4-25-13 Arlington Enterprise

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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Serving the Communities of Arlington and Green Isle, Minnesota
www.arlingtonmnnews.com Volume 129 • Number 43 • Thursday, April 25, 2013 • Arlington, MN 55307
Single copy $1.00
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East Public
Schools have received a total
of 17 applications for the
senior high principal posi-
tion which is open for the
2013-14 school year. The
deadline for applications
was Friday, April 19.
Current Sibley East Senior
High Principal and incoming
Superintendent Jim Amsden
reported the news to the Ar-
lington Enterprise on Mon-
day morning, April 22.
Amsden was recently
hired as the new superin-
tendent and will assume
those duties on July 1. His
current position as senior
high principal has now be-
come open.
The Sibley East adminis-
tration and at least two
School Board members were
expected to review the appli-
cations and select candidates
for written questions from
3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mon-
day, April 22.
These candidates are ex-
pected to submit the answers
to these questions from
Tuesday, April 23 through
Monday, April 29.
The Sibley East adminis-
tration and at least two
School Board members, dur-
ing a meeting from 3:30
p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday,
April 30, will select six fi-
nalists to be interviewed.
The Sibley East adminis-
tration, entire School Board,
teachers and office staff will
interview the six finalists
throughout the day on Mon-
day, May 6. The two finalists
will be determined during a
meeting from 3:45 p.m. to
4:45 p.m. Monday, May 6.
The Sibley East adminis-
tration and entire School
Board will interview the two
finalists on Monday evening,
May 13.
The School Board will se-
lect a final candidate during
a special meeting at 8 p.m.
Monday, May 13.
The School Board is ex-
pected to approve a contract
for the new principal during
a regular meeting at 6:30
p.m. Monday, May 20.
SE receives 17 applications for senior high principal position
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington City Coun-
cil, during a special meeting
on Saturday afternoon, April
20, unanimously approved a
motion to offer the open city
administrator position to Liza
M. Donabauer.
The City Council made the
move after interviews with
candidates on Friday after-
noon, April 19 and Saturday
morning, April 20.
Donabauer has accepted
the offer, Mayor Jim Kreft
told the Arlington Enterprise
on Tuesday morning, April
23.
Donabauer, according to
Kreft, will begin her new du-
ties on Tuesday, June 4.
The City Council was ex-
pected to formally approve a
contract and hire Donabauer
during a special meeting on
Wednesday night, April 24,
Kreft said.
Donabauer graduated from
the University of Wisconsin
at Stout in Menomonie, Wis.,
where she earned a Bachelor
of Science Degree in Busi-
ness Administration.
She was the office manag-
er/executive assistant to the
president at Hunerberg Con-
struction, LLC in Plymouth
from 1997 to 2000. Don-
abauer was the office admin-
istrator/systems and services
controller at Klein Under-
ground, LLC in Watertown
from 2000 to 2005. She was
also the recording secretary
for the City of Minnetrista,
Medina and Long Lake from
2004 to 2005. Donabauer was
the executive assistant at
Granite Financial, Inc. in St.
Cloud from 2005 to 2007.
She was also the administra-
tive clerk to the county coor-
dinator for Wright County in
Buffalo from January 2007 to
July 2011. In addition, she
has been the city clerk for the
City of Clearwater in Kansas
from July 2011 to the present
time.
In addition to Donabauer,
the other finalists were James
Rosenthal, Dana Hedberg,
Scott Weske and Kerry Ve-
nier.
History
The Arlington City Coun-
cil, during its regular meeting
on Tuesday night, Jan. 22,
unanimously approved a mo-
tion to approve a proposal
from Brimeyer Fursman,
LLC, Maplewood, to conduct
an executive search for a new
administrator for the City of
Arlington.
The City Council made the
move after it had earlier and
unanimously accepted the
resignation of City Adminis-
trator Matt Jaunich effective
Friday, Feb. 8. Jaunich was
hired as the first ever Sibley
County administrator.
The cost for the executive
search will be $18,875.
The City Council, inciden-
tally, used Brimeyer Furs-
man, LLC, to conduct its
search for a new city admin-
istrator during 2007. Jaunich
was hired as a result of that
search.
City administrator position is offered and accepted
By Dave Pedersen
Coordinator
In order to decrease the
amount of late credit card fi-
nance charges, the Sibley
County Board of Commis-
sioners voted to change to a
new procurement card pro-
gram at the meeting on Tues-
day, April 23.
Mary Fisher, County Treas-
urer, presented a proposal that
also established card program
policies and procedures.
“The Sibley County pro-
curement card program is an
opportunity to reduce paper-
work, expedite the purchasing
process at the department
level and reduce administra-
tive expenses,” said Fisher.
“The process will allow the
county to realize significant
savings while providing an
efficient and effective method
to buy certain goods and
services.”
Fisher said the procurement
program involves MasterCard
and is used by school districts
and other counties. She added
that the billing process should
become smoother and bills
will still be approved by the
board.
Rules and procedures for
card use are still important
and cards can be suspended if
claims are not turned in on
time.
“If department heads hand
out a card to be used by a
staff member they will need
to establish a checkout poli-
cy,” said Fisher. “Eventually,
we can set up ghost accounts
to streamline the process even
more.”
The only hang-up is the
clause saying the county must
waive the right to a jury trial.
County Attorney David
Schauer was not comfortable
with that idea of giving up a
right and does not see why it
has to be included. The com-
pany is checking if the rule
can be taken away.
The board voted to approve
the program contingent on the
county attorney giving it his
approval. There is a four to
six-week wait before the pro-
gram can start, which is ex-
pected to be in early June.
County Commissioner Bill
Pinske said the program “will
do wonders for my blood
pressure.”
Train Viewers
• In other business, County
Commissioner Jim Swanson
received an e-mail from
Shannon Fisher from the
Minnesota River Board. The
e-mail asked if the county
would be willing to commit
to spending at least $1,000
for a start up fee regarding a
new class at Ridgewater Col-
lege in Willmar that would
train viewers for determining
of benefits with county ditch
projects.
There is a current shortage
of viewers in the 10-county
area. If more than the 10
counties agree to the start up
fee, then the cost could be
lower.
By contributing, Sibley
County would have priority if
in need for a certified viewer.
Pinske suggested checking
with the Rush River water
group to see if their funds can
be used for this project since
it involves ditch water.
The board members agreed
to say they would support the
viewer class and will vote on
an official resolution at the
next meeting.
Hiring
• The board approved the
hiring of Joseph Savage,
Deputy/Assistant Emergency
Management Director, a part-
time position mandated by
the state.
• The resignation of Tony
Voigt from the public works
department was accepted as
was the resignation of Marlo
Lepel from public health and
human services.
• Employee recognition
was given to Marvin Doeden
for his retirement and to
Roseann Nagel, who was
named Human Resource Pro-
fessional of the Year.
• County Commissioner
Jim Nytes proposed the coun-
ty design a one-stop service
for requesting joint zoning
permits with the county and
Sibley County
Continued on page 3
County switches to a procurement credit card program as time, money saver
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Another April Snowstorm
The Arlington and Green Isle area received approxi-
mately 10 inches of snow late Thursday night, April 18
and early Friday morning, April 19. Arlington resident
Galen Wills operated his snowblower to remove snow
on the sidewalk along the 300 block of West Brooks
Street. Another three inches of snow fell on the area
late Monday night, April 22 and early Tuesday morn-
ing, April 23.
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
In his annual report to the
Sibley County board of com-
missioners, welfare fraud in-
vestigator Preston Cowing
said 85 to 90 percent of his
work involves fraud preven-
tion, not convictions.
The report was given at the
Tuesday, April 23 board
meeting where Cowing repre-
sents both Sibley and Brown
counties, making sure public
assistance is going out to the
people in the community who
need it.
“We don’t need to waste
our money on people who
don’t need the services,” said
Cowing. “However, there
have been a lot of changes
over the years regarding pub-
lic assistance, and after the
recent recession there are
more people needing assis-
tance.”
The welfare investigator
said he usually has two or
three criminal welfare cases
each year, where thousands
of dollars are recovered.
There are also several admin-
istrative disqualifications set-
tled out of court, saving the
counties money.
In 2012, the 13 Sibley
County welfare fraud cases
resulted in recovery of
$37,622.40. Between 1999
and 2012, there were 101
cases resulting in
$238,045.10 in recovered
fraud money.
The county is part of a
state collection network that
collects millions of dollars
from people who were not el-
igible. What Cowing does is
less about the criminal con-
victions, calling them the tip
of the iceberg.
“Most of the work I do is
like an iceberg, it is under-
neath the water,” said Cow-
ing. “I knock on doors and
try to make sure a client is
fully aware of our program
rules. We make clients aware
that they need to report any
changes in the household,
such as income or the people
living or not living in the
house.”
Cowing noted that in the
past three years he worked
with six or seven criminal
cases, but he closed 24 cases.
In 37 cases clients reported
changes after contact was ini-
tiated. Plus, the investigator
denied 10 cases because peo-
ple would not provide infor-
mation.
“You can see how these are
70 instances where there is a
huge change made in that as-
sistance unit, yet there were
only six criminal cases,” said
Cowing. “Fraud preventive
Welfare Fraud
Continued on page 3
Prevention efforts help control
Sibley County welfare fraud
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 25, 2013, page 2
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
VIEW US ONLINE AT
WWW.ARLINGTON
MNNEWS.COM
E-mail us at:
info@
arlingtonmnnews.com
Green Isle Fire 125
th
Anniversary Parade & 5k Run
July 13, 2013 5k Entry Fee:
$
20 Parade: FREE
Name: __________________________________________
Address: ________________________________________
City, State, ZIP: __________________________________
Phone: __________________________________________
Shirt Size: S M L XL
Circle One: 5k Kids Fun Run Parade
Register by June 30 to guarantee a free shirt.
5k and Kids Run Only, Not Parade.
Start Times:
Kids Run 11 a.m. • 5k Run Noon • Parade 1:30 p.m.
Mail entry form and payment to:
Green Isle Fire, Po Box 235, Green Isle MN 55338
Questions? Call 507-326-5941 for Parade or 5k info.
A15-16SAEa
Treasures
in the Attic
Antique Road Show with
Style Show Luncheon
Sat., April 27, 2013
10:00 a.m.
Arlington
Community Center
Adults:
$
8.00 • Under 10:
$
4.00
You are invited to bring a
knick-knack or heirloom.
Random selections will be
appraised by Carol Bode.
Sponsored by Sibley Medical Center Auxiliary.
Tickets at: SMC Clinics at Arlington, Gaylord,
Henderson & Winthrop; Morreim’s,
Arlington State Bank, and SMC Auxiliary members.
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Wednesday, May 1: Knights of Columbus Offi-
cers, St. Mary’s Parish Hall, 8 p.m.
Thursday, May 2: Arlington Ambulance Service,
7 p.m.
Arlington Lions Club, Arlington Haus, social 6
p.m., meeting 7 p.m.
Community
Calendar
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER
MAIN BANK
Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (straight thru)
DRIVE THRU
Monday - Thursday, 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.,
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Member
FDIC
Arlington State Bank
(507) 964-2256
Fax (507) 964-5550
www.ArlingtonStateBank.com
They are not gone until those who knew them forget to remember…
This Memorial Day,
Let us Pause and Reflect.
In the May 23 edition of the Arlington Enterprise and the
May 26 edition of the Sibley Shopper there will be a special
tribute to relatives and friends that have passed away.
You can place an “In Memoriam” ad in this special section
for only
$
10.60 for BOTH editions.
Or
$
7.50 for either the Shopper OR Enterprise.
Choose one of the following styles:
A. B.
C.
And choose one of the following symbols:
A. B. C.
Name of the deceased: ______________________________
Date of Death: ____________________________________
Name of person(s) dedicating memorial: ________________
________________________________________________
Paid by:__________________________________________
Example➔
Mail or drop off by Tues., May 21 to:
Arlington ENTERPRISE
/ Sibley Shopper
402 West Alden St., P.O. Box 388
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone 507-964-5547 FAX 507-964-2423
Hours: Mon.-Wed. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Thurs. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Fri. CLOSED
or e-mail your information to info@ArlingtonMNnews.com
In Memoriam
John Smith
who passed away May 5, 2009
Dearly missed by
his wife
and family

In loving memory of
John Smith
who passed away Dec. 18, 2005
Sadly missed by
wife, Jane Smith
Gone but not forgotten
John Smith
who passed away July 2, 2008
Dearly missed by
his wife
and family
Gone but not forgotten
John Smith
who passed away Jan. 8, 2008
Dearly missed by
his friends
Choose one of the
following options:
Arlington Enterprise
Sibley Shopper
BOTH
New Auburn Lions
Spring Fling
Breakfast
Brunch
Sunday, April 28
9:30am – 12:30pm
New Auburn City hall
Scrambled eggs with ham,
hashbrowns, homemade
muffins, coffee & milk
Adults
$
6; Children 10 & Under
$
5;
5 & Under FREE
Proceeds go to community projects.
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Thanks for the
frst, Jackie
Robinson.
Love,
Stubby
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Thank You
I would like to
thank the AGI
Women of Today
for the gift card I
won at your East-
er event.
Thanks for al l
the fun things you
do.
Cullen Dhaene
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News Briefs
Vehicle rolls into building
A vehicle reportedly struck The Quick Shop building
in Arlington at 1:40 p.m. Sunday, April 21, according to
the Arlington Police Department.
Sara M. Schultz, 33, Gaylord, parked her 2002 Dodge
in the parking lot at The Quick Shop and entered the
business, according to the report. Schultz reportedly did
not get the shift lever completely into the park position
and the vehicle rolled into the front of the building, the
report said.
There were paint markings on the building, but no
other damage to the store, according to the report.
Mailboxes are vandalized
The Sibley County Sheriff’s Department received re-
ports that three mailboxes were reportedly vandalized in
Dryden and New Auburn townships over the weekend.
The vandalism occurred at the Wallace Carlson and
Marcee Panning residences in Dryden Township and at
the Orlin Piescke residence in New Auburn Township.
Damage to the mailboxes was estimated at $200 each.
Individuals who have any information about these
vandalism incidents are encouraged to contact the Sib-
ley County Sheriff’s Department at 507-237-4330.
Vehicle found in ditch
A deputy from the Sibley County Sheriff’s Depart-
ment was patrolling east on Highway 19 and observed a
blue Dodge Ram 1500 stuck in a field, according to a
news release from the sheriff’s department.
By the tire tracks in the snow it looked like the driver
reportedly lost control of the vehicle and it entered the
ditch. The vehicle reportedly struck a mailbox and ad-
dress marker near County Road 4 and Highway 19, then
continued on down the ditch and became stuck in the
mud at the edge of a field.
The driver was identified by driver’s license as Timo-
thy L. Perkins, 19, Red Wing.
Martha Voight turns 102
Martha Voight, a resident at the Good Samaritan So-
ciety - Arlington, celebrated her 102nd birthday on
Tuesday, April 23.
Martha has one son, Wayne, who lives in Burnsville
with his wife, Sue. She also has two grandchildren.
Emilie Voight lives in Paris, France, and Steven Voight
lives in Minneapolis. Martha says the staff treats her
well at Good Sam and the food is good. She even gets
sauerkraut on occasion.
Tootsie Roll Drive to be held
The local Knights of Columbus organization will
hold its annual Tootsie Roll Drive in Arlington from
Friday, April 26 through Sunday, April 28, according to
Knights of Columbus member Pat Liebl.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Family Of Snowmen
The family of Dustin and Nicki Voight, for the second
time in about a week, made this family of snowmen in
the front yard of their house located along the 200
block of Fourth Avenue Northeast in Arlington. The
adults are located on each end while the children are
upside down in the middle. Their children are Hunter,
Cody and McCabe.
