4-18-13 Arlington Enterprise

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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Serving the Communities of Arlington and Green Isle, Minnesota
www.arlingtonmnnews.com Volume 129 • Number 42 • Thursday, April 18, 2013 • Arlington, MN 55307
Single copy $1.00
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
The Winter That Won’t Go Away
Although Minnesota is three weeks into spring, winter
returned after approximately eight inches of snow fell
on the Arlington and Green Isle area last Wednesday
night, April 10, and early Thursday morning, April 11.
This picture was taken at the corner of East Main
Street and Fourth Avenue Northeast in Arlington.
Schools in the Sibley East School District were
closed on Thursday, April 11. It was the third time
schools were closed in the school district this winter.
In addition, there have been seven two-hour late
starts and one three-hour early dismissal. The fore-
cast is for the white stuff to return during the next
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East Public
Schools have received a
dozen applications for the
senior high principal position
which is open for the 2013-14
school year. The deadline for
applications is Friday, April
19.
Current Sibley East Senior
High Principal Jim Amsden
reported the news to the Sib-
ley East School Board during
its regular monthly meeting
in Arlington on Monday
night, April 15.
Amsden was recently hired
as the new superintendent and
will assume those duties on
July 1. His current position as
senior high principal has now
become open.
Amsden said half of the ap-
plicants have some form of
administrative experience
while others have licenses,
but no experience. One appli-
cant is going through the
process to obtain a license.
The Sibley East administra-
tion and at least two School
Board members will review
the applications and select
candidates for written ques-
tions from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30
p.m. Monday, April 22.
These candidates will sub-
mit the answers to these ques-
tions from Tuesday, April 23
through Monday, April 29.
The Sibley East adminis-
tration and at least two
School Board members, dur-
ing a meeting from 3:30 p.m.
to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, April
30, will select six finalists to
be interviewed.
The Sibley East administra-
tion, entire School Board,
teachers and office staff will
interview the six finalists
throughout the day on Mon-
day, May 6. The two finalists
will be determined during a
meeting from 3:45 p.m. to
4:45 p.m. Monday, May 6.
The Sibley East administra-
tion and entire School Board
will interview the two final-
ists on Monday evening, May
13.
The School Board will se-
lect a final candidate during a
special meeting at 8 p. m.
Monday, May 13.
The School Board is ex-
pected to approve a contract
for the new principal during a
regular meeting at 6:30 p.m.
Monday, May 20.
Dozen applications received for principal position
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East School
Board, during its regular
monthly meeting in Arlington
on Monday night, April 15,
voted 5-0 and approved the
proposed 2013-2014 operat-
ing capital budget.
School Board members
Brian Brandt, Beth DuFrane,
Anne Karl, Missy Weber and
Dan Woehler voted in favor
of the motion. School Board
member Scott Dose was un-
able to attend the meeting.
The information was pre-
sented by Interim Superin-
tendent John Langenbrunner
and Maintenance Supervisor
Bob Pichelmann.
The proposed operating
capital budget is divided into
estimated operating capital
revenue, capital projects/ex-
penditures and facility lease
levy.
Revenue
The estimated operating
capital revenue includes de-
ferred maintenance levy
($85,000), operating capital
aid at levy ($388,000), facili-
ty lease levy ($87,757) and
health and safety levy (this
amount will be presented in
July).
According to Langenbrun-
ner, the State of Minnesota
must approve all health and
safety projects. Sibley East
can levy locally for these
projects, but the payment is
delayed from the state any-
where from one to three
years. An example of a pro-
posed health and safety proj-
ect is the replacement of
doors, according to Pichel-
mann. The replacement of the
stage curtains, placement of
wood chips in the playground
area at Arlington and the re-
placement of two univents at
Gaylord are examples of
other proposed health and
safety projects.
Expenditures
The capital projects/expen-
ditures include iPad lease
($200,461 year 2 of 3), copy
machine lease/maintenance
($29,500 year 2 of 5), tech-
nology equipment-classroom
computers ($6,000), elemen-
tary math textbooks/work-
books ($40,000), carpet ex-
tractor ($2,700), water vacu-
um ($700), elementary desks
and chairs ($5,200), sanitary
hand blowers in washrooms
($4,000), lease to purchase
two buses ($38,000 year 1 of
5), replacement wiring and
communication in bus garage
($1,600), outside grounds/-
ma i n t e n a n c e / r e p a i r s
($10,000), athletic equipment
($8,000), drinking fountain
replacement ($2,460), custo-
dial plumbing/electrical re-
pairs ($29,000 year 3 of 3),
light repairs on athletic field
($23,000), and fixing leaks
on roofs ($15,000).
Langenbrunner said that
the costs for the capital proj-
ects/expenditures are just es-
timates at this time.
He commented that the
iPad lease of over $200,000
is a big chunk of the capital
projects/expenditures and
limits Sibley East to complete
other projects.
He added that Sibley East
has an aging bus fleet since
the school has not purchased
a bus in the last 2 1/2 to three
years.
The purpose of some proj-
ects is to save money, accord-
ing to Pichelmann. He said
Sibley East has spent about
$10,000 in hand towels at
both school sites since last
July. That is the reason for
the proposed sanitary hand
blowers which will be in-
stalled in the main restrooms
at both sites.
Lease Levy
The facility lease levy in-
cludes satellite buildings in
Arlington ($29,940), Sibley
Medical Center-HOSA Pro-
gram ($10,342), Riverbend
Lease ($46,475) and Walsh
Field ($1,000).
Sibley East, according to
Langenbrunner, can levy 100
percent in this area if the fa-
cility is used for student in-
struction.
Other Needs
Langenbrunner and Pichel-
mann also presented a list of
other needed capital projects.
They included windscreen re-
placement at the tennis courts
($4,000), track resurfacing
($40,000), replacement of
floor scrubber ($6,000), total
roof repairs at both sites
($214,000 and $185,00), total
roof replacement at both sites
($1.8 million), sanding and
reline gym floors at both sites
($12,000 and $15,000), re-
place clock system in Arling-
ton ($12,000), replace foot-
ball field lights ($125,000),
replacement of four class-
room floors ($25,000), class-
room tables and chairs
($7,200), concession stand
with washroom at the Sibley
East Athletic Complex (no
estimate) and goal posts (no
estimate).
Next Meeting
The Sibley East School
Board will hold its next regu-
lar monthly meeting in Room
149 at the Arlington school
site at 6:30 p.m. Monday,
May 20.
School Board approves proposed
2013-14 operating capital budget
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington City
Council, during its regular
meeting on Monday night,
April 15, unanimously ap-
proved a motion to ap-
prove Ordinance 280
which supersedes Ordi-
nance 267 and regulates
the possession, sale and
consumption of intoxicat-
ing and 3.2 percent malt
liquor within the City of
Arlington.
City Council members
Jennifer Nuesse, Ben
Jaszewski, Curt Reetz,
Jason Ruehling and Galen
Wills voted in favor of the
motion.
The revised ordinance
will give the City Council
more flexibility in the
penalty phase of the docu-
ment. In addition, the doc-
ument includes a penalty
for employees who sell
liquor to minors. Further-
more, the Sunday opening
for liquor establishments
is now 10:30 a.m. The pre-
vious start time was noon.
In other action, the City
Council discussed the
open maintenance supervi-
sor position held by the
late Dan Thomes.
The City Council later
unanimously approved a
motion to accept the re-
vised description, approve
use of a supplemental
questionnaire and author-
ize and direct advertising
of the employment posi-
tion.
The applications will be
accepted from Tuesday,
April 16 through Friday,
May 3, according to Inter-
im City Administrator
Cynthia Smith- Strack.
The Street Committee,
during the week of Mon-
day, May 6, will review
the most qualified applica-
tions and narrow the field
of finalists for the position
to approximately five can-
didates.
The City Council will
interview the finalists dur-
ing mid May.
The City Council hopes
to offer the position to the
final candidate by the end
of May.
The goal is to have a
maintenance supervisor in
place by the first part of
June.
Revised liquor ordinance
approved by City Council
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East School
Board, during its regular
monthly meeting on Monday
night, April 15, voted 5-0 and
approved a motion to receive
a notice of desire to negotiate
from Sibley East Education
Minnesota.
School Board members
Brian Brandt, Beth DuFrane,
Anne Karl, Missy Weber and
Dan Woehler voted in favor
of the motion. School Board
member Scott Dose was un-
able to attend the meeting.
Interim Superintendent
John Langenbrunner said it is
difficult for the School Board
to begin negotiations with
Sibley East Education Min-
nesota until the Minnesota
Legislature acts on the educa-
tion bill.
Langenbrunner later ad-
vised the School Board to
wait until the State Legisla-
ture acts on the education bill
and then hold a strategic
meeting.
Langenbrunner said Sibley
East Education Minnesota
representatives Dan Tack-
mann and Christine Butler
will understand and respect
this approach.
Planning
Current Senior High Prin-
cipal Jim Amsden, who will
assume the duties of superin-
tendent on July 1, presented
information on a move for
the School Board to partici-
pate in TeamWorks Strategic
Planning Training Sessions
this fall.
The South Central Service
Cooperative created a part-
nership with Dennis Cheese-
brow of TeamWorks Interna-
tional to establish a cost ef-
fective program to create a
high quality strategic plan-
ning opportunity for its mem-
ber school districts.
Belle Plaine, Le Sueur-
Henderson and St. Clair com-
pleted their training this past
winter and are now imple-
menting a strategic roadmap
unique to each of their school
districts. The cost is $3,500.
There are several advan-
tages to the strategic plan-
ning, according to South
Central Service Cooperative
consultant Ed Waltman.
These advantages include a
strategic plan that does not
end up on the shelf after a
few years, a flexible planning
system which allows annual
adjustments as the needs of a
school district change, a plan
which demonstrates account-
ability to citizens, a system
which clarifies the roles of
the school board, administra-
tion, staff, parents, students
and citizens in creating a pos-
itive learning environment, a
planning system which is
very helpful during the transi-
tional period slightly before
Sibley East
Continued on page 5
School Board receives
notice to negotiate from
SE Education Minnesota
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 18, 2013, page 2
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
W W W . A R L I N G TO N M N N E W S . C O M
Friday, April 19: Arlington Veteran’s Organiza-
tion’s Steak Fry, Veteran’s building at Fairgrounds,
5:30-7:30 p.m.
Community
Calendar
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER
Arlington State Bank
(507) 964-2256
Fax (507) 964-5550
www.ArlingtonStateBank.com
MAIN BANK
Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (straight thru)
DRIVE THRU
Monday - Thursday, 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.,
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Member
FDIC
St. John’s
Lutheran Church
Arlington Township
38595 St. Hwy. 19, Arlington
(4 miles SE of Arlington)
Pancake
Meal
4:00 - 7:00 p.m.
Sunday, April 21
Serving: Pancakes,
syrup, sausage, cheese,
dessert, coffee
Hosted by St. John’s Men’s Club.
Proceeds fund local projects
& Lutheran Hour Ministries
throughout the world.
A
ll Y
ou
C
an
E
at
Free W
ill
O
ffering
*
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a
Green Isle Fire 125
th
Anniversary Parade & 5k Run
July 13, 2013 5k Entry Fee:
$
20 Parade: FREE
Name: __________________________________________
Address: ________________________________________
City, State, ZIP: __________________________________
Phone: __________________________________________
Shirt Size: S M L XL
Circle One: 5k Kids Fun Run Parade
Register by June 30 to guarantee a free shirt.
5k and Kids Run Only, Not Parade.
Start Times:
Kids Run 11 a.m. • 5k Run Noon • Parade 1:30 p.m.
Mail entry form and payment to:
Green Isle Fire, Po Box 235, Green Isle MN 55338
Questions? Call 507-326-5941 for Parade or 5k info.
A15-16SAEa
Thank You
I would like to thank
everyone who wished me
well on my retirement from
Morreim Pharmacy.
Thank you for stopping at
the Pharmacy, for all the
cards, phone calls, etc. I real-
ly appreciate it very much.
I’ve really enjoyed my
years at the Pharmacy and
will certainly miss seeing all
of you friendly customers.
Joyce Bening
*15E16Sa
Thank You
We wish to express our deep
appreciation for all of the kind
words and support we have re-
ceived since the passing of our
Father, Father-In-Law, Grandfa-
ther, Great Grandfather and
Uncle, Robert W. Mueller.
Special appreciation to the
Peace Lutheran Church Women’s
Gui l d, Pastor Kurt Lehmkuhl ,
Kolden Funeral Home and the
dedicated members of the Ar-
lington Fire Department for their
special and touching memorial
tribute. Your kindness will always
be remembered.
The Family of
Robert (Bob) Mueller,
Brady, Brent & Jeff Mueller
*15Ea
Henderson
Lions Club
Sunday,April21
4- 7p.m.
Henderson Community Building
Spaghetti
Feed
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Treasures
in the Attic
Antique Road Show with
Style Show Luncheon
Sat., April 27, 2013
10:00 a.m.
Arlington
Community Center
Adults:
$
8.00 • Under 10:
$
4.00
You are invited to bring a
knick-knack or heirloom.
Random selections will be
appraised by Carol Bode.
Sponsored by Sibley Medical Center Auxiliary.
Tickets at: SMC Clinics at Arlington, Gaylord,
Henderson & Winthrop; Morreim’s,
Arlington State Bank, and SMC Auxiliary members.
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Classes begin April 22, 2013
Class Name Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri Sat
Total Body Extreme 5:15am 5:15am 8:00am
Total Body Strength
& Conditioning 8:15am 4:15pm 8:15am 4:15pm 8:15am
Bootcamp for
Boomers 9:30am 9:30am 9:30am
Get Metobolic 4:30pm 4:30pm
Kettlebell Circuits 5:30pm 7:00pm 9:00am
Kettlebell Strength
& Conditioning 7:00pm 5:30pm
Adventure Racing
Training 10:15am
8 WEEK COUCH-TO-5K PROGRAM BEGINNING 4-20!
toughmuddette.com/tm-wellness-revolution
306 5th Ave NW, Arlington • 952-465-2298
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News Briefs
Graffiti at Four Seasons Park
A graffiti incident reportedly occurred at Four Sea-
sons Park in Arlington, according to the Arlington Po-
lice Department.
