6, 2014
STATE OF MINNESOTA
COUNTY OF SIBLEY
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
JOINT DITCH AUTHORITY-
SIBLEY-CARVER
In the matter of Joi nt Di tch
#22SC
Petitioners Robert Kloth, et-al
hereby
Request formal approval to be in-
cluded
Into the Joi nt Di tch #22 SC
Drainage System
NOTICE OF HEARING ON
THE PETITION FOR
INCLUSION INTO THE
JOINT DITCH #22 SC
DRAINAGE SYSTEM
WHEREAS, on the 3rd day of
January, 2014, a Petition for the
Inclusion of property into Joint
Di tch #22 Si bl ey and Carver
Counties was filed in the office of
the County Audi tor of Si bl ey
County, Minnesota, and
WHEREAS, the Sibley County
Attorney has reviewed the Peti-
tion and finds that it is proper and
pursuant to the provisions con-
tained in Minnesota State Statute
103E.
NOW, THEREFORE, TAKE
NOTICE, That the hearing to dis-
cuss the Petitioner’s request will
be held before the Joint County
Di tch Authori ty on Tuesday,
March 11, 2014 at 1:30 p.m. in
the Commissioner’s Room of the
Courthouse in the City of Gay-
lord, Minnesota. All interested
persons are invited to attend and
be heard in this matter. Items to
be discussed and considered in-
clude:
1. Receive the Petition for the
Removal of Property
2. Consider accepting the Peti-
tion for the Removal of Property
3. Consider appointment of
viewers
4. Other items of business as
deemed necessary
If you have any questi ons,
please contact the Sibley County
Auditor’s Office at 507-237-4070
or PropertyTax@co.sibley.mn.us.
Dated: February 11, 2014.
Lisa Pfarr,
Sibley County Auditor
Publish: February 20, 27 and
March 6, 2014
Washington Lake Township
Annual Meeting
The ci ti zens of Washi ngton
Lake Township, Sibley County,
State of Minnesota are hereby
notified that the annual township
meeting will be held on Tuesday,
March 11, 2014 at 8:00 p.m. at
the Green Isle Community Room.
The purpose of said meeting is
to set tax levies and to conduct
any other business necessary at
this time.
In case of inclement weather,
the meeti ng wi l l be hel d one
week later, Tuesday, March 18, at
the same time and location.
Diana Kroells
Township Clerk
Publish February 27 and
March 6
Arlington Township
Annual Meeting
Residents of Arlington Town-
ship, County of Sibley, State of
Minnesota are hereby notified
that the annual meeting will be
held on Tuesday, March 11, 2014,
7:30 p.m. at the Arlington Com-
munity Center.
This meeting is held to set the
tax levy for 2015 and any such
business pertaining to the voters
of the Township of Arlington.
In case of inclement weather,
the meeting will be postponed
until March 18.
Sheila Henke
Arlington Township Clerk
Publish February 27 and
March 6
Jessenland Township
Annual Meeting
Notice is hereby given to resi-
dents of Jessenland Township,
County of Sibley, State of Min-
nesota, that the Annual Town
Meeting will be held on Tuesday,
March 11, 2014. In case of in-
clement weather, the meeting
may be postponed until the third
Tuesday in March.
The annual meeting will com-
mence at 7 PM to conduct all
necessary business prescribed
by law.
The annual meeti ng wi l l be
held at the Jessenland Township
Hall.
Maynard Rucks
Township Clerk
Town of Jessenland
February 20, 2014
Publish: February 27 and
March 6
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The visiting Sibley East
varsity girls basketball team
lost to Glencoe-Silver Lake
64-50 during the opening
round of the Section 2AA
North Sub Section Girls Bas-
ketball Tournament on Mon-
day night, March 3.
The Lady Wolverines
struggled early and fell be-
hind 29-18 by halftime.
Sibley East did pull within
six points at one stretch dur-
ing the second half. The Pan-
thers, however, rebounded
and increased their lead back
to double digits.
“GSL made 16 of 20 free
throws in the second half
which made it difficult for us
to close the gap,” said Sibley
East head coach Todd
Warzecha.
Senior Kimberly Kurtzweg
and junior Autumn Dose
topped Sibley East with 10
points each. Senior Megan
Eckberg tossed in nine points
while juniors McKenzie
Sommers and Liz Thies
hooped five points apiece.
Senior Jessica Garza and
sophomore McKayla Stumm
netted four points each while
junior Kelli Martens added
three points.
The Lady Wolverines hit
13 of 36 shots from two-point
range for 36 percent and two
of 10 long bombs for 20 per-
cent. Sibley East also canned
just 18 of 33 charity tosses
for 55 percent.
Sibley East grabbed 28 re-
bounds, one less than Glen-
coe-Silver Lake. Eckberg
snared nine boards while
Sommers collected six car-
oms.
Kutzweg also recorded
four thefts while Sommers
had two steals.
Sophomore Katie Tuchten-
hagen, Eckberg, Garza,
Martens, Kurtzweg and Som-
mers dished out two assists
apiece.
The Lady Wolverines, who
forced 27 turnovers, commit-
ted 23 miscues.