The following students
were recently named to the
“A” Honor Roll and “B”
Honor Roll at the Sibley East
Senior High School in Ar-
lington during the third quar-
ter.
“A” Honor Roll
Seniors: Jordan Bruss,
Nicolas Bruss, Jeremiah
DuFrane, Ashley Fahning,
Lindsay Fasching, Max
Grabow, Steven Haefs, Logan
Highland, Erin Mesker, Lea
Mueller, Dustin Pautsch,
Katelyn Reid, Briana Reier-
son, Morgan Setterman,
Stephanie Shimota, Alleyce
Somerville, Katherine Tem-
plin, Jordan Thomes, Nathan
Thomes and Megan Wiltgen.
Juniors: Samantha Aceve-
do, Benjamin Ahlstrand, Eliz-
abeth Becker, Quintin Dal-
bec, Megan Eckberg, Court-
ney Eibs, Jessica Garza, An-
drea Geib, Mitchell Heibel,
Victoria Henry, Eduardo Her-
rera, Kelsey Klaustermeier,
Alicia Kranz, Kimberly
Kurtzweg, Heidi Milczark,
Maren Miner, Melissa Otto,
Sara Peterson, Britany Reier-
son, Hayley Riebe, Mariah
Schrupp, Sarah Shimota,
Beau Swenson, Mitchel
Wentzlaff, Benjamin White
and Anna Woehler.
Sophomores: Andrew
Bullert, Jonah Butler, Autumn
Dose, Charles Ellwood, Isaac
Elseth, Megan Elseth, Nathan
Langworthy, Karley Lind,
Ana Rosa Mendoza, Ashley
Mercier, Paige Nelson, Zach-
ery Peterson, Jordan Petzel,
Taylor Pfarr, Brandon Raghu,
Karina Robeck, Jean Sick-
mann, Karissa Sorenson,
Elizabeth Thies, Sam Thies,
Shelby Voight, Breann Walsh,
Zachary Weber and Kyla
Wisch.
“B” Honor Roll
Seniors: Tyler Bates, Bran-
don Becker, Sara Borchert,
Courtney Bratsch, Marissa
Eckberg, Melanie Gerold,
Andrew Grack, Joshua
Hansen, Samuel Harrison,
Ashley Jackson, Tyler
Kratzke, Samantha Lane,
Courtney Schwirtz, Kayle
Seeman, Ashley Templin and
April Thurn.
Juniors: Julius Asmussen,
Carley Bening, Samuel
Bullert, Lena Burgess, Eliza-
beth Densmore, Kenneth
Depuydt, Stephanie Garcia,
Nickolas Haupt, Courtney
Hildebrandt, Caleb Justen,
Nicole Lieske, Levi Pfarr,
Alissa Ramthun, Brody Rod-
ning, William Rovinsky,
Austin Sadler, Donovan
Swanson, Michael Templin
and Amanda Uecker.
Sophomores: Vanessa
Aguilera, Lukas Bullert,
Jonathan DuFrane, Viviana
Flores, Chloe Franke, Ben-
jamin Freitag, Jessica Gad-
baw, Zachary Garza, Baryn
Gronholz, Justin Korson,
Haylee Loncorich, Kelli
Martens, Kenneth Martin,
Megan Mathews, Darin
Neisen, Madison O’Hara,
Mikayla Perschau, Puttikhun
Piyasakunchat, Jordyn
Polzin, Hunter Voight and
Matthew Weber.
Students named to the Honor Roll
at Sibley East Senior High School
Advertising Deadlines:
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Leader & Enterprise ........................Tuesday Noon
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McLeod Publishing
716 East 10th St.• Glencoe
Mon.-Fri. 8-5 p.m. • 320-864-5518
The McLeod County Chronicle
Silver Lake Leader
The Glencoe Advertiser
The Sibley Shopper
Arlington Enterprise (Arlington/Green Isle)
The Galaxy (supplement to Chronicle, Leader & Enterprise)
www. GlencoeNews. com
www. ArlingtonMNnews. com
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 25, 2013, page 3
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Business & Professional
Directory
CALL TODAY TO BE
INCLUDED IN OUR
BUSINESS &
PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY!
507-964-5547
Arlington
Chiropractic Clinic
JUSTIN E. DAVIS, D.C.
607 W. Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-2850
arlingtonchiropracticmn.com
Office Hours:
Mon. 9am-6pm; Tues. 9am-5pm;
Wed. 8am-6pm; Thurs. 1-6pm;
Fri. 8am-4pm; 1
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Sat. 8am-11am
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Large Animal
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Ultrasound repro, Surgical,
Medical and Nutrition
Small Animal House Call
by Appointment
Medical, Vaccination Services
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Dr. Robert G. Ovrebo
Office 507-964-2682
Cell 507-995-0507
Miller
Law
Office
RAPHAEL J. MILLER
ROXANN M. BERANEK
Attorneys at Law
332 Sibley Ave. 1042 First Ave.
Gaylord, MN Gibbon, MN
Tel. 507-237-2954 Fax: 507-237-2347
Wills - Taxes - Estate Planning
General Law Practice & Trials
Free consultation on personal injury claims
MESENBRING
CONSTRUCTION
(507) 964-2864
“Your local home builder and
remodeler for over 38 years”
Member: MN River Builders Assn.
MN License #4806
ROSS R. ARNESON
ATTORNEY AT LAW
302 West Main
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-5753
Real Estate, Estate Planning,
Probate and Business Law
Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Saturdays by Appointment
Farm – Residential
Commercial
Licensed - Bonded - Insured
• 24-Hour Emergency
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507-964-2525
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JEFF & WENDY KLEHR
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Hauling Gravel/Rock/Sand, Skidloader
Jeff cell: 612-756-0595
Wendy cell: 612-756-0594
640 E. BROOKS ST., ARLINGTON, MN 55307
1-507-964-5783 • FAX: 507-964-5302
Local LAWN
Enforcement
Arlington, MN
Licensed and Insured
Mowing, fertilizing and
weed control, dethatching,
garden tilling, core aeration
www.locallawnenforcement.com
Adam and David Hansen
Adam cell: 507-327-0917
507-964-5835
• 5” Seamless Gutters
• 6” Seamless Gutters
• K-Guard Leaf-Free
Gutter System
(lifetime clog free guarantee)
PHIL GOETTL
612-655-1379
888-864-5979
www.mngutter.com
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Office Hours: Monday–Friday
New Patients Welcome
Dr. Jason Anderson, D.D.S
Orthodontists
106 3
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Arlington
507-964-2705
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A9-10Ea
The Sibley East High
School Band, starting next
fall, plans to introduce
marching into its curriculum,
according to Band Director
Jim Callahan.
Sibley East has not had an
active marching band since
the late 1980s.
“It’s an important piece of
the high school band experi-
ence that our students cur-
rently do not get a chance to
experience,” said Callahan.
The goal is to start off
small, and have the students
march in the homecoming pa-
rade in the fall of 2014 with
hopes to add more marching
band events from there.
“The drum line equipment
that we currently have be-
tween the Gaylord and Ar-
lington sites is very outdated,
and for the most part, not use-
able,” said Callahan.
Sibley East would be very
appreciative to any interested
individuals, organizations and
businesses who would like to
support the music program in
the purchase of new equip-
ment.
For more information
about this topic, please con-
tact Jim Callahan at 507-964-
8233 or Randy Walsh at 507-
237-2322
Marching band is coming back to SE
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Students in the Sibley East
School District will not have
to make up any school days
due to the inclement weather.
Incoming Superintendent
Jim Amdsen made the an-
nouncement via an e-mail to
the media and School Board
members on Monday morn-
ing, April 22.
“We have built enough
time into the instructional
calendar to meet state
statute,” said Amsden. “We
are working with the Sibley
East Education Minnesota
group to add additional re-
quired professional develop-
ment for all Sibley East staff
members through the remain-
der of the year.”
As of Monday, April 22,
schools in the Sibley East
School District have had
seven two-hour late starts,
two three-hour early dis-
missals and four school clos-
ings during the 2012-2013
school year.
Students will not have to
make up any school days
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Magician/Comedian
Mankato resident Gary Tyson per-
formed his magic and comedy show
during the Sibley County Senior Expo
at the Arlington Community Center on
Tuesday, April 15.
its townships. Nytes wants to
make the process user friend-
ly, cutting down on the possi-
bility for fines and penalties
being assessed. A proposal
will be created and brought
back to the board.
• A new contract was ap-
proved with public health and
human services and the Ar-
lington Good Samaritan Cen-
ter for the provision of home
delivered meals to waiver
clients.
Funds Spent
• Pinske said the budget
committee is seeking bids for
the cost of running a fiber
communication line to the
human services building,
which would save money with
no more need for a server. The
estimated cost is $30,000.
• Approval was given for
the annual spraying agree-
ment with Scott’s Helicopter
Services, Inc. for $32.65 per
acre.
• Approval was given to
purchase 17 windows and a
projector for the training lab
at a cost of $7,492.90. Plus,
$4,246.68 will be spent on
window coverings.
• The public works depart-
ment was granted approval to
purchase a 2013 Ford Escape
from Wolf Motors for
$23,235.80. This vehicle re-
places the pickup truck that
was sold at auction last fall.
• The county jail will be re-
roofed with the low bid by
Vos Construction, Inc., Green
Isle, for $7,990.
Parking Lot
Donated
*The board passed two res-
olutions, one accepting and
acknowledging the generous
donation by LeRoy Chard and
Chard Tiling and Excavating,
Inc. of a paved parking lot for
the county food shelf, an esti-
mated value of $10,000.
The other resolution in-
volved making the county ad-
ministrator the clerk to the
county board, adding that all
actions must be signed by the
administrator, county auditor
and the board chair.
Sibley County Continued from page 1
investigation is the motto I
pushed when I started here in
1999. We try to address the
situation at the first sign and
make contact rather than let it
build to a big criminal case
which takes up a lot of time.”
Times have changed over
the past few years noted Cow-
ing. He said income is not as
big a deal as it had been be-
cause of being so tightly con-
nected to computers as a way
of keeping track.
No Asset Limit
“Another thing we don’t see
as much of any more is client
assets, which have been
changed or eliminated” said
Cowing. “There is no longer
an asset test to be eligible for
a food program. That big
change is hard to get used to.”
Cowing said there have
been massive changes in food
support where the case load
has doubled in recent years
because there is no asset limit.
It makes more people quickly
eligible for the program than
it used to be.
“In the past if your family
owned a couple of vehicles
you were not eligible for wel-
fare assistance,” said Cowing.
“Plus, the Department of
Human Services has been
doing an extensive outreach to
get people on food support.”
Reasons For
Fraud Alert
The most common reason
for welfare fraud referrals in-
volves income when people
fail to report wages from an
employer, self employment,
social security, child support,
gambling winnings and cash
jobs and gifts.
Another reason is when
people fail to report changes
in who is living in a residence
such as siblings, parent and
boy or girlfriends.
Something that has come up
recently is in the receiving of
assistance by the EBT card.
As long as a person knows the
pin number the card can be
used by anyone.
“We have been able to go
through surveillance tapes at
grocery stores and can find
who is using a card,” said
Cowing. “We are starting to
see some changes where they
are putting names on the cards
now. It may be a little deter-
rent for people not to give
their EBT card away or sell it.
They can be prosecuted for
it.”
Concern For
Future
With the affordable care act
soon going into effect, Cow-
ing is not sure how many peo-
ple will be coming to the
county for medical support.
With private insurance there
is no need for reporting, “You
just pay the premiums and are
good to go.”
Cowing added, “We will
never be able to eliminate
fraud, but we certainly can
communicate by knocking on
doors, asking questions and
making people aware.”
Welfare Fraud Continued from page 1
WE’RE ALL EARS
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Story Ideas?
Let us know how we're doing.
402 W Alden St. • Arlington, MN 55307
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Arlington ENTERPRISE
Your opinion is something we
always want to hear.
Contact us with feedback.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 25, 2013, page 4
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Minnesota Democrats can’t
agree on which taxes to
raise and by how much
Our View: Tax increases
are usually permanent
Opinions
Staff
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Publish-
ers; Kurt Menk, Edi t or; Kari n
Ramige, Manager; Marvin Bulau,
Production Manager; Barb Math-
wig, Office; Ashley Reetz, Sales;
and Jean Olson, Proof Reading.
Letters
This page is devoted to opin-
ions and commentary. Articles ap-
pearing on this page are the opin-
ions of the writer. Views expressed
here are not necessarily those of
the Arlington Enterprise, unless so
designated. The Arlington Enter-
prise strongly encourages others
to express opinions on this page.
Letters from our readers are
strongly encouraged. Letters for
publication must bear the writer’s
signature and address. The Arling-
ton Enterprise reserves the right to
edit letters for purpose of clarity
and space.
Ethics
The editorial staff of the Arlington
Enterpri se stri ves to present the
news in a fair and accurate manner.
We appreciate errors being brought
to our attention. Please bring any
grievances against the Arlington En-
terprise to the attention of the editor.
Should differences continue, readers
are encouraged to take their griev-
ances to the Minnesota News Coun-
cil, an organization dedicated to pro-
tecting the public from press inaccu-
racy and unf ai rness. The News
Counci l can be cont act ed at 12
South Si xth St., Sui te 940, Mi n-
neapolis, MN 55402, or (612) 341-
9357.
Press Freedom
Freedom of the press is guar-
anteed under the First Amendment
to the U.S. Constitution:
“Congress shall make no law
respecting an establishment of reli-
gion, or prohibiting the free exer-
cise thereof; or abridging the free-
dom of speech, or the press…”
Ben Franklin wrote in the Penn-
sylvania Gazette in 1731: “If print-
ers were determined not to print
anything till they were sure it would
offend nobody there would be very
little printed.”
Deadline for the Arlington En-
terprise news is 4 p.m., Monday,
and advertising is noon, Tuesday.
Deadline for The Galaxy advertis-
ing is noon Wednesday.
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Arlington ENTERPRISE
Guest Column
There is a new fight at the State Capitol in St. Paul these days.
Democrats in both the Senate and House, along with DFL Gover-
nor Mark Dayton, cannot agree on which taxes to raise and by how
much.
Governor Dayton, who dropped his first tax plan and now has a
revised tax proposal, wants to increase income taxes on the high-
est-paid two percent of Minnesotans. He also proposes to increase
the cigarette tax by 94 cents a pack, close a corporate tax loophole
that will save a few companies $323 million a biennium for having
certain overseas holdings, and establish a snowbird tax on former
Minnesotans who live outside the state for more than half the year
to avoid paying state income taxes.
The DFL controlled Senate, meanwhile, is also pushing for an
income tax increase, but one that some would reach down into
what many consider the middle class. The DFL Senate members
also want a dramatic increase in the tobacco tax, the first sales tax
on clothing and taxes on other things like tattoos and dating servic-
es.
The DFL-controlled House, on the other hand, wants to tap high
earners, smokers and drinkers. The alcohol tax, which has not risen
in more than 20 years, would increase by seven cents a beer, 47
cents per bottle of wine and $1.58 per bottle of hard liquor. In ad-
dition, the proposed plan also includes a sales tax on sports memo-
rabilia.
There will be a political showdown late in this year’s session,
but it will not be the annual Democrat and Republican clash as
usual. The showdown will be between politicians in the DFL Party.