Police photographed the graffiti and checked the area.
Local students receive degrees
Two local students received their degrees from Met-
ropolitan State University during its recent 91st com-
mencement ceremony in the Roy Wilkins Auditorium at
Saint Paul RiverCentre.
Rachel Hennen, Arlington, received a Bachelor of
Science Degree in Business Administration.
Arlington resident Mary Keen, who graduated
Summa Cum Laude, received a Bachelor of Arts De-
gree in Psychology.
Metropolitan State University, a member of the Min-
nesota State Colleges and Universities system, provides
high quality, affordable academic and professional de-
gree programs at the bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral
levels. It is the only state university in the Twin Cities
metropolitan area.
iShare Night set for May 8
The Sibley East Public Schools will present iShare
Night at the Gaylord campus from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Wednesday, May 8.
iShare Night is a K-12 family and community event
celebrating student success at Sibley East. In addition to
viewing student work, there will be a free meal, oppor-
tunities to try out different technology tools and chances
to win door prizes.
The following students
were recently named to the
Principal’s Honor Roll, “A”
Honor Roll and “B” Honor
Roll at the Sibley East Junior
High School in Gaylord dur-
ing the third quarter.
Principal’s
Honor Roll
Freshmen: Michael Bostel-
man, Samantha Carpenter,
Kailey Geib, Ian Holmes,
Ethan Pomplun, Rachel
Sorenson and Alyssa Weber.
Eighth Grade: Abigail But-
ler, Tory Knacke, Alexus
Kreft, Ella Lundstrom, Joel
Mercier, James Schealler,
Sierra Suedbeck and Kimber-
ly Velazquez.
Seventh Grade: Brendan
Dabek, Kevin Durham, Jr.,
Lindsey Flieth, Mikayla
Holmes, Jesus Rodriguez,
Kristian Schow, Alexander
Sell, Joshua Sorenson,
Alexandra Stock, Logan
Tesch, Jaci Tourtellott, Xavier
Wassather, Jacob Willmsen,
Katrina Wolter and Faith
Young.
“A” Honor Roll
Freshmen: Logan Bruss,
Trevor Diehn, Ashley Grack,
Madeline Kjellesvig, Megan
Krentz, Mason Latzke, Sarah
Malinowski, Mitchell Math-
ews, Natalie Mesker, Dylan
Pauly, Collin Pautsch, Sadie
Quast, Casey Samletzka,
Kaitlyn Schauer, Travis
Schmidt, Julia Schwartz,
Lucas Shogren, Aaron Strack,
McKayla Stumm, Emma
Thompson, Kaitlin Tuchten-
hagen and Bradley Ziegler.
Eighth Grade: Alli Harter,
Chloey Kellermann, Sadie
Lane, Alyssa Louwagie, Sh-
eryl Monsivaiz, Megan Ped-
erson, Jackson Rose, Jenna
Schuft, Leah Serbus, Zachary
Utendorfer and Gabrielle
Wiest.
Seventh Grade: Gavin
Bates, Harley Jo Borgmann,
Taylor Brinkman, Rebecca
Campbell, Lucas Chavez,
Connor Deis, Kaili Diehn,
Emily Doetkott, Thomas
Flannery, Olivia Gronholz,
Carron Kranz, Austin Kuphal,
Melissa Latchman, Kelsey
Luepke, Ellie Messner, Brody
Messner, Kiana Montes,
Dayne Morton, Veronica
Oyuela, Emily Peterson, An-
thony Petree, Mercedes
Roehler, Haley Rohwer,
Alexys Roseland, Dylan
Smith, Morgan Stearns and
Austin Weckwerth.
“B” Honor Roll
Freshmen: Jack Ballalatek,
Justin Bennett, Zachariah
Bremer, Kirsten Campbell,
Nicholas Doetkott, Sydney
Fogarty Busch, Amber
Frauendienst, Stephanie Jona-
son, Logan Jorgenson,
Zachary Latzke, Rachel Lon-
corich, Cailee Mathwig,
Lukas Messner, Morgan
Paulsen, Katelyn Quast, Anna
Ryan, Kyla Schlueter, Caitlin
Schmidt, Kaytlin Sellner,
Jacob Strack, Trevor Tuman,
Devan Tupa, Tristan Von Es-
chen and Jacob Wentzlaff.
Eighth Grade: Brody Bates,
Alison Eibs, Seth Fredin,
Dessirae Herold, Christopher
Johnson, Samantha Kahlow,
Brooke Klehr, Alma Lopez,
Emily Raddatz, Samantha
Raghu, Ashley Rechtzigel,
Tyler Roseland, Elizabeth
Wahlen, Hannah Wentzlaff
and Ana Zuniga.
Seventh Grade: Joseph
Aguilera, Thomas Battcher,
Carsten Bergersen, Mark
Brinkman, Katelyn Brink-
man, Jared Burg, Janessa
Dalbec, Ezperanza Diaz,
Tamara Ehrich, Benjamen
Klaers, Samantha Klehr,
Madilyn Latzke, Jose Luis
Mendoza, Taylor Perschau,
Jaden Podratz, Mackenzie
Pomplun, Lacey Scharping,
Paul Schmidt, Ahren Sellner,
Brennen St. John, Hanna
Steffer, Alexander Vazquez,
Austin Warwick, Thomas
Wentzlaff, Allison Zellmann
and Katelyn Zwart.
Students named to the Honor Roll
at Sibley East Junior High School
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Nathan Thomes, a senior at
the Sibley East Senior High
School, was recently chosen
by his classmates as the Out-
standing Senior of the Quar-
ter.
Seniors at Sibley East vote
for the outstanding member
of the senior class each quar-
ter. The names of those stu-
dents are then submitted to
the Gaylord Rotary Club to
consider for a scholarship
sponsored by the club. The
scholarship will be presented
to the Outstanding Senior of
the Year during the annual
awards ceremony in May.
Thomes is currently en-
rolled in Advanced Physical
Education, Physics, Econom-
ics, English, Calculus, Soci-
ology and Band.
Thomes is a member of the
“B” Honor Roll and is a past
Student of the Month.
He is also a member of the
Jazz Band and participated in
the Solo & Ensemble Contest
at the state level.
A two-year letterwinner,
Thomes was a member of the
Sibley East varsity wrestling
team which competed in the
Minnesota State Class A
Team Wrestling Tournament
this past winter. He also re-
turns as a starter on the Sib-
ley East varsity boys baseball
team this spring.
Outside of school, he has
worked at Thomes Brothers
for the past two years. In ad-
dition, he plays the trumpet
for the Praise Group at St.
Mary’s Catholic Church in
Arlington.
After graduation, Thomes
plans to attend Iowa State
University and major in me-
chanical engineering.
He is the son of Lorie
Thomes and the late Dan
Thomes, Arlington.
Thomes is Senior of the Quarter
Nathan Thomes
Xcel Energy has named
former Belle Plaine Commu-
nity Development Director
Trisha Rosenfeld manager of
community relations and eco-
nomic development.
Rosenfeld will serve cities
south and southwest of the
Twin Cities, including
Mankato, North Mankato,
Gaylord, Jordan, Belle
Plaine, Faribault, Montevideo
and surrounding communi-
ties.
In her position, Rosenfeld
will support utility opera-
tions, manage relationships
with local governments and
promote economic develop-
ment in areas served by Xcel
Energy.
Prior to becoming commu-
nity development director for
the City of Belle Plaine in
2006, Rosenfeld was em-
ployed by the Greater
Mankato Chamber of Com-
merce (now Greater Mankato
Growth) to assist with coordi-
nation of the regional plan-
ning effort Envision 2020.
Rosenfeld has a master’s
degree from the Urban and
Regional Studies Institute at
Minnesota State University,
Mankato, and an undergradu-
ate degree in marketing and
speech communications. She
is originally from Arlington
and currently resides in
Mankato.
Rosenfeld succeeds Dave
Pearson, who retired in 2012,
after 44 years with Xcel En-
ergy.
Xcel names Rosenfeld a manager
Advertising Deadlines:
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McLeod Publishing
716 East 10th St.• Glencoe
Mon.-Fri. 8-5 p.m. • 320-864-5518
The McLeod County Chronicle
Silver Lake Leader
The Glencoe Advertiser
The Sibley Shopper
Arlington Enterprise (Arlington/Green Isle)
The Galaxy (supplement to Chronicle, Leader & Enterprise)
www. GlencoeNews. com
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Arlington
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today.
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 18, 2013, page 3
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Business & Professional
Directory
CALL TODAY TO BE
INCLUDED IN OUR
BUSINESS &
PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY!
507-964-5547
Arlington
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JUSTIN E. DAVIS, D.C.
607 W. Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-2850
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Office Hours:
Mon. 9am-6pm; Tues. 9am-5pm;
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Cell 507-995-0507
Miller
Law
Office
RAPHAEL J. MILLER
ROXANN M. BERANEK
Attorneys at Law
332 Sibley Ave. 1042 First Ave.
Gaylord, MN Gibbon, MN
Tel. 507-237-2954 Fax: 507-237-2347
Wills - Taxes - Estate Planning
General Law Practice & Trials
Free consultation on personal injury claims
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(507) 964-2864
“Your local home builder and
remodeler for over 38 years”
Member: MN River Builders Assn.
MN License #4806
ROSS R. ARNESON
ATTORNEY AT LAW
302 West Main
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-5753
Real Estate, Estate Planning,
Probate and Business Law
Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Saturdays by Appointment
Farm – Residential
Commercial
Licensed - Bonded - Insured
• 24-Hour Emergency
Service
• Free Estimates
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507-964-2525
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&
Excavating, Inc.
JEFF & WENDY KLEHR
Dozer, Grader, Basements,
Septic Systems, Driveways, Backhoe Work,
Hauling Gravel/Rock/Sand, Skidloader
Jeff cell: 612-756-0595
Wendy cell: 612-756-0594
640 E. BROOKS ST., ARLINGTON, MN 55307
1-507-964-5783 • FAX: 507-964-5302
Local LAWN
Enforcement
Arlington, MN
Licensed and Insured
Mowing, fertilizing and
weed control, dethatching,
garden tilling, core aeration
www.locallawnenforcement.com
Adam and David Hansen
Adam cell: 507-327-0917
507-964-5835
• 5” Seamless Gutters
• 6” Seamless Gutters
• K-Guard Leaf-Free
Gutter System
(lifetime clog free guarantee)
PHIL GOETTL
612-655-1379
888-864-5979
www.mngutter.com
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9
tfn
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Gustafson
Family Dentistry
Dr. John D. Gustafson, D.D.S
Dr. Jared Gustafson, D.D.S
COMPREHENSIVE CARE
FOR ALL AGES
Office Hours: Monday–Friday
New Patients Welcome
Dr. Jason Anderson, D.D.S
Orthodontists
106 3
rd
Ave. NW,
Arlington
507-964-2705
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BODY REPAIR
See us for factory-trained
body repair work on
your vehicle.
• Free Estimates • Glass Replacement
• Collision Repair • Rust Repair
WINDSHIELD
REPLACEMENT
We install windshields
for all vehicles
We will contact the insurance company
for you and do all paperwork. See us
for professional glass installation.
BRAU
ARL I NGTON
www.braumotors.com
Local
507-964-5539
Toll Free
800-664-2728
PEEPS
612-719-4166
REPAIR LLC
HEAVY DUTY TRUCK
AND FARM EQUIPMENT
REPAIR
DOT INSPECTIONS
23315 HWY 5
ARLINGTON, MN 55307
PAUL PIEPER, OWNER
EMAIL: ppieper@ymail.com
Truck &
Farm Tire
Sales &
Service
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Liberty
Station
Corner of Hwy. 5 & Chandler
Arlington, MN
507-964-5177 or
Toll-Free 866-752-9567
www.LibertyStationAutoSales.com
Jim
Heiland’s
Affordable Used Cars
190 McGrann Street • PO Box 277 • Green Isle, MN 55338
507.326.7144 • www.greenislecommunityschool.org
A14E15SE16Ej
Green Isle
Community School
PRE SCHOOL
ROUNDUP
Thursday, April 23
rd
6:30pm
For children ages 3-5 years old
Bring your child and come see
what we have to offer!
Registration information for
Fall 2013 Pre School students will be available
Classes are Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
– Meet the Pre School teacher and GICS Staff –
– Tour the building –
Please call if you would like more information.
The Arlington Fire Department would like to thank the
ARLINGTON LIONS CLUB
for its
$
5,800 donation to purchase the jaws of life.
Left to right: Arlington Fire Chief John Zaske, Arlington Lions
Club Tail Twister Pat Liebl and Arlington Lions Club President
Dan Hislop.
The Arlington Lions Club raised the funds
through its calendar sales and fish fry.
A15Ea
See rebate coupon for complete details š Offer good April 18 – April 28 š $50 limit
April 18 – April 28
Receive a consumer mail-in rebate on all Valspar
®
Élan
®
Wall & Trim and
Kitchen & Bath paint, Medallion
®
interior and exterior paint and primers,
and Integrity
®
interior and exterior paint.
IF YOU DON’T LIKE YOUR COLOR,
HAVE ANOTHER ON US.
COLOR GUARANTEE DETAILS: OFFER ENDS 10/7/13. Valid for purchases of qualifyingValspar products made in
participating retailers by 10/7/13. Open only to individual legal residents of the 50 U.S. & D.C., age of majority or older in
place of residence. Limit: up to 2-gallon rebate per household. Additional terms/restrictions apply. See Offer Terms
at valsparcolorguarantee.comfor complete details. Void where prohibited, restricted or taxed.
Sponsor: The Valspar Corporation. ©2013The Valspar Corporation.
$
5
REBATE
per gallon
$
7
REBATE
on Élan
®
SPRING
per gallon/$20 per 5-gallon
REBATE
on Medallion
®
& Integrity
®
Thomes Bros.