“I’m proud to say I was a
part of this team, ” said
Warzecha. “We were down,
but we kept battling and
fighting no matter what the
score.”
Sibley East concludes the
season with a 4-10 mark in
the Minnesota River Confer-
ence and a 7-16 record over-
all.
St. Peter 57
Sibley East 39
The Sibley East varsity
girls basketball concluded its
regular season with a 57-39
loss to visiting St. Peter in
non-conference action on
Thursday night, Feb. 27.
Senior Megan Eckberg
paced Sibley East with 12
points. Juniors Kelli Martens
and McKenzie Sommers
pumped in seven points each
while senior Kimberly
Kurtweg scored six points.
Seniors Jessica Garza and
Maren Miner and junior Liz
Thies had two points apiece.
Senior Britany Reierson
added one point.
Sibley East girls lose to G-SL 64-50 in playoffs
Sibley East connected on
10 of 43 attempts from two-
point range for 23 percent and
just one of six shots from
three-point land for 17 per-
cent. The Lady Wolverines
also converted only 16 of 34
free throw attempts for 47
percent.
The Lady Wolverines were
out-rebounded by a 45-32
margin. Sommers and Eck-
berg pulled down six and five
rebounds respectively.
Martens recorded three
steals while junior Autumn
Dose and Thies had two thefts
each.
Martens also distributed
three assists.
Sibley East committed 28
turnovers in the setback.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Sibley East junior Liz Thies drove the baseline and
took the basketball to the hoop at Glencoe-Silver
Lake on Monday night, March 3. The Lady Wolverines
lost to the Panthers 64-50.
W W W . A R L I N G TO N M N N E W S . C O M
Sounds like
multiplication?
It’s newspaper
talk for a one
column by 4
inch ad. Too
small to be
effective?
You’re
reading
this one!
Put your 1x4
in the
Arlington
Enterprise
today.
507-964-5547
1
x
4
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 6, 2014, page 8
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
McGraw Monument
Works, Inc., LeSueur
Local Representative
Leah Schrupp
Arlington, MN 55307
612-308-8169
3 miles North of LeSueur
on Highway 169
30945 Forest Prairie Road
(507) 665-3126
HOURS: M-F 8-5
Weekends by appointment.
Visit our
INDOOR AND OUTDOOR
DISPLAYS
A32-27eowEa
combined
WET BASEMENT?
Blessings
And you must commit yourselves wholeheartedly to these commands that I
am giving you today. Repeat them again and again to your children. Talk
about them when you are at home and when you are on the road, when you
are going to bed and when you are getting up. – Deuteronomy 6: 6-7 NLT
Seventh Day Adventist
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
507-304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
Church Service: Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Commercial and Industrial Builders
Green Isle, MN 55338
ph. 507.326.7901 fax: 507.326.3551
www.vosconstruction.com
Arlington State Bank
Serving the Community Since 1895
BANKING SERVICES
964-2256
Arlington
A & N Radiator Repair
Allen & Nicki Scharn, Owners
23228 401 Ave., Arlington
877-964-2281 or 507-964-2281 Bus.
Certified ASE Technician on Staff
Also distributor for Poxy Coat II
Industrial Grade Coatings/Paint
MID-COUNTY
CO-OP
700 W. Lake St., Box 177
Cologne, MN 55322
(952) 466-3700
or TOLL FREE: 1-888-466-3700
HUTCHINSON CO-OP
AGRONOMY
LEON DOSE,
Arlington Branch Manager
411 7
th
Ave. NW • (507) 964-2251
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
402 W. Alden, Arlington
507-964-5547
Online at
www.Arlington
MNnew.com
Arlington Haus
Your Hometown Pub & Eatery
1986-2009
Arlington • 1-507-964-2473
STATE BANK OF
HAMBURG
100 Years. 100 Reasons.
Phone 952-467-2992
statebankofhamburg.com
CONVENIENCE
STORE
Hwy. 5 N., Arlington
507-964-2920
Homestyle Pizza
Real or Soft Serve Ice Cream
Gas – Diesel – Deli – Videos
(507)
964-2212
www.
chefcraigs
.com
23180 401 Ave., Arlington Phone 507-964-2264
EQUAL
HOUSING
LENDER
CRAIG BULLERT
ARLINGTON, MN
23189 Hwy. 5 North,
Arlington, MN 55307
arlington@hutchcoop.com
Office (507) 964-2283
Cell (320) 583-4324
HC
FUNERAL SERVICE
P.O. Box 314
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-2201
Member
FDIC
EARN $500 A DAY:
Insurance Agents Needed; Leads, no
cold calls. Commissions paid daily.
Lifetime renewals. Complete training.
