5-23-13 Arlington Enterprise

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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Serving the Communities of Arlington and Green Isle, Minnesota
www.arlingtonmnnews.com Volume 129 • Number 47 • Thursday, May 23, 2013 • Arlington, MN 55307
Single copy $1.00
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
After seeing the bids for
the 2013 bituminous overlay
project, the Sibley County
Board of Commissioners had
a change of heart and will go
after a higher quality of road
surface on CASH 8.
Darin Mielke, Public
Works Director, told the
board at the meeting on Tues-
day, May 14 that the low bid
was close to 25 percent under
the engineer ’s estimate of
around $3,030,000. That was
the reason why Mielke re-
turned to the question about a
possible more expensive up-
grade to CASH 8.
At the previous meeting,
the board decided to stay with
a less expensive overlay
process.
However, their eyes were
opened wider with the good
news that the low bid by ton
was similar to the 2008 and
2009 season.
“We couldn’t believe how
aggressively they bid this
job, ” said Mielke about
William Mueller and Sons,
Inc. “If you include a simple
overlay of CASH 8, the total
project cost is just under $2.3
million and our engineer’s es-
timate was just over $3 mil-
lion. That is about $700,000
less than what we had antici-
pated.”
Of the $2.3 million, Mielke
said about $500,000 is county
funds, going for county roads
that are not eligible for state
aid funding or it is for patch-
ing projects.
“We are going to use $1.8
million of our state aid allot-
ment,” said Mielke. “If we
look at our 2014 funding as
well, we still have $1.2 mil-
lion left on the table.”
The cost for grinding up
the pavement on CASH 8 and
paving it three and a half to
four inches deep would be
about $1.2 to $1.5 million.
“The county could be look-
ing at the state aid allotment
covering the project com-
pletely if it advances 2014
funds forward,” said Mielke.
“You may have to throw in
$200,000, but it would be a
very permanent fix for that
road.”
The life expectancy for the
overlay is 12 to 13 years
compared to 25 to 30 with the
paving.
Mielke suggested at this
point the board could award
the bid as is today and then
try to work out a negotiated
supplement agreement. Or it
could table the award to look
at the full picture.
Commissioner Bill Pinske
thought the county could
make the award as it is and
make an amendment later. He
added, “I would hate to tell
someone ahead of time that
we will work it out. We can
say we are going to look at
it.”
The cost for the upgrade is
between five and six dollars
more per ton because of bet-
ter quality asphalt, according
to Mielke.
“That is certainly a pleasant
surprise because I think we
were all looking at that but
the impact on the budget was
such that we could not live
with it,” said Pinske. “If it is
only a couple hundred thou-
sand dollars, we could take
that out of reserves.”
The board voted to accept
the current low bid and then
go after the upgrade.
• In other action the low
bid by Structural Specialties,
Inc. of $404,933. 65 for a
bridge construction project
came in at 23.60 percent
under estimate. The highest
bid was 27.88 percent over
estimate.
• A contract with Pro Land-
scape was approved for one
year of lawn maintenance and
snow removal around county
buildings.
During the year there will
be research into the possible
use of the Sentencing to Serv-
ice (STS) work program. At
the same time, the county
signed off on the income con-
tract with the state for the
STS program.
*Hearings were set on June
25 for minor alterations to
two ditches, County ditch 54
at 9:30 a.m. and Judicial
Ditch 20 at 1 p.m.
• The public hearing on the
engineer’s preliminary report
for the establishment of a
new drainage system project
on County Ditch No. 70 was
set for 2 p.m. Tuesday, May
28.
Low bid makes it possible for a county road upgrade
By Kurt Menk
Editor
A public forum on the
proposed affiliation be-
tween the Sibley Medical
Center (SMC) and
Ridgeview Medical Center
(RMC) will be held at the
Arlington Community
Center at 7 p.m. Thursday,
May 30.
During the past several
months, the SMC and the
Arlington City Council
have been in discussions
in regard to a deeper rela-
tionship between SMC
and RMC.
“We are excited to share
at the public forum how
the synergies of an affilia-
tion between our two or-
ganizations will benefit
the residents of the com-
munities we serve,” said
SMC Administrator Todd
Sandberg.
In a rapidly changing
healthcare environment,
the City of Arlington,
SMC Board and leader-
ship of SMC is working to
ensure that community
members continue to have
access to patient-centered
quality care, according to
Sandberg.
Public forum is set
for proposed SMC
and RMC affiliation
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Cancer Cruise
Approximately 70 to 75 units were part of the Cancer
Cruise of Sibley County in Arlington on Saturday, May
18, according to organizer Felicia Brockoff. A car
show was held in the parking lot at St. Paul’s Luther-
an Church at noon. The event included classics,
bikes, rat rods, trucks and any street legal vehicle.
Only Toons DJ played 50’s and 60’s music. In addi-
tion, there were trivia and prizes. The cancer cruise,
which paraded down Main Street in Arlington at 4
p.m., toured the eastern part of Sibley County and
ended in Henderson. Over $2,000 was raised for the
Sibley County Relay For Life. Cologne residents
Steve and Brenda Alseth drove their 1954 Chevy 210
down Main Street.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington City Coun-
cil, during its regular meeting
on Monday night, May 20,
voted 4-0 and approved a
motion to offer the mainte-
nance supervisor position to
local resident Jason Lovaas.
City Council members Ben
Jaszewski, Jennifer Nuesse,
Jason Ruehling and Galen
Wills all voted in favor of the
motion.
City Council member Curt
Reetz, who is related to Lov-
aas, abstained from the vote.
The City Council made the
move based on a recommen-
dation from a hiring commit-
tee comprised of Nuesse,
Ruehling and Interim City
Administrator Cynthia Smith-
Strack. The committee inter-
viewed the five finalists last
week. Incoming City Admin-
istrator Liza Donabauer also
participated in the interview
via telephone.
Lovaas accepted the posi-
tion and began his new duties
on Tuesday morning, May
21. His hourly wage will be
$18.43 which is on the sixth
step of the 12-step wage
scale, according to Smith-
Strack.
He replaces the late Dan
“Buck” Thomes who passed
away unexpectedly on Satur-
day, March 23.
Lovaas, who grew up in
Onamia by Mille Lacs, has
lived in Arlington for 11
years. He and his wife, Elissa
(Hebeisen) Lovaas, have
three children. Lovaas
worked for Ramsey Excavat-
ing and Kraus Anderson Con-
struction. He has 15 years of
experience in construction.
His hobbies are hunting, four
wheeling and spending time
with family.
Other Business
In other business, the City
Council unanimously ap-
proved a motion to approve
the 2012 audit financial state-
ments as presented by Tom
Olinger from Abdo, Eick &
Meyers.
“The general fund is in re-
ally healthy shape, ” said
Olinger.
He later added that, “Over-
all, the audit went very well
and very smooth.”
In other news, Smith-
Strack and Lowell Nagel pre-
sented the yearly update from
the Arlington Planning Com-
mission.
The Planning Commission
functions in three distinct ca-
pacities: planning capacity,
legislative capacity and regu-
latory capacity.
The officers are Chairper-
son Lowell Nagel, Vice
Chairperson Dwight Gra-
bitske and Secretary Jeff
Pinske. The remaining mem-
bers are Michelle Battcher,
Richard Nagel and Mike Vrk-
lan.
In other action, the City
Council unanimously ap-
proved a motion to hire
Nathan Henke for part-time,
temporary spring mowing
and weed trimming.
The Arlington City Council
will hold its next regular
meeting at 6:30 p.m. Mon-
day, June 3.
