4-11-13 Arlington Enterprise

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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Serving the Communities of Arlington and Green Isle, Minnesota
www.arlingtonmnnews.com Volume 129 • Number 41 • Thursday, April 11, 2013 • Arlington, MN 55307
Single copy $1.00
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Local resident Joe Thomes
received a 65-year award dur-
ing a Knights of Columbus
event in Le Sueur on Thurs-
day night, April 4. The
awards event alternates be-
tween Le Sueur and Arling-
ton every year.
The award recognizes
Thomes for 65 years of loyal
and faithful service to the St.
Arthur ’s Council of the
Knights of Columbus 10172.
Thomes is believed to be
the only member of the local
Knights of Columbus organi-
zation to receive the 65-year
award.
Thomes was not informed
about the award prior to the
event last week.
“I hadn’t really thought
much about it,” said Thomes.
“Yeah, that’s a long time. You
just don’t think about those
things at all.”
How did he feel about re-
ceiving the award? “Old,”
laughed Thomes. “It was nice
to get. The guys couldn’t be-
lieve I was in there that long.
That’s a long time to be in
one organization.”
Thomes recalled the day he
was initiated into the Knights
of Columbus organization.
“It was in Belle Plaine in
1948,” Thomes said. “I had
just gotten out of the service.
My brother, Karl, and uncle,
Bill Kreger, grabbed me and
away we went.”
Arlington, according to
Thomes, just had a Knights
of Columbus Club at that
time. The St. Arthur’s Coun-
cil of the Knights of Colum-
bus 10172 was organized
after that point, but he could
not recall the year.
Thomes, who holds the
rank of third degree in the
Knights of Columbus organi-
zation, does not attend
monthly meetings due to his
hearing. However, he still
works at breakfasts and other
events sponsored by the local
group.
“It’s a terrific organiza-
tion,” said Thomes, whose
two deceased brothers, Karl
and Ralph, were also mem-
bers of the Knights of Colum-
bus organization. “They have
good insurance and invest-
ments. They also give a lot
back to the community.”
Joe Thomes recognized for 65 years
of service with Knights of Columbus
Submitted Photo
Thomes Brothers Receives Century Award
Thomes Brothers recently re-
ceived a plaque for being a mem-
ber of the Minnesota-Dakotas
Retail Hardware Association.
Thomes Brothers president
Richard Thomes, middle, accept-
ed the award. Mac Hardin, former
Executive Director of the Min-
nesota-Dakotas Retail Hardware
Association, is pictured on the
left. John Haka, current Execu-
tive Director of the Midwest
Hardware Association, is pic-
tured on the right. Thomes
Brothers has been a member
through its founder Nick
Thomes, second generation
owners, Alexander, Edmond and
Agatha Thomes, third generation
owners Karl, Joe and Ralph
Thomes, and its fourth genera-
tion of ownership with Richard
Thomes. As part owner, Brian
Thomes is the fifth generation of
his family to own Thomes Broth-
ers.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Joe Thomes
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The pool of finalists has
changed for the city adminis-
trator position for the City of
Arlington.
Original finalist Abraham
Algadi, whose most recent
position was as a city admin-
istrator with the City of Pine
Island, has accepted an eco-
nomic development position
with the Worthington EDA.
Brian Beeman, who was an
original alternate candidate,
has accepted a position with
the City of Elk River.
Sibley East graduate James
Rosenthal has now been
named as a finalist. Rosenthal
was considered as an original
finalist, but not chosen be-
cause he could not attend the
interview.
Rosenthal, who graduated
from Ashford University in
Clinton, Iowa, has been serv-
ing in the military for several
years. He is currently in
Afghanistan.
Therefore, Rosenthal will
be interviewed via telephone
during the interview process.
In addition to Rosenthal,
the finalists are Dana Hed-
berg, Scott Weske, Kerry Ve-
nier and Liza Donabauer.
The finalists will be inter-
viewed on Friday, April 19
and Saturday, April 20.
The City Council hopes to
offer the position to the top
candidate on Saturday. April
20.
The ultimate goal is to have
the city administrator on
board by June 1.
History
The Arlington City Coun-
cil, during its regular meeting
on Tuesday night, Jan. 22,
unanimously approved a mo-
tion to approve a proposal
from Brimeyer Fursman,
LLC, Maplewood, to conduct
an executive search for a new
administrator for the City of
Arlington.
The City Council made the
move after it had earlier and
unanimously accepted the
resignation of City Adminis-
trator Matt Jaunich effective
Friday, Feb. 8. Jaunich was
hired as the first ever Sibley
County administrator.
The cost for the executive
search will be $18,875.
The City Council, inciden-
tally, used Brimeyer Furs-
man, LLC, to conduct its
search for a new city admin-
istrator during 2007. Jaunich
was hired as a result of that
search.
Pool of finalists changes for city administrator position
By Karin Ramige Cornwell
Manager
Sibley East Senior High
Principal Jim Amsden recent-
ly presented the school board
with the results of the iPad
survey which was conducted
through the district’s website.
Nearly 450 surveys were
received. 235 students, 138
parents and over 70 teachers
filled out the online survey.
Amsden said that it was in-
teresting to see the different
perspective between the an-
swers from parents and stu-
dents. The students showed
more favorable answers while
the parents’ answers were
more negative.
Amsden began by review-
ing the goals of Project Ed.21
as they were presented when
the school board approved
the project in early 2012.
These goals are:
• To achieve higher levels
of mastery using 21st century
skills.
• To improve instructional
methodologies by modeling
adaptable and flexible teach-
ing strategies.
• To create meaningful ex-
tension and expansion of the
traditional school day.
• To provide students and
families consistent academic
support and content.
• To increase learner en-
gagement and productivity.
When asked “On a scale of
one (not helpful) to five (very
helpful), to what degree has
the use of the iPads helped
your learning inside of a
class?” around 70 students
ranked the helpfulness at a
five.
Over 80 students answered
four. Around 62 ranked the
helpfulness at a three. Nearly
20 at a two and around 10
said the iPad was not helpful
in class.
The survey results were
presented to the school board
in the form of bar graphs.
Exact numbers or percentages
were not available at the
meeting.
Around 170 students said
that “the iPad has allowed
them to be a more effective
learner. Around 65 said the
iPad had not allowed them to
be a more effective learner.”
“This is where we start to
see some of the divergent
thinking between some of the
student responses and parent
responses,” Amsden said.
Over 80 of the 138 parents
who responded disagreed that
the iPad has allowed their
students to be more effective
learners.
Almost 60 agreed that it
had made students more ef-
fective learners.
Almost 160 students said
that the iPad has aided them
to be a more motivated learn-
er, while only around 50 of
the 138 parents agreed that
the iPad has aided their stu-
dent to be a more self moti-
vated learner.
Nearly 90 parents and over
70 students disagreed that the
iPad aided students to be a
more self motivated learners.
The results where similar
when both groups were asked
about the iPad enabling stu-
dents to be an engaged learn-
er, and productivity.
Both students and parents
agreed that access to commu-
nication between the students
and teaches has increased as a
result of the students having
iPads.
The parents also expressed
concerns with 82 comments
left.
Primary concerns are with
gaming, messaging, pictures
and social media and how
much students are using the
iPad for recreation versus ed-
ucation.
Overall teacher responses
were favorable about the use
of iPads in the classroom.
Over a third of 73 teachers
who responded said they use
the iPad in class daily. An-
other 25-plus use the iPad
weekly, around 15 monthly
and less than five responded
they have never used it or
have used it only once.
Fifty-one teachers said they
have used the iPad in a col-
laborative or interactive way
with students in class, while
19 responded that they had
not.
Just over half of the 63
teachers who responded if
they have used the iPad to
iPad Survey
Continued on page 5
Board hears results of recent iPad survey
By Karin Ramige Cornwell
Manager
Sibley County Auditor Lisa
Pfarr gave an informational
presentation on the 2013
gross tax report to the county
board at its regular meeting
on Tueday, April 9.
Pfarr explained to the
board that $22,361,834.44 is
to be collected in taxes by the
auditor’s office from 2012.
This is a $504,660.65 in-
crease from 2012.
The 17 townships in Sibley
County will make up 86 per-
cent of the total taxes, while
the remaining 14 percent
comes from the seven munic-
ipalities or cities.
Of the more than $22 mil-
lion dollars, the county’s por-
tion is $11,086,802.40.
This is about half of the
county’s expenditures budget.
The remaining revenue
comes from state, federal and
other sources.
Townships and cities will
receive a total of
$6,544,388. 74. This is a
$219,535 increase from 2012.
The 17 townships will re-
ceive $2,477,585.21, while
the remaining $4,066,803.53
will go to the cities.
Arlington will receive
$756,810 as the city’s portion
of the gross tax. Gree Isle’s
part is $502,323.55.
The school districts will re-
ceive $3,587,300.61.
Sibley East and GFW are
the county’s two home dis-
tricts, but five other school
districts come into the county
as well.
The auditor’s office col-
lects all of the Sibley County
taxes, then distributes them to
the different tax authorities,
such as cities, townships and
schoo districts, twice a year.
Sibley County auditor’s office to col-
lect $22.361 million in taxes
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 11, 2013, page 2
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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Come-N-Go
Bridal Shower
honoring
Afton Mackenthun
bride-to-be of
Dexter Kuphal
Sat., April 13
1:30-3:30 p.m.
Immanuel Lutheran
Gaylord, MN
Registered at
Target & Kohl’s
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VIEW US ONLINE AT
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ARLINGTON DUGOUT BAR
310 W. Main St., Arlington • 507-964-2211
“The Local Area’s LOWEST Off Sale Prices”
BAR HOURS STARTING APRIL 15
10am-1am Mon.–Sat.; Sun. 12-9pm
NOW SERVING food from the Side Dish Kitchen
starting at 11 a.m. DAILY
A14E15Sj
Thursday, April 11: Golden Age Club, Arlington
Haus, 6 p.m. social, 7 p.m. meeting.
Sunday, April 14: Arlington Conquerors 4-H
Club, Senior Citizen’s building at Four Seasons
Park, 5 p.m., Clover Buds 4 p.m.
Monday, April 15: Income Tax Day
Arlington City Council, council chamber, 6:30
p.m.
Sibley East School Board, Arlington campus,
6:30 p.m.
VFW Post 6031, Veteran’s building at Fair-
grounds, 8 p.m.
Tuesday, April 16: Knights of Columbus, St.
Mary’s Parish Hall, 8 p.m.
Community
Calendar
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER
Arlington State Bank
(507) 964-2256
Fax (507) 964-5550
www.ArlingtonStateBank.com
MAIN BANK
Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (straight thru)
DRIVE THRU
Monday - Thursday, 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.,
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Member
FDIC
IS BACK!
LAST BINGO!
Sat., Apr. 13
@ 5 p.m.
WIN up to
$
1,000
between our two
progressive games!
Green Isle Firemen’s Relief Assoc. – Lic. #02584
Pull Tabs Available
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at
the
All Are Welcome!
Trinity Lutheran Church
Country-Western/Bluegrass
Worshi p Servi ce
and Potato Pancake Dinner
Sun., April 14
“Come Celebrate at God’s
Special Country Church”
9 & 11 am Worship Services
10 am-2 pm Pancake Dinner
Music by the Groskreutz Family
Waldorf, MN
Special Western Sermon
by Pastor James Snyder
30
th
Annual Pancake Dinner
sponsored by Men’s Fellowship
Trinity Lutheran Church
Sibley Twp. 32234 431
st
Ave., Rural Gaylord
Serving: potato pancakes, pancakes, ham, etc.
Adults:
$
8; Children, 6-12:
$
3; Children 0-5: Free
*14EG,14-15Sa
Classes begin April 22, 2013
Class Name Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri Sat
Total Body Extreme 5:15am 5:15am 8:00am
Total Body Strength
& Conditioning 8:15am 4:15pm 8:15am 4:15pm 8:15am
Bootcamp for
Boomers 9:30am 9:30am 9:30am
Get Metobolic 4:30pm 4:30pm
Kettlebell Circuits 5:30pm 7:00pm 9:00am
Kettlebell Strength
& Conditioning 7:00pm 5:30pm
Adventure Racing
Training 10:15am
8 WEEK COUCH-TO-5K PROGRAM BEGINNING 4-20!
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306 5th Ave NW, Arlington • 952-465-2298
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In Loving Memory of
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who passed away ten years
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In the hearts of those
who loved you, you will
always be there.
Still missed by her family
Mary & Pat Brazil & family
Cindy & Bill Weldon & family
Gina & Terry Murphy & family
*14Ea
St. John’s
Lutheran Church
Arlington Township
38595 St. Hwy. 19, Arlington
(4 miles SE of Arlington)
Pancake
Meal
4:00 - 7:00 p.m.