It is unfortunate that the Democrats believe the solution to every
problem is to raise taxes. Some of these proposals do reach down
into the middle and lower classes. In addition, tax increases are
usually permanent.
This year and every year should be about cutting wasteful gov-
ernment spending and reform.
-K.M.
Too Tall’s Tidbits
Happy Birthday and Happy An-
niversary to the following local and
area residents compliments of the
Arlington Lions Club Community
Calendar.
April 26
Amanda Rischmiller, Tony Overson,
Audrey Ziegler, Jamie Dotolo, Mary
Hennies and Shaena Godwin.
April 27
Amy Hickler, Ella Schmidt, Hannah
Kranz, Nate Watson, Nevaeh Maki,
Rich Soberski, and Mr. and Mrs.
Corky Von Eschen.
April 28
Bradyn Kube, Corey Diekmann,
David Kreft, Jacquelyn Wibstad,
Kirsten Nienaber and Krista (Lamb)
Santillana.
April 29
Ethan Schuetz, Karissa Ann Vos,
Kristin McCarthy, Leon Dose,
Logan Kistner, Mackenzie Timm,
Matthew Maki, Nancy Battcher,
Scott Luepke, Mr. and Mrs. Fazel
Khan, and Mr. and Mrs. Larry
Duenow.
April 30
Lincoln James Schneider, Madison
Kistner, Mary Tollefson, Quentin
Lieske, Renae Dose and Tucker
Hendrycks.
May 1
Amy Pautsch, Brody Curtiss, Bryan
Pasek, Frank Kolander, Harris Dose,
Micah Schoeder, and Mr. and Mrs.
Chad Hildebrandt.
May 2
Ella Lundstrom, Jacob Scharpe,
Lacey Scharping, and Mr. and Mrs.
Len Vos.
*****
During the wedding rehearsal, the
groom approached the priest with an
unusual offer. “Look, I’ll give you
$200 if you’ll change the wedding
vows. When you get to me and the
part where I’m to promise to ‘love,
honor and obey’ and ‘forsaking all
others, be faithful to her forever,’ I’d
appreciate it if you’d just leave that
part out.” He passed the clergyman
the cash and walked away satisfied.
It is now the day of the wedding,
and the bride and groom have
moved to that part of the ceremony
where the vows are exchanged.
When it comes time for the groom’s
vows, the vicar looks the young man
in the eye and says: “Will you prom-
ise to love her always monetarially
and physically, obey her every com-
mand and wish, serve her breakfast
in bed every morning of your life
and swear eternally before God and
your lovely wife that you will not
ever even look at another woman, as
long as you both shall live?”
The groom gulped and looked
around, and said in a tiny voice,
“Yes.”
The groom leaned toward the
priest and said under his breath, “I
thought we had a deal.”
The priest put the $200 back
into his hand and whispered back,
“She made me a much better
offer.”
*****
A husband desperate to keep his
wife happy offers to buy his wife a
new car.
She cutely declines his offer by
saying, “That's not quite what I had
in mind.”
Frantically he offers her a new
house.
Again she rejects his offer, “That's
not quite what I had in mind.”
Curious, he asks, “What did you
have in mind?”
She retorts, “I'd like a divorce.”
He answers, “I hadn't planned
on spending quite that much.”
*****
A famous scientist was on his way
to a lecture in yet another university
when his chauffeur offered an idea.
“Hey, boss, I've heard your speech
so many times I bet I could deliver it
and give you the night off.”
“Sounds great,” the scientist said.
When they got to the auditorium,
the scientist put on the chauffeur's
hat and settled into the back row.
The chauffeur walked to the lectern
and delivered the speech.
Afterward he asked if there were
any questions. “Yes,” said one pro-
fessor. Then he launched into a high-
ly technical question.
The chauffeur was panic strick-
en for a moment but quickly re-
covered. “That's an easy one,” he
replied. “In fact, it's so easy, I'm
going to let my chauffeur answer
it!”
*****
By Senator John Marty
D-Roseville
With the growing concentration of
greenhouse gases in the atmosphere,
and virtually the entire scientific
community expressing deep con-
cerns about human-caused climate
change, our energy policies appear
to be racing towards a climate cliff,
driven by those who profit from our
consumption of fossil fuels.
Bill McKibben, the author and
journalist who has done as much as
anyone to educate the public about
the consequences of climate change
says, “So far, we've raised the aver-
age temperature of the planet just
under 0.8 degrees Celsius, and that
has caused far more damage than
most scientists expected. A third of
summer sea ice in the Arctic is gone,
the oceans are 30 percent more
acidic, and since warm air holds
more water vapor than cold, the at-
mosphere over the oceans is a
shocking five percent wetter, load-
ing the dice for devastating floods.”
McKibben suggests we are headed
for a “global catastrophe” unless we
change course.
While some still doubt the climate
scientists, people are looking out the
window and seeing that things are
changing. Recently the lobbyist for
the Minnesota Insurance Federation
testified before our Senate Environ-
ment and Energy Committee that
homeowner insurance premiums
have more than doubled in the last
decade primarily due to an increase
in tornadoes, floods, and other cata-
strophic weather events.
Minnesota's Will Steger, who has
spent over four decades exploring
the earth's polar regions, is an eye-
witness to the impact of climate
change. He points out that polar ice
has melted so much that “you can no
longer sled to the North Pole. That's
history.” Steger explains, “the ef-
fects of global warming are perva-
sive. We humans continue to burn
fossil fuels. The burning creates a
blanket and the blanket forms a
greenhouse over our earth. We can-
not delay in slowing and reversing
this trend. Our health, economy, na-
tional security and the environment
demand it.”
In the Minnesota legislature, there
is a push for a transition to a sustain-
able energy economy. Representa-
tive Melissa Hortman and I, as
chairs of the House and Senate En-
ergy Committees, are working with
environmental advocates and the
Dayton administration on an Om-
nibus Energy bill (Senate File 901 /
House File 956) that would beef up
Minnesota's energy conservation
and efficiency efforts, jump start the
solar energy industry in Minnesota,
and develop a framework to make
Minnesota the first state in the na-
tion to transition to a 100 percent re-
newable energy economy that no
longer uses fossil fuels as an energy
source.
Moving to a fossil-fuel free ener-
gy economy won't be easy and may
take a few decades. Opponents
often argue that such a transition
would be too costly. But it is our
current system that is too costly to
continue - Minnesota families and
businesses currently spend $13 bil-
lion to import fossil fuels from other
states and countries.
At a legislative hearing on energy,
Marty Kushler, Senior Fellow at the
American Council for an Energy-Ef-
ficient Economy, told legislators that
while Minnesotans regularly debate
the impact on the economy of the
$18 billion in taxes that pay for the
state general fund budget, they are
largely unaware of the $13 billion
that Minnesotans spend to import
coal, oil, natural gas, and other fossil
fuels. Yet, he points out, the state
budget dollars are spent in Minneso-
ta, by Minnesotans, and are recycled
in Minnesota's economy. In con-
trast, virtually all of the $13 billion
used for fossil fuel purchases goes
out of state, causing a huge drain on
our state economy.
Replacing those lost energy dol-
lars with investments in solar, wind,
and other renewable energy sources
is, in essence, replacing the ongoing
cost of importing fuels, with pay-
checks for Minnesota workers at
Minnesota businesses, installing, op-
erating, and maintaining these elec-
trical generation facilities - which
don't have to pay for fuel because
the wind and sun are free. Replac-
ing fossil fuel import spending with
funding for Minnesota businesses
and jobs boosts Minnesota's econo-
my even if you don't calculate the
very real health and environmental
savings.
Our children and their children,
and the entire human race, are de-
pendent upon the earth for our sur-
vival. There is no other planet that
we could move to if this planet can-
not sustain human life. We need to
dramatically reduce our consump-
tion of fossil fuels very quickly, or
our children and their children will
face catastrophic changes in the en-
vironment.
No matter how bold we are in re-
sponding this year to the problem,
20 years from now people will won-
der how we could have been so
timid. It's time to take thoughtful,
yet bold action to develop a frame-
work that will bring Minnesota to a
sustainable energy system.
Climate change requires bold response
By Glenn Mollette
We have everything we need in
America. We have natural gas, oil,
coal, solar and wind energy. We
should utilize everything at our dis-
posal to end our dependence on for-
eign oil. It is time to stop flooding
the Middle East with money. These
people hate us. Why do we buy their
oil?
America has enough oil. It is esti-
mated North Dakota has as much as
500 billion gallons of oil that is in
the process of being drilled. The
Marcellus shale fields of Pennsylva-
nia, Ohio, New York and West Vir-
ginia promises more natural gas than
Saudi Arabia has oil.
We can run automobiles and the
large trucks of America on natural
gas. It's time to start using it. Auto-
mobile companies are converting
some of their vehicles to operate on
natural gas. Service stations across
the nation must move forward with
natural gas pumps.
I like coal. My father was a coal
miner for 30 years. He raised five
kids on a coal miner's salary. We
must continue to work toward burn-
ing coal cleaner, more efficiently
and environmentally safer. It is a
powerful source of energy and we
should use it. We hear reports that
power plants are moving closer to
burning cleaner energy. We hear
other reports that power plants are
moving to natural gas.
We are learning more each year
on how to better use solar and wind
energy. We should utilize both of
these to meet our heating and cool-
ing needs. The windmills are dotting
a lot of landscape in the western part
of the United States. They are not
the complete answer for power but
they are a welcome part of the for-
mula.
As long as we are dependent on
foreign energy there will be wars in
the Middle East. We need to stop the
senseless wars that are ongoing over
Middle Eastern oil. Once we be-
come an energy independent nation
gasoline prices will decrease. Plus
we will not be burning our money in
fighting senseless wars to protect
our oil interests. Thousands of lives
will be spared from wars in places
like Iraq and Afghanistan.
The goal of every American
should be to utilize American ener-
gy. This will create more jobs and
wealth for Americans instead of
sending our wealth overseas.
An energy independent America
will be a happier America. Cutting
our entanglements with Middle
Eastern oil insures a brighter future
for America.
Glenn Mollette is the author of
American Issues: Every American
Has An Opinion.He is the author of
other books and hundreds of arti-
cles.
Energy - Stop using foreign oil
SHARE YOUR OPINION THROUGH
A LETTER TO THE EDITOR.
EMAIL YOUR LETTER TO
KURTM@ARLINGTONMNNEWS.COM
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 25, 2013, page 5
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
County Road Ditch Spraying
Sibley County will ONLY be spraying County road ditches
for noxious weeds. The spray is applied directly to the noxious weeds.
Chemicals used: Tordon K, Transline, Escort, Milestone, Forefront and 2-4D.
Anyone wishing to NOT have a specific county road ditch sprayed
should contact the Sibley County Public Works Office at 507-237-4092
before May 15, 2013 for a form. The No Spray Request Form is available
from the Office via: e-mail: SibleyPW@co.sibley.mn.us
or website: www.co.sibley.mn.us Landowners/renters are required
to flag the no spray zone with “Owner Will Maintain” flags provided by
Sibley County Public Works. The use of these flags will aid Sibley County
Public Works maintenance crews in identifying which areas landowners/
renters do not want sprayed. Flags are available at the Public Works
office in Gaylord and at all county highway garages in Arlington, Gaylord,
Gibbon, Green Isle, Henderson, Winthrop and at the Sibley County Gravel Pit.
By requesting that Sibley County does not spray your road ditch, landowners/renters
agree to maintain the noxious weeds and brush in the specified road ditches in their
entirety. When landowners/renters do not respond, we will assume it is acceptable to
spray. The County may begin spraying on or after May 15, 2013.
A15-16E16-17Sa
2013 DUST CONTROL NOTICE
• Offered to Sibley County residents on gravel surfaced public roads.
• Cost is
$
105.00 per 100 feet of treatment for 2 applications and must be paid in advance.
• Dust control has been effectively used by the County in the past. However, the County makes no guar-
antee as to the effectiveness of the material used or how long it will last.
• First application will be done approximately first week of June. Residents need to accurately measure
and flag the application area with orange flags on both ends at the edge of the road. Maintain these
flags the 2 weeks before each application until completed. Flags are available at the Public Works
Office in Gaylord, all county highway garages in Arlington, Gaylord, Gibbon, Green Isle, Hender-
son, Winthrop and the County Gravel Pit.
• Applicants will not be notified of the application date unless you provide email address – or please call
our office at 507-237-4092 or look for updates at www.co.sibley.mn.us .
• Applications must be received by May 15, 2013. Sign up online by visiting www.co.sibley.mn.us/pub-
lic_works/dust_control.html, in person at the Sibley County Service Center Building or by mailing this
sheet filled in with all the information below.
• A late fee surcharge of
$
25.00 will be assessed to individuals who sign up after May 15
th
.
Please mail in the following information:
Mail to: Sibley County Public Works, P.O. Box 897, Gaylord, MN 55334
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Name: __________________________ Daytime Telephone: __________________
❑ I would like to be notified by email of application date.
Email:_____________________________________________________________
Township: __________________________Section: ________________________
Property Address: _______________________City: ________________________
Length Sprayed: _________________Amount Paid: ________________________
Make checks payable to Sibley County Treasurer
Sibley East Schools are looking for
MN Reading Corps Literacy Tutors
for the 2013-14 school year
As a Minnesota Reading Corps Literacy Tutor you will:
• Impact the lives of children who need extra support to
become proficient readers.
• Provide one on one reading interventions with K-3
students.
• Help develop children’s literacy skills in a Pre-School
classroom.
• Positions are available in both the Arlington and Gaylord
Campuses.
For more information about literacy tutor positions avail-
able at Sibley East Public School please contact:
Mari Lu Martens
507-964-8225
507-237-3318
Apply, visit www.MinnesotaReadingCorps.org
Experience life-changing growth:
Make a lasting impact as a literacy Tutor.
A15-16E,16-17Sa
Green Isle Volunteer
Fire & Rescue Relief
13
th
Annual
SPRING GET
TOGETHER
Sun., May 5
7:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Green Isle Fire Hall
Menu: Pancakes, Sausage,
Eggs, Apple Sauce, Coffee,
Orange Juice & Milk
(To-go orders available)
FREE WILL
DONATION
All proceeds
go to new
equipment fund.
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Obituary
Philomena Haefs, age 90,
of Arlington, died at the Sib-
ley Medical Center in Arling-
ton on Thursday, April 18.
Funeral services were held
at St. Paul’s United Church of
Christ in Henderson at 11
a.m. Monday, April 22. Rev.
Brigit Stevens officiated.
Visitation was held at St.
Paul’s United Church of
Christ from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Sunday, April 21 and contin-
ued one hour prior to the
service at the church on Mon-
day, April 22.
Interment was at Brown
Cemetery in Henderson.
Philomena was born to
John and Emma (Budin) Edel
at home in rural Rice County
on Nov. 11, 1922.
On July 1, 1947, Philome-
na was united in marriage to
Leland Haefs at St. Paul’s
Parsonage in Henderson.
They made their home on the
farm in Kelso Township
where they were blessed with
three children. Philomena
liked cooking and gardening,
and was a former 4-H leader
as well as a member of the
Kelso Homemakers and St.
Paul’s Women’s Guild.
Philomena is survived by
her children, Rodney (Bar-
bara) Haefs of Henderson,
Robert (Karen) Haefs of Hen-
derson, and Sharon Marshall
of Arlington; 13 grandchil-
dren and two great-grandchil-
dren; brother, Ivan (Lois)
Edel of Cannon Falls; and
sisters-in-law, Lorraine Edel
of New Prague, Alice Haefs
of Belle Plaine and Adeline
Haefs of LeCenter.