Lovaas is hired as new
maintenance supervisor
The detour for the bridge
work on Highway 5 east of
Gaylord will be removed
soon after Memorial Day and
traffic restrictions from Gay-
lord to Arlington are expected
to follow beginning May 31,
weather permitting. according
to a news release from the
Minnesota Department of
Transportation (Mn/DOT).
The resurfacing operation
from First Street in Gaylord
to Sheila Drive in Arlington
will restrict traffic to one lane
with flagging operations and
a pilot car. Motorists are ad-
vised to drive with caution
through the work zone and
watch for workers, equipment
and traffic control devices.
The reconstruction of side-
walk ramps on Highway 5 in
Arlington will continue for
another three weeks. The
sidewalk improvements will
be made on alternating ramps
so that pedestrians are not in-
convenienced.
Central Specialties, Inc.,
Alexandria is the contractor
on the $2,593,892 project.
The project should be com-
plete in early July. Motorists
can expect a smoother ride on
Highway 5 and pedestrians in
Arlington will have ADA
compliant sidewalks.
A second project on High-
way 5 from Arlington to
Green Isle is scheduled to
begin in July.
For current statewide trav-
el information, visit
www.511mn.org.
Highway 5 Project moves to next stage
By Karin Ramige Cornwell
Manager
The Sibley East School
Board adopted an initial
budget for the 2013-14
school year at a deficit of
$160,841 during its regular
monthly meeting on Monday
night, May 20.
Total revenue in the budget
presented by the district’s
business manager Janna Tess-
mer, is projected to be
$12,885,770, with expenses
estimated at $13,046,611.
The revenues in the general
fund are $11,752,963, with
expenses budgeted at
$11, 891,074, a deficit of
$138,111.
The food service revenues
are estimated at $706,300
with $708,602 in expendi-
tures, a difference of -$2,002.
The community service
fund revenues are budgeted at
$231,937 with expenditures
at $252,365, a difference of
negative $20,420.
Interim Superintendent
John Langenbrunner said that
$286,295 in program and
budget adjustments were
made.
These adjustments include:
• Reduction in three teach-
ing overload sections,
$11,651.
• Two (possibly three) re-
tirements with new hires
compensated at a lower rate,
$50,000.
• Chargeback iPad lease to
capital budget, $50,461.
• Reduction in the dis-
trict’s technology budget,
$51,789.
• Reduction in workman’s
compensation rates, $35,000.
• Close the pool in Arling-
ton during July and August,
$11,500.
• Reduce the media re-
source budget by $2,000 per
building (elementary, junior
high and high school),
$6,000.
• Resignation from ECFE,
position will not be filled,
$15, 719.
• Chargeback after school
enrichment to community
service, $ 14,175.
• Chargeback elementary
computer staff to gifted and
talented, $6,000.
• Chargeback staff develop-
ment dollars to scheduled
staff workshop/in-service
days, $35,000.
Langenbrunner explained a
chargeback as moving dollars
from one fund to another
eliminating expenditures in
another fund.
He further explained that
the budget is created on as-
sumption taken from project-
ed enrollment reports from
the Minnesota Department of
Education (MDE) finance
section, auditor and other in-
formation.
Budget assumptions as of
May 20, 2013:
• “ At the end of fiscal year
(FY) ‘13, it is estimated the
unreserved (undesignated)
general fund balance will be
approximately $2,180,515
compared to $2,350,669 in
FY ‘12 and $2,691,549 in FY
‘11. If the board approves the
Budget
Continued on page 11
Another deficit budget at SE
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, May 23, 2013, page 2
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
EVERY TUESDAY IS
KIDS DAY!
1/2 Price Kids Meal with each Adult order. Eat-In Only!
Arlington Haus
Arlington • 507-964-2473 • (Your Hometown Pub & Eatery)
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“From this spot,
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Sibley East Retiree Recognition
Ceremony and Breakfast Banquet
Friday, May 31
st
Gaylord Campus Cafeteria 8:00 a.m.
We welcome community members and former
staff members to join us in honoring retirees:
Teri Pilacinski & Gail Norell
For their service to Sibley East and their dedication to
education. If you would like to attend the Breakfast
Banquet, please contact Gaylord school office at 507-237-
5511 or the Arlington school office at 507-964-2292 by
Thursday, May 30
th
. The cost of the breakfast will be
$
7.00.
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In Memory of
Richard Engelmann
who passed away 5 years ago
May 24, 2008
Little did we know that
morning
God was going to call your
name,
But as time slips by
And life goes on,
From our hearts you’re never
gone.
We think about you always,
We talk about you too,
We have so many memories,
But we wish we still had you
Love, Roxane, Jamie,
Sammie Jo, Bruce,
family & friends
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24 Pk. 12 Oz. Cans
$
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PiYo Strength 5:15am 5:15am
Total Body Strength
& Conditioning 7:30pm 8:15am 8:15am
Gentle Strength 9:30am 9:30am 9:30am
Gentle Metabolic 4:30pm 4:30pm
Kettlebell Circuits 5:30pm 7:00pm 9:00am
Kettlebell Strength
& Conditioning 8:15am 7:00pm 5:30pm
Stroller Strength & Conditioning Session starting in June!
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306 5
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Ave. NW, Arlington • 952-465-2298
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Monday, May 27: MEMORIAL DAY. Both Banks
will be closed.
Tuesday, May 28: Blood Drive, Arlington Com-
munity Center, 1 p.m.-7 p.m.
Wednesday, May 29: Arlington Fire Department
Relief Association, Arlington Fire Hall, 7 p.m.
Community
Calendar
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER
MAIN BANK
Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (straight thru)
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Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.,
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Member
FDIC
Arlington State Bank
(507) 964-2256
Fax (507) 964-5550
www.ArlingtonStateBank.com
News Briefs
Safarik wins top science award
Emily Safarik, a freshman at the Jefferson Junior
High School in Alexandria, received the top science
award out of 280 students during a program on Monday
night, May 20.
She is the daughter of James and Deena Safarik,
Alexandria.
She is also the granddaughter of Don and Donna
Wolter, Arlington
Area students on Dean’s List
Two area students were recently named to the Dean’s
List at South Dakota State University during the spring
semester.
The area students are Andrew Thies, Arlington, and
Erik Goetsch, Gaylord.
To earn Dean’s List distinction, in SDSU’s eight col-
leges, students must have completed a minimum of 12
credits and must have earned at least a 3.5 grade point
average on a 4.0 scale.
Students graduate from college
Two local students graduated from Minnesota State
College-Southeast Technical during recent commence-
ment exercises.
Joseph Maki received a certificate as an Industrial
Technology Welding Specialist from the Winona cam-
pus.
Amanda Peterson received a certificate as a Medical
Secretary Transcriptionist from the Winona campus.
Blood drive set for May 28
The Arlington Blood Drive will be held at the Com-
munity Center from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 28,
according to Coordinator Kay Schumacher.
For an appointment or more information, contact Kay
Schumacher at 507-964-5700.
People who have eligibility questions can call 1-866-
236-3276.
The need is constant. The gratification is instant. Give
blood.
Property damage in Arlington
A damage to property incident reportedly occurred at
Y-Not Plumbing & Heating along the 200 block of West
Main Street in Arlington sometime prior to Monday,
May 13, according to the Arlington Police Department.
It looked like a BB gun reportedly shot at the front
window of the business, according to the report. Two
more windows reportedly had slight chips in them as
well.
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
Sibley County Commis-
sioners are not ready to act on
a marketing agreement pro-
posal to utilize a Coast2Coast
Rx drug prescription card in-
volving discounts and re-
bates.
Public Health and Human
Service Director Vicki Stock
told the board at the May 14
meeting that the prescription
card offering discounted rates
would be used by the public
and jail inmates.