Health & Dental Insurance. Life insur-
ance license required. Call 888/713-6020
FARM LAND
For Sale, 400 acres, Murray Coun-
ty, Sect. 1 & 12, Twp. 107, Range
40. For more info call: Steven:
507/828-4308, Randy 218/770-2911
SILO DEMOLITION
We pay cash for harvesters, we
charge for staves, also turn your
old combines or machinery into
cash. Call Dennis 507/995-2331
IF YOU UNDERWENT
Testosterone Therapy for Low-T and
suffered a heart attack, stroke, pulmo-
nary embolism or a loved one died while
undergoing Testosterone therapy be-
tween 2000 and present time, you may
be entitled to compensation. Call Attor-
ney Charles H. Johnson 800/535-5727
APPLIANCE REPAIR
We fix it no matter who you bought
it from! Call ServiceLive and get re-
ferred to a pro today: 800/324-5295
GUARANTEED INCOME
for your retirement. Avoid market risk
& get guaranteed income in retire-
ment! Call for free copy of our safe
money guide plus annuity quotes from
A-rated companies! 800/917-4169
DONATE YOUR CAR
truck or boat to Heritage For The Blind. Free
3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing,
all paperwork taken care of 800/439-1735
DISH TV RETAILER
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12
mos.) & High Speed Internet start-
ing at $14.95/month (where avail-
able.) Save! Ask About same day In-
stallation! Call now! 800/297-8706
CANADA DRUG CENTER
is your choice for safe and affordable med-
ications. Our licensed Canadian mail order
pharmacy will provide you with savings of
up to 75% on all your medication needs.
Call today 800/259-1096 for $10.00 off
your first prescription and free shipping.
SAWMILLS
From only $4897.00 Make & save
money with your own bandmill. Cut
lumber any dimension. In stock ready
to ship. Free Info/DVD: 800/578-1363
Ext.300N www.NorwoodSawmills.com
MISCELLANEOUS
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HEALTH HELP WANTED - SALES
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statewide audience of 3 million readers!!!
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Church News
Menus
SENIOR DINING
Call 326-3401 for a meal
Suggested Donation $4.00
Meals are served at Highland
Commons dining room
Monday-Friday
Monday: Tator tot casserole,
green beans, peaches, bread with
margarine, pudding, low fat milk.
Tuesday: Roast pork, whole po-
tatoes, buttered cooked cabbage,
bread with margarine, rosy apple-
sauce, low fat milk.
Wednesday: Lasagna, Califor-
ni a bl end vegetabl es, l ettuce
salad with dressing, garlic bread,
margarine, bar, low fat milk.
Thursday: Oven crispy chicken,
mashed potatoes wi th gravy,
mixed vegetables, bread with mar-
garine, poke cake, low fat milk.
Fri day: Lemon pepper fish,
baked potato, corn, bread with
margarine, dessert, low fat milk.
SIBLEY EAST ELEMENTARY
BREAKFAST MENU
Arlington and Gaylord
Breakfast is served at 8:00 a.m.
daily. A 1/2 pint of milk is served
with each meal daily. Menu is sub-
ject to change.
Monday: Bug bites, cheese
stick, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Waffle, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Cereal , seeds,
fruit, milk.
Thursday: Frudel, juice, milk.
Friday: Pop Tart, cheese stick,
juice, milk.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Arlington
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each.
Menu is subject to change.
Monday: Chicken strips, sea-
soned rice, carrots, fruit, milk.
Tuesday: Sl oppy Joe, hash
brown potato, brown beans, fruit,
milk.
Wednesday: Chicken noodle
soup, hot ham and cheese sand-
wich, pickle spear, veggie sticks,
fruit, milk.
Thursday: Mexican haystack,
rice, fixings, refried beans, fruit,
milk.
Friday: Cheese pizza, romaine
salad, green beans, fruit, milk.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Gaylord
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: Chicken strips, sea-
soned rice, carrots, fruit, milk.
Alternate: Pizza burger.
Tuesday: Sloppy Joe, oven po-
tatoes, baked beans, fruit, milk.
Alternate: Salad.
Wednesday: Chicken noodle
soup, hot ham and cheese sand-
wich,pickles, veggie sticks, fruit,
milk.
Alternate: Cheese omelet.
Thursday: Mexican haystack,
filings, refried beans, corn, fruit,
milk.
Alternate: Fish burger.
Friday: Cheese pizza, romaine
salad, green beans, fruit, milk.
Alternate: Grilled chicken.
The Monday, Feb. 10 meet-
ing of the Ladies Auxiliary to
VFW Post 6031 was called to
order at 7:30 p.m. by Presi-
dent Carol Dammann, ac-
cording to Secretary Ramona
Bade. Ten members were
present.
After the Flag Pledge and
Roll, the secretary’s minutes
were read and approved.
Under new business, the
group has a nursing student
who is interested in applying
for the Marcella Arnold Nurs-
ing Scholarship.
A motion was made by
Diana Glieden, seconded by
Marge Kloeckl, to have the
group donate a prize for the
Hospital Foundation
fundraiser. The motion car-
ried. The prize is a $30 gift
certificate to be used at an Ar-
lington Veterans Steak Fry.
Being there was no further
business, the meeting was ad-
journed. The group will meet
again on Monday, March 10.
The door prize was won by
Esther Kuebler.
The group had a beautiful
variety of Valentine cookies
donated by members. After
the meeting, the cookies were
boxed and ready for delivery
to various places. A big thank
you to all of the bakers.