Hardware & Appliance
414 W. Main, Arlington
507-964-2310
OPEN SUNDAY 9-1; MON.-FRI. 8-7; SAT. 8-5
Arlington was named a
2012 Tree City USA by the
Arbor Day Foundation in
honor of its commitment to
effective urban forest man-
agement. This is the fifth
year Arlington has earned
the national designation.
Arlington achieved Tree
City USA recognition by
meeting the program’s four
requirements: a tree board
or department, a tree-care
ordinance, an annual com-
munity forestry budget of at
least $2 per capita and an
Arbor Day observance and
proclamation.
The Tree City USA pro-
gram is sponsored by the
Arbor Day Foundation, in
partnership with the U.S.
Forest Service and the Na-
tional Association of State
Foresters.
“Everyone benefits when
elected officials, volunteers
and committed citizens in
communities like Arlington
make smart investments in
urban forests,” said John
Rosenow, founder and chief
executive of the Arbor Day
Foundation. “Trees bring
shade to our homes and
beauty to our neighbor-
hoods, along with numer-
ous economic, social and
environmental benefits.”
Cleaner air, improved
storm water management,
energy savings and in-
creased property values and
commercial activity are
among the benefits enjoyed
by Tree City USA commu-
nities.
More information on the
program is available at ar-
borday.org/TreeCityUSA.
Arlington named Tree City USA
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Making Wooden Stools
Wendell Terlinden helped his grand-
daughter, Lydia Rose, make a wooden
stool during an event at the Sibley East
Elementary School in Arlington on Fri-
day afternoon, April 12. Gaylord resi-
dent Albie Kuphal, who passed away
nine years ago, began this project for
kindergarten students in Sibley County
17 years ago. Bird feeders were con-
structed in the first three years while
wooden stools have been constructed
the last 14 years. A group of Gaylord
men have continued the tradition and
assist all kindergarten students in Sib-
ley County and the Lafayette Charter
School. The volunteers and kinder-
garten students, along with family
members, will construct about 225
wooden stools this year. The local proj-
ect is funded by Haggenmiller Lumber
and the Sibley County Chapter of
Thrivent Financial For Lutherans. Lydia
is the daughter of Matt and Nichole
Rose, Henderson. Her grandparents are
Wendell and Lorraine Terlinden, Arling-
ton, and Marlin and Joan Rose, Hender-
son.
Call us at:
507-964-5547
Arlington Enterprise
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 18, 2013, page 4
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Opinion page is an
important part of a
community newspaper
Our View: It is a perfect forum
for people to exchange ideas
Opinions
Guest Column
Letter To The Editor
The opinion page is one of the most read pages in this newspaper. It
gives people an opportunity to express a stance, exchange ideas and
find out what other people are thinking about on specific issues.
Letters to the editor and opinion pieces may not change anyone’s
mind, but it might at least make people think and realize that there is
more than one way to look at an issue. It also starts or continues the
discussion and dialogue on timely and important issues that affect
people in the communities, school district, county and beyond.
It may be difficult for some people to express their ideas and opin-
ions, especially on sensitive topics, in a newspaper of a small commu-
nity where everyone seems to know everyone. Some people may also
believe that others who write a letter to the editor or opinion piece and
take a stand on these types of issues are negative individuals. That is
hardly the case at all. These individuals have the right to exercise
their freedom of speech and, more importantly, the courage to submit
their letter or column for publication. In a lot of cases, people who
write letters to the editor or opinion column often times share the
same opinion or ideas of readers who are reluctant to have their views
in print.
Finally, individuals who write a letter to the editor or an opinion
column are hardly the final voices of authority on a particular topic
and readers will surely not agree with them on every issue. When that
happens, this newspaper hopes readers will exercise their right and
write a letter to the editor or an opinion column for publication.
-K.M.
Too Tall’s Tidbits
Happy Birthday and Happy An-
niversary to the following local and
area residents compliments of the Ar-
lington Lions Club Community Cal-
endar.
April 19
Christopher Diekmann, Grayson So-
effker, Gretchen Henke, John
Schlueter, Linnea Swanson, Lucy
McCarthy, Tyler Gerke, Wade
Schneider, Mr. and Mrs. John Dotolo,
and Mr. and Mrs. Allen Kerber.
April 20
Jeritt Piotter, Julie Meyer, Mr. and
Mrs. Francis Bigaouette, Jr., Mr. and
Mrs. Jeff Schmidt, and Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Thomes.
April 21
Allan Bening, Carson Bartyzal,
Ellerd Mathwig, Kerigan Brau,
Rachel Gieseke, Mr. and Mrs. Brian
Bade, Mr. and Mrs. Miguel Campa,
and Mr. and Mrs. Steve Peterson.
April 22
In Memory Of Manley Mathwig,
Brandon Brinkman, Elissa Lovaas,
Tony Voigt, and Mr. and Mrs. Nate
Watson.
April 23
Andy Gieseke, Dylan Pauly, James
Schuetz, Nolan Battcher, Ryan
Sauter, Seth Anderson and Zac
Kroells.
April 24
Dan Hislop, Deb Brinkman, Gordon
Schauer, Jane Krohn, Kyle DeVlaem-
inck, Lori St. John, Olivia Otto and
Paul Rosenfeld.
April 25
Aiden Eckert, Dan Tackmann, Ellen
Traxler, Howard Brinkman, James
Gieseke, James J. Trocke, Janet
Schwartz, Keegan Effertz, Lisa Vos,
Scott Barlage and Tyler LeBrun.
Things My Parents
Taught Me
1. My parents taught me to appre-
ciate a job well done.
“If you're going to kill each
other, do it outside… I just finished
cleaning.”
2. My parents taught me religion.
“You better pray that will come
out of the carpet.”
3. My Parents taught me about
time travel.
“If you don't straighten up, I'm
going to knock you into the middle
of next week!”
4. My parents taught me logic.
“Because I said so, that's why.”
5. My parents taught me more
logic.
“If you fall out of that swing and
break your neck, you're not going
to the store with me.”
6. My parents taught me foresight.
“Make sure you wear clean un-
derwear, in case you’re in an acci-
dent.”
7. My parents taught me irony.
“Keep crying, and I'll give you
something to cry about.”
8. My parents taught me about the
science of osmosis.
“Shut your mouth and eat your
supper.”
9. My parents taught me about con-
tortionism.
“Will you look at that dirt on the
back of your neck!”
10. My parents taught me about
stamina.
“You'll sit there until all that
spinach is gone.”
11. My parents taught me about
weather.
“This room of yours looks as if a
tornado went through it.”
12. My parents taught me about
hypocrisy.
“If I told you once, I've told you
a million times. Don't exaggerate!”
13. My parents taught me the circle
of life.
“I brought you into this world,
and I can take you out.”
14 My parents taught me about be-
havior modification.
“Stop acting like your father!”
15. My parents taught me about
envy.
“There are millions of less fortu-
nate children in this world who
don't have wonderful parents like
you do.”
16. My parents taught me about an-
ticipation.
“Just wait until we get home.”
17. My parents taught me about re-
ceiving.
“You are going to get it when you
get home!”
18. My Parents taught me medical
science.
“If you don't stop crossing your
eyes, they are going to get stuck
that way.”
19. My parents taught me ESP.
“Put your sweater on; don't you
think I know when you are cold?”
20. My parents taught me humor.
“When that lawn mower cuts off
your toes, don't come running to
me.”
21. My parents taught me how to
become an adult.
“If you don't eat your vegetables,
you'll never grow up.”
22. My parents taught me genetics.
“You're just like your father.”
23. My parents taught me about my
roots.
“Shut that door behind you. Do
you think you were born in a
barn?”
24. My parents taught me wisdom.
“When you get to be my age,
you'll understand.”
25. My parents taught me about
justice.
“One day you'll have kids, and I
hope they turn out just like you!”
*****
To The Editor,
The Sibley County Economic De-
velopment Commission (SEDCO)
recently published a resolution in
support of the efforts of RS Fiber
and Rural Fiber Connections Coop-
erative to bring fiber-optic technolo-
gy to the homes, farms, schools, and
businesses of Sibley County.
We, the board of Rural Fiber Con-
nections Cooperative, acknowledge
and appreciate SEDCO’s action, as
well as similar statements made by
other groups and boards in the area
which recognize the importance of
fiber in meeting the needs of our
families and businesses both now
and in the future.
Rural Fiber Connections Coopera-
tive continues to look for ways to
bring fiber to rural Sibley County,
and is working closely with RS
Fiber to accomplish this goal for our
entire area. The options currently
available to many of our rural resi-
dents and agri-businesses are very
limited. We believe that the lack of
affordable high-speed Internet ac-
cess goes beyond inconvenience to
having a detrimental effect to the
population and business growth of
our area. Our cooperative is focused
on bringing fiber to rural Sibley
County so that our schoolchildren,
senior citizens, business people, and
all residents have the same commu-
nications opportunities as those in
nearby areas who are much better
connected with high-speed technolo-
gies.
We thank SEDCO for recogniz-
ing the importance of this technolo-
gy and for supporting the efforts of
RS Fiber and Rural Fiber Connec-
tions Cooperative in strengthening
the communications network of the
area for the betterment of economic
development and quality of life, and
we encourage other groups who are
in support of this goal to take similar
action in publicly supporting it.
Rural Fiber
Communications
Cooperative
Board of Directors
Mark Brandt, Gaylord
Cindy Gerholz, Gaylord
Linda Kramer, Gibbon
Ruth Bauer, Winthrop
Delayne Pagel, Winthrop
Rural Fiber Connections Cooperative appreciative
Letter To The Editor,
I would like to thank the newspa-
per for the wonderful press I re-
ceived for being awarded MRC and
Section coach of the year awards.
It is my staff who should be rec-
ognized because without them those
awards would not have come my
way.
Rod Tollefson, Carl Bratsch, Todd
Warzecha, Mike Haller, Tom Web-
ster, and Teddy DuFrane made up
our staff last year. Thank you.
Chuck Hartman
Sibley East
Head Football Coach
Coach thanks newspaper for wonderful press
This week in the Education Fi-
nance committee, we had the chance
to examine details of the Democrats’
bill that sets funding levels for the
2014-2015 biennium.
In the proposal, Democrats pro-
pose a $209 per-pupil funding in-
crease which will cost over $300
million dollars. They also want $150
million dollars to partially fund all-
day kindergarten for students
statewide. School districts that pro-
vide all-day kindergarten would
only receive some of the funding
needed, forcing schools to either
shift costs away from other parts of
their budget or increase class sizes.
I believe we need to leave it up to
school districts as to whether or not
they should provide all-day kinder-
garten. What works for a school in
Minneapolis may not work for a
school in a rural district like ours.
These unfunded mandates have con-
sequences that could have unintend-
ed detrimental effects.
One proposal in the bill that has
received bipartisan praise is the
funding for early-learning childhood
scholarships which allow low-in-
come parents flexibility in making
education choices about what school
is best for their children. This pro-
gram was piloted by Republicans in
2011, and a step in the right direc-
tion for school-choice advocates.
I'm pleased to see the Democrats
following our lead on such an im-
portant issue.
Glenn Gruenhagen
State Representative
District 18B
Gruenhagen comments on proposed education bill
By Phil Krinkie
Over the last few months Gover-
nor Dayton and now Attorney Gen-
eral Lori Swanson have made it
clear that if you are a small business
owner, a larger corporation or even a
major philanthropist, you are not
welcome in Minnesota. The not
welcome here parade started in Jan-
uary when Governor Dayton re-
leased his “tax reform” plan. The
Governor’s tax reform plan pro-
posed to add sales tax to all business
to business transactions. His plan
drew instant objection from busi-
nesses large and small across the
state. Because no other state in the
country imposes an across the board
sales tax on business to business
services many companies started to
consider the possibility of relocating
to another state.
But it wasn’t just Governor Day-
ton’s business to business tax that
got people thinking about relocation.
Governor Dayton has also proposed
increasing taxes on people who re-
side outside of the state for more
than six months. His so called
“snowbird” tax would levy tax
penalties on individuals who often
want to escape our Minnesota win-
ters and our high tax climate for
more weather and tax friendly loca-
tions.
But, of course Governor Dayton’s
“not welcome” here proposals go
beyond just the snowbirds and busi-
nesses. He is the champion of the
“tax the rich” mantra. Any entrepre-
neur or small business owner be-
lieves they are a target for higher
taxes with the Governor’s constant
drumbeat of “the rich don’t pay their
fair share.” In addition to targeting
small business owners and job cre-
ators, the taxing tyrant Governor
Dayton also wants to close “corpo-
rate tax loopholes.” This is code for
higher taxes on Minnesota corpora-
tions that have foreign operating
profits. Even though Governor Day-
ton dropped his plan to extend the
sales tax on business to business
services this year, his tax plan does
include raising the top income tax
rate by 23 percent on any one earn-
ing more than $150,000 a year.
As if it is not bad enough to have
the Governor parading around with
the chant of “higher taxes,” he has
been joined of course by DFL lead-
ers in the House and Senate. Not
only have they joined the Governor
in the choruses of higher income
taxes, but they have piled on with a
laundry list of additional taxes such
as: a tax on internet purchases, high-
er gas taxes, a wheelage tax, addi-
tional deed taxes, plus a health in-
surance tax.
But the DFL legislature doesn’t
stop at just increasing taxes on
everything and anything that busi-
nesses do; they have also proposed
raising the minimum wage by 45
percent. Between Governor Dayton
and Democrat legislators, it’s hard
to distinguish who is doing more to
hang out the “not welcome” here
sign.
Krinkie
Continued on page 5
Dayton, Swanson hang out ‘Not Welcome’ sign
Staf f
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Publish-
ers; Kurt Menk, Edi t or; Kari n
Ramige, Manager; Marvin Bulau,
Production Manager; Barb Math-
wig, Of fice; Ashley Reetz, Sales; and Jean Olson, Proof Reading.
Letters
This page is devoted to opin-
ions and commentary . Articles appearing on this page are the opinions of the
writer . V iews expressed here are not necessarily those of the Arlington Enterprise, unless so desig-
nated. The Arlington Enterprise strongly encourages others to express opin-
ions on this page.