“There is no cost to the
county to implement this pro-
gram,” said Stock. “Plus, the
county does receive a small
amount of rebate money. This
is endorsed by the Associa-
tion of Minnesota Counties
(AMC). Several counties
have incorporated the pro-
gram. I see it as a win-win
because the jail inmates can
use it, which I assume would
save the county some dol-
lars.”
Cards would be available
for pickup at the public health
office and at area drug stores.
County Administrator Matt
Jaunich said there is some
concern from staff and coun-
sel that if approved it would
appear the county is endors-
ing one company or product
over another. He called it a
policy decision.
“The agreement provides
that we endorse them, which
is not exclusive,” said County
Attorney David Schauer. “If
you use another product, the
discount or rebate we get for
every use of the card decreas-
es significantly. They also
want to be on our county
website. They want the right
to use the county seal. They
do the advertising. I raise the
issue if the county wants to
be in the business of raising
one private business over an-
other.”
Schauer offered an exam-
ple of what if other compa-
nies come and say let us be
on the county website in ex-
change for services like oil
changes.
“If the board does want to
go that route then you need to
think long-term,” advised
Schauer. “Are we going to
have a policy of who can use
the card or can anybody be
endorsed by the county?”
Stock said other counties
report that they do not end up
with a huge rebate, but they
are all very happy with the
program that works with
local pharmacies. She added
the prescription card is for
people who are under in-
sured, but anybody can use it.
County Commissioner Jim
Swanson suggested the board
do a trial for a year to see
what bang they get for the
buck. Or, the county can opt
out.
County Commissioner Bill
Pinske asked if the county
can live without this card.
“My fear with this is if this
outfit is big and comes to say
you are going to accept so
much for a prescription,” said
Pinske. “If you lose a drug
store in a small town you are
not doing a good service to
your constituents.”
County Commissioner Jim
Nytes asked if the company
would be willing to come
make a presentation. Pinske
asked if local drug stores can
be asked if they think this is a
good idea and want to go
along with it.
“If pharmacies are regulat-
ed with what they can charge,
it is not going to help them
any,” said Swanson.
Stock said that is true with
any medical insurance com-
pany saying what they are
willing to pay.
Pinske added, “We are not
necessarily opposed to this,
but I am in need of more in-
formation.”
Prescription card program not valid in county yet
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Music Awards
The following students received major awards during
the Spring Program and Music Awards Night at the
Sibley East Senior High School in Arlington on Tues-
day night, May 14. Front Row: (left to right) Samantha
Lane (Most Improved Vocalist), Courtney Schwirtz
(Outstanding Show Choir Member), Marissa Eckberg
(Sibley East Senior of the Year, Band Officer and
Choir Officer), Katelyn Reid (National School Choral
Award, Band Officer and Choir Officer) and Lindsay
Fasching (Most Improved Band Player). Middle Row:
(l to r) Liz Becerra (Choir Officer), Taylor Pfarr (Choir
Officer), Dustin Pautsch (Choral High C Award), Sara
Borchert (Choir Officer) and Nathan Thomes (John
Phillip Sousa Band Award). Back Row: (l to r) Austin
Brockhoff (Choir Officer), Lukas Bullert (Outstanding
Sophomore Choir Student), Sam Bullert (Outstanding
Junior Choir Student, Outstanding Junior Band Stu-
dent and All State Choir Member) Sam Harrison
(Choir Officer), Nick Bruss (Band Officer) and Jordan
Bruss (Louis Armstrong Jazz Award). Missing from
the photo are Jonah Butler (Band Officer), Jordyn
Polzin (Outstanding Sophomore Band Student) and
Karina Robeck (Choir Officer)
For nine days in March, 14
high school students from Le
Sueur-Henderson took their
bright and eager minds to
Costa Rica where they had
thrilling adventures, experi-
enced a new culture and
learned things about the
world and themselves, ac-
cording to an article in the Le
Sueur Herald.
“It’s such a good experi-
ence for the kids,” said Maria
Reinhardt, a Spanish teacher
at LS-H High School who ac-
companied the students on
the trip. “So many kids have
never been on a plane and
never left the country of even
the state.” In a coast-to-coast
tour of this small nation these
lucky students explored vast
tropical forests, stood in awe
at the sight of a volcano, felt
ocean waves crash in on their
feet and even white water
rafted.
Le Sueur-Henderson students learn and grow in Costa Rica
Thank You
I would like to thank
both the Arlington and
Green Isle Fire Depart-
ments for their quick re-
sponse to my recent
grove fire.
I am also grateful to
my neighbors and rela-
tives for their assistance
during and after the fire.
Bruce Neubarth
*20Ea
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, May 23, 2013, page 3
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Call us at:
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507-964-5547
Arlington
Chiropractic Clinic
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607 W. Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-2850
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Office Hours:
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Miller
Law
Office
RAPHAEL J. MILLER
ROXANN M. BERANEK
Attorneys at Law
332 Sibley Ave. 1042 First Ave.
Gaylord, MN Gibbon, MN
Tel. 507-237-2954 Fax: 507-237-2347
Wills - Taxes - Estate Planning
General Law Practice & Trials
Free consultation on personal injury claims
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ATTORNEY AT LAW
302 West Main
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-5753
Real Estate, Estate Planning,
Probate and Business Law
Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Saturdays by Appointment
Farm – Residential
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507-964-2525
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Septic Systems, Driveways, Backhoe Work,
Hauling Gravel/Rock/Sand, Skidloader
Jeff cell: 612-756-0595
Wendy cell: 612-756-0594
640 E. BROOKS ST., ARLINGTON, MN 55307
1-507-964-5783 • FAX: 507-964-5302
Local LAWN
Enforcement
Arlington, MN
Licensed and Insured
Mowing, fertilizing and
weed control, dethatching,
garden tilling, core aeration
www.locallawnenforcement.com
Adam and David Hansen
Adam cell: 507-327-0917
507-964-5835
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New Patients Welcome
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106 3
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Septic Services
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507-665-3732
or 952-873-2208
Call Shane
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612-719-4166
REPAIR LLC
HEAVY DUTY TRUCK
AND FARM EQUIPMENT
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DOT INSPECTIONS
23315 HWY 5
ARLINGTON, MN 55307
PAUL PIEPER, OWNER
EMAIL: ppieper@ymail.com
Truck &
Farm Tire
Sales &
Service
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Liberty
Station
Corner of Hwy. 5 & Chandler
Arlington, MN
507-964-5177 or
Toll-Free 866-752-9567
www.LibertyStationAutoSales.com
Jim
Heiland’s
Affordable Used Cars
BRAZIL
AUTOMOTIVE
36833 200
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GREEN ISLE, MN 55338
Tires, Air Conditioning
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507-326-5751
MONDAY-FRIDAY 8-5
BEN BRAZIL,
Owner/Technician
brazilautomotive@gmail.com
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Hardware &
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A20Ea
The Minnesota Pollution
Control Agency (MPCA) re-
cently recognized People
Service employee Michael
Barthel from the City of Ar-
lington for maintaining a per-
fect record of compliance
with its wastewater treatment
permit during 2012. This
year, the City of Arlington
wastewater treatment facility
was among 168 wastewater
facilities statewide to receive
this recognition.
MPCA Commissioner John
Linc Stine had high praise for
the award recipients.
“Last summer, MPCA had
a rare opportunity to evaluate
the Minnesota River under
extreme drought conditions,”
said Stine. “These tests were
a chance for us to find out
whether tougher standards for
nearby wastewater treatment
plants were improving the
quality of the river. The tests
confirmed what we had al-
ready observed: that the work
of nearby wastewater opera-
tors has made a clear and
measurable difference in the
health of the Minnesota
River. So, this year, we can
tell Minnesotans with even
more certainty: your commu-
nity’s wastewater operators
are doing good work to pro-
tect Minnesota’s environment
and keep our water fishable
and swimmable.”