Philomena was preceded in
death by her parents; her hus-
band, Leland; brothers,
Richard and Alvin Edel; and
sister, Helen Pesta.
Kolden Funeral Home of
Arlington handled the
arrangements.
Philomena Haefs, 90, Arlington
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Wolverines of the Month
The following students were recently
chosen as Wolverines of the Month at
the Sibley East Junior High School in
Gaylord. Front Row: (left to right) Madi-
lyn Latzke and Morgan Paulsen. Back
Row: (l to r) Lucas Chavez, Casey Sam-
letzka and Jackson Rose. Missing from
the photo is Alison Eibs.
The Southern Minnesota
Initiative Foundation (SMIF)
recently approved funding
from its Small Enterprise
Loan fund to Home Town
Bakery LLC. Loren Ludewig,
Sleepy Eye, purchased the
former Thorson's Bakery, lo-
cated in downtown Gibbon,
and plans to expand the busi-
ness. The Sibley County
EDA, City of Gibbon EDA,
and State Bank of Gibbon are
also partnering with SMIF on
this loan.
“It is my goal to not only
keep this bakery running in
Gibbon, but to expand it by
bringing some of the goods to
Sleepy Eye and sell in stores
there,” Ludewig said.
“Thanks to this loan from
Southern Minnesota Initiative
Foundation, I am able to
make this business work.”
“We' re pleased to help
Loren grow this business
through our micro loan pro-
gram,” said Tim Penny, SMIF
President/CEO. “Our Foun-
dation remains committed to
providing resources to grow
local businesses.”
SMIF provides loan to bakery in Gibbon
History
98 Years Ago
April 29, 1915
Buck & Didra, Publishers
The Arlington Milling Co.
shut down the mill Saturday and
it is not known how long it will
remain closed. Inability to make
it pay expenses is said to be the
reason. The mill has always en-
joyed a good trade and turned
out a fine brand of flour and it is
to be regretted that it had to
close.
Lost: A horse blanket, Mon-
day, on the road between F. C.
Bening’s and Wm. Barkes.
Find-er leave at the Enterprise
office.
Oscar Altnow trapped and
shot 1,481 muskrats during the
winter just closed. All the ani-
mals were killed on the lake
near his place and H. M. Noack
& Sons purchased the entire lot.
That it pays to raise beef cat-
tle was again demonstrated last
week when Mike O’Brien
shipped a steer and cow which
he bought from Thies Bros. The
former weighed 1,550 pounds
and brought $116.25 and the lat-
ter 1,260 and brought $85.05 or
a total of $201.30 for the two
animals.
68 Years Ago
April 26, 1945
Louis Kill, Editor
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Meyer,
well known pioneer resident of
Arlington, observed their golden
wedding anniversary last Sun-
day, April 22nd, surrounded by
many of their relatives who
gathered at their home to honor
them on this occasion. A sump-
tuous dinner was served, and a
pleasing program of talks and
musical numbers was rendered.
Second Lieutenant Karl N.
Thomes, 22, of Arlington, and a
pilot of the “Air Apaches,”
crack 345th Bombardment
Group of the 5th Air Force, has
been credited with sinking a
2,500-ton Japanese tanker off
the Indo-China coast. Lieutenant
Thomes strafed the vessel thor-
oughly on the approach and
scored a direct hit with a 500-lb.
bomb as he skimmed his B-25
over the tanker at mast height
level.
Grocery specials at Henschke
& Haupt Food Store: Peanut
butter, 32 oz, jar 43c; tomato
juice, 46 oz. can 24c; Wheaties,
3- 8 oz. pkgs. 29c; Staley’s corn
syrup, crystal - 5 lbs. 36c, gold-
en - 5 lbs. 35c; catsup, 14 oz.
bottle 18c
38 Years Ago
April 24, 1975
Val Kill, Editor
Three hundred forty-five
thousand volts of electricity
would be carried over a Delano
to Mankato power transmission
line which would pass about 3
miles east of Arlington accord-
ing to a proposal of the United
Power Association and the Co-
operative Power Association.
Both are REA associations. The
proposed line would pass near
Green Isle on the west side.
Relatives and friends of Mrs.
Lena Kamps helped her cele-
brate her 83rd birthday on Sun-
day with a potluck lunch. Her
son, Luvern and wife, who were
unable to attend, called wishing
her a happy birthday.
8 Years Ago
April 28, 2005
Kurt Menk, Editor
A total of 29 applications
have been received for the soon-
to-be open superintendent posi-
tion at the Sibley East Public
Schools. The closing date to re-
ceive applications was Monday,
April 25, 2005.
A cow was reportedly shot
with an arrow and killed at the
Gerald Mueller residence in
rural Arlington sometime late
last week, according to the Sib-
ley County Sheriff ’s depart-
ment. Mueller, according to the
sheriff’s department, reported
that the cow was killed some-
time after 6 p.m. Friday, April
22, as it was found dead in the
pasture during the morning
hours on Saturday, April 23.
Arlington resident Bernet
Pinske was the winner in the Ar-
lington Alliance’s ”Help Us
Name Our Church Contest.”
Pinske was awarded $500 in
front of the church that she
named the Creekside Communi-
ty Church on Thursday,
The Minnesota Hospital
Association (MHA) is oppos-
ing a payment change plan by
Blue Cross and Blue Shield
of Minnesota (BCBS) sched-
uled to take effect May 1 that
will slash payments to hospi-
tals and have a particularly
devastating effect on rural
health care.
MHA President and CEO
Lawrence Massa described
the payment change as con-
verting BCBS payments from
a negotiated discount from a
hospital's charges — a pay-
ment methodology that has
been used for small hospitals
for decades — to a below-
cost or marginally above-cost
rate unilaterally set by BCBS.
MHA has heard from
dozens of hospitals scheduled
to have their payments cut on
May 1 that the impacts will
be “in the hundreds of thou-
sands to millions of dollars.”
Massa said that for many of
these small hospitals in rural
communities, the payment
cuts will “put them into deep,
deep red ink.”
“To dramatically disrupt
long-standing reimburse-
ments to hospitals will, if im-
plemented, jeopardize pa-
tients' access to care, espe-
cially in rural communities
served by smaller hospitals,
such as ours,” said Kimber
Wraalstad, administrator of
the Cook County North Shore
Hospital in Grand Marais, a
critical access hospital. “Be-
cause of Blue Cross’ unilater-
al change to the reimburse-
ment methodology and rates,
we may have no choice but to
terminate our contract with
Blue Cross.”
“As a result of the Blues’
plan, we are looking for what
changes we need to make to
absorb the unexpected and
significant cuts from the
largest insurer in the state,”
said Joel Beiswenger, presi-
dent and CEO of Tri-County
Health Care in Wadena, also
a critical access hospital.
Massa said that BCBS
began contacting a portion of
hospitals earlier this year
about the payment changes.
“Instead of contacting all
hospitals and warning them
about this change at once,”
Massa said, “Blue Cross is
communicating with only 25
or 30 percent of hospitals at a
time, perhaps to avoid the in-
evitable statewide backlash
that would be unleashed.”
Minnesota hospitals are at-
tempting to individually con-
tact Blue Cross to negotiate a
revised payment methodolo-
gy or reimbursement rates
that are less devastating. In
addition, some hospitals are
seeking a delay in the imple-
mentation.
Anecdotally, Massa said he
has heard of hospitals decid-
ing to eliminate services such
as home health care, which
provides vulnerable and eld-
erly patients with care in their
home so they do not have to
travel to appointments at
greater cost and with more
risk of exacerbating their
health conditions.
Massa said that he heard of
one hospital where the em-
ployees collectively chose to
forego a portion of their re-
tirement benefits to help sal-
vage access to needed care
for patients. “It’s very frus-
trating to our members that
the people who provide direct
patient care are faced with the
unthinkable choice between
cutting off services to their
patients or losing some of
their retirement benefits. I
don't believe for a second that
Blue Cross considered such
alternatives before deciding
to move forward with these
huge cuts.”
MHA is also concerned
that patients and communities
will attribute the loss of serv-
ices and access to health care
reform initiatives. “The tim-
ing of this is extra troubling,”
Massa said, “because some
people will mistakenly con-
clude that they lost access to
care or hospitals closed be-
cause of federal or state
health care reforms when, in
reality, these are decisions by
a single, dominant insurer
that decided to pay wholesale
rates rather than discounted
retail rates.”
The Minnesota Hospital
Association helps 144 hospi-
tals and health systems pro-
vide quality care for their pa-
tients and communities.
Blue Cross reimbursement change will
plunge rural hospitals into the red,
patient access to care is in jeopardy
Sounds like
multiplication?
It’s newspaper
talk for a one
column by 4
inch ad. Too
small to be
effective?
You’re
reading
this one!
Put your 1x4
in the
Arlington
Enterprise
today.
507-964-5547
1
x
4
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 25, 2013, page 6
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
24” x 36”
Photo
Posters
$
18
.00
+ tax
Call 507-964-5547 to place your order
or stop in at the
Arlington Enterprise / Sibley Shopper office.
402 W. Alden St., Arlington
*Photo can be from the Arlington Enterprise, The Sibley Shopper or one of your own digital files.
**Embellishments extra (ie.: borders, logos, text, etc.) at an extra cost of
$
10-20, depending on time.
Scenery Photos,
Sports Photos,
Kid Photos,
Graduation,
Birthdays & MORE!
Sports
By Kurt Menk
Editor
A campaign is underway to
get former Arlington A’s
baseball player Joe Driscoll
in the Minnesota Amateur
Baseball Hall of Fame.
Driscoll played 35 seasons
for four organizations in the
Minnesota Amateur Baseball
Association.
In addition, he was on 24
state tournament rosters with
eight different teams (four as
a draftee) of which six won
state championships. Driscoll
made the all state team five
times and won the most valu-
able player award playing for
the Arlington A’s in 1979.
Overall, Driscoll played in
over 1,200 games of which
approximately 100 were re-
gional/sectional contests and
100 state tournament games.
He also pitched in at least
310 games. In addition,
Driscoll played baseball with
over 300 players, threw to
about 50 catchers and played
with 50-plus teammates who
were former batboys over 35
years.
Individuals, businesses and
organizations can obtain a
nomination form from the
Minnesota Amateur Baseball
Hall of Fame website at
www. mnamateurbaseball-
hof.com.
Nomination forms can be
e-mailed to Rick Vogt at
rvogt@mchsi.com or mailed
to Rick Vogt, 306 North
Eighth Street, Olivia, MN,
56277.
Campaign underway to get
Joe Driscoll inducted into
the baseball hall of fame
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Boys Of Summer?
Cody Doetkott, a senior on the Sibley
East varsity baseball team, looked out
at the field at the Arlington Baseball
Park after approximately 10 inches of
snow fell on the area late Thursday
night, April 18 and early Friday morn-
ing, April 19. The Wolverines, due to the
inclement weather this spring, have
been unable to play a game yet this
season.
ARLINGTON A’s 2013 SCHEDULE
DATE: VS: LOCATION:
Fri., May 3 Sacred Heart* Home, 7:30
Sun., May 5 Victoria Away, 2:00
Friday, May 10 Dassel* Away, 7:30
Sun.., May 12 Chaska Home, 6:00
Fri., May 17 Le Sueur Away, 7:30
Sun., May 19 St. Peter Home, 6:00
Fri., May 24 Shakopee Home, 7:30
Wed., May 29 Glencoe* Home, 7:30
Fri., May 31 New Ulm Away, 7:30
Sun., June 2 Henderson Away, 4:00
Tues., June 4 Cleveland* Home, 7:30
Sun., June 9 Jordan Home, 6:00
Wed., June 12 Young America Home, 7:30
Sun., June 16 Chanhassen Away, 6:00
June 20-23 Miller High Life Invite Arlington/Gaylord, TBA
Tues., June 25 Hamburg* Home, 7:30
Fri., June 28 Gaylord Away, 7:30
Sun., June 30 St. Peter Away, 6:00
Tues., July 2 Plato* Home, 7:30
Sun., July 7 New Ulm Home, 6:00
Tues., July 9 St. Patrick* Home, 7:30
Fri., July 12 All Star Game vs DRS* Veseli, 7:30
Sun.., July 14 Fairfax Away, 6:00
Tues., July 16 Veseli* Home, 7:30
Fri., July 19 Gaylord Home, 7:30
Sun., July 21 Fairfax Home, 6:00
Wed., July 24 Le Sueur* Home, 7:30
Sun., July 28 Belle Plaine Home, 6:00
Playoffs begin on July 31
*Denotes Non-League Games
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The recent and current in-
clement weather continues to
raise havoc with the Sibley
East athletic schedule this
spring.
Sibley East has been forced
to postpone or cancel 88 ath-
letic events through Wednes-
day, April 24, according to
Athletic Director Randy
Walsh.
“Thursday, April 25 does
not look good as fields are
not ready yet and rain is ex-
pected later today (Wednes-
day, April 24),” said Walsh.
We are hoping to have our
softball field ready on Friday,
April 26 to play here if LSH
is not able to host. We are
looking at playing the Thurs-
day (April 25) baseball
games on Saturday afternoon
(April 27) if fields are not
ready on Friday (April 26).
The forecast looks good so
we are hopeful to get the sea-
sons started.”
Volunteers
Volunteers are needed for
the Mike Vrklan Relays
which will be held in Arling-
ton on Friday afternoon, April
26.
The field events will begin
at 4 p.m. while the running
events will start at 4:30 p.m.
Interested people who
would like to volunteer can
contact Sibley East head girls
track coach Jill Warzecha at
507-237-3366.
Nearly 90 SE athletic events postponed
or cancelled due to inclement weather
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Bergs Retires As Coach
Mike Bergs, left, recently retired after
coaching in the Sibley East Youth
Wrestling Club for 15 years. He was
honored and received an award during
a year-end awards night in Arlington
last week. Coach Dan Morton is pic-
tured on the right.
Governor Mark Dayton
has proclaimed April 21-27
Wildfire Prevention Week, as
most wildfires in Minnesota
occur in April and May. Once
this year’s snow melts, haz-
ardous fire conditions are
likely.
Minnesota wildland fire-
fighters extinguish an aver-
age 1,400 fires that burn
31,000 acres each year. Most
of those wildfires, 98 per-
cent, are caused by people.
The most common cause is
escaped debris-burning fires.
Wildfires jeopardize public
health and safety, destroy
homes and property and cost
millions of dollars each year
to extinguish.
Dayton recognizes the best
way to reduce the damage
and cost of wildfires is to
prevent them. He urges Min-
nesotans to exercise caution
in all burning operations this
week and throughout the
year.
April 21-27 is
declared Wildfire
Prevention Week
Before venturing out to
campgrounds, trails and
public water accesses
statewide, the Department
of Natural Resources
(DNR) advises people to
check online or call ahead
to avoid surprises.
“Winter weather is al-
ways a challenge to public
water access,” said Nancy
Stewart, DNR public access
program coordinator. “Be-
cause of the late ice out this
year, DNR crews have been
unable to inspect and repair
launch ramps or put the
docks in at the DNR-oper-
ated public water access
sites. We will get them
ready as soon as possible,
but we are at the mercy of
Mother Nature right now.”
Meanwhile, at Minnesota
state parks, the cold weath-
er has kept water shut off
and RV dump stations
closed at many camp-
grounds.