Letters from our readers are
strongly encouraged. Letters for
publication must bear the writer’ s signature and address. The Arlington Enterprise reserves the right
to edit letters for purpose of clarity
and space.
Ethics
The editorial staf f of the Arlington Enterprise strives to present the news in a
fair and accurate manner . W e appreciate errors being brought to our attention.
Please bring any grievances against
the Arlington Enterprise to the attention of the editor . Should dif ferences continue, readers are encour-
aged to take their grievances to the
Minnesota News Council, an organi-
zation dedicated to protecting the
public from press inaccuracy and un-
fairness. The News Council can be contacted at 12 South
Sixth St., Suite 940, Minneapolis,
MN 55402, or (612) 341-9357.
Press Freedom
Freedom of the press is guar-
anteed under the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitu- tion:
Established in 1884.
Postmaster send address changes to:
Arlington Enterprise.
402 West Alden Street, P.O. Box 388,
Arlington, MN 55307.
Phone 507-964-5547 FAX 507-964-2423.
Hours: Monday-Wednesday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.;
Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 2 p.m.; and Friday closed.
Entered as Periodicals postal matter at Arlington,
MN post office. Postage paid at Arlington USPS No.
031-980.
Subscription Rates: Minnesota – $33.00 per year. Out-
side of state – $38.00 per year.
Arlington ENTERPRISE
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 18, 2013, page 5
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
REMINDER
TO LICENSE YOUR PET
In accordance with the terms of Ordinance No. 206:
—All domesticated pets (dogs and cats) must be licensed.
If you have not already done so, please stop by the City Office
to obtain a 2013 pet license. The fee is
$
5.00 per pet. Late fees
added May 1
st
.
A health certificate showing that the pet is current on its ra-
bies vaccination is required.
— Any person or entity found to be in violation of this Ordi-
nance shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine,
plus all veterinary impoundment and boarding charges, and in
the case of destruction of an ani-
mal, any veterinary charge for
said service.
– PETS ARE NOT PERMIT-
TED TO RUN AT LARGE
WITHIN THE ARLINGTON
CITY LIMITS. They must ei-
ther be leashed or
cabled/chained, kenneled or in a
fenced yard and not allowed to
roam freely.
By Order of the
Arlington City
Council
A15Ea
County Road Ditch Spraying
Sibley County will ONLY be spraying County road ditches
for noxious weeds. The spray is applied directly to the noxious weeds.
Chemicals used: Tordon K, Transline, Escort, Milestone, Forefront and 2-4D.
Anyone wishing to NOT have a specific county road ditch sprayed
should contact the Sibley County Public Works Office at 507-237-4092
before May 15, 2013 for a form. The No Spray Request Form is available
from the Office via: e-mail: SibleyPW@co.sibley.mn.us
or website: www.co.sibley.mn.us Landowners/renters are required
to flag the no spray zone with “Owner Will Maintain” flags provided by
Sibley County Public Works. The use of these flags will aid Sibley County
Public Works maintenance crews in identifying which areas landowners/
renters do not want sprayed. Flags are available at the Public Works
office in Gaylord and at all county highway garages in Arlington, Gaylord,
Gibbon, Green Isle, Henderson, Winthrop and at the Sibley County Gravel Pit.
By requesting that Sibley County does not spray your road ditch, landowners/renters
agree to maintain the noxious weeds and brush in the specified road ditches in their
entirety. When landowners/renters do not respond, we will assume it is acceptable to
spray. The County may begin spraying on or after May 15, 2013.
A15-16E16-17Sa
2013 DUST CONTROL NOTICE
• Offered to Sibley County residents on gravel surfaced public roads.
• Cost is
$
105.00 per 100 feet of treatment for 2 applications and must be paid in advance.
• Dust control has been effectively used by the County in the past. However, the County makes no guar-
antee as to the effectiveness of the material used or how long it will last.
• First application will be done approximately first week of June. Residents need to accurately measure
and flag the application area with orange flags on both ends at the edge of the road. Maintain these
flags the 2 weeks before each application until completed. Flags are available at the Public Works
Office in Gaylord, all county highway garages in Arlington, Gaylord, Gibbon, Green Isle, Hender-
son, Winthrop and the County Gravel Pit.
• Applicants will not be notified of the application date unless you provide email address – or please call
our office at 507-237-4092 or look for updates at www.co.sibley.mn.us .
• Applications must be received by May 15, 2013. Sign up online by visiting www.co.sibley.mn.us/pub-
lic_works/dust_control.html, in person at the Sibley County Service Center Building or by mailing this
sheet filled in with all the information below.
• A late fee surcharge of
$
25.00 will be assessed to individuals who sign up after May 15
th
.
Please mail in the following information:
Mail to: Sibley County Public Works, P.O. Box 897, Gaylord, MN 55334
A
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5
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1
6
E
1
6
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2
7
S
a
Name: __________________________ Daytime Telephone: __________________
❑ I would like to be notified by email of application date.
Email:_____________________________________________________________
Township: __________________________Section: ________________________
Property Address: _______________________City: ________________________
Length Sprayed: _________________Amount Paid: ________________________
Make checks payable to Sibley County Treasurer
Obituary
Helen A. Gores, age 96, of
Arlington, passed away at the
Arlington Good Samaritan
Center on Thursday, April 11.
Mass of Christian Burial
was held at St. Mary’s
Catholic Church in Arlington
at 11 a.m. Wednesday, April
17.
Visitation was held at the
church from 9:30 a.m. to 11
a.m. Wednesday, April 17.
Interment was in St.
Mary’s Catholic Cemetery.
Helen was born to Joseph
and Josephine (Wilt) Soupir
in Westline Township, Red-
wood County, on Feb. 10,
1917. She was a graduate of
the Milroy High School. On
June 4, 1936, Helen married
Christian H. Gores at Our
Lady of Victory Church in
Lucan. She and her husband
owned and operated Chris’
Café in Wabasso for 36 years.
After moving to Arlington,
Helen worked at Turner ’s
Café/Arlington Haus. After
retiring, she volunteered at
the Arlington Good Samari-
tan Center. She loved to cook
and also liked embroidering,
crocheting, gardening, play-
ing cards, fishing and watch-
ing Twins baseball.
She is survived by daugh-
ters, Shirley (Ken) Heiling of
Redwood Falls, Josie (Don)
Pelzel of Highland, Mich.,
and Sue (Rick) Walker of Ar-
lington; 19 grandchildren; 30
great grandchildren; and one
great great granddaughter.
Helen is preceded in death
by her husband; sons, Jerry,
Don, Fred, and Bob Gores;
great grandson John; and
fourteen siblings.
Kolden Funeral Home of
Arlington handled the
arrangements.
Helen A. Gores, 96, Arlington
Thomas Bigaouette, 84, of
Moore, Okla., passed away at
his home on Tuesday, March
26.
Services were held at Holy
Cross Lutheran Church in
Oklahoma City, Okla., on
Monday, April 1.
Interment was at Resthaven
Memory Gardens in Oklaho-
ma City.
Thomas was born to
Sylvester and Clara (Barlage)
Bigaouette on May 1, 1928.
On April 18, 1951, he mar-
ried Georgia Haynie. They
were married 58 years.
He served in the United
States Army as a sergeant
first class for 26 years.
Tom was a faithful
provider, father, husband,
grandfather and great-grand-
father.
Tom is survived by son,
Thomas, Jr., and wife, Karen
of Moore; and daughter,
Cheryl Wooten of Mustang,
Okla.; five grandchildren;
nine great-grandchildren;
brothers, Francis (Florence)
of Arlington; Richard (Ar-
dene) of Hamburg; sisters,
Josephine Deutsch of Jordan,
Myrtle Buesgens of Nor-
wood, Irene (Harold) Castor
of Belle Plaine, and Ethel
(Andy) Hervin of Waite Park;
and sister-in-law, Fran Bi-
gaouette.
He is preceded in death by
wife, Georgia; daughter,
Karen Brandy; sister, Marie
Brazil; and brothers, Ray-
mond and Jerry.
Thomas Bigaouette, 84, Moore, Okla.
History
98 Years Ago
April 22, 1915
Buck & Didra, Publishers
The first automobile accident
of the season occurred Saturday
when Maurice Noack, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Noack,
had his collar bone fractured by
falling from the rear of Barth’s
machine. He was hanging on the
tire holder in the rear and lost
his grip and the fall caused the
fracture.
The town was unusually busy
Thursday, but Monday of this
week was a hummer for our
merchants and far surpassed
Thursday in point of business,
and the number of teams in
town. Every merchant did a
splendid business. Horsemen
from the Cities, Henderson and
Green Isle were here purchasing
horses and the fact that most of
the seeding is finished caused
many farmers to come in.
A little German band serenad-
ed our citizens Tuesday after-
noon and evening. Usually they
only play in front of business
places, but this time they also
invaded the residence districts.
The old brick barn in
Bushey’s pasture, formerly used
as a saw mill, was razed last
week. It was so dilapidated as to
become dangerous. Rudolph
Jahr blew it up with dynamite.
68 Years Ago
April 19, 1945
Louis Kill, Editor
A quiet wedding ceremony
was performed by Rev. Ernst
Stahlke at the Evangelical Luth-
eran parsonage in Gaylord on
Wednesday, April 11, at 1:30
p.m., when Miss. Eldora Wisch,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. C.
Wisch of Arlington, and Mr.
Howard Bobo of Braham, Min-
nesota, were united in marriage.
The young couple will make
their home with the bride’s par-
ents on the farm near Arlington.
Our fellow townsman and pi-
oneer resident, August Hucken-
poehler, observed his 85th birth-
day on April 8th. We are pleased
to state that he continues to
enjoy fairly good health despite
his years, is mentally alert and
able to be up and around as
usual.
A study of the rural graduates
from the elementary schools in
Sibley County is being projected
through the office of the County
Superintendent of Schools. Pre-
liminary information has been
gathered concerning all young
people who completed the
eighth grade within the past four
years, and a follow-up survey is
now being undertaken to find
out more about the boys and
girls from this group who are
not now in school somewhere.
There are 58 rural elementary
schools operating in Sibley
County.
38 Years Ago
April 17, 1975
Val Kill, Editor
Local law enforcement offi-
cials have been busy lately and
as a result have solved a number
of burglaries in Arlington. In
each case local citizens came
forth and gave officers enough
information to apprehend two
individuals in separate inci-
dences that resulted in the return
of property to the owners in ex-
cess of $1,500.
On April 4, 1975, the A-GI
Public School was officially rep-
resented by their first state presi-
dent of the Future Homemakers
of America. She is Linda We-
meier, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Joe Wemeier. Linda, a junior,
was installed as president at the
banquet Friday night. There
were over 2,000 students with
their advisors, chaperones and
parents present at the banquet.
The Arlington Jaycees have
completed this year’s City of
Arlington charity drive. A total
of $3,530.80 was collected. The
distributions to specific charities
were made as indicated by
donors on their contributions en-
velopes.
8 Years Ago
April 21, 2005
Kurt Menk, Editor
Six members of the Sibley
East varsity boys wrestling team
were recently named to the
2004-2005 Minnesota River
Conference All Conference
Boys Wrestling Team. The six
wrestlers included seniors Tyler
Matz, Damon Traxler and Pat
Vos, junior Derek Berger, soph-
omore Andrew Bates and fresh-
man Jake Zeiher.
A bomb threat reportedly oc-
curred at the Sibley East Junior
High School in Gaylord at 1:45
p.m. Wednesday, April 13, 1985,
according to Gaylord Police
Chief Dale Roiger. School offi-
cials were alerted about the situ-
ation after a short message writ-
ten in pencil was found in the
boys restroom, according to
Roiger. After an approximate
one hour search, the building
was pronounced safe.
And just when you thought
no one could do more to drive
a stake in the entrepreneurial
spirit in Minnesota, Attorney
General Lori Swanson rides
into the public spot light.
Last week, Ms. Swanson held
a public meeting to lambast
Sanford Health executives
about a possible merger with
Fairview Health Services.
The undertone of the hearing
was that Attorney General
Swanson didn’t approve of
the non-profit health care or-
ganization, Sanford Health’s,
close association with its main
benefactor T. Dennis Sanford.
Sanford Health got the mes-
sage. Just days after Attorney
General Swanson’s public
ridiculing of Sanford Health ,
their CEO, Kelby Krabben-
hoft announced that a possible
merger with Fairview Health
was off. In a public letter he
said the possible merger “has
turned into a situation that
finds us being unwelcome by
some interested parties and
key stakeholders.”
For some reason Ms. Swan-
son didn’t appreciate the idea
of St. Paul native and Univer-
sity of Minnesota graduate
Denny Sanford playing a
major role with the University
of Minnesota’s hospital and
medical education program.
Despite the fact that Mr. San-
ford has no official position
with Sanford Health, his affil-
iation with the operation has
been brought into question.
Swanson even stated that in-
vestigators in her office had a
hard time finding anyone at
the University of Minnesota
that wanted to go into busi-
ness with Sanford Health.
That seems a little hard to be-
lieve, considering Sanford
Health is the largest non-prof-
it rural health care system in
the country, with 35 hospitals
and 140 clinics in eight states.
Why would Minnesota’s At-
torney General not want such
an organization to play a
major role in Minnesota
health care delivery system?
It seems inconceivable that
elected officials in Minnesota
would rebuke a large and well
respected business like San-
ford Health. At the same time
Attorney General Swanson
was yanking away the wel-
come mat from Sanford
Health, she also slammed the
door in the face of Denny
Sanford, who has been recog-
nized as one of the top 50 phi-
lanthropists in America. He
alone has donated more than
$600 million to the health
care organization that bears
his name.
With the recent actions like
that of Attorney General
Swanson and the tax policies
proposed by Governor Day-
ton, Minnesota’s and the DFL
controlled legislature our
state’s reputation will soon
evolve from being just a high
taxed state to a state with a
hostile business environment.