A lunch of Valentine cook-
ies and coffee was enjoyed by
all.
VFW Auxiliary to meet Monday night, March 10
ST. PAUL’S EV.
REFORMED CHURCH
15470 Co. Rd. 31, Hamburg
Dan Schnabel, Pastor
952-467-3878
www.stpaulsrcus.org
Sunday, March 9: 8:30 a.m.
Sunday school and Bible study.
9:30 a.m. Worship service.
Tuesday, March 11: 7:00 p.m.
Consistory meeting.
ORATORY OF
ST. THOMAS
THE APOSTLE
Jessenland
507-248-3550
Fr. Sam Perez
Thursday: Weekly Mass at
5:00 p.m.
ST. MARY, MICHAEL
AND BRENDAN AREA
FAITH COMMUNITY
Fr. Keith Salisbury, Pastor
Friday, March 7: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar). 4:45-8:00 p. m.
Jump for Joy (Mar).
Saturday, March 8: 5:00 p.m.
Mass (Mar).
Sunday, March 9: 7:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre). 9:00-10:15 a.m. El-
ementary religious education
(Mar). 9:00 a.m. Mass (Mic).
10:30 a.m. Mass (Mar).
Monday, March 10: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar). 8:00 p.m.
AA and AlaNon (Mar).
Tuesday, March 11: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar).9:30 a.m.
Mass (Arlington Good Samari-
tan).
Wednesday, March 12: 8:20
a.m. Mass (Mar). 9:00 a. m.
Word and Communion (Oak
Terrace). 5:30-6:15 p.m. Lenten
CCW soup & sandwich (Mar).
6:30 - 7:00 p.m. Mass (Mar).
7:00-8:00 p.m. Jr./Sr. High Ele-
mentary Religious Education
(Mar/Mic). 7:00 p.m. Stations of
the Cross (Mar/Mic).
Thursday, March 13: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre and Mic). 7:00
p.m. Administrative council
meeting (Bre). 7:30 p.m. Nar-
cotics Anonymous (Mic).
TRINITY LUTHERAN
32234 431st Ave., Gaylord
Rev. James Snyder,
Sunday, March 9: 10:00 a.m.
Worship service.
Monday, March 10: 9:00
a.m.-3:00 p.m. Quilting.
Tuesday, March 11: 9:00
a.m.-3:00 p.m. Quilting.
Wednesday, March 12: 1:30
p.m. WELCA.
Thursday, March 13: 7:00
a.m. Men’s Lenten breakfast at
Assembly of God.
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod)
Arlington
Pastor William Postel
Phone 507-964-2400
Thursday, March 6: 5:30 p.m.
Deadline for bulletin informa-
tion.
Sunday, March 9: 9:00 a.m.
Bible class. 10:00 a.m. Worship
with Holy Communion. Potluck
farewell for Pastor & Diane.
Tuesday, March 11: 7:00 p.m.
Pillowcase dress sewing night.
Wednesday, March 12: 7:00
p.m. Lenten service.
EVANGELICAL
COVENANT CHURCH
107 W. Third St., Winthrop
Pastor Kyle Kachelmeier
(507) 647- 5777
Parsonage (507) 647-3739
www.wincov.org
Sunday, March 9: 9:30 a.m.
Worship. 10:45 a.m. Sunday
school.
Tuesday, March 11: 7:00 p.m.
Leadership team meeting.
Wednesday, March 12: 9:00
a.m. Prayer coffee. 6:00 p.m.
AWANA--store night.
Thursday, March 13: 9:30
a.m. Women’s Bible study. 6:30
p. m. Men’s Bible study at
Peik’s.
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN
Green Isle
Pastor Eric W. Rapp
Friday, March 7: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, March 9: 9:00 a.m.
Worship with Communion.
10:00 a.m. Sunday school. 10:15
a.m. Bible study with Rhonda.
3:30 p.m. Bible study with Pas-
tor.
Tuesday, March 11: 9:00
a. m. -3:00 p. m. New Pastor
learning community.
Wednesday, March 12: 5:00
p.m. Lenten service. 6:00 p.m.
Potluck supper. 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Confirmation and Wednesday
night school grades 1-5.
Thursday, March 13: 7:30
p.m. Choir practice
PEACE LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Kurt Lehmkuhl, Pastor
www.hispeace@frontiernet.net
Sunday, March 9: 8:15 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:30 a.m. Wor-
ship service with Holy Com-
munion.
Wednesday, March 12: 3:45
p. m. Catechism. 6:00 p. m.
Lenten supper. 7:00 p.m. Lenten
service.
ZION LUTHERAN
Green Isle Township
Pastor Eric W. Rapp
Friday, March 7: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, March 9: 10:30 a.m.
Worship. 3:30 p.m. Bible study
at St. Paul’s with Pastor.
Tuesday, March 11: 9:00
a. m. -3:00 p. m. New Pastor
learning community.
Wednesday, March 12: 6:30-
7:30 p.m. Confirmation and
Wednesday night school grades
1-5 at St. Paul’s. 8:00 p. m.
Lenten service.