“Winter conditions per-
sist at Gooseberry Falls
State Park and many other
parks around the north-
land,” said Park Manager
Audrey Butts. “We’ve had
some folks arrive with
camping reservations with-
out knowing in advance
what to expect – which has
been unplowed roads and a
foot of snow in their site.”
As for roads and trails,
the DNR anticipates the
need for temporary closures
in state forests, state parks,
recreation areas and
wildlife management areas,
due to wet conditions. Road
and trail conditions are de-
teriorating rapidly this
spring, and many are not
yet firm enough to support
vehicle traffic without
being damaged. The tempo-
rary closures could remain
in effect until sometime in
May, depending on weather
conditions.
People can also call the
DNR Information Center at
651-296-6157 or toll-free
888-646-6367 between 8
a.m. and 4:30 p.m. week-
days. For conditions at state
parks, check the visitor
alerts on the individual park
pages or call the parks di-
rectly.
DNR advises checking status of boat ramps,
campgrounds, roads and trails before traveling
The Minnesota Department
of Natural Resources (DNR)
will conduct a public open
house to discuss and take
comments on its proposal to
suspend hybrid (tiger)
muskellunge stocking on five
lakes in Carver County and
Hennepin County.
The meeting is May 2,
from 6:30-8 p.m. at the DNR
west metro fisheries office,
7050 County Road 101 East,
Suite 100, Shakopee.
These lakes are: Eagle,
Pierson, and Wasserman in
Carver County; and Bush and
Weaver in Hennepin County.
The proposal stems from a
2006 evaluation of the tiger
muskie program to determine
if lakes being stocked with
the hybrid species were meet-
ing goals. Due to a lack of
appropriate habitat and forage
to sustain viable populations
of tiger muskies, as well as
limited angling pressure and
fish cost and availability,
fisheries staff recommended
dropping tiger muskie stock-
ing on these five lakes. Four
other lakes in the west metro
fisheries area will continue to
be managed for this hybrid.
One lake (Lake of the Isles)
will be managed for pure-
strain muskellunge.
Tiger muskies, a cross be-
tween female muskellunge
and male northern pike, were
first stocked in Minnesota
lakes in 1983 to provide an-
glers with an opportunity to
land a large fish that was rela-
tively easy to catch. Tiger
muskies also grow faster than
northerns or pure strain
muskellunge.
Those unable to attend the
meeting may direct written
comments until 4:30 p.m.,
June 3, to DNR west metro
fisheries, 7050 County Road
101 East, Suite 100,
Shakopee, MN 55379.
Comments may be deliv-
ered by email to daryl.elli-
son@state.mn.us or by call-
ing 952-496-4141, ext. 222.
DNR proposes to drop
hybrid muskie stocking
on 5 west metro lake
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 25, 2013, page 7
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Legals
SIBLEY EAST
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
SCHOOL BOARD MINUTES
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING
INDEPENDENT SCHOOL
DISTRICT NO. 2310
ARLINGTON GAYLORD
GREEN ISLE
ARLINGTON CAMPUS –
ROOM #149
MONDAY, JANUARY 14, 2013-
6:30 PM
Following the Salute to the
Flag, the meeting was called to
order by Superintendent Lan-
genbrunner at 6:30 p.m. Mem-
bers present: Brian Brandt, Scott
Dose, Anne Karl, Michelle Weber
and Danny Woehl er. Absent:
Beth DuFrane
Board Chair Anne Karl per-
formed the Oath of Office swear-
ing in newly elected candidates
Brian Brant and Michelle Weber.
ELECTION OF SCHOOL OF-
FICIALS:
Nominations for Board Chair
were received: Brian Brandt re-
ceived the only nomination for
Chair.
Motion by Karl and seconded
by Woehler to elect Brian Brandt-
Chairperson. Roll call vote carried
unanimously.
Nominations for Vice-Chairper-
son were received. Anne Karl re-
ceived the only nomination for
Vice Chair. Motion by Woehler
and seconded by Weber. Roll call
vote carried unanimously.
Nominations for Board Secre-
tary/Treasurer were recei ved.
Scott Dose recei ved the onl y
nomination.
Motion by Brandt and second-
ed by Woehl er to el ect Scott
Dose as Secretary/Clerk. Motion
carried unanimously.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA:
Motion by Karl and seconded
by Woehler to approve the agen-
da. Motion carried unanimously.
NEW BUSINESS: APPOINT-
MENTS:
Motion by Karl and seconded
by Woehler to approve the follow-
ing committee appointments and
standing committees for 2013.
Motion carried unanimously.
*Community Education & Early
Childhood Education (Brandt)
*School Pol i cy Commi ttee
(Due Process, Di sci pl i ne,
Meet/Confer, School Lunch Ap-
peals, MSHSL, Minnesota River
Conference and Title IX (Dose)
*Negoti ati ons (Certi fi ed)-
School Insurance, Fi nance,
Shared Decision ( Karl, Weber &
Woehler) alternate-DuFrane
*Non-Certified Salary Agree-
ments (Brandt, Dose, & Woehler)
alternate-Weber
*River Bend Special Education
District Board (Karl)
*MSBA Legi sl ati ve Li ai son
(Dose)
*Staff Devel opment Di stri ct
Committee (DuFrane)
*Sibley County Collaborative
Council (Brandt)
*School Di stri ct Faci l i ti es
(Brandt, Dose & Weber) alter-
nate-Woehler
*Transportation (Karl)
*Technology (Brandt, Weber)
*Conti nui ng Educati on
(DuFrane)
*Standing Committees on Site
Based and Staff Development
shall be made up of members
from the certified negotiating
commi ttee. (Karl , Weber &
Woehler) alternate-DuFrane
*Calendar Committee (Brandt,
DuFrane)
*Extra-Curri cul ar Acti vi ti es
Committee (Brandt, Dose & Karl)
Motion by Dose and seconded
by Woehler to approve the official
newspapers as the Arlington En-
terprise and the Gaylord Hub.
Motion carried unanimously.
Motion by Karl and seconded
by Woehler to approve the official
depositories as follows: Arlington
State Bank, Pro-Growth Bank
Gaylord, First National Bank of
Minnesota, Cornerstone Bank of
Green Isle and MSDLAF+. Motion
carried unanimously.
Motion by Dose and seconded
by Weber delegating Janna Tess-
mer and Jayne Ihrke to transfer
and make Electronic Fund Trans-
fers on behalf of the district for
the 2013 FY. Motion carried unan-
imously.
Motion by Karl and seconded
by Dose to approve district mem-
bership in the following organiza-
tions: Minnesota School Boards
Association, South Central Serv-
ice Cooperative, River Bend Edu-
cation District, Minnesota State
High School League, Minnesota
River Conference and Socrates.
Motion carried unanimously.
Motion by Woehler and sec-
onded by Dose to approve Antho-
ny Nerud, as the School District
Attorney. Motion carried unani-
mously.
Motion by Weber and second-
ed by Woehler to approve the IRS
mileage reimbursement as allow-
able, currently at 56.5 cents per
mile. Motion carried unanimous-
ly.
Motion by Dose and seconded
by Karl to set the school board
compensation as $50 per meet-
ing and $120 after four (4) hours.
An additional $500 per year for
the chairperson and the secre-
tary/clerk. Motion carried unani-
mously.
VISITOR/GUEST COM-
MENTS: None
CONSENT AGENDA:
-Approval of the Minutes from
the December 17, 2012 Regular
School Board Meeting.
-Bills and payments totaling
$1,003,048.85 for January 2013
were recommended for payment.
-Accepted the resignation/re-
tirement letter submitted by Judy
Pi oske effecti ve February 1,
2013.
-Accepted the Leave of Ab-
sence Request (maternity leave)
submitted by Molly McGinley from
April 12, 2013 to the end of the
school year.
Motion by Dose and seconded
by Woehler to approve the con-
sent agenda. Moti on carri ed
unanimously.
NEW/OTHER BUSINESS:
Motion by Dose and seconded
by Karl directing the Superintend-
ent and Administration to plan
and make recommendations for
adjustments in curriculum, pro-
grams and staffing for the 2013-
14 school year. Motion carried
unanimously.
Discussion took place relating
to district financial reviews and
providing pertinent financial infor-
mation to the board during each
Regular School Board Meeting.
ADJOURNMENT:
The meeting adjourned at 7:03
pm.
Chairperson: Brian Brandt
Secretary/Clerk: Scott Dose
SIBLEY EAST
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
SPECIAL SCHOOL BOARD
MINUTES
INDEPENDENT SCHOOL
DISTRICT NO. 2310
ARLINGTON GAYLORD
GREEN ISLE
ARLINGTON CAMPUS –
ROOM #149
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12,
2013
Following the Salute to the
Flag, the meeting was called to
order at 10:04 p.m.
Present: Brian Brandt, Scott
Dose, Beth DuFrane, Anne Karl,
Mi chel l e (Mi ssy) Weber and
Danny Woehler. Absent: None
Member Karl moved, seconded
by DuFrane to approve the agen-
da. Motion approved unanimous-
ly.
After discussion and determi-
nation of the final candidate to fill
the Sibley East Superintendent
position.
Member Karl moved, seconded
by DuFrane to offer the Sibley
East Schools Superintendent po-
sition to candidate James Ams-
den
Motion approved unanimously.
6-0 vote
Member DuFrane moved, sec-
onded by Dose to have the
School Board Chair and South
Central Service Cooperative Con-
sultant negotiate a contract with
candidate James Amsden and to
have the contract reviewed by the
District Attorney Anthony Nerud.
Motion approved unanimously.
6-0 vote
The meeting was adjourned at
10:07 p.m.
Brian Brandt, Chairperson
Scott Dose, Clerk
SIBLEY EAST
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
REGULAR SCHOOL BOARD
MINUTES
INDEPENDENT SCHOOL
DISTRICT NO. 2310
ARLINGTON GAYLORD
GREEN ISLE
ARLINGTON CAMPUS
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19,
2013
Following the Salute to the
Flag, the meeting was called to
order at 6:30 p.m.
Members present: Brian Brandt,
Scott Dose, Beth DuFrane, Anne
Karl, Michelle (Missy) Weber and
Dan Woehler. Absent: None
APPROVAL OF AGENDA:
Motion by member Dose, sec-
onded by Woehler approving the
board agenda.
Motion approved by unanimous
vote.
VISITOR/GUEST COM-
MENTS:
Three parents of Sibley East
students shared their respective
concerns relating to iPad usage
within the Sibley East Schools.
Andrea Thoele, Jason Thoele and
Sandy Klaers shared information
wi th the board members and
asked for changes relating to ipad
usage in the schools.
CONSENT AGENDA:
Motion by member Karl, sec-
onded by DuFrane approving the
following consent agenda items.
Motion passed by unanimous
vote.
Approval of January 14, 2013
Regular School Board Meeting
minutes, and February 5, 2013
and February 12, 2013 Special
School Board Meeting Minutes.
Bills and payments totaling $
1,043,281.17 for February 2013
were approved for payment.
Resignation:
Doug Flieth, 7th Grade Foot-
ball Coach
Hire/s:
Janice Lehmkuhl, Paraprofes-
sional (Reading Intervention) 4.5
hours per day @ $10.77/hour, ef-
fective January 22, 2013.
Hanna Miller, Paraprofessional
(Special Education) 7.0 hours per
day @ $ 9.57/hour, effective Feb-
ruary 19, 2013.
Leave of Absence:
Michelle Brueske, leave effec-
tive approximately April 17, 2013
thru the end of the school year.
Fundraising requests:
Approved the fundraising re-
quest submitted by Chuck Hart-
man, Adrenaline card sales, prof-
its to benefit football account pur-
chases.
OLD / UNFINISHED BUSI-
NESS:
Motion by member Karl, sec-
onded by DuFrane to approve
recommended Superintendent
Contract between the Sibley East
School s and James Amsden.
Motion approved by unanimous
vote.
NEW BUSINESS:
Motion by member Dose, sec-
onded by Michelle (Missy) Weber,
to approve the 2013-2014 School
Calendar, recommended by the
District Calendar Committee. Mo-
tion approved by unanimous vote.
Motion by member Dose, sec-
onded by Karl to approve (renew)
Environmental Consulting Agree-
ment for Health & Safety related
services from Harbo Consulting,
Lake Crystal, Minnesota from July
1, 2013 to June 30, 2016. Motion
approved by unanimous vote.
Motion by member Dose, sec-
onded by DuFrane to approve the
2013-2014 Di stri ct
Integration/Budget Plan as pro-
posed by the Integration Planning
Committee.
Moti on approved by unani -
mous vote.
Motion by member Weber, sec-
onded by Dose to accept the fol-
lowing donations:
Arl i ngton Area Chamber of
Commerce-$50 to the Sibley East
Choir.
Si bl ey East Booster Cl ub-
$1,164 to the Arlington Campus
for purchase of weights.
Arlington Baseball Association-
$3,500 to the Sibley East School
for purchase of a windscreen.
Arl i ngton Area Chamber of
Commerce-$210 to the Sibley
East Video Productions class.
Motion passed by unanimous
vote.
SCHOOL BOARD REPORTS:
Board members Brian Brandt
and Anne Karl shared information
relating to the Sibley County Col-
laborative and River Bend Spe-
cial Education Cooperative.
PRINCIPAL REPORT:
Elementary Mari Lu Martens
presented information relating to
the elementary buildings.
OTHER INFORMATION:
1. Interim Superintendent Lan-
genbrunner presented the Janu-
ary 31, 2013 enrollment report.
2. March 2013 Regular School
Board Meeting will be held at
6:30 p.m. on Monday,
March 18, 2013, in room # 149,
Arlington Campus.
ADJOURNMENT:
The meeting was adjourned at
7;15 p.m.
Chairperson-Brian Brandt
Clerk-Scott Dose
SIBLEY EAST
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
SPECIAL SCHOOL
BOARD MINUTES
INDEPENDENT SCHOOL
DISTRICT NO. 2310
ARLINGTON GAYLORD
GREEN ISLE
ARLINGTON CAMPUS
TUESDAY APRIL 2, 2013
Following the Salute to the
Flag, the meeting was called to
order at 6:30 p.m.
Members present: Brian Brandt,
Beth DuFrane, Anne Karl ,
Mi chel l e (Mi ssy) Weber and
Danny Woehler. Absent: Scott
Dose
APPROVAL OF AGENDA:
Motion by member Karl , sec-
onded by Woehler approving the
speci al school board agenda,
to take up matters previously set
on the cancelled March 18, 2013
Regular Meeting Agenda. Mo-
tion was approved by unanimous
vote.
VISITOR/GUEST COM-
MENTS:
None
CONSENT AGENDA:
Motion by member Weber, sec-
onded by Woehler approving the
consent agenda items.
Motion passed by unanimous
vote.
Approval of February 19, 2013
Regular School Board Meeting
Minutes.
Bills and payments totaling $
1,098,102.11 for March 2013
were approved for payment.
Leave of Absence:
Jeana Wibstad, requesting a
one year leave of absence with-
out pay for the 2013-14 school
year.
Fundraising requests:
Dan Tackman, Varsity Baseball
Coach requesting approval to
conduct thei r annual cooki e
dough sales with profits going to
purchase baseball equipment.
OLD / UNFINISHED BUSI-
NESS:
None
NEW BUSINESS:
Janna Tessmer, District Busi-
ness Manager reviewed the dis-
trict 2012-13 revised budget and
2013-14 budget analysis. Super-
intendent Langenbrunner shared
his comments relating to district
expenditures and revenues and
recommended that the district
move towards a balanced budget
in 2013-14.
He further noted that a pro-
posed budget will be presented at
the May Regular School Board
Meeting.