To be eligible for the
award, facility operators were
required to submit all moni-
toring reports to the MPCA
correctly and on time,
demonstrate consistent com-
pliance through monitoring or
surveys and employ MPCA-
certified operators. The City
of Arlington first received
this award in 1991 and has
earned an award 12 times
since then.
The awards were presented
at the 76th annual Wastewater
Operations Conference in
Brooklyn Park.
The annual Wastewater
Operations Conference brings
together wastewater operators
from Minnesota for training
and professional education.
There are about 1,360 munic-
ipal and industrial wastewater
treatment facilities in Min-
nesota. The size of the com-
munity, institution or treat-
ment plant was not a factor in
awarding the certificates of
excellence.
People Service employee recognized as
outstanding wastewater plant operator
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
Despite disliking the idea
of a legal clause not being re-
moved, the Sibley County
Board of Commissioners
gave final approval to a mem-
ber agreement for a new pro-
curement card system at the
meeting on Tuesday, May 14.
At the previous meeting,
County Treasurer Mary Fish-
er presented a proposal to
change from the current cred-
it card program to a procure-
ment program which is ex-
pected to decrease the
amount of late credit card fi-
nance charges and save the
county money.
County Attorney David
Schauer had concerns about a
clause saying the county de-
clines the right for a jury trial
in case of a dispute. The
board voted to approve the
program contingent on
Schauer giving it his ap-
proval.
County Administrator Matt
Jaunich said the company
was asked to take out the
clause and it declined.
Jaunich said he had seen
the clause in quite a few con-
tracts and does not see it to be
an issue. Plus, the staff rec-
ommended moving ahead.
“I don’t like to see the
county give up its rights, but
it is a policy decision,” said
Schauer. “A jury trial gives us
the opportunity to be heard
by six people besides just a
judge. If we have issues we
can say we want to back out
of our agreement.”
County Commissioner Jim
Nytes said it was a good fi-
nancial decision to go ahead
and moved for approval.
Other Business
• At the top of the list for
Sibley County employee
recognition awards for serv-
ice through 2012 were Envi-
ronmental Services Director
Jeff Majeski and County At-
torney David Schauer, both
marking 30 years.
Gail Estenson has spent 25
years with the sheriff’s de-
partment. Working for Sibley
County the past 15 years has
been Sue Bentz in extension,
Marlo Lepel and Eric Thor-
lacius in public health and
human services, plus James
Mueller in public works.
• The board accepted the
resignation of Heidi Anfinson
from the Public Health and
Human Services Department.
It approved the hiring of
Todd Kahle in highway main-
tenance, effective May 13.
• The sheriff’s department
was authorized to hire up to
three part-time deputies to
help cut down on overtime
and burnout.
Despite clause, procurement card system approved
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Painting A Wooden Stool
Jake Lucas watched his son, Brock
Lucas, paint a wooden stool they con-
structed during an event at St. Paul’s
Lutheran School in Arlington on Friday
morning, May 17. Gaylord resident
Albie Kuphal, who passed away nine
years ago, began this project for
kindergarten students in Sibley County
17 years ago. Bird feeders were con-
structed in the first three years while
wooden stools have been constructed
the last 14 years. A group of Gaylord
men have continued the tradition and
assist all kindergarten students in Sib-
ley County and the Lafayette Charter
School. The volunteers and kinder-
garten students, along with family
members, constructed about 225 wood-
en stools this year. The local project is
funded by Haggenmiller Lumber and
the Sibley County Chapter of Thrivent
Financial For Lutherans.
For the past four consecu-
tive years, the City of Arling-
ton has been recognized by
the Arbor Day Foundation as
a “Tree City USA.” One of
the requirements for a city to
be recognized as such is to
have an Arbor Day Proclama-
tion and observance.
This year, Arlington’s
Arbor Day will be observed
by continuation of the city-
wide tree inventory, as well
as tree plantings. Mayor Jim
Kreft will be reading the
Arbor Day Proclamation and
City Forester, Stephen
Nicholson, will be collaborat-
ing with Christine Butler’s
Sibley East High School biol-
ogy students on boulevard
tree location, identification,
and evaluation. The students
gain useful knowledge of tree
identification and care, along
with hands-on application of
classroom-learned tech-
niques, and important lessons
in community service. A tree
inventory is a tool by which
our city can evaluate the
overall health of our urban
forest, and plan for tree prun-
ing, removal, and replanting.
The area Girl Scouts have ea-
gerly volunteered to assist in
planting trees in Memorial
Park. The trees have been
generously donated by the
Sibley Medical Center.
May 24 is Arbor Day in City of Arlington
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, May 23, 2013, page 4
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Staff
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Pub-
lishers; Kurt Menk, Editor; Karin
Rami ge, Manager; Marvi n
Bulau, Production Manager;
Barb Mathwig, Office; Ashley
Reetz, Sales; and Jean Olson,
Proof Reading.
Letters
This page is devoted to opin-
ions and commentary. Articles
appearing on this page are the
opinions of the writer. Views ex-
pressed here are not necessarily
those of the Arlington Enter-
prise, unless so designated. The
Arlington Enterprise strongly
encourages others to express
opinions on this page.
Letters from our readers are
strongly encouraged. Letters for
publ i cati on must bear the
writer’s signature and address.
The Arlington Enterprise re-
serves the right to edit letters
for purpose of clarity and space.
Ethics
The editorial staff of the Arling-
ton Enterprise strives to present
the news in a fair and accurate
manner. We appreciate errors
being brought to our attention.
Pl ease bri ng any gri evances
against the Arlington Enterprise to
the attention of the editor. Should
differences continue, readers are
encouraged to take their griev-
ances to the Mi nnesota News
Council, an organization dedicated
to protecti ng the publ i c from
press inaccuracy and unfairness.
The News Council can be contact-
ed at 12 South Sixth St., Suite
940, Minneapolis, MN 55402, or
(612) 341-9357.
Press Freedom
Freedom of the press is guar-
anteed under the First Amend-
ment to the U.S. Constitution:
“Congress shall make no law
respecting an establishment of
religion, or prohibiting the free
exercise thereof; or abridging
the freedom of speech, or the
press…”
Ben Frankl i n wrote i n the
Pennsylvania Gazette in 1731:
“If printers were determined not
to print anything till they were
sure it would offend nobody
there would be very little print-
ed.”
Deadline for the Arlington
Enterprise news is 4 p.m., Mon-
day, and advertising is noon,
Tuesday. Deadl i ne for The
Gal axy adverti si ng i s noon
Wednesday.
Established in 1884.
Postmaster send address changes to:
Arlington Enterprise.
402 West Alden Street, P.O. Box 388,
Arlington, MN 55307.
Phone 507-964-5547 FAX 507-964-2423.
Hours: Monday-Wednesday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.;
Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 2 p.m.; and Friday closed.
Entered as Periodicals postal matter at Arlington,
MN post office. Postage paid at Arlington USPS No.
031-980.
Subscription Rates: Minnesota – $33.00 per year. Out-
side of state – $38.00 per year.
Arlington ENTERPRISE
Memorial Day is a time
to remember those people
who have died in service
Our View: Purpose of Memorial Day has
not changed in Arlington and Green Isle
Opinions
Guest Column
Letters To The Editor
Memorial Day is a time to remember and honor the brave
men and women who have died in service of our country. It is
also a time to remember and honor the veterans who have
passed away after their service in the military.
Some people believe the holiday has strayed from that pur-
pose. Instead of an official day of remembrance and mourn-
ing, they feel it has become an unofficial kickoff to a vaca-
tion season.