Sunday, April 21
Serving: Pancakes,
syrup, sausage, cheese,
dessert, coffee
Hosted by St. John’s Men’s Club.
Proceeds fund local projects
& Lutheran Hour Ministries
throughout the world.
A
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Clients & Friends of the
Arlington Animal Clinic are invited to a
Client Appreciation
Retirement Open House
Lyle Rud, DVM
Friday, April 19 • 5-8:30 p.m.
Light Supper • Short Program @ 7 p.m.
Arlington Community Center
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News Briefs
Boat stolen near Belle Plaine
A boat was reportedly stolen from property owned by
Jerry Pilsner along Highway 25 near Belle Plaine, ac-
cording to the Sibley County Sheriff’s Department.
The 1974 Lund boat, which was last seen on Tuesday,
April 2, had a 90 horsepower Evinrude outboard motor
on it. The boat was on a homemade trailer and con-
tained general boating supplies.
The boat is valued at approximately $2,500, accord-
ing to the report.
iPads reportedly stolen at SE
Two iPads were reportedly stolen at the Sibley East
Public School in Arlington, according to the Arlington
Police Department.
The incident was reported to the local police depart-
ment on Friday, April 5.
GICS receives $3,500 grant
The Prairie Lakes Regional Arts Council recently an-
nounced that grants of $98,390 from the Arts and Cul-
tural Heritage Fund have been awarded to 19 arts organ-
izations, community groups and schools in the region.
In Sibley County, the Green Isle Community School
(GICS) received a $3,500 grant. GICS will sponsor an
Artist in Residency where students interview elders
from the community and work with local artists to cre-
ate plays and music based on the elders’ lives.
This fund was created by the people of Minnesota to
support the arts and preserve our heritage. The Clean
Water, Land and Legacy Amendment, passed by the
voters in November, 2008, created new resources for
land conservation, water conservation, parks and the
arts.
SE Ice Cream Social is April 14
The Sibley East Jazz Band and Show Choir Ice
Cream Social will be held in the large gym at the Sibley
East Senior High School in Arlington at 7 p.m. Sunday,
April 14.
The Wolverine Jazz Band and Show Choir will be
performing a variety of different selections. It will be a
fun evening with music that everyone can enjoy.
Badeland Cattle is member
Badeland Cattle, Arlington, is a new member of the
American Angus Association, according to Bryce Schu-
mann, CEO of the national breed organization head-
quartered in Saint Joseph.
The American Angus Association, with more than
25,000 active adult and junior members, is the largest
beef breed association in the world. Its computerized
records include detailed information on more than 17
million registered Angus. The association records an-
cestral information, keeps production records on indi-
vidual animals, and develops industry-leading selection
tools for its members. These programs and services help
members select and mate the best animals in their herds
to produce quality genetics for the beef cattle industry
and quality beef for consumers.
Food shelf is appreciative
The Sibley County Food Shelf received a total of
14,102 pounds of food and $17,539 in donations during
the Minnesota FoodShare March Drive, according to
Acting Coordinator Maxine McPherson.
“These totals were made possible through the hard
work of the churches, civic groups, Boy Scouts and in-
dividuals who donated,” said McPherson.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Sibley East Speech
The Sibley East speech team competed in the sub
section speech contest at Jordan on Thursday, April
4. Left to right: Brandon Raghu, Isaac Elseth, Ben
Steinborn, Zack Klaers and head coach Shannon
Hruska. The Duo Interpretation team of Raghu and
Elseth posted some of their best scores this season
and finished in 11th place. Klaers finished ninth in
Discussion. Due to illness, Steinborn was unable to
complete all rounds of competition and was not
ranked. “These gentlemen are all sophomores, so I
anticipate that they will continue to improve in the
next two years,” said Hruska.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Town & Country Days
celebration was the main
topic of discussion during the
regular monthly meeting of
the Arlington Area Chamber
of Commerce on Monday,
April 8.
President Steve Gillapise
presented information on the
raffle. A total of $14,690 in
prizes will be given away
during the raffle. The Cham-
ber will have to sell about
750 tickets at $20 each to
break even.
Outside of the raffle tick-
ets, he added that the estimat-
ed revenues and expenditures
to date are about the same.
Those figures include almost
$1,900 in donations from
local and area businesses to
be sponsors on the celebra-
tion poster.
The discussion later cen-
tered around the percentage
to charge vendors to sell their
products during the celebra-
tion.
It was unclear whether the
Chamber has charged 10 per-
cent of the gross sales or 10
percent of the profit.
Some Chamber members
felt the percentage should be
higher since the group covers
all expenses for advertising,
two bands and most activi-
ties.
The Town & Country Days
Committee will discuss the
percentage topic during its
next meeting. A report will
then be presented at the next
regular monthly meeting of
the Chamber.
In other related news,
Gillaspie reported that the
celebration will be held at
Four Seasons Park on Friday
night, June 14. It was origi-
nally scheduled to be held on
Main Street. It will continue
at Four Seasons Park on Sat-
urday, June 15 and Sunday,
June 16.
Lyle Rud reported that the
annual Breakfast on the Farm
event will be held at Sunshine
Dairy on Friday morning,
June 14. The farm is owned
by Ron and Pam, and Scott
and Stephanie Krueger. Addi-
tional information on this
event will be presented at the
next regular monthly meet-
ing.
Jim Heiland, in other news,
inquired if the Chamber has
plans to promote businesses
during the upcoming High-
way 5 project. He said traffic
will decrease dramatically
along Highway 5 during the
project.
Heiland, after some discus-
sion, will research the costs
for a possible billboard adver-
tisement to alert motorists
that “Arlington is still open
for business” during the two
phases of the project.
Celebration main topic at Chamber meeting
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 11, 2013, page 3
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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Arlington
Chiropractic Clinic
JUSTIN E. DAVIS, D.C.
607 W. Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-2850
arlingtonchiropracticmn.com
Office Hours:
Mon. 9am-6pm; Tues. 9am-5pm;
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Office 507-964-2682
Cell 507-995-0507
Miller
Law
Office
RAPHAEL J. MILLER
ROXANN M. BERANEK
Attorneys at Law
332 Sibley Ave. 1042 First Ave.
Gaylord, MN Gibbon, MN
Tel. 507-237-2954 Fax: 507-237-2347
Wills - Taxes - Estate Planning
General Law Practice & Trials
Free consultation on personal injury claims
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New Patients Welcome
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106 3
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REPAIR LLC
HEAVY DUTY TRUCK
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23315 HWY 5
ARLINGTON, MN 55307
PAUL PIEPER, OWNER
EMAIL: ppieper@ymail.com
Truck &
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Sales &
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190 McGrann Street • PO Box 277 • Green Isle, MN 55338
507.326.7144 • www.greenislecommunityschool.org
A14E15SE16Ej
Green Isle
Community School
PRE SCHOOL
ROUNDUP
Thursday, April 23
rd
6:30pm
For children ages 3-5 years old
Bring your child and come see
what we have to offer!
Registration information for
Fall 2013 Pre School students will be available
Classes are Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
– Meet the Pre School teacher and GICS Staff –
– Tour the building –
Please call if you would like more information.
A staff member from the
Information Technology
Department of New Centu-
ry Charter School and New
Discoveries Montessori
Academy in Hutchinson
has been charged for al-
legedly having a sexual re-
lationship with a 17-year-
old female student over the
past two years, according to
the KDUZ/KARP/KGLB
Radio website.
Stephen M. Noga, 29,
Hutchinson was arrested at
the school on Thursday,
April 4. He has been
charged with third degree
criminal sexual conduct.
The investigation report-
edly began after authorities
were notified by another
students’ parents, who were
suspicious of the staff
member’s behavior.
Hutchinson man is arrested
for criminal sexual conduct
A Henderson man has been
accused of physically abusing
his girlfriend’s 15-month-old
daughter, according to the
KNUJ Radio website.
Bryan C. Delbridge, 24,
was scheduled to appear for
an Omnibus Hearing in Sib-
ley County District Court on
Thursday, April 4. He has
been charged with felony
third degree assault, domestic
assault, and malicious pun-
ishment of a child after taking
care of his girlfriend’s two
children while she was at
work. The toddler reportedly
suffered numerous injuries,
including multiple bumps and
bruises on her face and head.
Delbridge had told authorities
at first that the girl was hit by
a door, but later reportedly
admitted to getting frustrated
with the child and striking her
several times. He claims to
have several mental health is-
sues, but also has prior as-
sault and harassment convic-
tions.
Delbridge remains in cus-
tody in the Sibley County Jail
and faces up to five years in
prison.
Henderson man is charged in connection
with physically abusing 15-month-old girl
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Sibley County, along with
Le Sueur and Mille Lacs
counties, is now considered
part of the Minneapolis-St.
Paul-Bloomington Metropoli-
tan Statistical Area (MSA),
according to federal Office of
Management and Budget.
What formerly was a 13-
county Twin Cities MSA is
now a 16-county entity.
A county becomes part of
an MSA when at least 25 per-
cent of its workforce com-
mutes to one of the abutting
MSA core counties.
Sibley County borders on
the counties of Carver and
Scott. Le Sueur County abuts
Scott County.
“For the most part, it does-
n’t really mean anything,”
said Sibley County Adminis-
trator Matt Jaunich. “It’s
more for statistical data col-
lection. There is a very slight
chance that it might open us
up for some additional fund-
ing opportunities, but to what
extent no one can tell me.”
Sibley County part of Twin Cities MSA
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Grilling For The Chamber
The Sibley Medical Center (SMC) pro-
vided a complimentary lunch for nearly
20 members of the Arlington Area
Chamber of Commerce during its regu-
lar monthly meeting on Monday, April 8.
SMC Administrator Todd Sandberg per-
formed the grilling duties prior to the
meeting which was held in the confer-
ence room at the Sibley Medical Center
in Arlington
Mike Barthel, operator at
the Arlington Treatment Fa-
cility, recently attended the
76th annual Wastewater Op-
erations Conference in
Brooklyn Park. The event
was sponsored by the Min-
nesota Pollution Control
Agency.
He joined more than 500
other professionals who oper-
ate the treatment plans that
keep Minnesota’s rivers,
streams and 10,000 lakes
clean and safe for drinking,
fishing, swimming and boat-
ing, and help protect public
health for 5.3 million state
residents.
During the conference,
Barthel learned about the lat-
est methods and technologies
that help clean-water plants
meet ever-stricter quality
standards to help ensure fish-
able, swimmable waterways.
The classes and seminars he
attended will help him oper-
ate the Arlington Treatment
Facility more effectively and
efficiently.
The Arlington Treatment
Facility helps sustain safe,
clean water in the High Island
Creek and preserve public
health, wildlife habitat, recre-
ation and scenic values for
the city’s residents.
Local clean-water operators attend
statewide professional conference
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 11, 2013, page 4
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Governor Mark Dayton
releases his proposed
bonding bill
Our View: Big cities, regional centers get
the money and small towns get the shaft
Opinions
Staf f
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Publish-
ers; Kurt Menk, Edi t or; Kari n
Ramige, Manager; Marvin Bulau,
Production Manager; Barb Math-
wig, Of fice; Ashley Reetz, Sales; and Jean Olson, Proof Reading.
Letters
This page is devoted to opin-
ions and commentary . Articles appearing on this page are the opinions of the
writer . V iews expressed here are not necessarily those of the Arlington Enterprise, unless so desig-
nated. The Arlington Enterprise strongly encourages others to express opin-
ions on this page.
Letters from our readers are
strongly encouraged. Letters for
publication must bear the writer’ s signature and address. The Arlington Enterprise reserves the right
to edit letters for purpose of clarity
and space.
Ethics
The editorial staf f of the Arlington Enterprise strives to present the news in a
fair and accurate manner . W e appreciate errors being brought to our attention.
Please bring any grievances against
the Arlington Enterprise to the attention of the editor . Should dif ferences continue, readers are encour-
aged to take their grievances to the
Minnesota News Council, an organi-
zation dedicated to protecting the
public from press inaccuracy and un-
fairness. The News Council can be contacted at 12 South
Sixth St., Suite 940, Minneapolis,
MN 55402, or (612) 341-9357.
Press Freedom
Freedom of the press is guar-
anteed under the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitu- tion:
Established in 1884.
Postmaster send address changes to:
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Phone 507-964-5547 FAX 507-964-2423.
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Entered as Periodicals postal matter at Arlington,
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Subscription Rates: Minnesota – $33.00 per year. Out-
side of state – $38.00 per year.
Arlington ENTERPRISE
Guest Column
Letter To The Editor
Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton, earlier this week, re-
leased his proposed $750 million bonding bill. Like most
bonding bills, the proposal has some strengths and weaknesses.