Cathy Wills, District Technology
Director reviewed the 2012-13
Technology Budget.
James Amsden, Incoming Su-
perintendent reviewed the iPad
survey summary responses that
were submitted by parents, stu-
dents and faculty.
Motion by Woehler and sec-
onded by Karl accepting the fol-
lowing donations:
$544 from Arlington VFW Post
#6031 to the Sibley East School
Patrol.
$130 from the Si bl ey East
Wolverine Boosters for All-State
Music lodging.
PRINCIPAL REPORTS:
Junior High Principal Steve
Harter and High School Principal
Jim Amsden presented informa-
tion relating to building activities
and events.
OTHR INFORMATION:
April 15, 2013 Regular School
Board Meeting will be held at
6:30 p.m. in room # 149, Arling-
ton Campus.
ADJOURNMENT:
The meeting was adjourned at
8:02 p.m.
Chairperson-Brian Brandt
Clerk-Scott Dose
SIBLEY EAST
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
REGULAR SCHOOL
BOARD MINUTES
INDEPENDENT SCHOOL
DISTRICT NO. 2310
ARLINGTON GAYLORD
GREEN ISLE
ARLINGTON CAMPUS
MONDAY APRIL 15, 2013
Following the Salute to the
Flag, the meeting was called to
order at 6:30 p.m.
Members present: Brian Brandt,
Beth DuFrane, Anne Karl ,
Michelle (Missy) Weber and Dan
Woehler. Absent: Scott Dose
APPROVAL OF AGENDA:
Motion by member Weber, sec-
onded by Karl approvi ng the
board agenda.
Moti on approved by unani -
mous vote.
VISITOR/GUEST COM-
MENTS:
None
CONSENT AGENDA:
Motion by member Woehler,
seconded by DuFrane approving
the fol l owi ng consent agenda
items.
Motion passed by unanimous
vote.
Approval of April 2, 2013 Spe-
cial School Board Meeting Min-
utes.
Bills and payments totaling $
1,015,669.77 for April 2013 were
approved for payment.
Resignations:
Molly McGinley, ESL Teacher.
Gai l Norel l , El ementary
Teacher, resigned due to retire-
ment.
Holly Vos, Elementary Teacher.
Mike Haller, Assistant Varsity
Football Coach.
Fundraising request:
Approved a flip flop fundraising
request submi tted by Carri e
Bartlette, advisor of student travel
group.
OLD / UNFINISHED BUSI-
NESS:
NEW BUSINESS:
Motion by member Karl, sec-
onded by Woehler acknowledging
receiving a Notice Of Desire to
Negotiate from Sibley East Edu-
cati on Mi nnesota. Moti on ap-
proved by unanimous vote.
Motion by member Karl, sec-
onded by Woehler to approve the
2013-14 capital budget and pro-
posed projects as recommended
by Buildings and Grounds Direc-
tor Bob Pichelmann and Interim
Superi ntendent John Langen-
brunner. Moti on approved by
unanimous vote.
Motion by member DuFrane,
seconded by Woehler to accept
the following donations:
$1,761 from Minnesota Valley
Electric Trust to the High School
Art Department.
$1,000 from the Arlington VFW
Post # 6031 to the Wrestling Pro-
gram.
$500 from the Arlington VFW
Post # 6031 to the Sibley East
Trap Team.
$6,000 from the Arlington, Gib-
bon & Winthrop Cable Commis-
sion for technology.
2 network pri nters from
ProGrowth Bank to the Sibley
East School District.
$803 from the Minnesota Val-
ley Electric Cooperative Round
Up Program to the HOSA Pro-
gram. Motion passed by unani-
mous vote.
Incomi ng Superi ntendent
James Amsden shared informa-
tion relating to the current High
School Principal Search and hir-
ing process and District Strategic
Planning Activities that have been
tentatively scheduled for the Fall
of 2013.
SCHOOL BOARD REPORTS:
Anne Karl shared information re-
lating to River Bend Special Edu-
cation Cooperative.
PRINCIPAL REPORTS:
Junior High Principal Steve
Harter and High School Principal
James Amsden shared informa-
tion relating to building activities
and events.
OTHER INFORMATION: The
May 2013 Regular School Board
Meeting will be held at 6:30 p.m.
on Monday, May 20, 2013 i n
room # 149, Arlington Campus.
ADJOURNMENT:
The meeting was adjourned at
7:50 p.m.
Chairperson-Brian Brandt
Clerk-Scott Dose
Call us at:
320-864-5518
The McLeod County Chronicle
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 25, 2013, page 8
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Tri-County Household Hazardous
Waste Collection in Gibbon
At the Sibley County Highway Shop (corner of Ely & E. Mill Rd.)
Thursday, May 2nd 2013 from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
For residents of Le Sueur, Sibley, & Nicollet Counties
Examples of Acceptable Items: Paints & stains, thinners,
solvents, home & garden chemicals, roof & driveway tars,
household cleaners, aerosols, acids, bases, adhesives,
rechargeable & button batteries, mercury thermometers &
thermostats, and fluorescent bulbs (from households only!).
WE ABSOLUTELY CANNOT ACCEPT: Business bulbs or business waste of
any kind; or explosives or ammunition.
For more information,
call the Tri-County Solid Waste Office at 507-381-9196
http://www.co.sibley.mn.us/tricounty_swo/index.html
A15-16E16-17Sa
City-Wide Garage Sales
in Arlington Friday & Saturday, May 10 & 11
For only
$
15
00
you can:
1. Place your Garage Sale Ad
2. Receive 2 FREE Garage
Sale Signs
If enough participate, advertising will include The Sibley Shopper,
Arlington Enterprise and the Glencoe Advertiser.
Sponsored by The Sibley Shopper and Arlington Enterprise.
Yes! We’re having a Garage Sale May 10 & 11!
Deadline: Wednesday, May 1, 2013.
Name: ________________________________________
Address: ______________________________________
Time: __________________a.m. to ____________p.m.
List of items (Limit 10): ___________________________
______________________________________________
______________________________________________
______________________________________________
Just gather up
your unused
items and bring
the following
info to The
Arlington
Enterprise/
Sibley Shopper
office.
Starting
at 8 a.m.
Office Hours:
Mon., Tues., Wed.
8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Thurs.
8:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
Fri. CLOSED
Invest in the crahsmanship and beauty cf
ABC Seamless Siding & Gutters
Since 1967, Richard Larscn 8uiIders has prcvided hcmecwners with
high quaIity prcducts and great custcmer service.
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K6,8,10,12,14,16,10,20,22,24,26,28,30CEa
“Plant Trees for a
Brighter Minnesota,” is the
theme of Arbor Month in
May, the Department of
Natural Resources (DNR)
said. Arbor Day, April 26,
marks the beginning of a
month-long celebration of
trees.
The idea is to encourage
Minnesotans to replace
trees lost during the past
year’s tornadoes, floods,
blowdowns and snow-
storms.
“These newly planted
trees will brighten Min-
nesota by creating mature
forests that will improve the
environment, enhance our
quality of life and foster
recreation,” said Jennifer
Teegarden, DNR forestry
outreach specialist.
To celebrate Arbor
Month, the DNR sent 3,600
packets to educators, cities,
nurseries and others con-
sisting of “Plant Trees for a
Brighter Minnesota” poster,
instructions on how to plant
seedlings and balled and
burlapped trees.
The DNR has partnered
with the City of Duluth to
celebrate Arbor Month as
an effort to encourage the
greater Duluth area to re-
cover from last year ’s
floods. A celebration is
scheduled May 15 in
Chester Park between
11:30-2 p. m. , with a
planned 1 p.m. ceremony.
The park lost many trees in
the floods.
Activities include
seedling and tree planting
and archery. State Forestry
Division Director Forrest
Boe and Duluth Mayor Don
Ness are scheduled to
speak. It’s free and open to
the public. Registration is
not required.
Visit the DNR’s Arbor
Month Web page for more
information about planting
trees in Minnesota and to
find a local celebration.
For an Arbor Month
packet, contact the DNR In-
formation Center at
info.dnr@state-.mn.us, 651-
296-6157 or toll-free 888-
646-6367.
Celebrate Arbor Month and brighten
Minnesota by planting trees in May
Conifers growing in Min-
nesota have had a long, hard
winter with plenty of opportu-
nities for winter injury, ac-
cording to the Department of
Natural Resources (DNR). By
now, many people have no-
ticed conifers full of brown
and red needles, especially
along highways. People might
have seen the conifers in their
yards, or along buildings and
driveways, are turning red or
brown.
In spite of their appearance,
people should not prune or re-
move the discolored trees.
Chances are good that the
trees are alive and healthy be-
neath their mask of red nee-
dles. Buds were well protect-
ed during the winter and will
grow once spring arrives, said
Jana Albers, DNR forest
health specialist.
The most evident damage,
caused by de-icing salts, oc-
curred on white pines growing
along highways. This salty
water settles on the pines and
is absorbed into individual
needles, killing them back
starting at the tips. Other dam-
age to conifers can be caused
by winter drying, or needle
dehydration.
“Throughout the winter,
each passing car sends up
clouds of salty water,” Albers
said. “Winter injury is also
caused by strong, dry winds,
many days of bright sunshine
and low relative humidity that
dries the needles.”
Some trees or groups of
trees seem to get winter injury
every year. It is likely the
trees are stressed due to poor
site conditions.
Native tree populations are
adapted to their location.
Moving seeds or seedlings
100 miles north or south of
their site of origin can result
in damage due to winter in-
jury.
Prevention techniques:
When selecting trees to
plant, choose species that are
adapted to local growing con-
ditions.
Avoid planting white and
red pines, balsam fir and
white spruce within 150 feet
of a highway to prevent salt
damage.
Avoid planting yew and
arbor vitae on south or south-
west sides of buildings or in
sunny and windy locations.
Erect temporary barriers
around conifers susceptible to
winter burn. They can be
made of plywood, burlap, tar
paper or plastics.
Just after the snow melts
and prior to bud break, rinse
de-icing salts off both conifers
and hardwoods.
Reduce or eliminate the use
of de-icing salts.
Replace trees that have se-
vere winter injury year after
year. They are not in the right
location and will only decline
due to needle and twig loss
over a period of many years.
Keep conifers properly wa-
tered throughout the growing
season and fall. Decrease the
watering slightly in Septem-
ber to encourage hardening
off. Water thoroughly in Octo-
ber until freeze-up.
DNR urges homeowners to resist
pruning or removing conifers
with red needles until late spring
Americanism
Essay Winner
In Gaylord
Jose Felipe, a sixth
grade student at the
Sibley East Elementary
School in Gaylord, was
recently chosen by the
Gaylord unit of the
American Legion Auxil-
iary as the winner of its
Americanism Essay
Contest, according to
Americanism Essay
Contest Committee
Chairperson Vernette
Mehlhop. A certificate
and $25 prize was
awarded to Felipe at
the elementary school
on Friday, April 19.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Jose Felipe
About one quarter of all
U.S. soybeans are exported to
China, making them the sin-
gle largest soybean export
customer. Some Minnesota
farmers now have a broader
understanding of the market’s
magnitude and the work that
has gone into cultivating it.
A group of 27 farmers re-
cently traveled there with the
Minnesota Soybean Research
& Promotion Council’s
(MSR&PC) See For Yourself
trip. While on the trip, partic-
ipants learned about the chal-
lenges facing Chinese agri-
culture, the import-export
outlook and were able to see
firsthand how their soybean
checkoff dollars are being in-
vested.
During the trip, farmers
toured feed mills, soy food
processing plants, food mar-
kets and aquaculture farms.
Minnesota farmers had the
opportunity to hear from their
international representatives
at the United States Meat Ex-
port Federation (USMEF),
the U.S. Embassy in China,
the United States Soybean
Export Council (USSEC) and
U.S. exporters.
“The trip to China exceed-
ed my expectations. It was a
wonderful, educational expe-
rience, and I feel confident
and comfortable in how the
soybeans we grow here are
being promoted abroad,” said
Jim Sallstrom, farmer from
Winthrop and participant on
the See For Yourself trip.
This is the eighth year of
the See For Yourself pro-
gram, and it has helped foster
relationships with interna-
tional customers. The U.S.-
China soy industry relation-
ship is collaborative and trips
like this help to build a
stronger relationship with
Chinese customers. The eco-
nomic landscape in China is
rapidly changing with a
growing middle class that is
gradually moving from rural
areas to cities and demanding
a diet higher in meat protein.
Minnesota soybean farmers
can help meet this growing
demand.
“This increasing demand
for protein drives the demand
for northern U.S. soybeans.
Chinese market opportunities
continue to expand at an in-
credible pace,” stated Tom
Slunecka, Minnesota Soy-
bean Executive Director and
participant on the See For
Yourself China trip. “Without
the investment of checkoff
funds, access to the ever
growing Chinese market
would be lost to South Amer-
ican beans.”
The agriculture industry in
China is very strong, con-
tributing 10 percent of the na-
tion’s gross domestic product
(GDP) and 35 percent of the
labor force.
Over half of Minnesota’s
soybean production is export-
ed to feed people and live-
stock around the world.
China is the largest customer
for U.S. soybeans with pur-
chases exceeding $10.5 bil-
lion in 2011. As demand for
crops continues to grow glob-
ally, farmers are meeting the
challenge through the use of
technology and the develop-
ment of international business
relationships.
The international market-
ing of soybeans and meats is
a priority for the soybean
checkoff that MSR&PC ad-
ministers on behalf of Min-
nesota soybean farmers. The
soybean checkoff is an in-
vestment soybean farmers
make in order to increase
yields, improve quality and
expand markets for soybeans
in the U.S. and around the
world.
The See For Yourself trip,
organized by MSR&PC, pro-
vides an opportunity for Min-
nesota farmers to see first-
hand how their soybean
checkoff is being used to add
value to their soybeans in the
international market.
Minnesota soybean farmers venture to China
It’s beginning to look a lot
like Christmas. Wait a
minute, Christmas was three
and a half months ago! Even
though the weather is dreary,
the Arlington Conquerors
were not fooled at their meet-
ing on April 14. Instead of
talking about Christmas, the
club looked ahead to summer.
The club heard the reports
from the Federation and PDC
meetings. Members also
started talking about our
community pride project.
The club will hold its next
meeting at the Senior Citi-
zens Building on Sunday,
May 5. It will be a potluck
and there will be alumni Ar-
lington Conquerors’ members
who will reminisce about
what it was like to be an AC
member “back in the day.”
Arlington Conquerors look forward to summer
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 25, 2013, page 9
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
McGraw Monument
Works, Inc., LeSueur
Local Representative
Leah Schrupp
Arlington, MN 55307
612-308-8169
3 miles North of LeSueur
on Highway 169
30945 Forest Prairie Road
(507) 665-3126
HOURS: M-F 8-5
Weekends by appointment.
Visit our
INDOOR AND OUTDOOR
DISPLAYS
M31-30Ea
Blessings
For you know that it was not with perishable things such as silver or gold
that you were redeemed from the empty way of life handed down to you
from your ancestors, but with the precious blood of Christ,
a lamb without blemish or defect. 1 Peter 1:18-19 NIV
Zion Lutheran Church
Green Isle Township
Fill In Pastor Bob Hines
Worship: Sunday 9:00 a.m.
Commercial and Industrial Builders
Green Isle, MN 55338
ph. 507.326.7901 fax: 507.326.3551
www.vosconstruction.com
Arlington State Bank
Serving the Community Since 1895
BANKING SERVICES
964-2256
Arlington
A & N Radiator Repair
Allen & Nicki Scharn, Owners
23228 401 Ave., Arlington
877-964-2281 or 507-964-2281 Bus.