At a time when our states
economy is starting to re-
bound Governor Dayton and
his DFL cronies are sending
the wrong message across the
state and around the country,
by pulling the welcome mat
from out under the feet of our
business leaders, entrepre-
neurs and philanthropic com-
munity.
Phil Krinkie, a former
eight-term Republican state
representative from Lino
Lakes who chaired the House
Tax Committee for a while, is
president of the Taxpayers
League of Minnesota. People
can contact him at philk@tax-
payersleague.org.
Krinkie Continued from page 4
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Guest Reader at St. Paul’s
Andrew Mathwig, a part-time officer for
the Arlington Police Department, was a
guest reader for “Drop Everything And
Read Day” at St. Paul’s Lutheran
School in Arlington on Friday morning,
April 12. Other guest readers included
Jim Kreft, Sheila Arneson and Theresa
Bjorklund.
or after a change in the su-
perintendent or a major
change in the membership of
a school board, and develop-
ment of a plan using a nation-
ally recognized facilitator.
Other Business
The School Board voted 5-
0 and approved the consent
agenda which included resig-
nations from Molly McGinley
from her ESL position, Holly
Vos from her teaching posi-
tion, Gail Norell from her ele-
mentary teaching position (for
purposes of retirement) and
Mike Haller from his assistant
football coach position.
The consent agenda also in-
cluded a request from Carrie
Bartlette, advisor for the stu-
dent travel group, to sell flip
flops as a fundraiser. The rev-
enue generated would assist
in defraying the travel costs
related to the group’s upcom-
ing trip to Germany, Austria
and Switzerland.
In other news, Weber asked
a couple of questions and
made a few comments about
various bills.
Sibley East, according to
Weber, spent nearly $800 on
iPad repairs last month. In-
cluded in that total was $305
in repairs to just one iPad.
Weber also inquired about a
bill for over $1,000 in lodging
for Junior High Principal
Steve Harter to attend a na-
tional convention.
Harter, who was present at
the meeting, said the trip to
the national convention is part
of his contract and he is al-
lowed to make two such trips
during a four-year period.
Sibley East Continued from page 1
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 18, 2013, page 6
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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Sports
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The recent and current in-
clement weather continues to
raise havoc with the Sibley
East athletic schedule this
spring.
Sibley East has been forced
to postpone or cancel 68 ath-
letic events through Thurs-
day, April 18, according to
Athletic Director Randy
Walsh.
“We are holding on to a
couple events on Friday with
hope the weather forecast is
not accurate,” Walsh said.
Walsh continued, “We will
be playing all doubleheaders
for conference baseball and
softball games. We had one
change of location for track
and one addition. We are still
working on trying to find
some extra dates for golf.
Walsh added, “Currently
we have lost three varsity
track meets, one junior high
track meet, three A/B softball
games, three A/B baseball
games and five golf meets.
We added one track meet and
are working on finding new
dates for golf.”
The Sibley East varsity
boys baseball team will open
its season at Le Sueur-Hen-
derson at 4 p.m. Thursday,
April 25.
The Sibley East varsity
girls softball team will open
its season at Le Sueur-Hen-
derson at 4 p.m. Thursday,
April 25.
The Sibley East varsity
boys and girls track teams
will open their seasons at Wa-
tertown-Mayer on Tuesday
afternoon, April 23.
Volunteers
Volunteers are needed for
the Mike Vrklan Relays
which will be held in Arling-
ton on Friday afternoon, April
26.
The field events will begin
at 4 p.m. while the running
events will start at 4:30 p.m.
Interested people who
would like to volunteer can
contact Sibley East head girls
track coach Jill Warzecha at
507-237-3366.
Nearly 70 SE athletic events postponed
or cancelled due to inclement weather
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Gaylord resident Carl Wet-
zel did not make a lot of
money during his 20-year ca-
reer in junior, pro and interna-
tional hockey. He played
hockey for the love of the
game and the result has been
a lot of great memories and
friendships.
Early Days
His love for hockey began
as a youth. Wetzel grew up in
Detroit not far from Olympia
Stadium where the Red
Wings played their games. He
attended games and admired
the play of the great goal-
tenders such as Terry Saw-
chuck, Harry Lumley and
Glenn Hall in the 1950’s. It
was at this time that Wetzel
decided he wanted to be a
goaltender.
“I played my first organ-
ized game in tenth grade,”
said Wetzel. “Before that I
played street hockey. There
was no high school hockey in
those days.”
That first outfit was the ju-
venile Arrowsmith team. Wet-
zel would hitchhike or take
city buses to practices and
games.
By the time Wetzel was a
16-year-old senior, he was
good enough to practice with
the Detroit Red Wings and
even played four exhibition
games.
Hockey Career
Wetzel, soon after that
time, signed a pro contract
and began a checkered career
in junior, pro and internation-
al hockey.
Wetzel played with the Ed-
monton Flyers (1958-59),
Omaha Knights (1959-60),
Spokane Comets (1960-61),
Indianapolis Chiefs (1960-
61), Fort Wayne Komets
(1960-61) and Sudbury
Wolves (1962-63).
He played briefly with the
Detroit Red Wings and made
a league minimum $7,500
during the 1964-65 season.
Wetzel was also a member
of the Montreal Canadiens
during the 1965-66 season.
Wetzel was also a member
of the Minnesota North Stars
during their expansion season
in 1967-68. It was the first
expansion for the National
Hockey League which had
only six teams up to that
point.
Wetzel recalled that his
salary was $17,500 during his
first season with the North
Stars.
It was a different time in
professional sports, including
hockey, when teams really
owned the players and the
“players worked in the off
season back then,” he said.
During that 1967-68 sea-
son, Wetzel was loaned by
Minnesota to the Toronto
Maple Leafs who, in turn,
sent him down to play with
the Rochester Americans.
Wetzel shared the goaltend-
ing duties with Bobby Per-
reault and the Rochester
Americans eventually ad-
vanced to the finals against
the Quebec Aces in the Amer-
ican Hockey League playoffs.
“I relieved Perreault in
games three and four,” said
Wetzel. He was also in the
nets for game six when the
Rochester Americans won 4-
1 and captured the Calder
Cup. Wetzel had 42 saves in
the final contest.
Between the two stints with
Detroit and Minnesota, Wet-
zel was reinstated as an ama-
teur and had a great season
with the U.S. National Team
during the 1966-67 season.
He also played well during
the World Tournament in Vi-
enna, Austria. Although the
United States finished with a
3-3-1 record and failed to
medal, Wetzel was named the
Best Goaltender in the tour-
nament and earned a spot on
the All Star Team. His most
memorable games were three
consecutive shutouts over
East Germany, Finland and
West Germany.
Wetzel is very proud to
claim that he is the only
American to be named to the
World Cup All Star Team
from 1961 to the present day.
He played in the North
Stars organization again dur-
ing the 1968-69 season and
shared time between Min-
nesota and the minor league
teams of Cleveland and
Memphis.
After the 1968-69 season,
Wetzel was once again rein-
stated as an amateur and
played with the U.S. National
Team during the 1969-70 and
1970-71 seasons, but the
team failed to win a medal.
He played the 1971-72 sea-
son with Kitzbuhel in Austria.
Wetzel, after returning
home, closed out his career
by playing one game with the
Minnesota Fighting Saints
during the 1972-73 season.
His autographed Minnesota
Fighting Saints uniform
hangs in a frame at Tom
Reid’s bar just a few blocks
from the home of the Min-
nesota Wild in St. Paul.
Wetzel, like most goalies of
his time, played in the nets
without a mask except for the
last few years of his career.
“It wasn’t easy back in
those days,” said Wetzel.
“The coaches thought a mask
would interfere with your vi-
sion.”
He added that his grand-
daughter, who is currently a
goalie at the high school
level, “has better equipment
than I had years ago.”
Wetzel and his wife, Clau-
dia, of 50 years, along with
their family, had to move nu-
merous times over his long
career. The couple now has
three children and 10 grand-
children.
In addition to his career
and the memories made along
the way, Wetzel treasures the
many people he has met and
the friendships he had kept
over the years.
Coaching
Wetzel later served as an
assistant coach for the Min-
nesota Gopher hockey team
in the early to mid 1980’s.
He also served as an assis-
tant coach under head coach
Herb Brooks with the Min-
nesota North Stars during
1987-88.
“That was the first job I
ever got fired from,” laughed
Wetzel. Brooks, he said, got
fired and the entire coaching
staff was dismissed as well.
Wetzel added that he
played with Brooks on all
three U.S. National Teams.
Wetzel later sold hockey
equipment and advertising
specialty items before his re-
tirement in Gaylord.
Retirement
Today, Wetzel serves as the
host in the NHL Alumni
Room on the Xcel Energy
Center’s Club Level. It is a
position he has held for the
previous seven years.
It is also a way for Wetzel
to stay close to the game of
hockey. In addition, it gives
him an opportunity to run
into and visit with his former
teammates with the Minneso-
ta North Stars.
Ushers, ticket takers, tv an-
nouncers and other employ-
ees all know Wetzel by his
first name when he enters and
walks around the Xcel Ener-
gy Center to open the alumni
room on game nights.
Outside of this hobby, Wet-
zel and his former Minnesota
North Stars teammates sign
autographs at shows to raise
money for various charities
throughout the year.
Hockey has created great memories, friendships for Carl Wetzel
Submitted Photo
An autographed picture of Carl Wetzel from his early
playing days.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Carl Wetzel proudly displays the trophy he received
for being named the Best Goaltender in the World
Tournament during the 1966-67 season.
None of the more than
2,300 deer tested for Chronic
Wasting Disease (CWD) in
three specific areas of Min-
nesota have tested positive
for the disease.
Deer were tested in an area
of southeastern Minnesota as
part of the Minnesota Depart-
ment of Natural Resources’
(DNR) ongoing CWD sur-
veillance and disease man-
agement efforts in the Pine
Island area. Deer also were
tested as a precaution in east-
central Minnesota because
the disease was discovered in
wild deer from nearby Wis-
consin. Testing was done in
the north metropolitan area
because a captive European
Red Deer herd in North Oaks
tested positive for the disease.
Testing will continue in
southeastern Minnesota and
the north metropolitan area.
Surveillance in deer permit
areas 159, 183, 225 and St.
Croix State Park will be dis-
continued.
“The results are encourag-
ing in southeastern Minneso-
ta,” said Michelle Carstensen,
DNR wildlife health program
director. “To date, the only
CWD positive deer we’ve
found is the one discovered
from the 2010 hunting season
that prompted our surveil-
lance.”
In the southeast, 1,195 deer
tested negative for the disease
in the CWD management
zone during 2012, marking
the second consecutive year
of no positives being detect-
ed. Deer tested were harvest-
ed during archery, firearm
and muzzleloader seasons.
“Cooperation from hunters
has been outstanding”, said
Erik Hildebrand, DNR
wildlife health specialist.
“There is a lot of support for
ensuring Minnesota has a
healthy deer herd in the
southeast.”
A helicopter survey con-
ducted in early March within
the CWD management zone
indicated the objective of re-
ducing deer population densi-
ty in deer permit area 602 has
been met. As a result, the area
will be designated as inten-
sive rather than unlimited for
this fall’s hunt, allowing
hunters to harvest up to five
deer.
Deer
Continued on page 8
No wild deer test positive for CWD
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 18, 2013, page 7
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
MELSHA CONSTRUCTION, INC.
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Sibley East Schools are looking for
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for the 2013-14 school year
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• Impact the lives of children who need extra support to
become proficient readers.
• Provide one on one reading interventions with K-3
students.
• Help develop children’s literacy skills in a Pre-School
classroom.
• Positions are available in both the Arlington and Gaylord
Campuses.
For more information about literacy tutor positions avail-
able at Sibley East Public School please contact:
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507-964-8225
507-237-3318
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Legals
Menus
ADVERTISEMENT
FOR QUOTES
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS:
Quotes for gravel will be received
until 7 p.m., April 24, 2013, by
Maynard Rucks, Clerk of Jessen-
land Township, Sibley County on
behalf of the supervisors of said
township for the following: 3,000
ton of class 5 gravel more or less
delivered to any place in the town-
ship by July 1, 2013.
Townshi p i s al so aski ng for
quotes for road grading and weed
cutting this season, snowplowing
and sanding this next season.
Township reserves the right to
reject any and all quotes.
Maynard Rucks, Clerk
Jessenland Township
35493 226th St.
Henderson, MN 56044
507-964-2733
Publish April 11 and 18, 2013
TITLE AND SUMMARY
OF ORDINANCE 280
THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE
CITY OF ARLINGTON, MIN-
NESOTA, DOES ORDAIN AS
FOLLOWS:
AN ORDINANCE SUPERSED-
ING ORDINANCE 267, REGU-
LATING THE POSSESSION,
SALE, AND CONSUMPTION OF
INTOXICATING AND 3.2 PER-
CENT MALT LIQUOR WITHIN
THE CITY OF ARLINGTON, MIN-
NESOTA
“On April 15, 2013, the City
Council of the City of Arlington ap-
proved Ordinance 280 entitled ‘A
Resolution Providing for Summary
Publication of Ordinance 280 Enti-
tled “An Ordinance Superseding
Ordinance 267, Regulating the
Possession, Sale, and Consump-
tion of Intoxicating and 3.2 Per-
cent Malt Liquor Within the City of
Arlington, Minnesota’. The Ordi-
nance in its entirety is available
for review and/or photocopying
during regular office hours at the
City of Arlington, 204 Shamrock
Dri ve, Arl i ngton, Mi nnesota
55307. Ordinance 280 allows for
Sunday liquor sales beginning at
10:30 a.m., provides for the citing
of employees accused of selling
liquor to minors, clarifies suspen-
sion and revocation standards,
and prescribes penalties”.
This ordinance shall become
effective after summary publica-
tion.