The proposed bonding bill would invest $109 million in a
major restoration of the State Capitol and make the building
functional and safe for the next century. It would also invest
millions of dollars in higher education, roads and bridges, and
veterans.
The downfall, however, is that the creation of 21,000 jobs
due to the proposed bonding bill would only be temporary. In
addition, taxpayers across the state would pay nearly $60 mil-
lion for civic center expansions in Rochester, Mankato and St.
Cloud. Furthermore, taxpayers would pay $20 million for the
reconstruction of Nicollet Avenue in downtown Minneapolis.
The taxpayers in those cities should pay for those improve-
ments.
The biggest setback to the proposed bonding bill is that mil-
lions of dollars, as usual, would go to big cities and regional
centers across the state and little if any money would go to
small towns in Minnesota. The result is the big cities and re-
gional centers would continue to grow and thrive while the
small towns would shrink and struggle. Imagine what would
happen if the $80 million dollars for the civic centers and
Nicollet Avenue were invested in numerous small towns across
the state.
It is time for politicians from both parties, especially in the
rural areas, to stand up for the small towns across the state.
Minnesota will never thrive unless it starts to invest in small
communities around the state.
-K.M.
Too Tall’s Tidbits
Happy Birthday and Happy An-
niversary to the following local and
area residents compliments of the
Arlington Lions Club Community
Calendar.
April 12
Angela Hennies, Colton Timm, Dar-
lene Tollefson, Janet Hansen, Lauren
Von Eschen, Maeya Dose, Zac
Pauly, Amber Mathwig, and Mr. and
Mrs. Aaron Hendrycks.
April 13
In Memory Of Lynn Sauter, Janice
Lehmkuhl, Megan Anderson, and
Mr. and Mrs. John Schlueter.
April 14
Duke Schmidt, Karen Archer, Mor-
gan Bednarek, Wendy Dieball, and
Mr. and Mrs. Don Kubal.
April 15
Cassy Bratsch, Kristi Sauter
Bartkowicz and Megan Bening.
April 16
Caleb Ling, Corrine Carney, Joan
Pinske, Mike Raddatz and Steve
Schmitz.
April 17
Ramona Bade, and Mr. and Mrs.
Bob Lueth.
April 18
Amy Zingsheim, Barb Luepke, Bob
Gildea, Brandon Ronning, Corky
Von Eschen, Maryn Pazdernik,
Nathan Thomes and Scott Schultz.
*****
The Smiths were proud of their
family tradition. Their ancestors had
come to America on the Mayflower.
They had included Senators and
Wall Street wizards.
They decided to compile a family
history, a legacy for their children
and grandchildren. They hired a fine
author. Only one problem arose -
how to handle that great-uncle
George, who was executed in the
electric chair.
The author assured the family he
could handle the story as tactfully as
possible and was given the go-ahead
to write the book.
The book appeared. It said
“Great-uncle George occupied a
chair of applied electronics at an
important government institution
and was attached to his position
by the strongest of ties. His death
came as a great shock.”
*****
After losing another tooth, eight-
year-old Timmy became more curi-
ous about the elusive tooth fairy.
Finally putting two and two to-
gether, he came right out and asked
his mother, “Mom, are you the tooth
fairy?”
Assuming he was old enough to
hear the truth, she replied, “Yes, I
am.”
Timmy seemed to take this news
quite well. But as he headed for the
door, he slowly turned back toward
his mother with a curious look on his
face and said, “Wait a minute. How
do you get into the other kids’
houses?”
*****
As the family gathered for a big
dinner together, the youngest son an-
nounced that he had just signed up at
an army recruiter’s office.
There were audible gasps around
the table, then some laughter, as his
older brothers shared their disbelief
that he could handle this new situa-
tion.
“Oh, come on, quit joking,” snick-
ered one. “You didn’t really do that,
did you?”
“You would never get through
basic training,” scoffed another.
Finally, his father spoke up. “It’s
going to take a lot of discipline. Are
you ready for that?”
The new recruit looked to his
mother for help, but she was just
gazing at him.
When she spoke, she simply
asked, “Do you really plan to
make your own bed every morn-
ing?”
*****
Each Friday night Bill drove his
wife to the train station so she could
go visit her sister who was ill.
Ten minutes later, Bill’s sister ar-
rived by train so that she could look
after the kids while Bill worked over
the weekend. On Sundays this pro-
cedure worked in reverse with Bill’s
sister departing by train ten minutes
before Bill’s wife arrived.
One evening after Bill’s sister left
and while he awaited his wife’s ar-
rival, a porter sauntered over.
“Mister,” he said, “you sure
have some system going! But one
of these days you’re goin’ to get
caught!”
*****
By Glenn Gruenhagen
State Representative
District 18B
This session, Governor Dayton
and Democrats in the legislature are
demanding billions of dollars in new
taxes to fix our $627 million dollar
budget shortfall. They insist that
raising revenues is the only way to
fix our budget, putting forth a budg-
et with minimal reforms and cuts.
The Governor’s initial plan for in-
stance asked for $22 dollars in new
taxes for every $1 in cuts. Hardly a
balanced approach. It’s my belief
that before we ask hardworking
Minnesotans for even one more dol-
lar in tax increases that we ensure
our government programs are de-
void of waste and running as effi-
ciently as possible.
Last month, the Minnesota Office
of the Legislative Auditor (OLA) is-
sued a report faulting the Minnesota
Department of Human Services
(DHS) for failing to check the eligi-
bility of participants in a number of
public assistance programs that pro-
vide medical, cash and food benefit
to low-income citizens.
Under state and federal law, agen-
cies are required to verify income
levels for participants in the various
public assistance programs. The
OLA report cited the MinnesotaCare
insurance program as having failed
to adequately verify the income
level of participants.
In addition, despite federal re-
quirements, DHS failed to cross-
check and address discrepancies in
reported income levels with other
government data for the Medical As-
sistance program, the Temporary
Assistance for Needy Families pro-
gram, and the Supplemental Nutri-
tion Assistance food-stamp program.
In February, I received a memo
from DHS Inspector General Jerry
Kerber that cited just five cases of
fraud and abuse that resulted in
$2,762,197 dollars in overpayments
from the government. These fraud
and abuse investigations were the
result of anti-fraud measures insti-
tuted by the Republican-led legisla-
ture in 2012.
If anything, we should be increas-
ing funding to the departments that
are tasked with finding and fighting
fraud and abuse to help clean up
these government programs.
I believe these examples should
be a wakeup call to Democrats in
the legislature. We don’t need to
raise taxes to address our budget
gap. We need to be examining our
government programs from top to
bottom, ensuring that we find every
dollar of cost savings possible, and
that our programs are free of waste,
fraud, and abuse. I am concerned
that these examples are just the tip
of the iceberg.
These are your tax dollars at work
– I believe your government owes it
to you to ensure that those dollars
are being spent responsibly and effi-
ciently. You deserve nothing less.
Cut waste and find reforms in Minnesota
By Lee H. Hamilton
A few weeks ago, the Republican
National Committee issued a 100-
page report aimed at reviving the
GOP after its poor showing in last
November’s elections. It was re-
markably blunt about the specifics
of the party’s shortcomings — its
lack of inclusiveness, its hapless
data initiatives, its poor grassroots
organizing. What it did not take on,
however, was an issue the RNC can
do little about: the diminished influ-
ence, if not irrelevance, of both
major parties in American politics.
In the early years of my political
career, the parties were pretty much
the only game in town. If you want-
ed to be a candidate, there was no
one else to turn to for help with
building a campaign organization,
finding volunteers, making contact
with activists and donors, or creat-
ing a network of supporters. People
could and did win elections without
official party support — but not
often, and not easily.
The parties also registered voters,
turned them out on Election Day,
and provided much of the campaign
funding. They not only articulated
policy and kept the other party hon-
est, but also served to forge a policy
consensus among the disparate
coalitions that made them up, striv-
ing to make themselves as inclusive
as possible.
All this is much less evident these
days. At the very top, once the nom-
ination is sewed up, presidential
candidates run independently of the
party. They have their own staffs, do
their own fundraising, and build
their own organizations. I’ll be
stunned if we don’t see future presi-
dents take a leaf from President
Obama’s playbook and form their
own grassroots organizations out-
side the party apparatus to pressure
Washington lawmakers.
The rise of increasingly influential
outside players has done much the
same thing for candidates lower
down. They can now hire their own
signature-gatherers for petitions,
their own pollsters, their own con-
sultants and specialists in virtually
every aspect of modern campaign-
ing. Scores of groups representing
various factions within a party have
emerged as significant players in the
political process. The parties are
simply outmatched in resources and
organization. They’ve even lost con-
trol of campaign funding, as special
interest groups with their own or-
ganizations — the NRA, say, or the
Club for Growth — not only put
money behind or against candidates,
but also turn out voters on behalf of
their favorite issues.
The parties’ loss of influence is
especially obvious when you look at
primaries. Where party approval
once was tantamount to nomination,
today it’s anything but. In last year’s
elections, any number of party-ap-
proved candidates were beaten by
well-funded outside challengers. It’s
one of the reasons that building con-
sensus on Capitol Hill has become
so difficult: with congressional dis-
tricts drawn to favor one party or an-
other, incumbents live in fear of tak-
ing a stance that might draw a chal-
lenger with special-interest backing.
At the state and local level, party
organizations are finding it harder
than ever to recruit volunteers inter-
ested in building the party itself,
rather than in promoting a favored
cause by trying to take over its appa-
ratus. Where volunteers once put in
many hours licking stamps, walking
the streets to identify and register
voters, or getting people to the polls,
today far fewer people feel they can
justify the time unless it’s on behalf
of a particular candidate or issue.
Obviously, the parties are not en-
tirely out of the game. Some roles
only a national party can play, as
with the presidential nominating
process. But where they once were
able to exert control, now they can
at best hope for a bit of influence.
I favor strengthening the role of
political parties in our system. They
once played a central role in identi-
fying candidates, articulating ideas
and positions, and identifying talent
for government; today, those jobs
often are not performed at all. Ro-
bust political parties might even
help break the impasse in Washing-
ton. They used to bring a wide array
of Americans together under one
banner, and pressed their members
to learn how to build consensus on
behalf of a larger cause. This was a
skill that carried over to Capitol
Hill. Independence from the party
may be a fine thing for self-expres-
sion, but it carries a cost to the coun-
try.
Lee Hamilton is Director of the
Center on Congress at Indiana Uni-
versity. He was a member of the
U.S. House of Representatives for
34 years.
We’d be better if the parties were still relevant
SHARE YOUR OPINION THROUGH
A LETTER TO THE EDITOR.
EMAIL YOUR LETTER TO
KURTM@ARLINGTONMNNEWS.COM
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 11, 2013, page 5
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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Obituaries
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
New Squad Car
Arlington Police Chief Bruce Rovinsky
stands in front of the new 2013 Chevro-
let Impala squad car which was pur-
chased from Brau Motors in Arlington.
The new squad car, which arrived on
Wednesday, April 4, replaces the 2008
Chevrolet Impala.
Longtime Arlington resi-
dent Bob Mueller, 95, passed
away on Saturday, April 6.
Funeral services will be
held at Peace Lutheran
Church in
Arlington at
11 a.m. Fri-
day, April
12.
Visitation
will start at
the church at
10 a.m. Fri-
day, April
12.
Interment
will be at the
Arlington Public Cemetery.
Bob was born in Min-
neapolis on Sept. 19, 1917.
He was adopted by William
and Helen Mueller, Arling-
ton, and spent the majority of
his life there. His father
owned Mueller Brothers
Hardware and the Ford auto-
mobile dealership in Arling-
ton. He was baptized at St.
Paul’s Lutheran Church,
graduated from the Arlington
High School in 1936 and
from St. Olaf College in
Northfield in 1941. On May
26, 1945, he married his col-
lege sweetheart, Lorraine An-
dersen, who was from Duluth
at Mount Olivet Lutheran
Church in Minneapolis by
Rev. Reuben Youngdahl. Bob
and Lorraine settled in Ar-
lington shortly after they mar-
ried.
Bob had several jobs dur-
ing his career working with
Lutheran Brotherhood Insur-
ance, a joint partnership in
the Spannaus-Mueller Deep
Rock filling station, and
many years with Big Stone
Canning Company where he
retired. In 1952, Bob made an
unsuccessful bid for Mayor
of Arlington. He was also a
member of the Arlington
Lions Club and Arlington
Commercial Club. At the
time of his death, Bob was
the oldest surviving member
of the Arlington Fire Depart-
ment where he served as a
volunteer for more than 25
years. Bob was an avid sports
enthusiast and spent many
years playing baseball for the
Arlington A’s. Bob loved to
dance and have fun and he
had a great sense of humor.