Certified ASE Technician on Staff
Also distributor for Poxy Coat II
Industrial Grade Coatings/Paint
MID-COUNTY
CO-OP
700 W. Lake St., Box 177
Cologne, MN 55322
(952) 466-3700
or TOLL FREE: 1-888-466-3700
HUTCHINSON CO-OP
AGRONOMY
LEON DOSE,
Arlington Branch Manager
411 7
th
Ave. NW • (507) 964-2251
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
402 W. Alden, Arlington
507-964-5547
Online at
www.Arlington
MNnew.com
Arlington Haus
Your Hometown Pub & Eatery
1986-2009
Arlington • 1-507-964-2473
STATE BANK OF
HAMBURG
100 Years. 100 Reasons.
Phone 952-467-2992
statebankofhamburg.com
CONVENIENCE
STORE
Hwy. 5 N., Arlington
507-964-2920
Homestyle Pizza
Real or Soft Serve Ice Cream
Gas – Diesel – Deli – Videos
(507)
964-2212
www.
chefcraigs
.com
23180 401 Ave., Arlington Phone 507-964-2264
EQUAL
HOUSING
LENDER
CRAIG BULLERT
ARLINGTON, MN
23189 Hwy. 5 North,
Arlington, MN 55307
arlington@hutchcoop.com
Office (507) 964-2283
Cell (320) 583-4324
HC
FUNERAL SERVICE
P.O. Box 314
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-2201
Member
FDIC
Church News
Menus
Submitted Photo
Retirement Open House
A retirement open house was recently
held for Joyce Bening, middle, at Mor-
reim’s Pharmacy in downtown Arling-
ton. Bening was honored after 21 years
of employment. Left to right: Joyce
Morreim, Joyce Bening and Les Mor-
reim.
ST. MARY, MICHAEL
AND BRENDAN AREA
FAITH COMMUNITY
Fr. Keith Salisbury, Pastor
Friday, April 26: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar). 4:30 to 8:00 p.m.
Jump For Joy (Mar).
Saturday, April 27: Catholic
Home Missions appeal. Second
grade retreat (Mar). 5:00 p.m.
Mass (Mar).
Sunday, April 28: Catholic
Home Missions appeal. 7:30
a.m. Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m. Ele-
mentary religious education
(Mar), last class; Mass (Mic).
10:30 a.m. Mass (Mar). 1:00 to
7:00 p.m. Junior High Festival
at St. Mary, Sleepy Eye.
Monday, April 29: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre); Word and Commu-
nion (Mar). 8:00 p.m. AA and
AlaNon (Mar).
Tuesday, April 30: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar).
Wednesday, May 1: 7:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar). 8:30 a.m. Mass
(Bre). 9:00 a.m. Word and Com-
munion (Oak Terrace). 6:30
p.m. Year-end religious educa-
tion party (Mar). 7:00 p.m. KC
officers meeting (Mar).
Thursday, May 2: 7:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar). 8:30 a.m. Mass
(Bre and Mic). 9:00 a.m. Scrip-
ture study (Srs. residence in
Gaylord). 7:30 p.m. Narcotics
Anonymous (Mic).
TRINITY LUTHERAN
32234 431st Ave., Gaylord
Rev. James Snyder,
Interim Pastor
Sunday, April 28: 9:30 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:45 a.m. Fel-
lowship. 10:30 a.m. Worship.
Tuesday, April 30: 7:30 p.m.
Shared ministry meeting at St.
Paul’s.
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Pastor William Postel
Phone 507-964-2400
Sunday, April 28: 9:00 a.m.
Bible class. 10:00 a.m. Worship.
with Holy Communion. Potluck
dinner. Ladies Aid meeting.
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN
Green Isle
Friday, April 26: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, April 28: 7:45 a.m.
Worship with Communion. Pas-
tor Bob Hines. 9:00 a.m. Sunday
school.
Wednesday, May 1: 3:45 p.m.
Confirmation at Peace Lutheran,
Arlington 6:30 to 7:30 p. m.
Wednesday school for grades 1-
5.
PEACE LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Kurt Lehmkuhl, Pastor
Sunday, April 28: 8:15 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:30 a.m. Wor-
ship service. 10:30 a.m. Voters’
meeting.
Monday, April 29: 7:00 p.m.
Bible study and Guild meeting.
Wednesday, May 1: 3:45 p.m.
Confirmation. 5:00 p.m. Junior
Bell Choir.
ZION LUTHERAN
814 W. Brooks St.
Arlington – (507) 964-5454
James Carlson, Pastor
Sunday, April 28: 8:00 a.m.
Choir. 9:00 a.m. Worship. 10:00
a.m. Sunday school and fellow-
ship.
Tuesday, April 30: 6:00 to
7:00 p.m. TOPS in church base-
ment.
ZION LUTHERAN
Green Isle Township
Friday, April 26: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, April 28: 9:00 a.m.
Contemporary worship.
Wednesday, May 1: 3:45 p.m.
Confirmation at Peace Lutheran,
Arlington. 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday school for grades 1-
5 at St. Paul’s.
CREEKSIDE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Christian & Missionary
Alliance
Ben Lane, Pastor
114 Shamrock Drive
Arlington – 507-964-2872
www.creekside-church.com
email: creeksidecc@media-
combb.net.
Thursday, April 25: 1:00 or
7:00 p.m. Women’s Bible study
- Experiencing God. 7:00 p.m.
Still Water Concert, free of
charge. 6:30 p.m. Men’s Bible
study of Luke at Oak Terrace in
Gaylord.
Sunday, April 28: 10:30 a.m.
Worship service with Sunday
school.
Wednesday, May 1: 6:30 to
8:00 p.m. Kids Club back yard
bash for 4-year-olds thru 6th
graders and their families. 7:00
to 8:30 p. m. REACH Youth
Group at Shogren’s.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
(507) 304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
507-234-6770
Saturday: Church services at
9:30 a.m. Bible study at 11:00
a.m. Fellowship dinner at 12:00
p.m. All are welcome.
UNITED METHODIST
Arlington
Wayne Swanson, Pastor
www.arlingtonunited
methodist.org
Thursday, April 25: 10:00
a.m., 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. Wor-
ship on cable TV. 1:00 and 7:00
p. m. Bible study at Jean
Olson’s.
Saturday, April 27: 8:00 a.m.
A-Men men’s group. 10:00 a.m.
Esther Bible study at Bette Nel-
son’s.
Sunday, April 28: 9:00 and
11:00 a.m. Worship. 10:15 a.m.
Sunday school. 6:30 p.m. Par-
enting series.
Wednesday, May 1: 7:00 p.m.
Confirmation and choir.
Thursday, May 2: 10:00 a.m.,
2:00 and 7:00 p.m. Worship on
cable TV. 1:00 and 7:00 p.m.
Bible study at Jean Olson’s.
EVANGELICAL
COVENANT CHURCH
107 W. Third St., Winthrop
Pastor Kyle Kachelmeier
507-647-5777
Parsonage 507-647-3739
www.wincov.org
Sunday, April 28: 9:30 a.m.
Worship. 10:45 a.m. Sunday
school. 12:00 p.m. Baked potato
bar - MOPS fundraiser.
Monday, April 29: 5:00 p.m.
Exercise.
ST. PAUL LUTHERAN
(WELS),
Arlington
Bruce Hannemann, Pastor
WEBSITE:
www.stpaularlington.com
EMAIL:
Bruce.Hannemann@stpaul
arlington.com
Friday, April 26: 9:30 a.m.
MLC Children’s Theater trip.
Saturday, April 27: 11:00 a.m.
Track meet at New Ulm.
Sunday, April 28: 8:45 a.m.
Sunday school. 9:00 a.m. Fami-
ly Bible study. 10:00 a.m. Ex-
amination Sunday, worship with
Communion. 6:30 p.m. Youth
Group meeting at school.
Monday, April 29: Food taken
to Food Shelves.
Tuesday, April 30: 8:45 a.m.
M.O.M.’s at school. 7:00 p.m.
Adult Bible course at school.
Wednesday, May 1: 2:00 p.m.
Bible study. 7:30 p.m. Choir
practice.
Thursday, May 2: 10:00 a.m.
Bulletin information due. 11:00
a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Service on
cable TV, channel 8. 6:30 p.m.
Worship Committee meeting.
GAYLORD ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
Gaylord
Bob Holmbeck, Pastor
Sunday, April 28: 9:00 a.m.
Sunday school. 10:00 a.m. Sun-
day worship service. Pot bless-
ing noon fellowship meal.
Wednesday, May 1: 6:30 p.m.
Evening Bible classes and
Youth Focused.
ST. PAUL’S EV.
REFORMED CHURCH
15470 Co. Rd. 31, Hamburg
Dan Schnabel, Pastor
952-467-3878
www.stpaulsrcus.org
Sunday, April 28: 8:30 a.m.
Sunday school and adult Bible
study. 9:30 a.m. Worship serv-
ice. Choir practice after wor-
ship.
Wednesday, May 1: 6:30 to
8:00 p.m. Catechism class.
Thursday, May 2: 6:30 p.m.
Women’s Guild.
ORATORY OF
ST. THOMAS
THE APOSTLE
Jessenland
507-248-3550
Fr. Sam Perez
Thursday: Weekly Mass at
5:00 pm.
ST. PAUL’S UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Henderson
(507) 248-3594 (Office)
Rev. Brigit Stevens, Pastor
Find us on Facebook:
St. Paul’s UCC - Henderson
Sunday, April 28: 10:00 a.m.
Worship. 10:20 a.m. Sunday
school (Preschool to 6th).
SENIOR DINING
Call 326-3401 for a meal
Suggested Donation $3.85
Monday: Hamburger, oven
brown potatoes, corn, bun with
margarine, rhubarb sauce, low fat
milk.
Tuesday: Chi cken papri ka,
brown rice, mixed vegetables,
peaches, cream puff dessert, low
fat milk.
Wednesday: Ital i an meat
sauce, spaghetti noodles, lettuce,
dressi ng, green beans, garl i c
bread with margarine, low fat
milk, ice cream.
Thursday: Pork l oi n, whol e
parslied potatoes, carrots, dinner
roll with margarine, poke cake,
low fat milk.
Friday: Roast beef, mashed
potatoes wi th gravy, stewed
tomatoes, bread with margarine,
fruit, low fat milk.
SIBLEY EAST ELEMENTARY
BREAKFAST MENU
Arlington and Gaylord
Breakfast is served at 8:00
a.m. daily. A 1/2 pint of milk is
served wi th each meal dai l y.
Menu is subject to change.
Monday: Cereal, cheese stick,
fruit, milk.
Tuesday: Pop tart, seeds,
juice, milk.
Wednesday: Muffin, cheese
stick, juice, milk.
Thursday: Mini cinnis, juice,
milk.
Friday: Crunchmania, seeds,
juice, milk.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Arlington
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served
with each meal. Additional milk is
avai l abl e for 40 cents each.
Menu is subject to change.
Monday: Pi zza, romai ne
salad, vegetable, fruit. Alternate:
None.
Tuesday: Chicken nuggets,
seasoned rice, vegetable, carrot
sticks, fruit. Alternate: Cooks’
choice.
Wednesday: Chili with cheese,
veggie sticks, Johnny cake, fruit,
whole grain bread.
Thursday: Sub sandwi ch,
chips, fixings, fresh fruit.
Friday: Oven roasted chicken,
cheezy potatoes, peas, frui t,
whole grain bread.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Gaylord
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served
with each meal. Additional milk is
avai l abl e for 40 cents each.
Menu is subject to change.
Monday: Pi zza, romai ne
salad, green beans, peach slices.
Alternate: Grilled chicken.
Tuesday: Chicken nuggets,
seasoned rice, broccoli, carrot
sti cks, mi xed frui t. Al ternate:
Ravioli.
Wednesday: Pork and gravy,
mashed potatoes, glazed carrots,
fruit. Alternate: Fish burger.
Thursday: Toasted cheese
sandwich, tomato soup, black
bean sal ad, vegetabl e sti cks,
pear slices. Alternate: Cold cut
sandwich.
Friday: Hot dog on whole grain
bun, oven potatoes, baked
beans, fruit. Alternate: Cooks’
choice.
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The Arlington
Enterprise
402 W. Alden St.
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-5547
52 Weeks
a Year!
IS
S
U
E
S
!
w
E
ha
e
v
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 25, 2013, page 10
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
LIES KE TRAC TOR
Want ed: Your OLD TRAC TORS,
any con di tion, make or mod el. We
also spe cial ize in new and used
TRAC TOR PARTS AND RE PAIR.
Call Kyle. Lo cat ed west of Hen -
der son. (612) 203-9256.
$$ DOL LARS PAID $$ Junk ve -
hi cl es, re pai r abl e cars/trucks.
FREE TOW ING. Flatbed/ wreck er
serv ice. Im me diate pick up. Mon -
day-Sun day, serv ing your area
24/7. (952) 220-TOWS.
1,200 Cow dairy farm in Wa ver ly,
MN is cur rent ly seek ing to fill a
farm main tenance po si tion. Will be
re spon si ble for per form ing pre ven -
tive and gen er al main tenance on
farm equip ment and build ings. Will
also help with field work and ma -
nure haul ing. Pri or work ex peri -
ence re quired. Must be able to
weld. Must be able to op er ate pay -
load ers,skid steers and trac tors.
CDL a plus. Call (763) 658-4877
or stop by bet ween 7 a.m.-5 p.m.
Mon day through Fri day. Wood land
Dairy, Wa ver ly, MN.
CON KLIN® DEAL ERS NEED ED!
Life time ca reer in mar ket ing, man -
age ment and ap ply ing “Green”
pro ducts made in Amer i ca. Full
time/ part time. For a free cat a log,
call Franke’s Con klin Serv ice now
at (320) 238-2370. www.frank e -
mar ket ing.com.
Gold en Hearts As sist ed Liv ing is
tak ing ap pli ca tion for the fol low ing
per son al care at tend ant j obs:
Bath ing Care giv er, Tues day and
Fri day morn ings; Per son al Care -
giv er, two po si tions. Mon day- Sun -
day morn ings. (Shifts al ter nate to
in clude eve ry oth er wee kend.);
Per son al Care giv er, two po si tions.
Mon day- Sun day af ter noon/even -
ing. (Shifts al ter nate to in clude
eve ry oth er wee kend.) Ap ply in
per son at 602 Mari on Drive, Ar -
ling ton.
HAND Y MAN: Will do re mo del ing
of kitch ens, bath rooms, hang ing
doors and wi nd ows, pai nt i ng,
sheet rock ing, tex tur iz ing or any
minor re pairs in side or out side.
Wi l l al so do cl ean i ng of base -
ments/ga rag es. Call (320) 848-
2722 or (320) 583-1278.
2007 Sun set Creek Trav el Trail er.
IM MACU LATE con di tion! All alu mi -
num, nice and light weight- easy
pull with 1/2 ton. Wa ter heat er,
show er, two sky lights, front and
rear easy l ow er i ng sta bi l i z i ng
jacks, front queen bed, fridge,
oven, mi crowave, bat tery, one
slide out, nice awn ing. Sleeps 6.
Al ways stored in doors when not in
use. $14,500. (507) 995-0739.
Spe cial- 95% Good man gas fur -
nace and pro gram ma ble ther mo -
stat $2,200 in stalled or AC unit
$1,900 in stalled. J&R Plumb ing
Heat ing AC, Lester Prair ie (320)
510-5035.