Thursday, March 13: 7:30
p.m. Choir practice at St. Paul’s.
ZION LUTHERAN
814 W. Brooks St.
Arlington – (507) 964-5454
James Carlson, Pastor
Sunday, March 9: 9:00 a.m.
Sunday school, fellowship.
10:00 a.m.Worship with Holy
Communion. 11:00 a.m.-1:00
p.m. Chicken dinner.
Tuesday, March 11: 6:00-7:00
p.m. TOPS in church basement.
Wednesday, March 12: 3:45
p.m. 9th Confirmation. 4:30
p.m. 8th Confirmation. 6:00
p.m. Lenten supper. 7;00 p.m.
Lenten service. 8:00 p. m.
Church council and ZCW exec.
board meeting.
Thursday, March 13: 9:00
a.m. and 1:00 p.m. Zion service
on cable.
CREEKSIDE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Christian & Missionary
Alliance
Pastor John Cherico
114 Shamrock Drive
Arlington – 507-964-2872
email: creeksidecc@media-
combb.net
Sunday, March 9: 9:00 a.m.
Sunday school for children age
4-6th grade and Adult Sunday
school. 10:30 a.m. Worship
service.
Wednesday, March 12: 7:00-
8:30 p.m. R.E.A.C.H. youth
group at Terry and Becky
Shogren’s home, 6th through
12th grade.
Thursday, March 13: 1:00 &
7:00 p.m. Women’s community
Bible study, “Revelation” at
Jean Olson’s home. 6:30 p.m.
Men’s community Bible study at
Chuck Peik’s home.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
(507) 304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
507-234-6770
Saturday: Church services at
9:30 a.m. Bible study at 11:00
a.m. Fellowship dinner at 12:00
p.m. All are welcome.
UNITED METHODIST
Arlington
Rodney J. Stemme, Pastor
wwwarlingtonunited
methodist.org
Saturday, March 8: 8:00 a.m.
A-Men men’s group.
Sunday, March 9: 9:00 and
11:00 a.m. Worship. 10:15 a.m.
Sunday school.
Wednesday, March 12: 6:00
p.m. Lenten supper. 7:00 p.m.
Lenten worship. 8:00 p.m.
Choir.
Thursday, March 13: 10:00
a.m. 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
Worship on cable TV. 1:00 &
7:00 p.m. Women’s Bible study
at Jean Olson’s. Sibley East
Music Contest all day.
ST. PAUL LUTHERAN
(WELS),
Arlington
Bruce Hannemann, Pastor
WEBSITE:
www.stpaularlington.com
EMAIL:
Bruce.Hannemann@stpaul
arlington.com
Sunday, March 9: 8:45 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:00 a.m. Fami-
ly Bible study, 10:00 a.m. Wor-
ship.
Monday, March 10: Grand-
parents day at school. 7:00 p.m.
Council meeting.
Tuesday, March 11: Field trip
day at school. 3:45 p.m. Public
school Confirmation class. 6:00
p.m. Counting committee meet-
ing.
Wednesday, March 12: 2:30
p.m. Bible Study. 3:45 p.m.
Lenten afternoon service. 5:00
p.m. Lenten supper. 7:00 p.m.
Lenten evening service. 8:00
p.m. Choir practice.
Thursday, March 13: Par-
ents/visitor day at school. 10:00
a.m. Bulletin information due.
11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Servic-
es on cable TV channel 8. 6:30
p.m.
GAYLORD ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
Gaylord
Bob Holmbeck, Pastor
Sunday, March 9: 9:00 a.m.
Sunday school. 10:00 a.m. Sun-
day worship service Pastor
Steve Pershay preaching. 1:15
p.m. Oak Terrace service.
Wednesday, March 12: 6:30
p.m. Wednesday evening Bible
classes and Youth Focused. 8:00
p.m. Supper-Welcome!
ST. PAUL’S UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Henderson
(507) 248-3594 (Office)
Deb Meyer, Pastor
Find us on Facebook:
St. Paul’s UCC - Henderson
Sunday, March 9: 9:00 a.m.
Sunday school, Confirmation.
10:00 a.m. Worship.
Monday, March 10: 6:00 p.m.
Budget and finance.
Tuesday, March 11: 7:00 p.m.
Church council.
Wednesday, March 12: 6:00
p.m. Lenten supper, 7:00 p.m.
Lenten service.
AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
LIESKE TRACTOR
Wanted: Your OLD TRACTORS,
any condition, make or model. We
also specialize in new and used
TRACTOR PARTS AND REPAIR.
Call Kyle. Located west of Hender-
son. (612) 203-9256.
AUTOMOTIVE
Motorcycles
Suzuki. Need a Dealer? Jungclaus
Motor Sports, Gl encoe, Si nce
1999. (320) 864-8526.
Parts, Repair
$$ DOLLARS PAID $$ Junk vehi-
cles, repairable cars/trucks. FREE
TOWING. Flatbed/ wrecker serv-
ice. Immediate pick up. Monday-
Sunday, serving your area 24/7.
(952) 220-TOWS.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
CONKLIN© DEALERS NEEDED!