He and Lorraine also enjoyed
several vacations in Hawaii, a
place they loved. Bob and
Lorraine, who enjoyed 45
years together, were blessed
with three sons, twins Brady
and Brent, and Jeff.
In 1995, he moved to
Lakeville with his son, Brady,
and in 2000 he moved into
the Apple Valley Villa apart-
ment complex in Apple Val-
ley, where he resided until his
death.
In addition to his three
sons, Bob is survived by
Carol Mueller, Diana Mueller
and Randy Sands; three
grandchildren, Andrew
Mueller, Lindsay (Tom)
Wernimont and Stacy
(Aaron) Tepp; three great-
grandchildren, Skyler, Norah
and Ahnalie Tepp; and two
nephews, Bill and Bryan
Scott.
Bob was preceded in death
by his parents, William and
Helen Mueller; wife, Lor-
raine, in 1990; sister, Ruby
Scott Dvorak, in 1999;
nephew, Mark Scott, in 2011;
and granddaughter, Jill Hunt-
ington Mueller, in 1992.
Memorials may be made
to Peace Lutheran Church,
514 Freedom Drive, Arling-
ton, MN 55307.
Kolden Funeral Home is
handling the arrangements.
Robert Mueller, 95, formerly of Arlington
Robert W.
‘Bob’ Mueller
Anna M. Hamblin, age 69,
of Arlington, died at her
home in Arlington on Satur-
day, April 6.
A memorial service will be
held at St. Paul’s Evangelical
Lutheran Church in Arlington
at 11 a.m. Saturday, April 13.
Rev. Hanneman will officiate.
Visitation will be held at
St. Paul’s Evangelical Luther-
an Church in Arlington from
5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, April
12, and continue one hour
prior to the memorial service
at the church on Saturday,
April 12.
Interment will be in St.
Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran
Church Cemetery in Arling-
ton.
Anna was born to Henry
and Frances (Chapman) Sperr
in Morris on Jan. 23, 1944.
She married Darrell Hamblin
at St. Paul’s Evangelical
Lutheran Church in Arlington
on Aug. 12, 1988. She
worked as an Office Manager
for Kidney Care Specialists
for 22 years. She retired on
June 30, 2006. She was a
member of St. Paul’s Church
Choir and the Mission Socie-
ty. She volunteered at the
Treasure Haus, Arlington
Good Samaritan Center and
St. Paul’s Lutheran School
reading with the children.
She was also very active in
Ala-non. She loved garden-
ing, camping, vacationing,
canning and most of all
spending time with her fami-
ly.
Anna is survived by her
husband, Darrell; children,
Julie (Jeff) Hines, Patrick
(Shauna) Caddell, Robin
Hamblin, Dawn (Allen)
Schwirtz and Jean (special
friend, Todd Hudson) Ham-
blin; 18 grandchildren; 11
great-grandchildren; siblings,
Paul (Betty) Sperr, Vivian
(Harvey) Graff, Edith (Roy)
Tribe and Carrie (Rod)
Mitzel; siblings-in-law, Ruth
Mathews, Francis Hamblin,
Viola Wurzberger, Virgil
(Yvonne) Hamblin, Donnis
Beneke, Harold (Violet)
Hamblin, Carroll (Marlene)
Hamblin, Josephine (Jerry)
Kalis, Bill (Marilyn) Ham-
blin, Ronald (Kathy) Ham-
blin and Gale (Joann) Ham-
blin; and many nieces and
nephews.
Anna is preceded in death
by her parents; parents-in-
law, Karl and Jenny Hamblin;
son-in-law, Danny “Barney”
Adams; brothers-in-law, Ray-
mond Hamblin, Erwin Math-
ews, Joseph Wurzberger and
Harvey Beneke; sister-in-law,
Ann Hamblin and great-
granddaughter, Stella Peter-
son-Caddell.
Anna M. Hamblin, 69, Arlington
The Meeker-McLeod-Sib-
ley Healthier Communities
will host a free worksite well-
ness conference at the Victo-
rian Inn in Hutchinson from
8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 1.
People can learn more
about how worksite wellness
initiatives help create a
healthier, more productive
workforce at their worksite.
Whether people are new to
worksite wellness or a long-
standing leader, this confer-
ence will provide them with
new skills and tools to en-
hance wellness initiatives in
your worksite.
This unique opportunity is
being sponsored by the
Statewide Health Improve-
ment Program through Meek-
er, McLeod and Sibley coun-
ties and is being made avail-
able absolutely free.
People can choose from
multiple sessions to learn best
practices for implementing
wellness initiatives in your
workplace from the area’s
leading experts. These ses-
sions will focus on many as-
pects of worksite wellness,
including healthy eating,
physical activity, tobacco,
and stress relief.
There is no cost, but pre-
registration is required. To
view the complete agenda for
the day or to register, please
visit www. mmshealthy-
communities.org or contact
Mary Bachman, SHIP Coor-
dinator, at (507) 237-4048.
Meeker-McLeod-Sibley will host a
free worksite wellness conference
Join the Sibley Medical
Center Auxiliary for its
Treasures in the Attic
Spring Luncheon at the Ar-
lington Community Center
at 10 a.m. Saturday, April
27.
The event will feature a
segment of antique ap-
praisals by Carol Bode,
New Ulm. Bode, along
with her husband, was a
former owner of an antique
shop until they retired al-
most 20 years ago. During
this time, Bode studied and
learned about the history
and value of family heir-
looms and other itemss that
came in and out of the
store. Since then the couple
has traveled throughout the
Midwest, Colorado and
Texas while her husband
appraised, showed and sold
items.
People are invited to
bring a knick knack or fam-
ily heirloom to this annual
event. Please do not bring
guns or jewelry. Time does
not permit to have all items
evaluated so a random
drawing will be held.
There will also be a
showing of spring styles to
add some variety to the
luncheon.
The proceeds from this
event will go toward the
purchase of items for the
Sibley Medical Center.
What is it worth? Find out on April 27
help with problem solving
and/or decision making.
Less than half of the teach-
ers have used the iPad to cre-
ate interactive projects or
help students to analyze.
Amsden also provided
some statistics from Schoolo-
gy, the learning management
system used by the district.
This system allows teach-
ers to maintain a page for
each of their classes to create
and share academic content.
During the time frame of
June 2012 through March
2013 there were 33,394 total
visits to Schoology.
On those visits there were
271,591 page views, 30,772
comments posted, 13964 as-
signments and 15,673 files
uploaded.
Amsden stressed that this
is still a new initiative within
the district and there is a
learning curve, it isn’t a
quick switch.
As the year has gone on,
the administration is seeing
more projects and interactive
projects happening in the
classrooms.
iPad Survey Continued from page 1
School Board Chairperson
Brian Brandt said they need
to be supportive with the
progress being made even
though it might be slow to get
the teachers comfortable and
increase the use in the class
room.
iShare Night
The district will host a fam-
ily and community iShare
night at the Gaylord campus
from 5 p. m. to 7 p. m.
Wednesday, May 8.
The evening will highlight
the successes of the Project
Ed.21 over the school year.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 11, 2013, page 6
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Sports
Submitted Photo
Hartman Recognized
Sibley East head football coach Chuck
Hartman was recognized during an
event at the Double Tree Hotel in St.
Louis Park on Saturday night, April 7.
Hartman received the Minnesota River
Conference Coach of the Year Award
and the Section Coach of the Year
Award. His wife, Kris, is pictured on the
right. The event was sponsored by the
Minnesota Football Coaches Associa-
tion.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
boys golf team returns five
letterwinners this spring, ac-
cording to head coach Mike
Feterl.
The returning letterwinners
include seniors Zach Bostel-
man and Matt Davis; junior
Levi Pfarr; sophomore Jordan
Petzel; and freshman Mike
Bostelman.
The remaining athletes
consist of freshmen Zach
Bremer, Aaron Strack, Jacob
Strack, Devin Tupa and Brad
Ziegler; eighth graders Jack-
son Rose and Brent Walters;
and seventh graders Mark
Brinkman, Andy Davis and
Neylan Ott.
“We return three varsity
players back from a team that
placed third in the conference
last year, but we did lose a
key contributor in Zach Pet-
zel,” said Feterl. “With the
return of all conference hon-
orable mention player Mike
Bostelman along with Jordan
Petzel and Zach Bostelman,
the Wolverines hope to con-
tend for a top spot in the con-
ference again this year.
Feterl added, “If our top
players play consistent all
year and we can find a fourth
score from one of the other
boys, we could compete for a
top three place in the confer-
ence. The returning players
have all made a section golf
tournament and have played
numerous conference match-
es so the experience is there.”
With the recent rain and
snow it is unclear when the
Wolverines will get outside
and officially begin their sea-
son.
Feterl is assisted by coach
Doug Flieth.
SE boys golf team returns
5 letterwinners this season
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
The Sibley East varsity boys golf team
returns five letterwinners this spring.
Left to right: Levi Pfarr, Matt Davis,
Mike Bostelman and Jordan Petzel.
Missing from the photo is Zach Bostel-
man.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Three letterwinners return for the Sib-
ley East varsity girls golf team this sea-
son. Left to right: Liz Thies, Heidi Mil-
czark and Rachel Davis.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
A trio of letterwinners re-
turn for the Sibley East varsi-
ty girls golf team this season,
according to head coach
Mike Feterl.
The three returning letter-
winners include senior Heidi
Milczark, junior Rachel
Davis and sophomore Liz
Thies.
The remaining athletes
consist of Kierstan Campbell
and Rebecca Davis.
“The Lady Wolverines will
be led by Liz Thies,” said
Feterl. “Liz made it to the
section golf tournament last
year and is a three-time letter-
winner as a sophomore. Liz
has gained valuable experi-
ence the last few years, and
works hard on her game in
the off season. I feel Liz is
ready to make big strides this
year in the conference.”
Feterl continued, “Other re-
turning girl golfers are Heidi
Milczark, who has played
varsity since a young age and
is very capable to posting
good scores for us this year.
Rachel Davis is also return-
ing and also has the ability to
post competitive scores in the
conference.”
Feterl added, “The team
needs to find a fourth score
from one of our young
golfers who have very little
course experience. I hope by
the end of the season we can
post a team score for the girls
team.”
It is unclear when the Lady
Wolverines will get outside
and officially begin their sea-
son due to the recent rain and
snow.
Feterl is assisted by coach
Doug Flieth.
Trio of letterwinners return for
the Sibley East girls golf team
Flocks of giant white birds
are catching the eyes of out-
door enthusiasts across Min-
nesota, as once-rare Ameri-
can White Pelicans migrate
north to their nesting grounds
across the state.
American White Pelicans
were driven to near extinction
in the early 20th century from
human pressures, according
to the Minnesota Department
of Natural Resources (DNR).
There were no reports of
nesting pelicans in Minnesota
for 90 years, from 1878 until
1968.
Conservation efforts and
federal regulations have
helped pelican populations
make a slow and steady
comeback. “The prairie pot-
hole region of western Min-
nesota hosts 22 percent of the
global population of this
species,” according to Lisa
Gelvin-Innvaer, DNR
nongame wildlife specialist.
In Minnesota, there are esti-
mated to be about 22,000
pairs of pelicans that nest at
16 sites on seven lakes across
the state.
American White Pelicans
leave Minnesota each fall as
lakes and rivers freeze. They
winter along the Gulf Coast
from Florida to Mexico and
typically return to Minnesota
in early spring, as lakes and
rivers thaw.
They are among the
world’s largest birds and are
easily recognized in flight.
Wingspans up to nine feet,
bright white plumage with
black-edged wings and large,
orange bills distinguish them
from any other species.
“Pelicans often fly in even-
ly spaced lines or V forma-
tions,” Gelvin-Innvaer said.
“Unlike swans or geese
which fly with necks out-
stretched, pelicans fly with
their necks doubled back
against their shoulders. They
often set up a rhythmic pat-
tern of wing beats that ripple
from the lead bird back to the
end.”
American White Pelicans
are highly social and live in
large, dense colonies. They
feed exclusively on small fish
and crustaceans and will
work together for a meal.
“A group of pelicans will
swim in a semicircle to herd
their prey into shallow
water,” Gelvin-Innvaer said.
“Then they’ll scoop up fish
and water in their beak
pouch, drain out the water
and swallow their food.”
Pelicans are popular among
wildlife watchers. Gelvin-In-
nvaer advises that the birds
are best enjoyed from a dis-
tance. “Pelican colonies are
vulnerable to human distur-
bance and contact should be
minimized,” she said.