That may be true in some communities around the country,
but it is certainly not the case in Arlington and Green Isle.
The veterans service organizations in both communities
have traditionally featured meaningful programs which have
been well attended by local and area residents on Memorial
Day over the years.
One bright note to this traditionally subdued observance is
the way the veterans service organizations have gotten the
youth involved in these programs. The Sibley East senior
high band and Boy Scouts have participated in the yearly
program over the years and it is the hope that these youth will
pass the importance of this holiday on to their children in the
future.
Memorial Day is only a few days away and there is no
doubt that local and area residents will again attend the pro-
grams at Memorial Park in Arlington and the gymnasium at
the Green Isle Community School on Monday, May 27.
It is important for local and area residents to take one hour
out of their lives to attend these programs to honor and reflect
on the more than 45 million men and women who have
served in the military in a long distinguished line going back
to the American Revolution and to the more than one million
veterans who have died in that service.
-K.M.
Too Tall’s Tidbits
Happy Birthday and Happy An-
niversary to the following local and
area residents compliments of the
Arlington Lions Club Community
Calendar.
May 24
In Memory Of LeRoy Winter, Debo-
rah Perschau, Faith Otto, Logan
Glieden, Marisa Kroells, and Mr.
and Mrs. Clarence Sickmann.
May 25
In Memory Of Norb Brau, Jim Far-
ber, Mark Melsha, Reda Ulven, Rick
Koepp and Shirley Kubal.
May 26
In Memory Of Debbie Mathwig, In
Memory Of Pam Lohse, David
Krohn, Jeremy Latzke, Kurt Kolan-
der, Noah Tackmann and Will His-
lop.
May 27
Jeff Schuetz, Rese Henke, Tirzah
Ling, Derek Pfeller, Carrie Pioske
and Betsy Conway.
May 28
In Memory Of Elaine Schauer, Ellie
Kaesermann, Marion Woehler,
Wendy Pederson, and Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Woehler.
May 29
Barb Haggenmiller, Barb Krueger,
and Mr. and Mrs. Allen Schwirtz.
May 30
Andy McCarthy, Colton Luepke,
Loanne Sorenson and Logan Mc-
Cormick.
*****
A little boy at a wedding looks at
his mom and says, “Mommy, why
does the bride wear white?”
His mom replies, “The bride is in
white because she’s happy and this
is the happiest day of her life.”
The boys thinks about this, and
then says, “Well then why is the
groom wearing black?”
*****
An elderly couple had been expe-
riencing declining memories, so they
decided to take a power memory
class where one is taught to remem-
ber things by association.
A few days after the class, the old
man was outside talking with his
neighbor about how much the class
helped him.
“What was the name of the in-
structor?” asked the neighbor.
“Oh, ummmm, let’s see,” the old
man pondered. “You know that
flower, you know, the one that
smells really nice but has those
prickly thorns, what’s that flower’s
name?”
“A rose?” asked the neighbor.
“Yes, that's it,” replied the old
man. He then turned toward his
house and shouted, “Hey, Rose,
what’s the name of the instructor
we took the memory class from?”
*****
Mary was having a tough day and
had stretched herself out on the
couch to do a bit of what she thought
to be well-deserved complaining and
self- pitying.
She moaned to her mom and
brother, “Nobody loves me ... the
whole world hates me!”
Her brother, busily occupied
playing a game, hardly looked up
at her and passed on this encour-
aging word: “That’s not true,
Mary. Some people don't even
know you.”
*****
There were three construction
workers that always got the same
thing for lunch. All of them were
tired of eating the same thing over
and over again.
First worker : “I hate sandwiches.
If I get sandwiches for lunch again
tomorrow I’m jumping off that
bridge.”
Second worker : “Oh my Gosh! If
I see another taco I’m going to jump
off that bridge tomorrow.”
Third worker: “Beans again? I will
jump off that bridge tomorrow if I
get beans for lunch again.”
The next day they all got the same
thing for lunch so each jumped off
the bridge and died.
Their wives were inconsolable.
First wife: “If I knew he would do
that, I would have never packed him
sandwiches!”
Second wife: “If I knew he would
do that, I would have never packed
him tacos!”
Third wife: “If I knew he would
do that, I never would have let
him pack his own lunch!”
By Amy Klobuchar
U.S. Senator
Across Minnesota, communities
have been facing a rash of robberies.
But these thieves aren’t your com-
mon thugs stealing TVs or comput-
ers – instead they’re going after
high-priced metal from businesses,
homes and even veterans’ graves,
and selling it to scrap dealers to
make a quick buck.
In Rochester, I met with a local
business that has been robbed by
metal thieves 12 times in just the
past two years and suffered more
than $150,000 in losses. During one
of these robberies, thieves even stole
a truck with the company logo on it,
and then used that truck to rob other
construction sites without raising
suspicion.
In St. Paul, metal thieves stole
$20,000 worth of copper pipes from
the Phalen Ice Rink, causing the rink
to temporarily close until local busi-
nesses offered to pitch in for repairs.
And in Isanti County, in an act too
callous to comprehend, criminals
stole more than 200 brass stars from
veterans’ graves over Memorial Day
weekend.
This crime can also threaten pub-
lic safety. Metal thieves have caused
explosions in vacant buildings by
stealing metal from gas lines and
they’ve caused blackouts by stealing
copper wiring from streetlights and
electrical substations.
What’s more, the problem is get-
ting worse. The worldwide price of
copper has increased significantly.
As a result, thieves are eager to steal
copper and resell it to scrap metal
dealers. In recent years metal theft
has jumped nationally by more than
80%, with an estimated cost of up to
$900 million each year for copper
wire theft. It’s is clear we need to
take action.
This is a national problem that
will require a national solution with
federal, state, and local officials
working together. While some states
like Minnesota have a tougher metal
theft laws, that doesn’t stop thieves
from stealing metal from one state
and selling it in other states.
That is why I introduced legisla-
tion with Republican Senators Lind-
say Graham from South Carolina
and John Hoeven of North Dakota
to crack down on metal thieves na-
tionwide and make it harder for
them to sell their stolen metal.
Our bill makes it a federal crime
to steal metal from critical infra-
structure and ensures we have tough
penalties for those who break the
law. The bill also contains a “Do
Not Buy” provision which bans
scrap metal recyclers from buying
certain items unless the sellers es-
tablish with written documentation
that they are authorized to sell the
scrap metal in question.
Under our legislation scrap metal
dealers will be required to keep de-
tailed records of metal purchases for
two years and make them available
to law enforcement agencies. Final-
ly, the bill would require that pur-
chases of scrap metal over $100 be
done by check instead of cash to
help law enforcement track down
thieves.
In order to stop these thieves from
wreaking havoc on families’ homes,
businesses’ bottom lines, and even
veterans’ graves, we need to take
swift action to crack down and force
these criminals to pay a heavy price
when caught. I will continue to work
with law enforcement, local commu-
nities, and my colleagues in the Sen-
ate to get this done.
Fighting metal theft in Minnesota communities
To The Editor,
The last day of the 2013 legisla-
tion brings to an end five months of
Democrat overreach. Since the be-
ginning of session, Democrats have
taken every opportunity to expand
government, take more of your
hard-earned tax dollars, and divide
Minnesotans with divisive social is-
sues at the behest and direction of
the far-left special interests who
swept them into office by spending
millions to purchase a friendly legis-
lature to do their bidding.
During their short time in the ma-
jority, Democrats have brought forth
a lot of bad legislation, but on the
last day of session, by one vote, De-
mocrats passed a bill I consider
morally reprehensible. This bill aims
to unionize childcare providers -- in-
dependent small business owners --
forcing providers who don't wish to
join a union to either pay fair share
dues or not accept low-income chil-
dren who receive childcare assis-
tance program subsidies.