Lifetime career in marketing, man-
agement and applying “Green”
products made in America. Full
time/ part time. For a free catalog
call Franke’s Conklin Service now
at (320) 238-2370. www.franke-
marketing.com.
Li censed hai r dresser, 22-32
hours/week. Vacati on pay and
other benefits. Mainstreet Stylist
and Tan, 103 E Main Street, Ar-
lington, (507) 964-5992.
Light typing, errands and to teach
me to retrieve my emails. Must
have flexible schedule. Youths
may apply. (507) 964-2550.
Owner/Operators with step-deck
trailer for interstate trucking in
lower 48 states and Canada. Call
Kohout Trucking, Inc. (320) 444-
4108.
Spartan Staffing, a TrueBlue Com-
pany, is hiring for immediate Pro-
duction, Assembly and Forklift po-
sitions in Glencoe. Must have 6
months production/forklift experi-
ence, stand entire shift, lift 50 lbs.;
forklift racking 5 ft. high. Must
have great attendance record,
solid work history, and positive atti-
tude. Long term/temp-to-hire’ all
shifts; $10.27-13.13/hour. To apply
onl i ne go to
www.spartanstaffing.com, or email
resume to 3418-br@spar-
tantstaffing.com or call 320-587-
0400. Text SPARTAN to 27697 for
job alerts.
FOR SALE
Heating/Air Conditioning
Special-95% Goodman gas furnace
and programmable thermostat,
$2,200 installed or AC unit, $1,900
installed. J&R Plumbing Heating
AC, Lester Prairie (320) 510-5035.
Wanted To Buy
WANTED TO BUY: Old signs all
types, farm primitive painted furniture
all types, cupboards, cubby units,
locker and pool wire baskets, wood
& metal pieces with lots of drawers,
old pre-1960 holiday decorations, in-
dustrial/school items such as metal
racks, stools, workbenches, lightning
rods and balls, weather vanes, archi-
tectural items like corbels and stain
glass windows. Gas station and oil
related items from signs to pumps,
dress forms, old store fixtures, chan-
deliers, old lighting fixtures, mantels,
hardware store parts, bins,
feed/grain/seed related items and old
cement statuary/bird baths. We buy
one item and entire estates. Check
out the barns, attic and basement.
Don’t get a dumpster until you call us
first. We are local. (612) 590-6136 or
email rb7579@msn.com.
BUYING JUNK BATTERIES
We buy used batteries. Paying
$10 for automotive batteries. We
pick up. Call 800-777-2243.
Wanted: Motorcycles, ATV’s. Buy-
ing most brands, ALL years, run-
ni ng or not. Jungcl aus Motor
Sports (320) 864-8526.
RENTAL
Apartment
Village Cooperative of Hutchinson
(320) 234-7761. 55+ Senior living.
One-2BR, 2BA unit available. Call
for your tour! Come in and check
out our many amenities and how
to receive homeowner benefits
with Cooperative Living! Equal
Housing Opportunity.
RENTAL
Apartment
2BR, 1BA dupl ex i n Arl i ngton.
Laundry, si ngl e garage, qui et
nei ghborhood. NO PETS. No
smoking. Application, background
check, 12 month lease. $550 de-
posit, rent $550. Available immedi-
ately. (612) 236-5304
Now Taki ng Appl i cati ons. 1BR
apartment in GLencoe. Must be 62
years of age or older, or disabled.
Some incomed restrictions apply.
Rent based on 30% of income.
Call (320) 864-5282.
RELOCATED WITH YOUR TAX
REFUND! 1BR immediate open-
ings in Arlington! Flexible leases
and deposit pay plans! (507) 964-
2430 or 800676-6505.
www.lifestyleinc.net, TDD 507-451-
0704. Equal Housing Opportunity.
Updated, spacious one and two
BR apartments in Renville. In-
cludes heat, water garbage. New
stove, fridge, air conditioner. Pet-
friendly. Call (320) 564-3351 for
appointment.
Want To Rent
Father and Son Operation look-
ing for farmland to rent. Call (320)
523-1116 or (320) 522-0272.
Wanted: Farmland to rent 2014
and beyond. Curtis Weckwerth
(507) 380-9128, Wayne Franzeen
(507) 380-2466.
Young farmer looking for land to
rent for 2014 and beyond. Compet-
itive rates and reference available.
Call Austin Blad (320) 221-3517.
SALES
Sales
Remember The Past Spring Vin-
tage Sale, March 26-30, April 23-
27 in Hutchinson Mall, 1060 High-
way 15 South. Wednesday-Friday
10 a.m.- 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-
6 p.m.; Sunday, 12 p.m.-5p.m.
Easter, outdoor garden items, re-
cycled treasures, planters, furni-
ture, art decor, primitive, galva-
nized metal cottage and cabin, old
and new items, vintage. Buying
and selling (320) 583-9519.
SERVICES
Building Contractors
30 Years professional home repair
service. Interior/exterior. Fair rates
for quality work. Call (320) 359-
0333.