Due to the Deepwater
Horizon oil spill in 2010, in
an area of the Gulf of Mexico
where American White Peli-
cans winter, efforts are under-
way to assess potential im-
pacts of the spill to Minneso-
ta breeding populations.
Pelicans return to MN after near extinction
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Sibley East graduate
Marshall Bjorklund recent-
ly finished his junior season
with the men’s basketball
team at North Dakota State
University.
The Bison finished the
season with a 12-4 mark in
the conference and a 24-10
record overall.
Bjorklund played an av-
erage of 27.3 minutes in all
34 games. The 6’8” post
player shot 67 percent from
the field and scored an av-
erage of 11.5 points per
game this year. He also av-
eraged 5.9 rebounds per
game. Overall, Bjorklund
was the second leading
scorer and rebounder for
the Bison this season.
He is the son of Dale and
Tracie Bjorklund, rural St.
Peter.
Bjorklund finishes season at NDSU
The High Island Arena
Rodeo will be held at 7
p.m. Friday, April 12 and
Saturday, April 13.
The 10th annual activity
will consist of all nine
rodeo events which include
bareback riding, saddle
bronc riding, steer
wrestling, team roping, bar-
rel racing, calf roping,
break-away roping, bull
riding and 40-plus calf rop-
ing.
The event normally at-
tracts a full house on both
nights. The arena seats ap-
proximately 1,500 people.
For directions to the
arena, people should go one
mile south of Arlington
along Highway 19, turn left
on County Road 65 and
then follow the signs.
For printable directions
and more information, in-
terested people can go to
the High Island Ranch
Arena website at
www.highislandarena.com.
Rodeo is Friday and Saturday
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The recent and current in-
clement weather has raised
havoc with the Sibley East
athletic schedule this spring.
Sibley East has had to post-
pone or cancel 36 events
through Thursday, April 11,
according to Athletic Director
Randy Walsh. Thirty-one
events have been rescheduled
and five have been canceled.
“We only cancel events if
we cannot find a date to
reschedule,” said Walsh.
“We take into consideration
how many events we feel is
safe for an athlete to compete
in each week. We will most
likely need to drop some of
our non-conference baseball
and softball games if we need
to change any more games.”
Walsh continued, “With
tournaments starting the week
of May 20 for all sports, we
are down to a five week sea-
son. With 20 baseball and
softball games scheduled,
that puts us at four games per
week. We also try to keep a
couple dates open at the end
of the season for late season
rain-out and added
practice/rest time for the ath-
letes as they head into the
play-offs. The lack of prac-
tice during the season makes
it hard for coaches and ath-
letes to work on areas of con-
cern.”
Walsh cannot remember a
season getting started this
late.
“We have had some wet
springs that have required
shortening schedules, but
nothing like this. Our golfers
have not been to the course
yet, softball has been outside
two days, and baseball has
been outside two days with
limited use of the fields. We
are fortunate to have three
nets for baseball, softball and
golf to use, but I know the
athletes and coaches are get-
ting tired of being inside.”
Walsh added, “I am con-
cerned about getting games in
next week as the forecast is
for cool wet weather through
next week.”
Nearly 40 SE sports events postponed
or cancelled due to inclement weather
24” x 36”
Photo Posters
$
18
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Call 507-964-5547
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Arlington Enterprise
Sibley Shopper
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 11, 2013, page 7
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
E-Mail us at
info@ArlingtonMNnews.com
E-Mail us at
info@ArlingtonMNnews.com
combined
Legals
Whether you’re looking to
explore a new career in edu-
cation, re-enter the workforce
or simply want to work with
youth, you’re ready for the
next thing. Become a Min-
nesota Math Corps math tutor
at the Sibley East Public
Schools, Gaylord campus,
and start creating meaningful
growth.
Tutors are parents, grand-
parents, recent college grads
and mid-career professionals.
You will provide research-
based strategies and tools,
monitor progress and ulti-
mately, guide students who
need extra support toward be-
coming successful in math by
the end of eighth grade. It’s a
chance to explore life in a
school, connect with students
and create lasting change –
both in your life and students’
lives.
During your 11 months of
service as a full-time Min-
nesota Math Corps tutor, in-
dividuals will receive exten-
sive training, support and
professional development op-
portunities. In addition, they
will receive a living stipend
and an education award. All
necessary training is provided
and no licensure is necessary.
Positions for the 2013-14
school year begin in August.
For more information or to
apply, visit www.Minnesota-
MathCorps.org or contact
Linda Willhite, Internal Math
Coach at Sibley East Public
Schools, at 507-237-3370.
Become a Minnesota Math Corps tutor
History
98 Years Ago
April 15, 1915
Buck & Didra, Publishers
Henry Becker of New Auburn
Township and Miss Dora
Proehl, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Fred Proehl of Arlington
Township were united in mar-
riage at St. Paul’s German
Lutheran Church in this city at
11 o’clock a.m. on Friday, April
9. The young couple will reside
on the groom’s farm 3 miles
north of New Auburn.
August Luepke has started to
manufacture canes. He makes
them out of stems or trunks of
old Christmas trees by cutting
off the branches and when
smoothed up and varnished they
make a dandy walking stick. He
has already received several or-
ders to make many more if the
supply of raw material holds
out.
Miss Alma Noack, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Noack of
this place, and Henry Schutz,
son of Peter Schutz of Jordan
were united in marriage yester-
day noon at St. Paul. They will
make their home in Boyd,
Minn., where the groom has
charge of a branch of the Arling-
ton Produce Company.
68 Years Ago
April 12, 1945
Louis Kill, Editor
Architect Ernest Schmidt of
Mankato has completed the pre-
liminary plans and specifica-
tions for Arlington’s proposed
new municipal hospital and they
are now in the hands of the vil-
lage council and subject to their
approval. Several colored draw-
ings giving an exterior view of
the building have also been
made and are now on display in
the business places of the vil-
lage.
Ben Locher, who retired his
position as buttermaker at the
Green Isle creamery, left Mon-
day for Rockford, Wright Coun-
ty, where he has accepted a like
position. Carl Nemitz of Hector
has taken the position of butter-
maker at the local creamery.
Herman Schwirtz and his
son-in-law and daughter, Mr.
and Mrs. Wilmer Bartels and
family of Richmond, California,
arrived here Sunday and will
again make their home in Ar-
lington. Mr. Schwirtz and Mr.
Bartels were employed in the
big ship building plant in Rich-
mond for the past two years. Mr.
Bartels expects to be inducted
into the armed forces in the near
future.
38 Years Ago
April 10, 1975
Val Kill, Editor
The south half of District 13
met at A-GI High School last
Thursday, April 3, for district
speech competition. In addition
to A-GI students, students from
Cleveland, Henderson, LeCen-
ter, LeSueur, St. Peter and Wa-
terville-Elysian performed in
three speaking rounds.
Big Stone Canning Company
received a permit to build an
$80,000 warehouse addition at
the Arlington City Council
meeting Monday night. A mo-
tion was also made, seconded
and unanimously approved to
begin legal procedure to vacate
a portion of the city street boule-
vard which will be used in the
construction of the new ware-
house.
Mark Wisch, 17, of Arlington,
has been named one of the win-
ners in the “Farming is every-
body’s bread and butter because
. . .” essay contest, sponsored
for Future Farmers of America
(FFA) by Production Credit As-
sociation. Wisch, who attends
A-GI High School, will receive
a $100 U.S. Savings Bond and a
custom-made plaque engraved
with his name from the PCA of
Mankato.
8 Years Ago
April 14, 2005
Kurt Menk, Editor
Green Isle Community
School, the new K-6 charter
school located in Green Isle, an-
nounces that a special “Family
Day” event will be held at the
Green Isle Fire Hall from 1:00
to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, April 16,
2005. Interested parents and
community members will have
the opportunity to meet with the
Green Isle Community School
Start-up Coordinator, Bonnie
Jean Flom, to learn more about
the charter school which will
open during September of 2005.
Darin Mielke, who was raised
in rural Arlington, recently as-
sumed his duties as the new Sib-
ley County Public Works Direc-
tor and Highway Engineer.
Mielke is a 1996 graduate of the
Sibley East Senior High School
and Minnesota State University
in Mankato, where he received a
Bachelor’s Degree in Civil En-
gineering.
Green Isle resident Melanee
Buckentin was the winner of the
grand prize at the 18th annual
Benefit & Fun Night sponsored
by the Sibley Medical Center
Foundation on Friday night,
April 8, 2005. The grand prize
was airfare for two people any-
where within the United States.
Sibley Aggregates gravel
pit owner, LeRoy Chard, has
requested Sibley County to
relocate Sibley CSAH 6
(Scenic Byway Road) from
approximately 0.4 mile north-
east of the intersection with
CSAH 5 (Faxon Road) to
0.25 mile south of the inter-
section with 291st Avenue,
according to Sibley County
Engineer and Public Works
Director Darin Mielke.
Sibley Aggregates also re-
quested to relocate CSAH 60
(295th Avenue) from the in-
tersection of CSAH 6 (Scenic
Byway Road) to approxi-
mately 0.5 mile north of the
CSAH 6 intersection.
Sibley Aggregates operates
a large gravel pit located in
northeastern part of Sibley
County upon which CSAH 6
and 60 travel over by high-
way easement. The gravel pit
supplies concrete, bitumi-
nous, and aggregate materials
for many cities, counties, and
local residents in the area.
The lower level of the gravel
pit is located approximately
40 feet below the current ele-
vation of CSAH 6 and CSAH
60.
Sibley Aggregates would
like to relocate CSAH 6 to
the northwest and CSAH 60
to the north, and lower the
highways closer to elevation
of the bottom of the gravel
pit.
Relocating the highways to
the northwest/north will im-
prove the general safety of
the road by eliminating the
steep slopes that currently
exist adjacent to the rights-of-
way, and it will allow Sibley
Aggregates to mine the ag-
gregate material under the ex-
isting highways which they
are the underlying landowner
and own the rights to the ag-
gregate material.
Sibley Aggregates has initi-
ated a process that is con-
trolled by Minnesota state
statute.
Minnesota Statute §160.10
states: “When any road, in-
cluding any street within a
city crosses mineral land and
the road interferes with min-
ing operations on the land,
the owner or lessee of the
land may notify the road au-
thority of the interference and
request that the road be relo-
cated.
The road authority shall,
thereupon in the manner pro-
vided by law, relocate the
road so as not to interfere
with the mining operations.
The relocated road shall be
constructed to at least the en-
gineering standards of the old
road unless the road authority
determines that such stan-
dards are not necessary for
safety or for the convenience
of public travel. All right-of-
way needed for such reloca-
tion shall be provided by the
owner or lessee of the land or
shall be acquired by the road
authority by gift, purchase, or
other manner provided by
law.” In summary, Minnesota
state law requires the mine
owner to pay for all costs in-
curred to move the highway
with the approval of the
County Board of Commis-
sioners.
The Sibley County Board
of Commissioners has en-
tered into a formal relocation
agreement with LeRoy Chard
to initiate the process for the
relocation of the highways.
The agreement specifically
requires that detailed con-
struction plans, specifica-
tions, and construction stan-
dards are developed for the
relocating of the highways to
the satisfaction and approval
of Sibley County. LeRoy
Chard has procured I & S
Group (Mankato, MN) for the
development of preliminary
construction layouts, detailed
construction plans and speci-
fications and a right of way
plat map. If, during the pre-
liminary construction layout
phase of the project, Sibley
Aggregates determines that
the project will not be feasi-
ble or worthwhile to com-
plete, the project may cease
before any ground work is
performed. The preliminary
construction layout is antici-
pated to be complete in June
2013 and will be available to
the public on the project web.
If the project moves to the
construction phase, the de-
tailed construction plans,
specifications and detour plan
will be reviewed and ap-
proved by Sibley County
Public Works and the County
Board of Commissioners.
Sibley County Public Works
will monitor the project dur-
ing construction to ensure the
quality and workmanship
meet current specification re-
quirements. The relocation
and construction of the new
highway segments are antici-
pated to begin late summer or
early fall of this year; howev-
er, this schedule is still very
fluid and the duration of the
closure of the highway is not
well defined at this point in
time. However, efforts will be
made to minimize the disrup-
tion to highway users, espe-
cially to the other aggregate
producers in the immediate
project area.
Sibley County Public
Works maintains a web page
for the project discussed
above, which can be found by
navigating to:
http://www.co.sibley.mn.us/p
ublic_works/. On the project
web page, the public can find
a project narrative describing
the project, preliminary con-
struction layouts, detour in-
formation and construction
update notices. If a citizen
has any questions in regards
to construction projects on
the county highway system,
they can be directed to Tim
Becker, Assistant County En-
gineer, or Darin Mielke,
County Engineer/Public
Works Director at 507-237-
4092.