The fact that Democrats are will-
ing to force unionization on
providers who don’t want it at the
expense of low-income children and
families is one of the most outra-
geous things I’ve seen in my time at
the legislature. This is nothing more
than a power-grab for union organi-
zations. It’s not what’s best for Min-
nesota, it's a “thank you” to labor
union bosses who spent millions to
get them elected. The bill author ad-
mitted as much during an interview
on WCCO.
The state of Minnesota will now
spend $4 million of taxpayer money
to hold an election for a union that
providers don’t want. This election
will likely mean unnecessary
headaches for childcare providers. A
recent article in the Sauk Centre
Herald outlined the deceptive and
intimidating practices employed by
union organizers that will be
brought to the doorsteps of Min-
nesota's 11,000 childcare providers
to coerce them into supporting the
union.
The unions have a vested interest
in making sure this election goes in
their favor; they currently have
about $8 million dollars in debt after
spending millions to elect Democ-
rats to the legislature. If successful,
it’s estimated that the childcare
union would bring in $8-$13 million
dollars. How convenient.
Minnesota parents, children, and
childcare providers did not ask to be
brought into a legalized money-
laundering scheme to pay back
union special interests. Dozens of
my GOP colleagues spent many
hours calling every single childcare
provider in their district. Support for
the union was extremely sparse. The
results were conclusive -- many
times fewer than five percent in sup-
port. I can’t imagine that my col-
leagues across the aisle heard results
much different from ours, yet they
voted for this disgrace of a bill any-
way.
I hope childcare providers remain
vigilant and do their research about
the potential impacts that this union-
ization effort will have. Higher
childcare costs thanks to expensive
union dues, and fewer choices for
the parents of low-income parents is
not something that will be good for
providers or good for Minnesota
parents.
Glenn Gruenhagen
State Representative
R-Glencoe
Democrats brought forth bad legislation
To The Editor, 
The only good thing about the
legislative session is that it's over.
Unfortunately, the damage inflicted
on families, taxpayers and employ-
ers will be long lasting and far
reaching.  The overreach of this De-
mocrat controlled House, Senate and
Governorship was historical.  We
can only hope their exuberance will
lead to the loss of majority in the
next election.  Even then, it will be
very difficult to repair the damage to
our society and beloved State of
Minnesota.
Larry Sorenson
Arlington
Only good thing is legislative session is over
SHARE YOUR OPINION THROUGH
A LETTER TO THE EDITOR.
EMAIL YOUR LETTER TO
KURTM@ARLINGTONMNNEWS.COM
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, May 23, 2013, page 5
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
VI EW US ONLI NE AT
WWW. ARLI NGT ONMNNEWS. COM
CEMETERY NOTICE
All items decorating gravestones in the Arlington
Public Cemetery are permitted 1 week prior to Me-
morial Day and need to be removed from the grass
area within 2 weeks after the holiday to allow for the
orderly mowing and maintenance of the cemetery.
Thank you for your cooperation.
Arlington City Council
A19-20Ea
NOTICE TO RESIDENTS
OF THE CITY OF ARLINGTON
Recreational (outdoor) fires are permitted within city lim-
its so long as they are contained in an outdoor fireplace,
barbecue equipment or concrete-lined fire pit, sufficient to
provide physical limitation to the spread of the fire.
Recreational purposes shall include only the cooking of
food or the providing of heat and light for outdoor social
gatherings. Only propane, charcoal bricks or wood prod-
ucts may be used to fuel outdoor fires (ABSOLUTELY
NO GARBAGE). Outdoor fires must be supervised at all
times by at least one (1) adult person or extinguished if
unsupervised. Outdoor fires shall be created or maintained
at a distance of at least 15 feet from all structures and
property lines. Thank you for your cooperation.
If Sibley County implements a burning ban, this does in-
clude recreational fires within city limits.
Arlington City Council
A19-20Ea
NOTICE TO RESIDENTS
OF THE CITY OF ARLINGTON
PLEASE DO NOT DISCHARGE LAWN CLIPPINGS/
DEBRIS ONTO CITY STREETS. Lawn clippings and/or
debris that are discharged onto city streets eventually wash
into the storm sewers and cause them to clog. Besides
being an inconvenience to residents, it is also COSTLY
and time consuming for the City to clean and unclog
storm sewers. The City is asking all residents to take their
grass clippings/debris to the compost site. The compost
site is Open 7 days a week during daylight hours to bet-
ter accommodate the residents of Arlington.
Thank you for your cooperation.
Arlington City Council
A19-20Ea
BIDS FOR SNOW REMOVAL
FOR THE CITY OF ARLINGTON
The City of Arlington is seeking applicants to assist with
snow removal for the 2013-2014 snow season. We are
looking for contractors to bid for the 3 separate areas:
Street Blading, Dump Truck Hauling, and Skid Loader
Work. All bids must be received by 4:00 p.m., WEDNES-
DAY, JUNE 12
th
. The City Council will review all bids at
their second meeting in June (17
th
). For more information
and/or an application, please contact the Arlington City
Office at 204 Shamrock Drive, or call 507-964-2378. Ap-
plications also available on the city’s website: www.ar-
lingtonmn.com.
By Order of the
City of Arlington
A19-20Ea
HAVE A SAFE MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND,
REMEMBER OUR VETERNS.
LIBERTY STATION AT CHANDLER STREET
AND HIGHWAY 5 IS OPEN DURING
HIGHWAY 5 ROAD CONSTRUCTION
LIBERTY STATION
Corner of Hwy. 5 & Chandler, Arlington, MN
507-964-5177 or Toll-Free 866-752-9567
www.LibertyStationAutoSales.com
Jim
Heiland’s
Affordable
Used Cars
A
2
0
E
a
History
A rift over the cost of fire
services has Kelso Town-
ship making a change, ac-
cording to a recent article
in the Le Sueur News Her-
ald.
The Kelso Township
Board of Supervisors re-
cently voted unanimously
to break its fire protection
contract with the City of Le
Sueur and requested it be
put into effect immediately.
Stipulations in the contract
means Kelso Township will
continue to receive fire pro-
tection from the City of Le
Sueur until the beginning of
October, at which time it
will obtain services from
Arlington at less than half
of the cost.
“It wasn’t just Kelso that
was upset,” said Lyle
Wiest, a supervisor for
Kelso Township.
“No one is complaining
about the quality of serv-
ice,” said Terry Genelin,
who serves as clerk for
Prairie Lake Township.
Kelso Township ends its fire
contract with City of Le Sueur
Gaylord city officials were
recently notified that the
Minnesota Department of
Transportation (MnDOT) is
planning to test its through-
stop intersection proposal in
July, according to an article
in The Gaylord Hub.
As part of MnDOT’s street
reconstruction project, it is
being proposed that the traf-
fic signal light at Gaylord’s
downtown intersection be re-
moved.
Trial period set to determine if MnDOT’s
proposal is the safest solution in Gaylord
98 Years Ago
May 27, 1915
Buck & Didra, Publishers
The Ebenezer Cemetery As-
sociation sold that part of their
land not laid out in lots to Mr. P.
Williams and put a new fence
around the cemetery. The prop-
erty looks much improved. The
cemetery is 3 miles south of Ar-
lington.
Frenzel’s pond, which was
swelled by the recent heavy
rains, is now being used for
boating.
The contract for the new
Lutheran church in Arlington
Township was awarded to Chas.
Guetschoff of Gaylord for
$8,008. This includes the con-
struction and material but does
not include the heating plant,
furnishings or altar which will
cost several thousands addition-
al.
For all your farm machinery,
Mr. Farmer - call on J. B.