Farm
FARM DRAINAGE Farm drainage
company from the
Stewart/Hutchinson area is looking
for tiling in summer months. Ewert
Bros. Inc. is a 4th generation tiling
company established in 1908. We
do quality work and have competi-
tive prices. Email jewert@hutch-
tel.net.
Misc. Service
LIMO/PARTY BUS Available for
weddings, shuttles, Twins, bache-
lor(ette) parties, birthday or busi-
ness. Contact Dina (612) 940-2184
or www.theurbanexpress.com for
more info.
Snow-ice removal. Hot water re-
moval available. Free roof esti-
mates for Spring-Summer. Fully li-
censed and insured. Cacka Roof-
ing, Inc. Silver Lake, MN. License
# BC626502. *Keep these num-
bers for all your roofing needs.
(320) 327-3131, cell (612) 978-
7457, Mike Cacka.
Tax Preparation
BluMark LLC. Income tax and ac-
counting services. Randy Martti-
nen (952) 210-8721 www.blumark-
llc.com
Classifieds
ADD ANOTHER PAPER
FOR ONLY
$
2.00 PER PAPER
(based on first week pricing)
The McLeod
County Chronicle
Silver Lake Leader
The Glencoe
Advertiser
The Sibley Shopper
Arlington Enterprise
The Galaxy
3-WEEK SPECIAL: ONE WEEK:
$
15
80
2
nd
Week 1/2 Price
3
rd
Week FREE
McLeod
Publishing
All Six Papers Reach Over 50,000 Readers Weekly in over 33 Communities
For 20 words, one time in
ANY TWO PAPERS and on the internet.
30¢ per word after first 20 words.
AGRICULTURE AUTOMOTIVE EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE LIVESTOCK
& PETS
LIVESTOCK
& PETS
REAL ESTATE SERVICES RENTAL RENTAL
All ads appear online
at GlencoeNews.com
Enterprise
To place an ad: Call: 507-964-5547; Fax: 507-964-2423; E-Mail: info@ArlingtonMNnews.com; Mail: P.O. Box 388, Arlington, MN 55307
Advertising
Deadlines
The McLeod County Chronicle Mondays at Noon
The Arlington Enterprise & The Silver Lake Leader Tuesdays at Noon
The Glencoe Advertiser, The Sibley Shopper
& The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 6, 2014, page 9
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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Agricultural background and mechanical ability
to operate and repair/maintain agricultural
equipment. Class A CDL preferred or ability to
obtain a Class A CDL.
To apply or for more information contact:
R9E10SGa
HELP WANTED:
The City of Arlington is accepting applications for the
following seasonal positions:
Mowing/Weed Trimming Positions. The season will start
tentatively May 1
st
and run approximately 24 weeks, sub-
ject to growing season (dryness, wetness, early/late frost).
The hours for lawn mowing/trimming are Monday-Friday
8am-5pm. Areas mowed/trimmed include the parks, ceme-
tery, and around City buildings. No weekend or evening
mowing/trimming will be permitted. Approximately 32
hours per week will be spent mowing/trimming and main-
taining equipment (oil changes, clean out decks, etc.). Sea-
sonal Part-Time Wage is $8.75 per hour. Applicants must
be 18 years or older to apply and have a valid driver’s li-
cense.
The City is preferably looking for individuals to mow/trim
for the entire season. Applications will be accepted for
backup mowers to help with the first half (April-May) and
second half (August-October) of the season.
Contact the City Office for an application, 507-964-
2378.
DEADLINE: All applications must be returned by
4:00 p.m. on Friday, March 21, 2014.
A9-10Ea
Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington
is seeking the following positions:
• Evening LPN nurse needed for 40+
hours per pay period.
• TMA or LPN nurse needed for
2:30-9pm, every other weekend.
• Day Certified Nursing Assistant,
6:30am-12:30pm, every other weekend.
• Night Certified Nursing Assistant, 10:30pm-6:30pm,
every other weekend.
• Evening Certified Nursing Assistant, 57+ hours per pay
period, includes every other weekend/holiday.
• Evening Certified Nursing Assistant, 31+ hours per pay
period, includes every other weekend/holiday.
• Day Certified Nursing Assistant, 42+ hours per pay
period, includes every other weekend/holiday.
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information,
call Tiffany Brockhoff,
Human Resource Director at
507-964-2251 or email:
tbrockof@good-sam.com
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap Drug-Free Workplace
Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life.
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NOW ACCEPTING
LAWN CARE PROPOSALS
FOR AMBERFIELD PLACE
APARTMENTS FOR 2014
SEND PROPOSALS TO:
E-mail: skunz@amberfeldplace.com
Mail: 227 Drew Ave SE, Madelia, MN 56062
Fax: 507-642-3047
Bids due March 7, 2014
For more information call 507-642-8701
Arlington, Gaylord,
Winthrop, Gibbon
and Henderson
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Summer Intern Job Description
4-H/Youth Program and General Extention
(Youth, Agriculture, Horticulture)
Summer Assistant
(2014)
Type of Opening: Seasonal/Temporary Summer Assistant
(up to 12 weeks)
Location: Sibley County Extension Service
– Gaylord
Salary: MINIMUM: $8.50 MAXIMUM: $8.67
Application Deadline: open until successfully filled
Duties include, but not limited to:
• Plan and assist with day and/or resident camps
• Assist with county fair activities
• Assist the Sibley County 4-H Program Coordinator and
Ag Educator
• Assist with summer 4-H programs
• Work with team leaders
• Search to reach new audiences
• Assist with media relations and promotion of programs
Qualifications:
• A high school diploma or equivalent is required
• Currently enrolled in (a) Associate Degree program,
or (b) Bachelor Degree program, or (c) possess a
Degree; with a preferred degree focus in agriculture,
horticulture or youth development. Closely related
degree may be considered. Preference will be given to
candidates with a minimum of two years completed
towards focus degree.