Public works director explains relocation project
ADVERTISEMENT
FOR QUOTES
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS:
Quotes for gravel will be received
until 7 p.m., April 24, 2013, by
Maynard Rucks, Clerk of Jessen-
land Township, Sibley County on
behalf of the supervisors of said
township for the following: 3,000
ton of class 5 gravel more or less
del i vered to any pl ace i n the
township by July 1, 2013.
Township is also asking for
quotes for road gradi ng and
weed cutting this season, snow-
plowing and sanding this next
season.
Township reserves the right to
reject any and all quotes.
Maynard Rucks, Clerk
Jessenland Township
35493 226th St.
Henderson, MN 56044
507-964-2733
Publish April 11 and 18, 2013
Submitted Photo
HR Professional of the Year Award
Sibley County Human
Resource Director
Roseann Nagel was re-
cently named HR Profes-
sional of the Year 2013
by the Minnesota County
Human Resource Man-
agement Association
(MCHRMA). Each year,
MCHRMA looks to iden-
tify the HR professional
that has distinguished
themselves with the
work they perform and
the example they set in
the area of public sector
human resource man-
agement. Nagel received
the award during the
MCHRMA Spring Confer-
ence in St. Cloud on
Thursday, April 4.
MCHRMA President Jen-
nifer Thorsten, Stearns
County Human Re-
source Director, is pic-
tured on the left.
The Minnesota Valley
Action Council will hold an
open house in Arlington to
celebrate the “Week of the
Young Child” on Monday,
April 15. The open house
will be held at 101 West
Chandler Street from 2:30
p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
The week of April 15-19
has been set aside by the
National Association of the
Education of Young Child
to recognize those dedicat-
ed to caring for and educat-
ing young children
throughout the country.
At the open house, fami-
lies and community mem-
bers can learn more about
the educational opportuni-
ties available through the
Minnesota Valley Action
Council. Interested individ-
uals who would like to
apply for Head Start or
have any questions should
contact Mary at 1-507-964-
2555 or Minnesota Valley
Action Council at 1-800-
767-7139, extension 2410.
The Head Start program
is a family-centered child
development opportunity
for children ages three to
five. This opportunity is
made available to the com-
munity by the Minnesota
Valley Action Council. One
of the Minnesota Valley
Action Council’s goals is to
bring about a greater degree
of social and educational
competence in preschool-
aged children and help
them prepare for their en-
trance into kindergarten.
There is no charge for
children to participate, but
families need to meet cer-
tain federally-established
income guidelines. Ten per-
cent of the children may be
over those income guide-
lines. The Head Start pro-
gram actively recruits and
serves children with diag-
nosed disabilities regardless
of severity. Transportation
is provided when available.
Staff assists families in ob-
taining transportation for
this early learning opportu-
nity.
The Minnesota Valley
Action Council is a com-
munity action agency that
has served south central
Minnesota since 1965. The
Minnesota Valley Action
Council is for communities,
not for profit. The Min-
nesota Valley Action Coun-
cil is a group of people
helping people. It develops
opportunities for people
and communities to secure
affordable housing, viable
transportation, employ-
ment, training for employ-
ment and educational op-
portunities for children.
MVAC to celebrate Week of the Young Child
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 11, 2013, page 8
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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safety program, or value package apply.
Limit one per person.
Valid for one year supply of contacts or frame and lenses.
If you were previously seen at
Minnesota Eye Consultants -
Gaylord location, your charts are
now back in Gaylord at
Goldsmith Eye Care.
214 Fourth St. N. • Gaylord, MN
Mon., Wed., Turs., Fri. 9-5, Tues. 9-6
www.goldsmitheye.com
507-237-2015
A11-14E,12-15Sa
LIBERTY STATION
Corner of Hwy. 5 & Chandler, Arlington, MN
507-964-5177 or Toll-Free 866-752-9567
www.LibertyStationAutoSales.com
Jim
Heiland’s
Affordable
Used Cars
2010 Chevy Impala 46k ............................$12,900
2008 Chevy Silverado Z71 47k ................$25,995
2008 Chevy Silverado 271 99k ................$19,995
2008 Chevy HHR........................................$4,995
2004 Chevy Blazer 54K..............................$7,997
2006 VW Jetta Diesel..................................$7,995
2003 Oldsmobile Alero 137k 4 cyl. ............$3,995
1997 Chevy 1500 Z71 4x4 149k ................$5,995
A
1
4
E
1
5
G
j
FSA Matters
Scott and Stephanie
Krueger, Arlington, recently
participated in the Young Co-
operator (YC) program held
in conjunction with the Asso-
ciated Milk Producers Inc.
(AMPI) annual meeting in
Bloomington.
The dairy farmers joined
other young AMPI members
to focus on cooperative edu-
cation and leadership. The
gathering is one of many op-
portunities available through
AMPI’s YC program which is
open to members age 40 and
under.
“The AMPI YC program
provides a behind-the-scenes
view of what goes on in the
co-op,” said Aaron Raderma-
cher. “It enables us to better
understand how milk is mar-
keted and dairy policies are
made.”
“The YC program is also a
great way to meet other
young dairy farm families,”
said Jessica Radermacher.
“We can share the challenges
and joys of farming and rais-
ing a family.”
The Radermachers and
their fellow YC steering com-
mittee members will lead the
group in the coming year.
Other members of the com-
mittee are past chairpersons,
Mark and Angie Qual, Lis-
bon, N.D.; vice chairpersons,
Dustin and Courtney Dobber-
stein, New Richland; secre-
taries, Jeff and Amber
Leuthold, Ellsworth; and
members-at-large, Jacob and
Sarah Enter, Nicollet.
YCs who will serve as divi-
sion chairpersons include
Dan Dietzenbach, Fort Atkin-
son, Iowa; Seth and Erin An-
derson, Ettrick, Wis.; Jacki
Pettis, Osseo, Wis.; Scott and
Stephanie Krueger, Arlington;
Josh and Linda Dickmann,
Pierz; Jon Schmidt, Owaton-
na; and Kevin and Cari
Knapp, Larchwood, Iowa.
Associated Milk Producers
Inc. (AMPI) is a dairy mar-
keting cooperative owned by
2,900 dairy farmers who mar-
ket 5.6 billion pounds of
milk, resulting in $1.7 billion
in annual sales. Members op-
erate dairy farms located
throughout the Midwest
states of Wisconsin, Min-
nesota, Iowa, Nebraska,
South Dakota and North
Dakota. The members own 11
manufacturing plants and
market a full line of con-
sumer-packaged dairy prod-
ucts.
Area dairy farmers participate in AMPI annual meeting
The Minnesota Department
of Public Safety Division of
Homeland Security and
Emergency Management,
along with the National
Weather Service, sponsors
Severe Weather Awareness
Week annually to promote
weather knowledge and plan-
ning.
The week’s topics include:
Monday, April 15 – Alerts
and Warnings
Tuesday, April 16 – Severe
Weather, Lighting, and Hail
Wednesday, April 17 –
Floods
Thursday, April 18 – Tor-
nadoes (with statewide torna-
do drills)
• Sibley County will be
participating in tornado drills
at 1:45 p.m. and 6:55 p.m.
Friday, April 19 – Extreme
Heat
Information on tornado
safety and instructions on
protecting yourself in the
event of severe weather can
be found on the Department
of Public Safety website
(www.severeweather.state.mn
.us). The National Weather
Service in Chanhassen web-
site (www.crh.noaa.gov/mpx)
also provides fascinating
weather facts and a variety of
downloadable resources for
families, teachers and chil-
dren.
For additional information,
please contact Sibley County
Emergency Management or
visit its website.
Severe Weather Awareness Week is April 15-19
Corn and soybean farmers
from Nicollet and Sibley
Counties have better insight
into one of their biggest ex-
port customers, thanks to Pat
Klaers and his tales of a re-
cent trip he took to China.
Klaers was recently the fea-
tured speaker at the Nicol-
let/Sibley Corn & Soybean
Growers Annual Banquet at
the American Legion in Gay-
lord.
“Chinese customers want
to build relationships,” said
Klaers. “That’s why this trip
was so important, especially
for Minnesota soybean pro-
ducers. Our Chinese cus-
tomers had the unique oppor-
tunity to talk to the people
who actually grow the soy-
beans they purchase, instead
of some broker or politician,
who they usually interact
with.”
Klaers, a local farmer from
Arlington, joined other Min-
nesota soybean farmers on a
“See For Yourself” trip to
China. This trip was designed
for soybean farmers to see
how their checkoff dollars are
being spent on developing
global market opportunities
overseas. Every other row of
soybeans produced in the
United States is exported, and
half of those exports are sent
to China.
Most of the soybeans ex-
ported to China are used as
feed for livestock, which has
been a growing market as the
country’s population swells.
China is expected to grow by
54 million people in the next
decade.
“Feed demand in China is
expected to increase 23.5 per-
cent from 2010 to 2015,”
Klaers explained. The surging
demand for food and live-
stock feed comes from the
growing and increasingly
prosperous middle class.
Although there is agricul-
ture production in China, it is
practiced on a much smaller
scale than in the United
States. “We saw a total of two
tractors the entire time we
were there,” Klaers said.
“And one of those tractors
was on display in a museum.”
Klaers wrapped up his
presentation stressing the im-
portance of building relation-
ships and getting to know in-
ternational customers and
their needs, citing the Min-
nesota Soybean Research and
Promotion Council as an im-
portant resource to farmers
across the state.
Farmers gain insight into international markets
Enterprise photo courtesy of Megan Bennett
Orange Spectacular
The Upper Midwest A-C Club held its
annual meeting at the Darrell Grams
residence, rural Green Isle, on Satur-
day, April 6. The primary purpose of the
annual meeting is to plan for the Or-
ange Spectacular which will be held at
the McLeod County Fairgrounds from
Friday, July 26 through Sunday, July
28. This free event, which draws about
16,000 to 20,000 people, is the largest
all Allis-Chalmers tractor, machinery
and toy show in the United States. Dar-
rell Grams, a member of the club for the
past 16 years, poses next to the Allis-
Chalmers tractor that will be raffled off
during the event. His three sons, Dar-
rell, Jr., Todd and Brad, are also mem-
bers of the club. The family, which took
nine antique tractors to the event last
year, has 30 antique tractors which
range from 1927 to 1967. Eleven of
those antique tractors are restored.
Scott and Stephanie Krueger
By Lori Weckwerth
Sibley FSA
Farm Storage
Facility Loans
The Farm Storage Facility
Loan Program (FSFLP) al-
lows producers of eligible
commodities to obtain low-
interest financing to build or
upgrade farm storage and
handling facilities.
The new maximum princi-
pal amount of a loan through
FSFL is $500,000. Partici-
pants are now required to
provide a down payment of
15 percent, with CCC provid-
ing a loan for the remaining
85 percent of the net cost of
the eligible storage facility
and permanent drying and
handling equipment. New
loan terms of seven, ten or
twelve years are available de-
pending on the amount of the
loan. Interest rates for each
term rate may be different
and are based on the rate
which CCC borrows from the
U.S. Treasury Department.
Payments are available in
the form of a partial disburse-
ment and the remaining final
disbursement. The partial dis-
bursement will be available
after a portion of the con-
struction has been completed.
The final fund disbursement
will be made when all con-
struction is completed. The
maximum amount of the par-
tial disbursement will be 50
percent of the projected and
approved total loan amount.
Applications for FSFL
must be submitted to the FSA
county office that maintains
the farm's records. An FSFL
must be approved before any
site preparation or construc-
tion can begin.
For more information
about FSFL please visit or
call the FSA county office.
Loans For The
Socially Disadvantaged
FSA has a number of loan
programs available to assist
applicants to begin or contin-
ue in agriculture production.
Loans are available for oper-
ating or help purchase or im-
prove farms or ranches.
While all qualified produc-
ers are eligible to apply for
these loan programs, the FSA
has provided priority funding
for socially disadvantaged ap-
plicants.
A socially disadvantaged
applicant is one of a group
whose members have been
subjected to racial, ethnic or
gender prejudice because of
his or her identity as mem-
bers of a group.
FSA loans are only avail-
able to applicants who meet
all the eligibility require-
ments and are unable to ob-
tain the needed credit else-
where.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 11, 2013, page 9
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
McGraw Monument
Works, Inc., LeSueur
Local Representative
Leah Schrupp
Arlington, MN 55307
612-308-8169
3 miles North of LeSueur
on Highway 169
30945 Forest Prairie Road
(507) 665-3126
HOURS: M-F 8-5
Weekends by appointment.