For the City of Arlington:
/s/ James R. Kreft
By James R. Kreft
Its Mayor
/s/ Cynthia Smith-Strack
By Cynthia Smith-Strack
Its Interim City Administrator
First Reading: April 1, 2013
Second Readi ng: Apri l 15,
2013
Adopted: April 15, 2013
Publish: April 18, 2013
ORDINANCE
NO. 2013-01
THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE
CITY OF GREEN ISLE, MIN-
NESOTA TO PROMOTE THE
PUBLIC SAFETY, HEALTH AND
WELFARE, HEREBY ORDAIN AS
FOLLOWS:
AN ORDINANCE PROHIBIT-
ING CERTAIN SUMP PUMP AND
OTHER DISCHARGES INTO
THE CITY’S SANITARY SEWER
SYSTEM
This ordinance prohibits the
discharge of storm and surface
water i nto the ci ty’s sani tary
sewer system, and sets up an in-
specti on procedure to ensure
compliance with this ordinance.
The full text of this ordinance is
available on the City of Green Isle
w e b s i t e ,
www.cityofgreenislemn.org, and
also at the City Office.
Adopted: April 9, 2013
For City of Green Isle
By: Dale ZumBerge
Its Mayor
By: Bert Panning
Publish April 18, 2013
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Show Choir
The Sibley East Jazz Band and Show Choir presented
their Spring Concert at the Arlington school site on
Sunday night, April 14. The trio of Marissa Eckberg,
left, Courtney Schwirtz, middle, and Katelyn Reid,
right, sang “Do You Believe In Magic” during the con-
cert. An ice cream social was also held in conjunction
with the Spring Concert.
SENIOR DINING
Call 326-3401 for a meal
Suggested Donation $3.85
Monday: Turkey casserol e,
peas, tropical fruit, bread with
margarine, bar, low fat milk.
Tuesday: Sweet and sour pork,
rice, broccoli, mandarin oranges,
cookie, low fat milk.
Wednesday: Baked chicken,
potato salad, mixed vegetables,
bread with margarine, fresh melon
cubes, low fat milk.
Thursday: Meatballs with gravy,
mashed potatoes, beets, bread
with margarine, fruit crisp, low fat
milk.
Fri day: Lemon pepper fish,
baked potato, Prince William veg-
etables, bread with margarine, pie,
low fat milk.
SIBLEY EAST ELEMENTARY
BREAKFAST MENU
Arlington and Gaylord
Breakfast i s served at 8:00
a.m. daily. A 1/2 pint of milk is
served with each meal daily. Menu
is subject to change.
Monday: Cracker stick, yogurt,
juice, milk.
Tuesday: Frudel, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Oatmeal bar,
cheese stick, juice, milk.
Thursday: Waffle, juice, milk.
Friday: Bug bites, seeds, juice,
milk.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Arlington
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: Mexican haystack, let-
tuce, tomato, peppers, onions,
rice, salsa, fruit. Alternate: Cooks’
choice.
Tuesday: Shri mp poppers,
scalloped potatoes, green beans,
cheese plate, fruit. Alternate: Ravi-
oli.
Wednesday: Chicken noodle
soup, hot ham and cheese, veggie
sticks, pickles, fruit. Alternate: Mini
corn dogs.
Thursday: French toast sticks,
sausage, hash browns, cucum-
bers, juice. Alternate: Hot sand-
wich.
Friday: Rib on whole grain bun,
oven potatoes, brown beans, fruit.
Alternate: Cooks’ choice.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Gaylord
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: Mexican haystack,
tomatoes, lettuce, refried beans,
corn, mixed fruit. Alternate: Pizza
burger.
Tuesday: Shri mp poppers,
macaroni and cheese, broccoli,
pineapple. Alternate: Meatballs.
Wednesday: Hot ham and
cheese sandwich, chicken noodle
soup, veggie sticks, pickle spears,
peaches. Alternate: salad bar.
Thursday: French toast sticks,
sausage, oven potatoes, cucum-
bers, applesauce. Alternate: Chow
mein.
Friday: Rib on whole grain bun,
oven potatoes, baked beans, pear
slices. Alternate: Cooks’ choice.
By Karin Ramige Cornwell
Manager
Sibley County is the offi-
cial caretaker of the tax-for-
feited former Gaylord Sal-
vage Yard and what to do
with it was a topic of discus-
sion at the Tuesday, April 9
regular county board meeting.
County Administrator Matt
Jaunich and Environmental
Services Director Jeff Majes-
ki have visited the site a cou-
ple of times over the last
weeks.
Jaunich said it appears to
be mostly junk rather filled
with contaminates.
After talking with the Min-
nesota Pollution Control
Agency (MPCA), he suggest-
ed the first step is to clean up
the junk, then if there were
questions about contamina-
tion, the area could be tested.
Jaunich said that it doesn’t
seem to be anything of value,
a lot of tires and some appli-
ances. However, there ap-
pears to be a vehicle inside
one of the locked buildings.
The ultimate goal is to sell
the property.
Jaunich said the county
doesn’t have to clean it up,
but they are liable for the
property.
He outlined four possible
options for the board:
1. Do nothing, attempt to
sell “as is” and hope the
buyer will clean up the area.
2. Seek bids from outside
companies to clean the site.
3. Have Sentence-to-Serve
and the Public Works Depart-
ment do the clean up as time
allows. There would be a
cost for dumpsters and dis-
posal.
4. A combination of the
second and third options.
The board decided the
county will discuss the matter
with the City of Gaylord to
see if the city would be inter-
ested in the site before mak-
ing any decision.
Jaunich will meet with
Gaylord City Administrator
Kevin McCann to discuss the
matter further.
Emergency
Management
Sibley County’s Emer-
gency Management Director
Bryan Gorman gave an up-
date about the county’s
Threat Hazard Identifications
and Risk Assessment
(THIRA).
In this assessment, which
has been approved by the
state, the department picks
the three worst scenarios that
the county could face and
looks for the gaps to work on.
It could also be used to iden-
tify areas where grant monies
may be available to help with
the gaps.
Gorman also gave an up-
date on a CodeRED drill that
took place in early April.
In the drill, 6,200 numbers
were called and messages
were left.
Gorman reported that 42
percent of the numbers were
non-working numbers and
they have received 350 new
numbers since the drill took
place.
To sign up for the
CodeRED alerts, visit the
Emergency Management
page on the Sibley County
Website at http://www.co.sib-
ley.mn.us/emergency_man-
agement_services/index.html
and select “CodeRED Com-
munity Notification Enroll-
ment” at the top of the left
hand navigational bar. Alerts
can be by phone, text or e-
mail.
This is the first time a drill
of this kind has taken place.
County Board weighs options for Salvage Yard,
hears emergency management plans at meeting
E-Mail us at
info@ArlingtonMNnews.com
E-Mail us at
info@ArlingtonMNnews.com
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 18, 2013, page 8
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Tri-County Household Hazardous
Waste Collection in Gibbon
At the Sibley County Highway Shop (corner of Ely & E. Mill Rd.)
Thursday, May 2nd 2013 from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
For residents of Le Sueur, Sibley, & Nicollet Counties
Examples of Acceptable Items: Paints & stains, thinners,
solvents, home & garden chemicals, roof & driveway tars,
household cleaners, aerosols, acids, bases, adhesives,
rechargeable & button batteries, mercury thermometers &
thermostats, and fluorescent bulbs (from households only!).
WE ABSOLUTELY CANNOT ACCEPT: Business bulbs or business waste of
any kind; or explosives or ammunition.
For more information,
call the Tri-County Solid Waste Office at 507-381-9196
http://www.co.sibley.mn.us/tricounty_swo/index.html
A15-16E16-17Sa
City-Wide Garage Sales
in Arlington Friday & Saturday, May 10 & 11
For only
$
15
00
you can:
1. Place your Garage Sale Ad
2. Receive 2 FREE Garage
Sale Signs
If enough participate, advertising will include The Sibley Shopper,
Arlington Enterprise and the Glencoe Advertiser.
Sponsored by The Sibley Shopper and Arlington Enterprise.
Yes! We’re having a Garage Sale May 10 & 11!
Deadline: Wednesday, May 1, 2013.
Name: ________________________________________
Address: ______________________________________
Time: __________________a.m. to ____________p.m.
List of items (Limit 10): ___________________________
______________________________________________
______________________________________________
______________________________________________
Just gather up
your unused
items and bring
the following
info to The
Arlington
Enterprise/
Sibley Shopper
office.
Starting
at 8 a.m.
Office Hours:
Mon., Tues., Wed.
8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Thurs.
8:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
Fri. CLOSED
Submitted Photo
Sibley East sophomore Jonah Butler
earned a gold medal, an Army Innova-
tion award and a math award which in-
cludes mathematica software during
the Minnesota State Science and Engi-
neering Fair. In addition, Jonah earned
a trip to the International Science and
Engineering Fair (ISEF) which will be
held in Phoenix, Ariz., from May 12
through May 17. He was awarded this
trip at the Regional Science and Engi-
neering Fair in Mankato. He is the son
of William and Christine Butler, Glen-
coe.
Minnesota State Science and Engineering Fair
Submitted Photo
Sibley East eighth graders Abigail But-
ler, right, and Alexus Kreft, left, partici-
pated in the Minnesota State Science
and Engineering Fair, but did not place.
However, they earned three awards at
the Regional Science and Engineering
Fair in Mankato. These three awards in-
cluded the Thin Film Innovation Award,
Communication Award for their re-
search paper, and advancement to the
Minnesota State Science and Engineer-
ing Fair for their paper and board. Abi-
gail is the daughter of William and
Christine Butler, Glencoe. Alexus is the
daughter of Jim and Holly Kreft, Arling-
ton.
By Michael Mattison
Winthrop News
The membership of Waco-
nia Farm Supply (WFS)
voted overwhelmingly in
favor for a merger proposal
with United Farmers Cooper-
ative on April 1.
The proposal called for all
WFS assets to be combined
into UFC’s cooperative busi-
ness.
Waconia Farm Supply has
420 voting patrons with 280
casting votes. Of those vot-
ing, about 90 percent voted in
favor of the proposal. This
will make WFS part of UFC
on September 1.
UFC General Manager Jeff
Nielsen said that the UFC
Board was contacted by the
WFS Board that it was faced
with a decision to seek out
options.
Waconia Farm Supply in-
vited five cooperatives to talk
about possible mergers and
hired a consultant to help it
work through the interview
process. Those interviews
were held in January.
UFC was contacted by the
WFS Board as the first choice
of the prospective coopera-
tives to see if it would like to
pursue a unification.
Nielsen said that the UFC
Management Board looked
into all aspects of a potential
merger and to see if it would
add value to the current mem-
bership of UFC.
“This is the biggest merger
we’ve been through,” Nielsen
said. He stated that WFS is
very strong in the areas of
livestock, fertilizer agrono-
my, farm equipment and en-
ergy. It also has hardware
stores and sells lawnmowers,
ATVs and snowmobiles.
Nielsen said that in most
recent years WFS sales have
been at about the $52 million
mark while UFC has been at
about $254 million.
“After several meetings
and close evaluation, it was
clear to the Board that this
would add value for the pa-
trons of both entities,”
Nielsen said.
He explained that the struc-
ture of the merger would
honor the equity of WFS and
bring all of its assets into the
UFC organization. Because
UFC would be acquiring
those assets, it was necessary
for the WFS members to vote
on the merger.
The UFC Board represent-
ed its membership and, be-
cause the membership was
not affected by the merger, no
vote by the UFC membership
was required.
“There is no change for the
UFC members except for
having a stronger company,”
Nielsen said.
The period between April 1
and August 31 will be one of
transition and getting every-
thing in order for the merger.
Audits will be conducted
for both cooperatives. “All
assets, inventory and property
will be transferred to UFC in
a structured and orderly fash-
ion,” Nielsen said. “During
the summer, UFC will be
working with WFS employ-
ees to bring the two coopera-
tives together.”
Nielsen said this was much
like the Ag-Land merger of a
few years ago.
“We are very excited about
the future,” he said. “This
greatly enhances UFC’s
strength in the marketplace.
The merger adds value for
our membership with the ad-
ditional equipment, products
and services we can supply to
our farmers and customers.
At the same time we are re-
turning profits back to our
member-owners.”
The addition of WFS will
make UFC one of the largest
feed operations in the Mid-
west.
In the area of agronomy,
Nielsen said WFS relied on
UFC to store much of
its fertilizer in years past.
He said this merger enhances
that relationship and allows
UFC to spread that cost over
a greater area.
It also provides a wider
base in energy and LP sales.
Nielsen said it spreads out the
risk with WFS located in a
more urban setting.
“Currently, if we do not
have to dry a lot of corn, we
don’t sell as much LP,” he
said.
UFC will also benefit from
WFS’s leadership in recre-
ational vehicle and lawn-
mower sales.
About 40 percent of WFS
membership had equity in
both cooperatives.
Nielsen said he has been
asked on several occasions
why get involved in a merger
like this.
“In rural Minnesota, if a
neighbor has a tree go down,
you go and help them,” he
said. “A cooperative called us
looking for help. We took a
look at the situation and
found out it would be benefi-
cial for both parties.
“We did an incredible
amount of study on this
merger and if it wasn’t going
to add value to our coopera-
tive, we wouldn’t do it.”
Waconia Farm Supply’s overwhelming votes to
become part of United Farmers Cooperative
“A shift away from unlimit-
ed antlerless harvest to an in-
tensive designation reflects
recent survey results but con-
tinues our focus on managing
densities while the area is still
under CWD surveillance,”
said Leslie McInenly, DNR
big game program coordina-
tor.
In east-central Minnesota,
1,092 samples were collected
during the opening weekend
of the firearm deer season. In
the north metro area, 180 deer
that were killed by vehicles,
removed through city deer re-
duction permits or harvested
by archery hunters in the both
Ramsey and Anoka counties
were tested.
“The thousands of hunters
who willingly donated a sam-
ple for the disease surveil-
lance effort make these tests
possible,” Carstensen said.
“We appreciate hunter com-
mitment to ensuring the health
of Minnesota’s wild deer pop-
ulation and the help of the
Minnesota Deer Hunters As-
sociation, both of which make
DNR disease surveillance ef-
forts much easier.”