Min ne so ta Twins sea son tick ets
for 2013 sea son. Sec ti on 121
seats. Pack age in cludes 2 seats.
5, 10 or 15 game pack ag es avail -
able. Con tact Rick at (952) 224-
6331 for more in for ma tion.
OLD MO TOR CY CLES WANT ED:
Cash paid, pre fer ably non run ning
con di tion, ti tle or no ti tle, Hon da,
Su zu ki, Ka wa sa ki, Ya ma ha, Tri -
umph and oth er makes. Please
call Dar ick at 507-381-3405.
BUY ING JUNK BAT TER IES
We buy used bat ter ies and lead
weights. Pay ing top dol lar for junk
bat ter ies. Pay ing $12 for au to mo -
tive bat ter ies We pick up with 18
bat tery min i mum. Call 800-777-
2243.
Want ed to buy: Junk cars and
trucks. Com peti tive pric ing with
friend ly serv ice. Tow ing avail able.
Call an y time (320) 296-2253.
WANT ED TO BUY: Old signs all
types, farm primi tive paint ed fur ni -
ture all types, cup boards, cub by
units, lock er and pool wire bas -
kets, wood & metal piec es with
lots of draw ers, old pre-1960 holi -
day dec o ra tions, in dus tri al/school
items such as metal racks, stools,
work bench es, light n ing rods and
balls, weath er vanes, ar chi tec tur al
items like cor bels and stain glass
wind ows. We buy one item and
en tire es tates. Don’t get a dump -
ster un til you call us first! We are
lo cal. (612) 590-6136.
Zero down RHA fi nanc ing is avail -
able for this prop er ty. 11798 155th
St., Glen coe. Hob by farm for sale.
6 +/- acr es, beau ti ful 4BR home.
Very new out bui l d i ngs. MLS#
4338091, $275,000. Con tact me
for a pri vate show ing. Paul Krueg -
er, Edi na Re al ty, (612) 328-4506,
Paul Krueg er@edi nare al ty.com.
1120 Grove Ave., Bi rd Is l and.
4BR, 3BA home on 2 l ots.
$119,000. Pool table and all ap -
plianc es in clud ed. (320) 296-1603.
Home for sale by own er. 3BR,
2BA, AC, large lot in Ar ling ton,
wood fire place, $119,000. (507)
380-1967 or (507) 964-2946.
Ar l i ng ton: Great start er home.
3BR, 2BA, new kitch en, fur nace
wa ter heat er, new heat ed ga rage.
Con tract for deed pos si bl e,
FSBO, $70,000/BO. (952) 486-
3342.
Lake home for sale 7 miles north
of Will mar on Ea gle Lake. (320)
235-8648, af ter 6 p.m.
2BR Apart ment with ga rage, wa -
ter/sew er/gar bage i n cl ud ed.
$450/mo. New Au burn (320) 327-
2928.
Newly remodeled apartments for
rent i n Renvi l l e. Water, heat,
garbage i ncl uded. New appl i -
ances, air conditioners. (320) 564-
3351.
Avai l abl e soon. 1BR and
2BR/2BA, laun dry in apart ment.
Ga rage avail able. Ar ling ton. Call
800-873-1736, Am ber Field Place
Apart ment.
Avail able soon. 2BR/2BA. Laun dry
in apart ment. Ga rage avail able.
Gay lord. Call 800-873-1736 Am -
ber Field Place Apart ment.
Glen coe Towns Edge Es tates has
a 2BR & 3BR avail able soon. In -
cludes heat, wa ter, gar bage and
sew er. We ac cept cats and small
dogs. (320) 864-6600.
Com mer cial Build ing avail able
now! 900 sq. ft. down town Gay -
lord. Call Sar ah at (507) 237-5339
days, (507) 237-4166 even ings.
AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
AUTOMOTIVE
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
Work Wanted
FOR SALE
Campers
Heating/Air Cond.
Miscellaneous
Wanted To Buy
REAL ESTATE
Hobby Farm
Houses
Lake Homes
RENTAL
Apartment
Business, Office
EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE
Houses
REAL ESTATE RENTAL
Apartment
RENTAL
Classifieds
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The McLeod
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The Glencoe
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The Sibley Shopper
Arlington Enterprise
The Galaxy
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AGRICULTURE AUTOMOTIVE EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE LIVESTOCK
& PETS
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REAL ESTATE SERVICES RENTAL RENTAL
All ads appear online
at GlencoeNews.com
Enterprise
To place an ad: Call: 507-964-5547; Fax: 507-964-2423; E-Mail: info@ArlingtonMNnews.com; Mail: P.O. Box 388, Arlington, MN 55307
Advertising
Deadlines
The McLeod County Chronicle Mondays at Noon
The Arlington Enterprise & The Silver Lake Leader Tuesdays at Noon
The Glencoe Advertiser, The Sibley Shopper
& The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
Commercial
Building and
Business
Opportunity
Call (507) 964-2256
A10-13E,11-14Sa
JOB POSTING
The City of Arlington is currently accepting applica-
tions for a full-time Maintenance Supervisor in the Pub-
lic Works Department. The position oversees operation
of the City’s streets, parks, cemetery, and grounds. The
position is responsible for budget development and su-
pervision of subordinates. The position is responsible for
performing various types of semi-skilled and skilled
labor and the operation of light to medium equipment
involved in the repair and maintenance of the City
streets, parks, and other municipal property.
Minimum Qualifications: High School Diploma or
G.E.D. plus two years of public works or related experi-
ence. Must possess and maintain a valid Minnesota
Class “B” or higher CDL or the ability to obtain one in
one month. Must possess and maintain a valid Class “C”
Boiler’s License or the ability to obtain one in one year.
Must possess and maintain a valid license for pesticide,
herbicide, and insecticide application or obtain one in
one year. Salary:
$
14.95 -
$
20.92/hour plus benefits.
For required application and job description, go online
at www.arlingtonmn.com or contact Arlington City Of-
fices, 204 Shamrock Drive, Arlington, MN 55307, (507)
964-2378. Cover letters, resume and applications are
due to the Interim City Administrator no later than 4:00
p.m. on May 3, 2013.
The City of Arlington is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
A15-16E,16-17AGa
LOOKING FOR A
PART-TIME JOB?
Come join our team at
HICR and work with
adults with developmental
disabilities.
We have an opening
for every other
weekend and fill-in
shifts as available.
Call Sue for an
appointment at
507-964-5984
A15-16E16-17ASa
OTR DRIVERS
Sign on bonus $1,000. Up to 45 CPM.
Full-time positions with benefits! Pet poli-
cy. O/O’s welcome! deBoer Transportation
800/825-8511 www.deboertrans.com
INVESTORS
Copyrighted smart phone technology.
Ground floor of a possible IPO. $5,000
min.- $25,000 max. investment. 1360 Uni-
versity Ave, Suite 232, St. Paul, MN 55104.
FTW IS CURRENTLY RECRUITING
volunteer community representa-
tives & host families for the 2013
school year. Call Kathy: 952/837-0025;
Kathy@facetheworld.org
NEW ALUMINUM ROLL-IN
Walks on Water dock 32’ wide, 8’
patio. Plastic wheels, cedar deck.
Delivery available. Clear Lake
Dock and Sports 320/743-2020
i nfo@cl earl akedockandsport s. com
CASH FOR CARS:
All cars/trucks wanted. Running or not! Top
dollar paid. We come to you! Any make/
model. Call for instant offer: 800/871-9145
SAWMILLS
from only $3,997.00 - Make & save
money with your own bandmill - cut
lumber any dimension. In stock ready
to ship. Free info/DVD: 800/578-1363
Ext. 300N www.NorwoodSawmills.com
DISH NETWORK
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
high speed internet starting at $14.95/month
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day installation! Call now! 866/785-5167
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OAK TERRACE
Healthcare Center of Gaylord
has openings in the following positions:
OAK TERRACE HEALTH CARE SKILLED NURSING FACILITY
RN/LPN:
• 64 hours a pay period combination evening and
over night shifts.
• Benefit eligible position.

$
2.00 eve. and
$
3.00 over night shift differential.
OAK TERRACE DIETARY
COOK/AIDE:
• Position is Resource/On Call
Please contact us for more information.
OAK TERRACE ASSISTED ACTIVITY DEPARTMENT
AIDE:
• Position is every other weekend 1-5 p.m.
• Looking for an energetic individual who enjoys
working with the Elderly
• Duties would include leading a variety of
activities throughout the facility.
Applications are available at:
640 Third St., Gaylord, MN
Or online at www.oakterraceliving.com
For further information, contact
Human Resources at 507-237-8703.
EOE
A
1
5
E
1
6
S
a
Available...
1 & 2 Bedroom
Apartments Available
All utilities,
except electric
Income based
Must be 62 or older
or handicapped
Highland Commons
Arlington
507-964-5556 HANDICAP
ACCESSIBLE
A
1
6
-
2
8
E
,1
7
-
2
9
A
S
G
a
Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington
is seeking the following positions:
• Full-Time Benefit eligible LPN/RN –
evening shifts with every other weekend
Hiring Bonus up to
$
500 for Full-Time
LPN/RN position
• LPN/RN - every other weekend with potential to pick
up more hours
• Resource On-Call/Universal Worker for Assisted Living,
must be 18 years of age
• Part-Time Dietary Position - includes every other
weekend/holiday
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information,
call Tiffany Brockhoff,
Human Resource Director at
507-964-2251 or email:
tbrockof@good-sam.com
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap Drug-Free Workplace
Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life.
A
1
6
E
1
7
S
a
Pinske Real Estate
& Auctioneers
(507) 964-2250
Arlington
• 3 BR, 1-1/2 story home,
newer roof, newl y re-
decorated, in Arlington.
$
69,000.
We need listings of
homes, farms and hobby
farms. If you are thinking
about selling it will pay for
you to call us.
REAL ESTATE
A16SGEa
Garage Sales
HENDERSON’S
COMMUNITY
FRIDAY, May 3
8 A.M.- 8 P.M.
SATURDAY, MAY 4
8 A.M. - NOON
A16-17SEa
Help Wanted:
Full-Time
Skilled Tradesmen
Looking for individuals
who possess previous
construction experience,
preferably in the commercial
or industrial markets.
More specific experience
desired but not required are
to include membrane
roofing, steel erection or
poured concrete
foundations. For more
information on the available
positions contact us at
507-326-7901 or
info@vosconstruction.com.
www.vosconstruction.com
A16ASGCEa
Classified
continued on page 11
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, April 25, 2013, page 11
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Sacred Heart, 205 Har ri son St.
Ni ce 2BR, 1BA, si n gl e fam i l y
1,359 sq. ft. , de tached ga rage.
Lease op tion or cash. $250 down,
$217/mo. (803) 978-1542.
For rent in Ar ling ton. New ly re mo -
deled 2BR main floor of house.
Sun porch, must see. $675. Call
(507) 381-1463.
LA DIES NIGHT EV ENT
May 17, 6 p.m.- 10 p.m.
Hutchin son Ev ent Cen ter
*Fash ion Show
*Dem on stra tions
*Door priz es eve ry hour on the
hour.
*25+ Ven dors, busi ness es and
craft ers.
*Buf fa l o Wi l d Wi ngs food and
drinks.
Re mem ber the Past Spring Vin -
tage Oc ca sion al Sale. Lo cat ed in
the Hutch Mall. May 15-19. Hours:
Wed nes day-Fri day, 10 a.m.- 8
p.m.; Sat ur day, 10 a.m.- 6 p.m.;
Sun day, 12 p.m.- 5 p.m. Fur ni ture,
home decor, yard and gar den,
glass ware, pot tery, cot tage, kitch -
en col lect i bles, Vic tor ian, col lect i -
bles and unique treas ures. (320)
583-9519, Buy ing and Sell ing.
CUS TOM LOG SAW ING- Cut at
your place or ours. White oak lum -
ber deck ing and fire wood. Give
Vir gil a call. Schau er Con struc tion,
Inc. (320) 864-4453.
LIMO/ PAR TY BUS. Wed dings,
busi ness, sports, birth days, etc.
Check us out www.theur ba nex -
press.com or call Dina (612) 940-
2184, Gl en coe busi ness. DOT
375227.
SERVICES
Misc. Service
Sales
SALES
House
RENTAL SALES
Sales
In our May 5 Sibley Shopper,
May 9 Arlington Enterprise
we will be publishing entries from
our Mother’s Day Promotion.
We are asking readers to send
“Mom Memories” or “Memories of Mom” to us.
We will have a basket full of goodies
for one lucky entrant to win!
Help us fill the basket for the lucky winner!
Donate an item up to
$
10 in value and receive
$
10 off
your ad! Ask your Sales Rep for more details.
Get your ad featured on this
special page in FULL COLOR
for LESS than Black & White!
Sibley Shopper
Arlington Enterprise
402 W. Alden St., Arlington
507-964-5547
www.ArlingtonMNnews.com
Ashley Reetz,
ashleyr@arlingtonmnnews.com
Because Mom is...
S
p
e
c
ia
l
!
Contact your Sales Representative by MAY 1 to advertise!
C
o
ntac
t
us
to
d
ay!
Submit your entries, in 100 words or less
and be entered into our Basket Drawing!
M
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s
o
f
M
o
m
:
M
o
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h
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k
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h
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o
l
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a
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s
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k
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f
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m
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R
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M
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Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
SOS Breakfast For The Veterans
Phyllis Kroehler cooked a trial run SOS breakfast for a
group of local veterans at Stu’s Rainbow Inn in down-
town Arlington on Monday morning, April 22. It is a
breakfast all service men would remember, according
to Arlington VFW Commander Blackie Schwirtz.
Kroehler will cook the same meal for people after this
year’s Memorial Day Program in Arlington. Left to
right: Veterans Steve Gillaspie, Sarge Meffert, Charlie
Haus, Roger Schneider, Blackie Schwirtz and Dick
Luepke.
Arlington Enterprise, www.arlingtonmnnews.com, Thursday, April 25, 2013, page 12
A & N Radiator Repair
After Burner Auto Body
Arlington Dugout
Arlington Enterprise
Arlington Market
Arlington NAPA
Arlington State Bank
Arneson Law Office
Brau Motors
CMC Construction
Cenex C Store
Chef Craig’s Caterers
CornerStone State Bank
Good Samaritan Society
Arlington Campus
Gustafson Family Dentistry
Haggenmiller Lumber
Hutchinson Co-op (Arlington)
Jerry’s Home Quality Foods
Kick’s Bakery
Kolden Funeral Home
Kreft Cabinets, Inc.
Krentz Construction, LLC
Lensing Insurance
Liberty Station
Local Lawn Enforcement
Mesenbring Construction
Morreim Pharmacy
Dr. H.M. Noack
Pinske Real Estate &
Auctioneers
Quick Shop/Subway
R & R Auto Repair
Reetz Floral
Reflections/Stu’s
Seneca Foods
Sibley Medical Center
TSE, a division of Ametek
Thomes Bros.
Tranquility Hair Salon &
Tanning
Tuchtenhagen
Construction, LLC
UFC/United Xpress
Vos Construction, Inc.
Y-Not Plumbing & Heating
Inc.
THIS PAGE SPONSORED BY THESE AREA BUSINESSES:
Sibley East High School
F
I
N
E
A
R
T
S
2
0
1
3
S
ho
w
C
ho
ir
Concert Choir
Sophom
oroe Choir
Knowledge Bowl
Jazz B
an
d
Senior High Band
Speech Team
Fall P
lay
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