Visit our
INDOOR AND OUTDOOR
DISPLAYS
M31-30Ea
Blessings
You see, at just the right time, when we were still powerless, Christ died for the
ungodly. Very rarely will anyone die for a righteous person, though for a good
person someone might possibly dare to die. But God demonstrates his own love
for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us. Romans 5:6-8 NIV
Seventh Day Adventist
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
507-304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
Church Service: Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Commercial and Industrial Builders
Green Isle, MN 55338
ph. 507.326.7901 fax: 507.326.3551
www.vosconstruction.com
Arlington State Bank
Serving the Community Since 1895
BANKING SERVICES
964-2256
Arlington
A & N Radiator Repair
Allen & Nicki Scharn, Owners
23228 401 Ave., Arlington
877-964-2281 or 507-964-2281 Bus.
Certified ASE Technician on Staff
Also distributor for Poxy Coat II
Industrial Grade Coatings/Paint
MID-COUNTY
CO-OP
700 W. Lake St., Box 177
Cologne, MN 55322
(952) 466-3700
or TOLL FREE: 1-888-466-3700
HUTCHINSON CO-OP
AGRONOMY
LEON DOSE,
Arlington Branch Manager
411 7
th
Ave. NW • (507) 964-2251
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
402 W. Alden, Arlington
507-964-5547
Online at
www.Arlington
MNnew.com
Arlington Haus
Your Hometown Pub & Eatery
1986-2009
Arlington • 1-507-964-2473
STATE BANK OF
HAMBURG
100 Years. 100 Reasons.
Phone 952-467-2992
statebankofhamburg.com
CONVENIENCE
STORE
Hwy. 5 N., Arlington
507-964-2920
Homestyle Pizza
Real or Soft Serve Ice Cream
Gas – Diesel – Deli – Videos
(507)
964-2212
www.
chefcraigs
.com
23180 401 Ave., Arlington Phone 507-964-2264
EQUAL
HOUSING
LENDER
CRAIG BULLERT
ARLINGTON, MN
23189 Hwy. 5 North,
Arlington, MN 55307
arlington@hutchcoop.com
Office (507) 964-2283
Cell (320) 583-4324
HC
FUNERAL SERVICE
P.O. Box 314
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-2201
Member
FDIC
Menus
Church News
SENIOR DINING
Call 326-3401 for a meal
Suggested Donation $3.85
Monday: Swiss steak, baked
potato, corn, bread wi th mar-
garine, pineapple, low fat milk.
Tuesday: Roast turkey, mashed
potatoes, peas and carrots, cran-
berry garnish, bread with mar-
garine, strawberry shortcake, low
fat milk.
Wednesday: Meatloaf with cat-
sup, whol e parsl i ed potatoes,
country blend vegetables, bread
wi th margari ne, pears, l ow fat
milk.
Thursday: Pork chop, mashed
potatoes, carrots, dinner roll with
margari ne, l emon angel food
cake, low fat milk.
Friday: Mandarin chicken salad,
fresh fruit, marinated tomatoes,
margarine, muffin, low fat milk.
SIBLEY EAST ELEMENTARY
BREAKFAST MENU
Arlington and Gaylord
Breakfast i s served at 8:00
a.m. daily. A 1/2 pint of milk is
served with each meal daily. Menu
is subject to change.
Monday: Gripz, yogurt, juice,
milk.
Tuesday: Crunchmania, juice,
milk.
Wednesday: Mini pancakes,
juice, milk.
Thursday: Cereal bar, cheese
stick, juice, milk.
Friday: Muffin, seeds, juice,
milk.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Arlington
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: Hamburger on whole
grain bun, oven potatoes, pickles,
onions, lettuce, tomato, fruit. Alter-
nate: Hot dog.
Tuesday: Chicken strips, sea-
soned ri ce, vegetabl e, carrot
sti cks, frui t. Al ternate: Turkey
wrap.
Wednesday: Ital i an dunker,
meat sauce, romaine salad, peas,
fruit. Alternate: Turkey burger.
Thursday: Turkey with gravy,
mashed potatoes, glazed carrots,
cranberries, fruit. Alternate: Cold
sandwich.
Friday: Toasted cheese sand-
wich, tomato soup, black bean
salad, green beans, fruit. Alter-
nate: Cooks’ choice.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Gaylord
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: Hamburger on whole
grain bun, oven potatoes, pickles,
onions, lettuce, tomatoes, fruit
mix. Alternate: Baked chicken.
Tuesday: Chicken strips, sea-
soned rice, broccoli, carrot sticks,
peaches. Alternate: Hot dog on
whole grain bun.
Wednesday: Italian dunker, ro-
maine salad, peas, pineapple. Al-
ternate: Salad bar.
Thursday: Turkey gravy with
mashed potatoes, glazed carrots,
cranberries, pear slices. Alternate:
Cold cut sandwich.
Friday: Toasted cheese sand-
wich, tomato soup, black bean
sal ad, fresh vegetabl e sti cks,
mandari n oranges. Al ternate:
Cooks’ choice.
Submitted Photo
Happy Trails
A retirement open house was recently held for employee Kay Schumacher at the
Arlington State Bank. Schumacher was employed at the Arlington State Bank for a
total of 27 years.
ORATORY OF
ST. THOMAS
THE APOSTLE
Jessenland
507-248-3550
Fr. Sam Perez
Thursday: Weekly Mass at
5:00 pm.
ST. PAUL’S UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Henderson
(507) 248-3594 (Office)
Rev. Brigit Stevens, Pastor
Find us on Facebook:
St. Paul’s UCC - Henderson
Sunday, April 14: 10:00 a.m.
Worship. 10:20 a.m. Sunday
school (Preschool to 6th).
ST. MARY, MICHAEL
AND BRENDAN AREA
FAITH COMMUNITY
Fr. Keith Salisbury, Pastor
Friday, April 12: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar). 4:30 to 8:00 p.m.
Jump For Joy (Mar).
Saturday, April 13: 5:00 pm.
Mass (Mar).
Sunday, April 14: 7:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m. Elemen-
tary religious education (Mar);
Mass (Mic). 10:30 a.m. Mass
(Mar). 11:00 a.m. Coffee and
donuts (Mar); St. Arthur’s cloth-
ing drive - KC’s pack clothing
(Mar).
Monday, April 15: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar). 6:30 to
8:30 p.m. Hispanic Core Group
meeting (Mic). 8:00 p.m. AA
and AlaNon (Mar).
Tuesday, April 16: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre) 7:30 p. m. Mass
(Mar). 8:00 p.m. St. Arthur’s
KC meeting.
Wednesday, April 17: 7:30
a.m. Mass (Mar). 8:30 a. m.
Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m. Word and
Communion (Oak Terrace). 7:00
p.m. Jr./Sr. high religious educa-
tion (Mar).
Thursday, April 18: 7:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar). 8:30 a.m. Mass
(Bre and Mic) .9:00 a.m. Scrip-
ture study (Srs. residence in
Gaylord). 7:30 p.m. Narcotics
Anonymous (Mic).
TRINITY LUTHERAN
32234 431st Ave., Gaylord
Rev. James Snyder,
Interim Pastor
Sunday, April 14: Country
western/Blue grass services.
9:00 a.m. Worship. 10:00 a.m.
Worship. 10:00 a.m. to 2:00
p.m. Potato pancake dinner.
Wednesday, April 17: 6:00
p.m. Confirmation at St. Paul’s.
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Pastor William Postel
Phone 507-964-2400
Sunday, April 14: 10:00 a.m.
Worship with Rev. Urbach
preaching.
Thursday, April 18: 5:30 p.m.
Deadline for bulletin informa-
tion.
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN
Green Isle
Friday, April 12: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
7:00 p.m. Questioning of confir-
mands at St. Paul’s.
Sunday, April 14: Confirma-
tion Sunday. 7:45 a.m. Worship
with Communion. Pastor Bob
Hines. 9:00 a.m. Sunday school.
Tuesday, April 16: 7:00 p.m.
LWML Ladies Aid. 8:00 p.m.
Joint Elders meeting at St;
Paul’s.
Wednesday, April 17: 3:45
p.m. Confirmation at Peace
Lutheran, Arlington. 6:30 to
7:30 p.m. Wednesday school for
grades 1 to 5 at St. Paul’s. 8:00
p.m. Joint choir practice at St.
Paul’s.
PEACE LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Kurt Lehmkuhl, Pastor
Sunday, April 14: 8:15 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:30 a.m. Wor-
ship service with Holy Com-
munion.
Monday, April 15: 11:30 a.m.
“Feeding of the 500 Club.”
Wednesday, April 17: 3:45
p.m. Catechism. 5:00 p.m. Juni-
or Bell Choir.
Thursday, April 18: 7:30 p.m.
Church Council meeting.
ZION LUTHERAN
814 W. Brooks St.
Arlington – (507) 964-5454
James Carlson, Pastor
Saturday, April 13: 9:00 a.m.
Confirmation pictures and re-
hearsal.
Sunday, April 14: 8:00 a.m.
Choir. 9:00 a.m. Worship with
Holy Communion. Confirma-
tion. 10:00 a.m. Sunday school
and fellowship.
Tuesday, April 16: 6:00 to
7:00 p.m. TOPS in church base-
ment.
Wednesday, April 17: 3:45
p.m. 7th and 9th grade confir-
mation. 4:30 p.m. 8th grade con-
firmation.
Thursday, April 18: 9:00 a.m.
and 1:00 p.m. Zion service on
cable.
ZION LUTHERAN
Green Isle Township
Friday, April 12: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
7:00 p.m. Questioning of confir-
mands at St. Paul’s.
Sunday, April 14: Confirma-
tion Sunday. 9:00 a.m. Worship
without Communion. Pastor
Bob Hines.
Tuesday, April 16: 8:00 p.m.
Joint Elders’ meeting at St.
Paul’s.
Wednesday, April 17: 3:45
p. m. Confirmation at Peace
Lutheran, Arlington. 6:30 to
7:30 p.m. Wednesday school for
grades 1 to 5 at St. Paul’s. 8:00
p.m. Joint choir practice at St.
Paul’s.
CREEKSIDE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Christian & Missionary
Alliance
Ben Lane, Pastor
114 Shamrock Drive
Arlington – 507-964-2872
www.creekside-church.com
email: creeksidecc@media-
combb.net.
Thursday, April 11: 1:00 or
7:00 p.m. Women’s Bible study
- Experiencing God. 6:30 p.m.
Men’s Bible study of Luke at
Oak Terrace in Gaylord.
Friday, April 12: 7:00 p.m.
Crazy Love study at the Lane’s.
Sunday, April 14: 10:00 a.m.
Prayer. 10:30 a. m. Worship
service with Sunday school.
Wednesday, April 17: 6:30 to
8:00 p.m. Kids club for 4-year-
olds - 6th graders. 7:00 to 8:30
p.m. REACH youth group at
Shogren’s.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
(507) 304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
507-234-6770
Saturday: Church services at
9:30 a.m. Bible study at 11:00
a.m. Fellowship dinner at 12:00
p.m. All are welcome.
UNITED METHODIST
Arlington
Wayne Swanson, Pastor
www.arlingtonunited
methodist.org
Saturday, April 13: 8:00 a.m.
A-Men men’s group. 10:00 a.m.
Esther Bible study at Bette Nel-
son’s.
Sunday, April 14: 9:00 and
11:00 a.m. Worship. 10:15 a.m.
Sunday school. 6:30 p.m. Par-
enting series.
Tuesday, April 16: 6:30 p.m.
SPPRC. 7:30 p.m. Ad. Council.
Wednesday, April 17: 7:00
p.m. Confirmation and choir.
Thursday, April 18: 10:00
a.m., 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. Wor-
ship on cable TV. 1:00 and 7:00
p. m. Bible study at Jean
Olson’s.
EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
107 W. Third St., Winthrop
Pastor Kyle Kachelmeier
507-647-5777
Parsonage 507-647-3739
www.wincov.org
Thursday, April 11: 4:30 p.m.
Exercise. 7:00 p.m. Men’s
group.
Friday, April 12: Senior high
MOVE retreat. Leaving at 5:00
p.m.
Sunday, April 14: 9:30 a.m.
Worship. 10:45 a.m. Sunday
school.
Monday, April 15: 5:00 p.m.
Exercise.
Wednesday. April 17: 9:00
a.m. Prayer coffee. 7:30 p.m.
Senior high youth group.
Thursday, April 18: 9:30 a.m.
Women’s Bible study. 4:30 p.m.
Exercise. 6:00 p.m. MOPS.
ST. PAUL LUTHERAN
(WELS),
Arlington
Bruce Hannemann, Pastor
WEBSITE:
www.stpaularlington.com
EMAIL:
Bruce.Hannemann@stpaul
arlington.com
Sunday, April 14: 8:45 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:00 a.m. Fami-
ly Bible study. 10:00 a.m. Wor-
ship.