Deer Continued from page 6
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 18, 2013, page 9
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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Local Representative
Leah Schrupp
Arlington, MN 55307
612-308-8169
3 miles North of LeSueur
on Highway 169
30945 Forest Prairie Road
(507) 665-3126
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We offer traditional funeral options and cremation as well
as honoring all family wishes. Did you know that some
families have a traditional visitation and funeral and then
cremation? We also provide Irrevocable Funeral Trusts so the
monies can be sheltered in the event of an extended nursing
home stay.
Feel free to contact us for a no obligation visit. Pre-
planning and possibly pre-funded final expenses can relieve
family stress and even save money.
Visit our web site at www.koldenfuneralhome.com for
more information and current obituaries.
Directors:
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Blessings
[ Christ Crucified Is God’s Power and Wisdom ] For the message of the cross
is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the
power of God. 1 Corinthians 1:18 NIV
Zion Lutheran Church (ELCA)
814 W Brooks St, Arlington • 507-964-5454
Pastor James Carlson
Worship: Sunday 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School/Fellowship 10:00 a.m.
Commercial and Industrial Builders
Green Isle, MN 55338
ph. 507.326.7901 fax: 507.326.3551
www.vosconstruction.com
Arlington State Bank
Serving the Community Since 1895
BANKING SERVICES
964-2256
Arlington
A & N Radiator Repair
Allen & Nicki Scharn, Owners
23228 401 Ave., Arlington
877-964-2281 or 507-964-2281 Bus.
Certified ASE Technician on Staff
Also distributor for Poxy Coat II
Industrial Grade Coatings/Paint
MID-COUNTY
CO-OP
700 W. Lake St., Box 177
Cologne, MN 55322
(952) 466-3700
or TOLL FREE: 1-888-466-3700
HUTCHINSON CO-OP
AGRONOMY
LEON DOSE,
Arlington Branch Manager
411 7
th
Ave. NW • (507) 964-2251
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
402 W. Alden, Arlington
507-964-5547
Online at
www.Arlington
MNnew.com
Arlington Haus
Your Hometown Pub & Eatery
1986-2009
Arlington • 1-507-964-2473
STATE BANK OF
HAMBURG
100 Years. 100 Reasons.
Phone 952-467-2992
statebankofhamburg.com
CONVENIENCE
STORE
Hwy. 5 N., Arlington
507-964-2920
Homestyle Pizza
Real or Soft Serve Ice Cream
Gas – Diesel – Deli – Videos
(507)
964-2212
www.
chefcraigs
.com
23180 401 Ave., Arlington Phone 507-964-2264
EQUAL
HOUSING
LENDER
CRAIG BULLERT
ARLINGTON, MN
23189 Hwy. 5 North,
Arlington, MN 55307
arlington@hutchcoop.com
Office (507) 964-2283
Cell (320) 583-4324
HC
FUNERAL SERVICE
P.O. Box 314
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-2201
Member
FDIC
Church News
ST. PAUL’S UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Henderson
(507) 248-3594 (Office)
Rev. Brigit Stevens, Pastor
Find us on Facebook:
St. Paul’s UCC - Henderson
Sunday, April 21: 10:00 a.m.
Worship. 10:20 a.m. Sunday
school (Preschool to 6th).
ST. MARY, MICHAEL
AND BRENDAN AREA
FAITH COMMUNITY
Fr. Keith Salisbury, Pastor
Friday, April 19: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar). 4:30 to 8:00 p.m.
Jump For Joy (Mar).
Saturday, April 20: 5:00 pm.
Mass (Mar).
Sunday, April 21: 7:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m. Elemen-
tary religious education (Mar);
Mass (Mic). 10:30 a.m. Mass
(Mar).
Monday, April 22: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar). 8:00 p.m.
AA and AlaNon (Mar).
Tuesday, April 23: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar).
Wednesday, April 24: 7:30
a.m. Mass (Mar). 8:30 a. m.
Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m. Word and
Communion (Oak Terrace). 7:00
p.m. Jr./Sr. high religious educa-
tion (Mar), last class.
Thursday, April 25: 7:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar). 8:30 a.m. Mass
(Bre and Mic) .9:00 a.m. Scrip-
ture study (Srs. residence in
Gaylord). 7:30 p.m. Narcotics
Anonymous (Mic).
TRINITY LUTHERAN
32234 431st Ave., Gaylord
Rev. James Snyder,
Interim Pastor
Sunday, April 21: 9:30 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:45 a.m. Fel-
lowship. 10:30 a.m. Worship.
Wednesday, April 24: 6:00
p.m. Confirmation at St. Paul’s.
7:15 p.m. Trinity Men’s Fellow-
ship.
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Pastor William Postel
Phone 507-964-2400
Saturday, April 20: 9:00 a.m.
LLL district convention, St.
John’s, Chaska.
Sunday, April 21: 9:00 a.m.
Bible class. 10:00 a.m. Worship.
4:00 to 7:00 p.m. Pancake sup-
per.
Monday, April 22: 7:00 p.m.
Quarterly voters’ meeting.
Thursday, April 25: 9:00 a.m.
Pastors’ Winkle, Immanuel,
Courtland. 5:30 p.m. Deadline
for bulletin and calendar infor-
mation.
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN
Green Isle
Friday, April 19: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, April 21: 7:45 a.m.
Worship without Communion.
Pastor Bob Hines. 9:00 a.m.
Voters’ meeting; Sunday school.
Wednesday, April 24: 3:45
p.m. Confirmation at Peace
Lutheran, Arlington. 6:30 to
7:30 p.m. Wednesday school for
grades 1 to 5 at St. Paul’s. 8:00
p.m. Joint choir practice at St.
Paul’s.
Thursday, April 25: 6:00 p.m.
Deadline for May activities cal-
endar.
PEACE LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Kurt Lehmkuhl, Pastor
Sunday, April 21: 8:15 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:30 a.m. Wor-
ship service with Holy Com-
munion.
Monday, April 22: 7:00 p.m.
Bible study and Guild meeting.
Wednesday, April 24: 3:45
p.m. Catechism. 5:00 p.m. Juni-
or Bell Choir.
ZION LUTHERAN
814 W. Brooks St.
Arlington – (507) 964-5454
James Carlson, Pastor
Sunday, April 21: 8:00 a.m.
Choir. 9:00 a.m. Worship. 10:00
a.m. Sunday school and fellow-
ship.
Tuesday, April 23: 6:00 to
7:00 p.m. TOPS in church base-
ment. 9:00 a. m. Newsletter
deadline.
Wednesday, April 24: 3:45
p.m. 7th grade confirmation.
4:30 p.m. 8th grade confirma-
tion. 7:00 p. m. Stewardship
meeting.
Thursday, April 25: 9:00 a.m.
and 1:00 p.m. Zion service on
cable.
ZION LUTHERAN
Green Isle Township
Friday, April 19: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, April 21: 9:00 a.m.
Worship with Communion. Pas-
tor Bob Hines.
Wednesday, April 24: 3:45
p. m. Confirmation at Peace
Lutheran, Arlington. 6:30 to
7:30 p.m. Wednesday school for
grades 1 to 5 at St. Paul’s. 8:00
p.m. Joint choir practice at St.
Paul’s.
Thursday, April 25: 6:00 pm.
Deadline for May activities cal-
endar.
CREEKSIDE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Christian & Missionary
Alliance
Ben Lane, Pastor
114 Shamrock Drive
Arlington – 507-964-2872
www.creekside-church.com
email: creeksidecc@media-
combb.net.
Thursday, April 18: 1:00 or
7:00 p.m. Women’s Bible study
- Experiencing God. 6:30 p.m.
Men’s Bible study of Luke at
Oak Terrace in Gaylord.
Saturday, April 20: 10:00 a.m.
to 12;00 noon, HTM Mobile
Food Shelf, open to all.
Sunday, April 21: 10:30 a.m.
Worship service with Sunday
school.
Wednesday, April 24: 6:30 to
8:00 p.m. Kids club for 4-year-
olds - 6th graders. 7:00 to 8:30
p.m. REACH Youth Group at
Shogren’s.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
(507) 304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
507-234-6770
Saturday: Church services at
9:30 a.m. Bible study at 11:00
a.m. Fellowship dinner at 12:00
p.m. All are welcome.
UNITED METHODIST
Arlington
Wayne Swanson, Pastor
www.arlingtonunited
methodist.org
Saturday, April 20: 8:00 a.m.
A-Men men’s group.
Sunday, April 21: 9:00 and
11:00 a.m. Worship. 10:15 a.m.
Sunday school. 6:30 p.m. Par-
enting series.
Monday, April 22: Deadline
for May newsletter.
Wednesday, April 24: 7:00
p.m. Confirmation and choir.
Thursday, April 25: 10:00
a.m., 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. Wor-
ship on cable TV. 1:00 and 7:00
p. m. Bible study at Jean
Olson’s.
EVANGELICAL
COVENANT CHURCH
107 W. Third St., Winthrop
Pastor Kyle Kachelmeier
507-647-5777
Parsonage 507-647-3739
www.wincov.org
Saturday, April 20: 9:00 a.m.
Clothes closet open until noon.
10:00 a.m. Food cupboard open
until noon.
Sunday, April 21: 9:30 a.m.
Worship. 10:45 a.m. Sunday
school.
Monday, April 22: 5:00 p.m.
Exercise.
Wednesday. April 24: 9:00
a.m. Prayer coffee.
Thursday, April 25: 9:30 a.m.
Women’s Bible study. 4:30 p.m.
Exercise. 7:00 p. m. Men’s
group.
ST. PAUL LUTHERAN
(WELS),
Arlington
Bruce Hannemann, Pastor
WEBSITE:
www.stpaularlington.com
EMAIL:
Bruce.Hannemann@stpaul
arlington.com
Sunday, April 21: 8:45 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:00 a.m. Fami-
ly Bible study. 10:00 a.m. Wor-
ship. Devotion Book door offer-
ing. Fellowship - Education
Outreach Committee.
Monday, April 22: 10:00 a.m.
Calendar information due. 7:30
p.m. Mission Society.
Tuesday, April 23: 6:00 p.m.
Counting Committee. 7:00 p.m.
Adult Bible course at school.
Wednesday, April 24: 2:00
p.m. Bible study. 3:45 p.m. Pub-
lic school confirmation class.
8:00 p.m. Finance Board.
Thursday, April 25: 10:00
a.m. Bulletin information due.
11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Serv-
ice on cable TV, channel 8.
GAYLORD ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
Gaylord
Bob Holmbeck, Pastor
Friday, April 19: Shakopee
women’s prison visit. 4:00 p.m.
Leave church. 6:30 p.m.
Thomas Bible study, 8510 Penn
Ave., Bloomington.
Sunday, April 21: 9:00 a.m.
Sunday school. 10:00 a.m. Sun-
day worship service.
Wednesday, April 24: 6:30
p.m. Evening Bible classes and
Youth Focused.
ST. PAUL’S EV.
REFORMED CHURCH
15470 Co. Rd. 31, Hamburg
Dan Schnabel, Pastor
952-467-3878
www.stpaulsrcus.org
Sunday, April 21: 8:30 a.m.
Sunday school and adult Bible
study. 9:30 a.m. Worship serv-
ice. Choir practice after wor-
ship.
Wednesday, April 24: 6:30 to
8:00 p.m. Catechism class.
ORATORY OF
ST. THOMAS
THE APOSTLE
Jessenland
507-248-3550
Fr. Sam Perez
Thursday: Weekly Mass at
5:00 pm.
The Creekside Commu-
nity Church, 114 Shamrock
Drive in Arlington, invites
the community for a free
night of gospel worship
with Still Water at 7 p.m.
Thursday, April 25.
Founded in 1994, Still
Water has brought their
unique talents and ministry
to folks all across the coun-
try.
The Lord has blessed
Still Water in many ways
and taken them many miles
to deliver the message of
Jesus Christ.
A Still Water concert is
far more than just rich vo-
cals and wonderful arrange-
ments. It is a time of spirit
filled ministry. Their blend
of transitional southern
gospel styling with modern
harmonies has had an im-
pact on audiences in just
about every setting one
could imagine.
A love offering will be
taken to support Still Water.
For more information,
visit their website at
www.stillwaterinc.org.
Still Water in concert at Creekside
1-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION FORM
Minnesota addresses
$
33 a year
Outside Minnesota Addresses
$
38 a year
Name __________________________________________
Mailing Address __________________________________
City/State/Zip ____________________________________
Please Indicate:
______NEW ______ RENEWAL
We accept Visa and Mastercard
Mail or drop off this form to:
Arlington ENTERPRISE
402 West Alden Street, P.O. Box 388 • Arlington, MN 55307
Phone 507-964-5547 FAX 507-964-2423
Amount Enclosed
$
1-Year Subscription
Get your subscription to the
Arlington ENTERPRISE
Your source for local news,
sports and entertainment!
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 18, 2013, page 10
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
LIES KE TRAC TOR
Want ed: Your OLD TRAC TORS,
any con di tion, make or mod el. We
also spe cial ize in new and used
TRAC TOR PARTS AND RE PAIR.
Call Kyle. Lo cat ed west of Hen -
der son. (612) 203-9256.
$$ DOL LARS PAID $$ Junk ve -
hi cl es, re pai r abl e cars/trucks.
FREE TOW ING. Flatbed/ wreck er
serv ice. Im me diate pick up. Mon -
day-Sun day, serv ing your area
24/7. (952) 220-TOWS.
1,200 Cow dairy farm in Wa ver ly,
MN is cur rent ly seek ing to fill a
farm main tenance po si tion. Will be
re spon si ble for per form ing pre ven -
tive and gen er al main tenance on
farm equip ment and build ings. Will
also help with field work and ma -
nure haul ing. Pri or work ex peri -
ence re quired. Must be able to
weld. Must be able to op er ate pay -
load ers,skid steers and trac tors.
CDL a plus. Call (763) 658-4877
or stop by bet ween 7 a.m.-5 p.m.
Mon day through Fri day. Wood land
Dairy, Wa ver ly, MN.
CON KLIN® DEAL ERS NEED ED!