• Valid MN DL, auto with statutory required insurance
• Criminal background check
• Available to work a flexible schedule, including some
nights and weekends.
Experience:
Computer and office equipment.
Knowledge and Skills:
An interest in working with people is required.
Excellent oral and written communication skills.
Ability to work as part of a team.
To apply – information available on county website.
Human Resource Department
400 Court Avenue, POB 256
Gaylord, MN 55334
www.co.sibley.mn.us
Email: HR@co.sibley.mn.us
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OAK TERRACE
Healthcare Center of Gaylord
has openings in the following positions:
ASSISTED LIVING FACILITY
LPN/RN:
• (2) 64 hrs a pay period, positions on evening shift.
$
2,000 Sign-On Bonus offered for the month of March.
NAR/PCA:
• 37.5 hrs a pay period, 10:30pm-6:00am.
HOMEMAKER:
• 24 hrs a pay period, 4:00pm-8:00pm.
Duties include serving out and cleaning up
following meals. Leading one scheduled activity.
Applications are available at:
640 Third St., Gaylord, MN
Or online at www.oakterraceliving.com
For further information, contact Human Resources
at 507-237-8703. EOE
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Help Wanted
on modern Egg
Production Farm.
FT/PT positions
available.
Call Brian @
507-237-5488
*
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, March 6, 2014, page 10
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
GIRLS ARE WELCOME TO JOIN ANY TIME. FOR MORE INFORMATION,
CONTACT MARY HENNIES, 507-964-5888, OR TINA MESSNER, 507-237-4160;
OR E-MAIL heather.ballman@GirlScoutsRV.org
A & N Radiator Repair
After Burner Auto Body
Arlington Dugout
Arlington Enterprise
Arlington Market
Arlington NAPA
Arlington State Bank
Arneson Law Office
Brau Motors
CMC Construction
Cenex C Store
Chef Craig’s Caterers
CornerStone State Bank
Good Samaritan Society
Arlington Campus
Gustafson Family Dentistry
Haggenmiller Lumber
Hutchinson Co-op (Arlington)
Jerry’s Home Quality Foods
Kick’s Bakery
Kolden Funeral Home
Kreft Cabinets, Inc.
Krentz Construction, LLC
Lensing Insurance
Liberty Station
Local Lawn Enforcement
Mesenbring Construction
Morreim Pharmacy
Dr. H.M. Noack
Pinske Real Estate &
Auctioneers
Quick Shop/Subway
R & R Auto Repair
Reetz Floral
Reflections/Stu’s
Seneca Foods
Sibley Medical Center
TSE, a division of Ametek
Thomes Bros.
Tranquility Hair Salon &
Tanning
Tuchtenhagen
Construction, LLC
UFC/United Xpress
Vos Construction, Inc.
Y-Not Plumbing & Heating
Inc.
THIS PAGE SPONSORED BY THESE AREA BUSINESSES:
CLEAN
UP DAY
&
RAIN
GARDEN
• Cookie & Fall Product Sales
• Girl Scout Week
March 9-15
• Girl Scout Thinking Day
• Parent Event
• Court of Awards
• Day Camp
• Service Projects
• Regular Troop Meetings
& Activities
• Cleaned Up Gaylord
Rain Garden
• Swim Team
• Bingo at Good Samaritan
Center and Oak Terrace
WWW. GI RLSCOUTSRV. ORG
INDEPENDENT
LEADERS
Ann Fries
Jenny
Torgerson
GAYLORD
LEADERS
Kali Messner
Jessica
Richardson
Tami Parrot
Liz Reishus
Heidi Storm
Denise
Tourtellott
Tina Messner
ARLINGTON
LEADERS
Lori Colling
Krista Kube
Stephanie
Halverson
Mary
Halverson
Jen Strack
Mary Hennies
Service Unit Managers -
Mary Hennies (Arlington),
Tina Messner (Gaylord)
Cookies - Gerri Fitzloff
Treasurer -
Brenda Sorenson (Arlington),
Sue Keithan (Gaylord)
Council Delegates -
Anne Karl, Elizabeth Reishus
Sibley East
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FIRST AID
EVENT
VETERANS
DAY
ARLI-DAZZLE
SWIM
MEET
SE GIRL SCOUT
SWIM TEAM
YEARLY SERVICE UNIT ACTIVITIES:
SIBLEY EAST
BROWNIES
SNOW
FUN
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