Tuesday, April 16: 8:45 a.m.
M.O.M.’s at school. 10:00 a.m.
Good Sam service. 7:00 p.m.
Adult Bible course at school.
Wednesday, April 17: 2:00
p.m. Bible study. 3:45 p.m. Pub-
lic school confirmation class.
7:30 p.m. Choir practice.
Thursday, April 18: 10:00
a.m. Bulletin information due.
11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Serv-
ice on cable TV, channel 8.
GAYLORD ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
Gaylord
Bob Holmbeck, Pastor
Friday, April 12: 7:00 p.m.
Duca Bible study at Farmington.
Welcome!
Sunday, April 14: 9:00 a.m.
Sunday school. 10:00 a.m. Sun-
day worship service.
Wednesday, April 17: 6:30
p.m. Evening Bible classes and
Youth Focused.
ST. PAUL’S EV.
REFORMED CHURCH
15470 Co. Rd. 31, Hamburg
Dan Schnabel, Pastor
952-467-3878
www.stpaulsrcus.org
Sunday, April 14: 8:30 a.m.
Sunday school and adult Bible
study. 9:30 a.m. Worship serv-
ice. Choir practice after wor-
ship.
Tuesday, April 16: 7:30 p.m.
Men’s Brotherhood.
Wednesday, April 17: 6:30 to
8:00 p.m. Catechism class.
VI EW US ONLI NE AT WWW. ARLI NGTONMNNEWS. COM
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 11, 2013, page 10
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
LIES KE TRAC TOR
Want ed: Your OLD TRAC TORS,
any con di tion, make or mod el. We
also spe cial ize in new and used
TRAC TOR PARTS AND RE PAIR.
Call Kyle. Lo cat ed west of Hen -
der son. (612) 203-9256.
Need peo ple to iden ti fy Brock -
off/Brockh off pic tures. Call Del-
phine Do bratz (320) 587-9250,
Hutchin son, MN.
$$ DOL LARS PAID $$ Junk ve -
hi cl es, re pai r abl e cars/trucks.
FREE TOW ING. Flatbed/ wreck er
serv ice. Im me diate pick up. Mon -
day-Sun day, serv ing your area
24/7. (952) 220-TOWS.
1,200 Cow dairy farm in Wa ver ly,
MN is cur rent ly seek ing to fill a
farm main tenance po si tion. Will be
re spon si ble for per form ing pre ven -
tive and gen er al main tenance on
farm equip ment and build ings. Will
also help with field work and ma -
nure haul ing. Pri or work ex peri -
ence re quired. Must be able to
weld. Must be able to op er ate pay -
load ers,skid steers and trac tors.
CDL a plus. Call (763) 658-4877
or stop by bet ween 7 a.m.-5 p.m.
Mon day through Fri day. Wood land
Dairy, Wa ver ly, MN.
CON KLIN® DEAL ERS NEED ED!
Life time ca reer in mar ket ing, man -
age ment and ap ply ing “Green”
pro ducts made in Amer i ca. Full
time/ part time. For a free cat a log,
call Franke’s Con klin Serv ice now
at (320) 238-2370. www.frank e -
mar ket ing.com.
Driv ers want ed. Class A or B CDL
re quired. Call (952) 657-1181 or
emai l ex per tasphal ti nc@gmai l
com for ap pli ca tion.
Gold en Hearts As sist ed Liv ing is
tak ing ap pli ca tion for the fol low ing
per son al care at tend ant jobs: Bath -
ing Care giv er, Tues day and Fri day
morn ings; Per son al Care giv er, two
po si tions. Mon day- Sun day morn -
ings. (Shifts al ter nate to in clude
eve ry oth er wee kend.); Per son al
Care giv er, two po si tions. Mon day-
Sun day af ter noon/even ing. (Shifts
al ter nate to in clude eve ry oth er
wee kend.) Ap ply in per son at 602
Mari on Drive, Ar ling ton.
Ren ville area farm op er a tion seek -
ing full and part time em ployees
wi th me chan i cal abi l i ty and/or
truck ing ex peri ence. Sal ary/ ben e -
fits/ va ca tion DOE. Must pass drug
test. Please call (320) 329-3536.
HAND Y MAN: Will do re mo del ing
of kitch ens, bath rooms, hang ing
doors and wi nd ows, pai nt i ng,
sheet rock ing, tex tur iz ing or any
minor re pairs in side or out side.
Wi l l al so do cl ean i ng of base -
ments/ga rag es. Call (320) 848-
2722 or (320) 583-1278.
Three month old fe male rat ter ri -
er/Jack Rus sell mix. (507) 964-
2657.
Spe cial- 95% Good man gas fur -
nace and pro gram ma ble ther mo stat
$2,200 in stalled or AC unit $1,900
in stalled. J&R Plumb ing Heat ing
AC, Lester Prair ie (320) 510-5035.
Ko dak al l -i n-one pri nt er, $25.
(320) 327-2541.
1995 John Deere 345, 18 hp liq uid
cooled Ka wa sa ki, only 550 hours,
54” deck, pow er flow bag ging sys -
tem, ti re chai ns wi th bl ade.
$2,950/BO. (320) 510-2181.
Min ne so ta Twins sea son tick ets
for 2013 sea son. Sec ti on 121
seats. Pack age in cludes 2 seats.
5, 10 or 15 game pack ag es avail -
able. Con tact Rick at (952) 224-
6331 for more in for ma tion.
OLD MO TOR CY CLES WANT ED:
Cash paid, pre fer ably non run ning
con di tion, ti tle or no ti tle, Hon da,
Su zu ki, Ka wa sa ki, Ya ma ha, Tri -
umph and oth er makes. Please
call Dar ick at 507-381-3405.
Want ed to buy: Junk cars and
trucks. Com peti tive pric ing with
friend ly serv ice. Tow ing avail able.
Call an y time (320) 296-2253.
WANT ED TO BUY: Old signs all
types, farm primi tive paint ed fur ni -
ture all types, cup boards, cub by
units, lock er and pool wire bas -
kets, wood & metal piec es with
lots of draw ers, old pre-1960 holi -
day dec o ra tions, in dus tri al/school
items such as metal racks, stools,
work bench es, light n ing rods and
balls, weath er vanes, ar chi tec tur al
items like cor bels and stain glass
wind ows. We buy one item and
en tire es tates. Don’t get a dump -
ster un til you call us first! We are
lo cal. (612) 590-6136.
Zero down RHA fi nanc ing is avail -
able for this prop er ty. 11798 155th
St., Glen coe. Hob by farm for sale.
6 +/- acr es, beau ti ful 4BR home.
Very new out bui l d i ngs. MLS#
4338091, $275,000. Con tact me
for a pri vate show ing. Paul Krueg -
er, Edi na Re al ty, (612) 328-4506,
Paul Krueg er@edi nare al ty.com.
1120 Grove Ave., Bi rd Is l and.
4BR, 3BA home on 2 l ots.
$119,000. Pool table and all ap -
plianc es in clud ed. (320) 296-1603.
Home for sale by own er. 3BR,
2BA, AC, large lot in Ar ling ton,
wood fire place, $119,000. (507)
380-1967 or (507) 964-2946.
Ar l i ng ton: Great start er home.
2BR, 2BA, new kitch en, fur nace
wa ter heat er, new heat ed ga rage.
Con tract for deed pos si bl e,
FSBO, $70,000/BO. (952) 486-
3342.
2BR Apart ment with ga rage, wa -
ter/sew er/gar bage i n cl ud ed.
$450/mo. New Au burn (320) 327-
2928.
Newly remodeled apartments for
rent i n Renvi l l e. Water, heat,
garbage i ncl uded. New appl i -
ances, air conditioners. (320) 564-
3351.
1BR Apart ment in Ar ling ton avail -
able May 1st. No pets, no smok -
ing. For more info call Dan (507)
964-2973.
Avai l abl e soon. 1BR and
2BR/2BA, laun dry in apart ment.
Ga rage avail able. Ar ling ton. Call
800-873-1736, Am ber Field Place
Apart ment.
Avail able soon. 2BR/2BA. Laun dry
in apart ment. Ga rage avail able.
Gay lord. Call 800-873-1736 Am -
ber Field Place Apart ment.
Com mer cial Build ing avail able
now! 900 sq. ft. down town Gay -
lord. Call Sar ah at (507) 237-5339
days, (507) 237-4166 even ings.
Sacred Heart, 205 Har ri son St.
Ni ce 2BR, 1BA, si n gl e fam i l y
1,359 sq. ft. , de tached ga rage.
Lease op tion or cash. $250 down,
$217/mo. (803) 978-1542.
For rent in Ar ling ton. New ly re mo -
deled 2BR main floor of house.
Sun porch, must see. $675. Call
(507) 381-1463.
Young farm er look ing for pro duc -
tive farm land for 2013 and be-
yond. Com peti tive rates and ref er -
enc es. Call Aus tin Blad at (320)
221-3517.
RE MEM BER THE PAST Spring
Vin tage Oc ca sion al Sale, lo cat ed
in the Hutchin son Mall, April 17-
21. Hours: Wed nes day-Fri day, 10
a.m.- 8 p.m.; Sat ur day, 10 a.m.- 6
p.m.; Sun day, 12 p.m.- 5 p.m. Fur -
ni ture, home decor, linens, yard
and gar den, col l ect i bl es and
unique treas ures. (320) 583-9519
Buy ing and Sell ing.
CUS TOM LOG SAW ING- Cut at
your place or ours. White oak lum -
ber deck ing and fire wood. Give
Vir gil a call. Schau er Con struc tion,
Inc. (320) 864-4453.
AGRICULTURE
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To place an ad: Call: 507-964-5547; Fax: 507-964-2423; E-Mail: info@ArlingtonMNnews.com; Mail: P.O. Box 388, Arlington, MN 55307
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& The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
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All utilities,
except electric
Income based
Must be 62 or older
or handicapped
Highland Commons
Arlington
507-964-5556 HANDICAP
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716 E. 10th St., P.O. Box 188, Glencoe, MN 55336
320-864-5518 • trishak@glencoenews.com
OTR DRIVERS
Sign on bonus $1,000-$1,200. Up to 45
CPM. Full-time positions with benefits! Pet
policy. O/O’s welcome! deBoer Transporta-
tion 800/825-8511 www.deboertrans.com
ARE YOU READY
to take your career to the next level?
Earn your CDL-A and start your driv-
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DRIVER
Two raises in first year. Qualify for
any portion of $.03/mile quarterly bo-
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MPG. 3 months OTR experience.
800/414-9569 www.driveknight.com
CASH FOR CARS:
All cars/trucks wanted. Running or not! Top
dollar paid. We come to you! Any make/
model. Call for instant offer: 800/871-9145
SAWMILLS
from only $3,997.00 - Make & save mon-
ey with your own bandmill - cut lumber
any dimension. In stock ready to ship.
Free info/DVD: 800/578-1363 Ext. 300N
www.NorwoodSawmills.com
DISH NETWORK
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
high speed internet starting at $14.95/month
(where available). Save! Ask about same
day installation! Call now! 866/785-5167
EVER CONSIDER
A REVERSE MORTGAGE?
At least 62 years old? Stay in your
home & increase cash flow! Safe
& effective! Call now for your free
DVD! Call now 888/610-4971
CANADA DRUG CENTER
is your choice for safe and affordable med-
ications. Our licensed Canadian mail order
pharmacy will provide you with savings of
up to 75% on all your medication needs.
Call today 800/259-1096 for $10.00 off
your first prescription and free shipping.
MISCELLANEOUS AUTOS WANTED HELP WANTED - DRIVERS
MISCELLANEOUS
Your ad here!
Only $249 to reach a statewide audience of
3 million readers!!! 1-800-279-2979
Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington
is seeking the following positions:
• Certified Nursing Assistant – every other
weekend with potential to pick up more
hours
• Benefit eligible LPN/RN – evening shifts
with every other weekend
• LPN/RN - every other weekend with potential to pick
up more hours
– Hiring Bonus of up to $500 for select positions –
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information,
call Tiffany Brockhoff,
Human Resource Director at
507-964-2251 or email:
tbrockof@good-sam.com
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap Drug-Free Workplace
Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life.
A
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a
Pinske Real Estate
& Auctioneers
(507) 964-2250
Arlington
• 3 BR, 1-1/2 story home,
newer roof, newl y re-
decorated, in Arlington.
$69,000.
We need listings of
homes, farms and hobby
farms. If you are thinking
about selling it will pay for
you to call us.
REAL ESTATE
A7E8SGa
Call us to place
your HAPPY ad.
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
964-5547
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