Jasken: Seeders, drills, manure
spreaders, gang plows, sulky
plows, binders, drags, wagons,
gas engines, etc., etc., Also
agent for Stillwater twine.
68 Years Ago
May 24, 1945
Louis Kill, Editor
Arlington boosters for a mu-
nicipal hospital won an over-
whelming victory in the special
election to determine the issue
last Friday. The vote was 409
for the hospital and only 45
against.
Previously reported missing
over Germany, the welcome
news reached Arlington Tuesday
that Lt. Elmer K. Nieland was
one of the prisoners recently lib-
erated from an enemy prison
camp. Lt. Nieland, pilot of a P-
51 Mustang fighter plane, was
reported missing in action over
Germany on March 19th.
Art Sprengeler of Green Isle,
president of the Sibley County
Agricultural Assn., and also sec-
retary of the Minnesota Brown
Swiss Breeders Assn., has been
engaged by the federal govern-
ment to purchase four carloads
of two-year old Brown Swiss
bred heifers for shipment to the
destitute countries of Europe.
Mr. Sprengeler is now making a
tour of the state in an effort to
locate this livestock.
38 Years Ago
May 22, 1975
Val Kill, Editor
Ninety A-GI High School
seniors will be graduated at
commencement ceremonies in
the Arlington auditorium
Wednesday evening, May 28.
This year ’s valedictorian is
David Schauer, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Alfred Schauer. His grade
average was 95.8. Salutatorian
is Jane Sander, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Robert Sander. Her av-
erage was 95.7.
Sunday afternoon, May 18,
Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Luff were
honored on their golden wed-
ding anniversary at St. Mary’s
Church Hall in Arlington. Open
house in the afternoon and
evening was attended by 267
friends, relatives and neighbors.
An afternoon luncheon was
served. At six o’clock a dinner
was served at the church hall for
immediate family and friends.
The A-GI baseball team be-
came the Minnesota River Con-
ference champs last week by
way of a 13-3 shellacking of
Montgomery. The two teams
were in a first place deadlock,
both with 6-0 marks, but A-GI
proved superior. banging out 12
hits.
8 Years Ago
May 26, 2005
Kurt Menk, Editor
The Sibley East School
Board, during a special meeting
in Gaylord on Monday evening,
voted 5-0 and approved a mo-
tion to approve a contract for
John Langenbrunner as the new
superintendent. Langenbrunner,
who has verbally accepted the
position, is expected to sign the
contract soon.
Several hundred people from
various states attended the
fourth annual Arlington Polka
Festival last Friday, Saturday
and Sunday. Overall, five polka
bands provided musical enter-
tainment throughout the three-
day event.
Six Sibley East students re-
cently participated in the 17th
annual Minnesota Technology
Education Association Super-
mileage Challenge at the Brain-
erd International Raceway. The
students who attended are in
Mark Standinger ’s Applied
Technology course at the Sibley
East Senior High School in Ar-
lington. According to Stan-
dinger, one objective of the
challenge was to build a vehicle
to provide students with a time-
ly and meaningful learning ex-
perience in vehicle design and
fabrication in the area of trans-
portation. Students who attend-
ed were Jordan Berg, Andy
Mathwig, Luke Geib, Brent Al-
sleben, Tyler Weber and Reed
Vos.
Some of the students who are
enrolled in the new Green Isle
Community School, along with
their parents, recently made and
delivered May baskets to Green
Isle homes and businesses. De-
livering these traditional spring
greetings is one of the first steps
students, staff and families are
doing to connect with the com-
munity as well as to engage in
service learning.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Jordan Thomes, a senior at
the Sibley East Senior High
School, was recently chosen
by her classmates as the Out-
standing Senior of the Quar-
ter.
Seniors at Sibley East vote
for the outstanding member
of the senior class each quar-
ter. The names of those stu-
dents are then submitted to
the Gaylord Rotary Club to
consider for a scholarship
sponsored by the club.
Thomes is currently en-
rolled in Forensics, Econom-
ics, Youth Service, Advanced
Physical Education, Honors
English, College Calculus
and Health Occupations.
Thomes, who is a member
of the National Honor Socie-
ty, is a member of the Stu-
dent Council and HOSA. She
is also a member of the “A”
Honor Roll and is a past Stu-
dent of the Month. In addi-
tion, Thomes was chosen as
Sibley East’s nominee for the
Triple A Award this past win-
ter.
Thomes earned 11 letters in
varsity sports throughout her
career. She was a three-year
letterwinner in volleyball, a
four-year letterwinner in bas-
ketball and a four-year letter-
winner in softball. In addi-
tion, she was recently select-
ed as the Sibley East Female
Athlete of the Year.
Outside of school, she has
worked part-time at the
McLeod Cooperative Power
Association. She will serve as
the softball coach for the Ar-
lington Summer Recreation
Program in June and July.
After graduation, Thomes
plans to attend Minnesota
State University, Mankato,
and major in pre-dentistry.
She is the daughter of Bob
and Gail Thomes, Arlington.
Thomes is Senior of the Quarter
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Jordan Thomes
On Monday, May 20, the
Minnesota Legislature ad-
dressed the state’s budget for
Fiscal Years 2014 and 2015.
The tax plan to pay for it all
passed almost exclusively by
House and Senate Democrats
and includes $2.1 billion in a
variety of new taxes, accord-
ing to a news release from the
office of State Senator Scott
Newman (R-Hutchinson).
In total, it spends $38.3 bil-
lion, the largest in state histo-
ry. This is an 8.1 percent in-
crease over the current budg-
et of $35.4 billion and re-
flects an increase of over $10
billion in less than a decade.
Newman voted in opposition
to the tax plan that increases
an array of sales, income, and
business taxes.
New sales tax items pushed
by Governor Mark Dayton
and Democrat leaders include
taxes on internet purchases,
digital downloads like iTunes
and eBooks, car rentals, stor-
age facilities and equipment
repair for businesses. Addi-
tionally, cigarettes will see a
$1.60 per pack sales tax in-
crease.
“If you remember one
thing about this legislative
session, it’s that everyone
will pay more in taxes for an
increasingly wasteful and in-
efficient government,” said
Senator Newman.
On top of new sales taxes,
income tax rates will rise 25
percent for individuals earn-
ing over $150,000 and cou-
ples earning over $250,000.
Minnesota companies will
find that the Governor and
Majority caucuses also elimi-
nated the Foreign Operating
Credit and Foreign Royalty
Deduction. On the removal of
these business incentives,
Senator Newman stated, “Of
all the tax increases, I believe
these will have the greatest
adverse effect on our state
economy, because Minnesota
will be telling the business
world that they are not wel-
come here, and remember,
private business is the only
real source of revenue avail-
able to fund government
spending.”
To consume this enormous
budget, various omnibus
spending bills will add hun-
dreds of new full-time gov-
ernment employees, add nu-
merous new advisory task
forces and enumerable enti-
tlement programs, all in an
inevitable march towards big-
ger government.
“While we did work in a
bipartisan manner on neces-
sary issues like the Minnesota
Sex Offender Program and a
bonding bill for the Minneso-
ta State Capitol restoration
and the Minneapolis Veterans
Home, this session was inun-
dated with bills to unionize
childcare providers, increase
in minimum wage and legal-
izing same sex marriage,”
said Newman. “These are not
the issues hard working tax-
payers of Minnesota need us
to be working on. We should
be focused on what we can
do that will best help stimu-
late our economy and create
private sector jobs.”
Newman added, “I want to
thank all the constituents who
wrote, called, emailed, and
visited me during the session.
Your views, opinions, experi-
ence, and expertise you
shared is very important, and
I’m honored to serve as your
state Senator. Please stay in
touch.”
The legislature will begin
the 2014 session at noon
Tuesday, February 25, 2014.