Life time ca reer in mar ket ing, man -
age ment and ap ply ing “Green”
pro ducts made in Amer i ca. Full
time/ part time. For a free cat a log,
call Franke’s Con klin Serv ice now
at (320) 238-2370. www.frank e -
mar ket ing.com.
Driv ers want ed. Class A or B CDL
re quired. Call (952) 657-1181 or
emai l ex per tasphal ti nc@gmai l
com for ap pli ca tion.
Gold en Hearts As sist ed Liv ing is
tak ing ap pli ca tion for the fol low ing
per son al care at tend ant j obs:
Bath ing Care giv er, Tues day and
Fri day morn ings; Per son al Care -
giv er, two po si tions. Mon day- Sun -
day morn ings. (Shifts al ter nate to
in clude eve ry oth er wee kend.);
Per son al Care giv er, two po si tions.
Mon day- Sun day af ter noon/even -
ing. (Shifts al ter nate to in clude
eve ry oth er wee kend.) Ap ply in
per son at 602 Mari on Drive, Ar -
ling ton.
HAND Y MAN: Will do re mo del ing
of kitch ens, bath rooms, hang ing
doors and wi nd ows, pai nt i ng,
sheet rock ing, tex tur iz ing or any
minor re pairs in side or out side.
Wi l l al so do cl ean i ng of base -
ments/ga rag es. Call (320) 848-
2722 or (320) 583-1278.
Spe cial- 95% Good man gas fur nace
and pro gram ma bl e ther mo stat
$2,200 in stalled or AC unit $1,900
in stalled. J&R Plumb ing Heat ing AC,
Lester Prair ie (320) 510-5035.
Ko dak al l -i n-one pri nt er, $25.
(320) 327-2541.
Min ne so ta Twins sea son tick ets
for 2013 sea son. Sec ti on 121
seats. Pack age in cludes 2 seats.
5, 10 or 15 game pack ag es avail -
able. Con tact Rick at (952) 224-
6331 for more in for ma tion.
OLD MO TOR CY CLES WANT ED:
Cash paid, pre fer ably non run ning
con di tion, ti tle or no ti tle, Hon da,
Su zu ki, Ka wa sa ki, Ya ma ha, Tri -
umph and oth er makes. Please
call Dar ick at 507-381-3405.
BUY ING JUNK BAT TER IES
We buy used bat ter ies and lead
weights. Pay ing top dol lar for junk
bat ter ies. Pay ing $12 for au to mo tive
bat ter ies We pick up with 18 bat tery
min i mum. Call 800-777-2243.
Want ed to buy: Junk cars and
trucks. Com peti tive pric ing with
friend ly serv ice. Tow ing avail able.
Call an y time (320) 296-2253.
WANT ED TO BUY: Old signs all
types, farm primi tive paint ed fur ni -
ture all types, cup boards, cub by
units, lock er and pool wire bas -
kets, wood & metal piec es with
lots of draw ers, old pre-1960 holi -
day dec o ra tions, in dus tri al/school
items such as metal racks, stools,
work bench es, light n ing rods and
balls, weath er vanes, ar chi tec tur al
items like cor bels and stain glass
wind ows. We buy one item and
en tire es tates. Don’t get a dump -
ster un til you call us first! We are
lo cal. (612) 590-6136.
Zero down RHA fi nanc ing is avail -
able for this prop er ty. 11798 155th
St., Glen coe. Hob by farm for sale.
6 +/- acr es, beau ti ful 4BR home.
Very new out bui l d i ngs. MLS#
4338091, $275,000. Con tact me
for a pri vate show ing. Paul Krueg -
er, Edi na Re al ty, (612) 328-4506,
Paul Krueg er@edi nare al ty.com.
1120 Grove Ave., Bi rd Is l and.
4BR, 3BA home on 2 l ots.
$119,000. Pool table and all ap -
plianc es in clud ed. (320) 296-1603.
Home for sale by own er. 3BR,
2BA, AC, large lot in Ar ling ton,
wood fire place, $119,000. (507)
380-1967 or (507) 964-2946.
Ar ling ton: Great start er home. 2BR,
2BA, new kitch en, fur nace wa ter
heat er, new heat ed ga rage. Con -
tract for deed pos si bl e, FSBO,
$70,000/BO. (952) 486-3342.
2BR Apart ment wi th ga rage, wa -
ter/sew er/gar bage in clud ed. $450/mo.
New Au burn (320) 327-2928.
Avail able soon. 2BR/2BA. Laun dry
in apart ment. Ga rage avail able.
Gay lord. Call 800-873-1736 Am -
ber Field Place Apart ment.
Newly remodeled apartments for
rent i n Renvi l l e. Water, heat,
garbage included. New appliances,
air conditioners. (320) 564-3351.
Avai l abl e soon. 1BR and
2BR/2BA, laun dry in apart ment.
Ga rage avail able. Ar ling ton. Call
800-873-1736, Am ber Field Place
Apart ment.
Glen coe Towns Edge Es tates has
a 2BR & 3BR avail able soon. In -
cludes heat, wa ter, gar bage and
sew er. We ac cept cats and small
dogs. (320) 864-6600.
Com mer cial Build ing avail able
now! 900 sq. ft. down town Gay -
lord. Call Sar ah at (507) 237-5339
days, (507) 237-4166 even ings.
Sacred Heart, 205 Har ri son St.
Ni ce 2BR, 1BA, si n gl e fam i l y
1,359 sq. ft. , de tached ga rage.
Lease op tion or cash. $250 down,
$217/mo. (803) 978-1542.
For rent in Ar ling ton. New ly re mo -
deled 2BR main floor of house.
Sun porch, must see. $675. Call
(507) 381-1463.
RE MEM BER THE PAST Spring
Vin tage Oc ca sion al Sale, lo cat ed
in the Hutchin son Mall, April 17-
21. Hours: Wed nes day-Fri day, 10
a.m.- 8 p.m.; Sat ur day, 10 a.m.- 6
p.m.; Sun day, 12 p.m.- 5 p.m. Fur -
ni ture, home decor, linens, yard
and gar den, col l ect i bl es and
unique treas ures. (320) 583-9519
Buy ing and Sell ing.
CUS TOM LOG SAW ING- Cut at
your place or ours. White oak lum -
ber deck ing and fire wood. Give
Vir gil a call. Schau er Con struc tion,
Inc. (320) 864-4453.
LIMO/ PAR TY BUS. Wed dings,
busi ness, sports, birth days, etc.
Check us out www.theur ba nex -
press.com or call Dina (612) 940-
2184, Gl en coe busi ness. DOT
375227.
AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
AUTOMOTIVE
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
Work Wanted
FOR SALE
Heating/Air Cond.
Household Goods
Miscellaneous
Wanted To Buy
REAL ESTATE
Hobby Farm
Houses
RENTAL
Apartment
Business, Office
House
SALES
Sales
SERVICES
Misc. Service
RENTAL
Apartment
SERVICES
Misc. Service
Classifieds
ADD ANOTHER PAPER
FOR ONLY
$
2.00 PER PAPER
(based on first week pricing)
The McLeod
County Chronicle
Silver Lake Leader
The Glencoe
Advertiser
The Sibley Shopper
Arlington Enterprise
The Galaxy
3-WEEK SPECIAL: ONE WEEK:
$
15
80
2
nd
Week 1/2 Price
3
rd
Week FREE
McLeod
Publishing
All Six Papers Reach Over 50,000 Readers Weekly in over 33 Communities
For 20 words, one time in
ANY TWO PAPERS and on the internet.
30¢ per word after first 20 words.
AGRICULTURE AUTOMOTIVE EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE LIVESTOCK
& PETS
LIVESTOCK
& PETS
REAL ESTATE SERVICES RENTAL RENTAL
All ads appear online
at GlencoeNews.com
Enterprise
To place an ad: Call: 507-964-5547; Fax: 507-964-2423; E-Mail: info@ArlingtonMNnews.com; Mail: P.O. Box 388, Arlington, MN 55307
Advertising
Deadlines
The McLeod County Chronicle Mondays at Noon
The Arlington Enterprise & The Silver Lake Leader Tuesdays at Noon
The Glencoe Advertiser, The Sibley Shopper
& The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
Available...
1-Bedroom
Apartment
All utilities,
except electric
Income based
Must be 62 or older
or handicapped
Highland Commons
Arlington
507-964-5556 HANDICAP
ACCESSIBLE
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Commercial
Building and
Business
Opportunity
Call (507) 964-2256
A10-13E,11-14Sa
WANTED: LIFE AGENTS
Earn $500 a day, great agent benefits.
Commissions paid daily. Liberal under-
writing. Leads, leads, leads. Life insur-
ance license required. Call 888/713-6020
DRIVERS/OWNER OPERATORS
wanted. Contact 540/280-0194. In-
dustry leading rates, 90% of line
haul rate. 100% of fuel surcharge.
INVESTORS
Copyrighted smart phone technology.
Ground floor of a possible IPO. $5,000
min.- $25,000 max. investment. 1360 Uni-
versity Ave, Suite 232, St. Paul, MN 55104.
CASH FOR CARS:
All cars/trucks wanted. Running or not! Top
dollar paid. We come to you! Any make/
model. Call for instant offer: 800/871-9145
SAWMILLS
from only $3,997.00 - Make & save
money with your own bandmill - cut
lumber any dimension. In stock ready
to ship. Free info/DVD: 800/578-1363
Ext. 300N www.NorwoodSawmills.com
DISH NETWORK
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
high speed internet starting at $14.95/month
(where available). Save! Ask about same
day installation! Call now! 866/785-5167
DONATE YOUR CAR
Truck or Boat to heritage for the blind. Free
3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing,
all paperwork taken care of 888/485-0398
PROTECT YOUR IRA
and 401(k) from inflation by owning
physical gold or silver! Tax-free, has-
sle-free rollovers. Free “Gold Guide”
American Bullion, 800/527-5679
CANADA DRUG CENTER
is your choice for safe and affordable med-
ications. Our licensed Canadian mail order
pharmacy will provide you with savings of
up to 75% on all your medication needs.
Call today 800/259-1096 for $10.00 off
your first prescription and free shipping.
EVER CONSIDER
A REVERSE MORTGAGE?
At least 62 years old? Stay in your
home & increase cash flow! Safe
& effective! Call now for your free
DVD! Call now 888/610-4971
MISCELLANEOUS AUTOS WANTED HELP WANTED - SALES
MISCELLANEOUS
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
HELP WANTED - DRIVERS
Advertise here statewide
in 270 newspapers
for onLy $249 per week!
Cal 800-279-2979
SUPER CLEAN, BLUE JEAN JOBS!
in partnership with
is seeking candidates for the following positions:
Production Workers -
Assemble & solder components.
Inspect, trim, label & package assembled parts.
Molding Machine Operators -
Operate rubber & plastic molding machines,
trim products using a hand held grinder, label,
package, apply hardware & decals.
1st shift – 7a-3:30p Mon.-Fri.
Competitive wages & weekly pay.
For immediate consideration, please call
to schedule an appt (320) 587-0400 or email
resume to: tkorson@theworkconnection.com
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JOB POSTING
The City of Arlington is currently accepting applica-
tions for a full-time Maintenance Supervisor in the Pub-
lic Works Department. The position oversees operation
of the City’s streets, parks, cemetery, and grounds. The
position is responsible for budget development and su-
pervision of subordinates. The position is responsible for
performing various types of semi-skilled and skilled
labor and the operation of light to medium equipment
involved in the repair and maintenance of the City
streets, parks, and other municipal property.
Minimum Qualifications: High School Diploma or
G.E.D. plus two years of public works or related experi-
ence. Must possess and maintain a valid Minnesota
Class “B” or higher CDL or the ability to obtain one in
one month. Must possess and maintain a valid Class “C”
Boiler’s License or the ability to obtain one in one year.
Must possess and maintain a valid license for pesticide,
herbicide, and insecticide application or obtain one in
one year. Salary:
$
14.95 -
$
20.92/hour plus benefits.
For required application and job description, go online
at www.arlingtonmn.com or contact Arlington City Of-
fices, 204 Shamrock Drive, Arlington, MN 55307, (507)
964-2378. Cover letters, resume and applications are
due to the Interim City Administrator no later than 4:00
p.m. on May 3, 2013.
The City of Arlington is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
A15-16E,16-17AGa
LOOKING FOR A
PART-TIME JOB?
Come join our team at
HICR and work with
adults with developmental
disabilities.
We have an opening
for every other
weekend and fill-in
shifts as available.
Call Sue for an
appointment at
507-964-5984
A15-16E16-17ASa
Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington
is seeking the following positions:
• Full-Time Benefit eligible LPN/RN –
evening shifts with every other weekend
Hiring Bonus up to
$
500 for Full-Time
LPN/RN position
• LPN/RN - every other weekend with potential to pick
up more hours
• Resource On-Call/Universal Worker for Assisted Living,
must be 18 years of age
• Part-Time Dietary Position - includes every other
weekend/holiday
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information,
call Tiffany Brockhoff,
Human Resource Director at
507-964-2251 or email:
tbrockof@good-sam.com
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap Drug-Free Workplace
Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life.
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OAK TERRACE
Healthcare Center of Gaylord
has openings in the following positions:
OAK TERRACE HEALTH CARE SKILLED NURSING FACILITY
RN/LPN:
• 64 hours a pay period combination evening and
over night shifts.
• Benefit eligible position.

$
2.00 eve. and
$
3.00 over night shift differential.
OAK TERRACE DIETARY
COOK/AIDE:
• Position is Resource/On Call
Please contact us for more information.
OAK TERRACE ASSISTED ACTIVITY DEPARTMENT
AIDE:
• Position is every other weekend 1-5 p.m.
• Looking for an energetic individual who enjoys
working with the Elderly
• Duties would include leading a variety of
activities throughout the facility.
Applications are available at:
640 Third St., Gaylord, MN
Or online at www.oakterraceliving.com
For further information, contact
Human Resources at 507-237-8703.
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This document is © 2013 by admin - all rights reserved.