Newman says everyone will pay
more, get less with the majority’s
wasteful tax and spending plan
By Kurt Menk
Editor
In order to allow the senior
high band to play in all three
communities and since there
is only one band director,
there will be some time
changes to the Memorial Day
programs in Arlington, Green
Isle and Gaylord on Monday,
May 27.
The Memorial Day pro-
grams will be held at Memo-
rial Park in Arlington at 8:30
a.m.; City Park in Gaylord at
10 a.m.; and Green Isle Com-
munity School at 11:30 a.m.
“With Mr. Pilacinski retir-
ing, I am now in charge of all
bands fifth grade through
12th grade,” said Sibley East
Band Director Jim Callahan.
“I met with the Legion com-
manders and other coordina-
tors for Memorial Day from
all three communities and
worked out a schedule so that
the band could perform at all
three services. It was impor-
tant to me to find a way for
us to be at all three services.
There had to be some creativ-
ity with the scheduling of the
services, but we have a plan
that should work for us into
the future.”
Callahan continued, “It
made the most sense from a
logistical standpoint to have
the high school group per-
form at all three services. I
added the ninth graders to the
mix for two reasons. One,
we will have a bigger band
and a fuller sound, and two,
it’s a good way for them to
experience high school level
music and to get a chance to
perform with the kids that
they will be in band with next
year.”
Changes made to Memorial Day
programs in the 3 communities
Callahan added, “I have
provided some other oppor-
tunities this year for junior
high band students to partici-
pate with the senior high
band this year also. The
more and more they can ex-
perience ‘what high school
band is like’ the more likely
they will be to stick with the
band program until they
graduate.”
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, May 23, 2013, page 6
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Kickball Tournament
Saturday, June 15
Four Seasons Park, Arlington
9:00 a.m. - Registration
10:00 a.m. - First Game Starts
TO sign up, contact
Katie Rickert @ 320-510-2390
or e-mail:
kjrickert@hotmail.com
Arlington Town
& Country Days
A20-22E
Sports
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The visiting Sibley East
varsity girls softball team lost
to Norwood Young America
12-2 in six innings during the
opening round of the Sub
Section North of Section 2A
Softball Tournament on Tues-
day afternoon, May 21.
The Lady Wolverines
scored one run each in the
first and sixth innings.
In the top of the first frame,
sophomore Breann Walsh
started the game with an in-
field single and advanced to
second base on a wild pitch.
Walsh scored moments later
when junior Kimberly Kurtz-
weg followed with an RBI
single.
NYA touched Sibley East
starting pitcher Jordyn Polzin
for four runs in the bottom of
the first inning and took a 4-1
lead.
NYA added another run in
the bottom of the second
frame and increased its lead
to 5-1.
The Lady Wolverines
loaded the bases in the top of
the third inning, but were un-
able to score when senior
Sara Borchert was tagged out
at home plate for the third out
after a wild pitch.
NYA countered with five
runs in the bottom of the third
inning. The host team plated
the runs on three hits and four
Sibley East errors. When the
damage was done, NYA ex-
tended its advantage to 10-1.
Sibley East tallied its final
run in the top of the sixth in-
ning and pulled within 10-2.
Walsh reached first base on
an error and eventually
scored on an RBI single by
senior Jordan Thomes.
NYA plated two runs in the
bottom of the sixth inning
and won 12-2.
Walsh, who scored both
runs, paced the offensive at-
tack with two infield singles.
Thomes and Kurtzweg added
one RBI apiece.
Polzin pitched the entire
six-inning game and suffered
the mound loss. The right
handed pitcher surrendered
seven earned runs on 11 hits.
She also struck out one and
walked six.
The Lady Wolverines con-
clude the season with a 2-12
mark in the Minnesota River
Conference and a 4-14 record
overall.
Sibley East girls softball team
falls to NYA 12-2 in playoffs
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
girls softball team was swept
by Jordan during a Minnesota
River Conference twinbill on
Thursday afternoon, May 16.
The Lady Wolverines con-
clude the regular season with
a 2-12 mark in the MRC.
Jordan 17
Sibley East 5
The Sibley East varsity
girls softball team lost to vis-
iting Jordan 17-5 during the
first game of a Minnesota
River Conference twinbill on
Thursday afternoon, May 16.
Senior Jordan Thomes, jun-
iors Kimberly Kurtzweg and
Britany Reierson and sopho-
more Breann Walsh con-
tributed one hit apiece.
Sophomore Jordyn Polzin
pitched the entire five-inning
game and was tagged with
the mound loss. Polzin, who
yielded 11 hits, fanned one
and walked five.
Jordan 11
Sibley East 1
The Sibley East varsity
girls softball team lost to vis-
iting Jordan 11-1 during the
second game of a Minnesota
River Conference double-
header on Thursday after-
noon, May 16.
Sophomore Breann Walsh
collected the only two hits for
the Lady Wolverines.
Junior Kimberly Kurtzweg
scored the lone run for Sibley
East.
Senior Briana Reierson
hurled the entire five-inning
game and was tagged with
the mound setback. The right
hander gave up 11 hits. She
also fanned one and walked
five.
Softball team falls to Jordan in twinbill
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Sibley East sophomore third baseman
Paige Nelson makes a throw to first
base against visiting Jordan on Thurs-
day afternoon, May 16.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Sibley East sophomore Jason Meyer
delivers a pitch against visiting Jordan
during the first game of a Minnesota
River Conference doubleheader on
Thursday afternoon, May 16. Sibley
East senior second baseman Nathan
Thomes is pictured in the background.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
boys baseball team closed out
its regular season with anoth-
er doubleheader split in Min-
nesota River Conference play
last week.
The Wolverines, 6-8 in the
MRC, will face Glencoe-Sil-
ver Lake during the opening
round of the Sub Section
2AA North Baseball Tourna-
ment at Glencoe at 1 p.m.
Saturday, May 25.
The semi-final round will
be played at the high seed at
5 p.m. Tuesday, May 28. The
championship game will be
played at the high seed on
Thursday night, May 30.
Sibley East 7
Jordan 1
Junior Brody Rodning
tossed a five-hitter as the Sib-
ley East varsity boys baseball
team defeated visiting Jordan
7-1 during the first game of a
Minnesota River Conference
twinbill on Thursday after-
noon, May 16.
Rodning pitched the entire
six-inning game and posted
the mound victory. The lefty,
who yielded one earned run,
also struck out 11.
Sophomore Zac Weber
powered Sibley East’s offen-
sive attack with two singles
and a triple. Freshman Travis
Schmidt hit a single and a
double while senior Cody
Doetkott and sophomores
Lukas Bullert and Andrew
Bullert contributed two sin-
gles apiece. Seniors Nathan
Thomes and Andrew Grack
and sophomore Austin Brock-
hoff added one single each.
Jordan 8
Sibley East 2
The Sibley East varsity
boys baseball team lost to
visiting Jordan 8-2 during the
second game of a Minnesota
River Conference twinbill on
Monday afternoon, May 16.
Sophomore Zac Weber
smacked a pair of doubles in
the loss. Seniors Andrew
Grack and Cody Doetkott
contributed two singles each
while junior Brody Rodning
and sophomore Austin Brock-
hoff added one single apiece.
Sophomore Jason Meyer
pitched the first 3 1/3 innings
and was tagged with the
mound loss.
Junior Nick Haupt hurled
the next two-thirds of an in-
ning while Weber worked the
final frame.
SE Invitational
The Sibley East varsity
boys baseball team split two
games in the annual Sibley
East Baseball Tournament on
Saturday, May 18.
Fairmont 8
Sibley East 2
The Sibley East varsity
boys baseball team lost to
visiting Fairmont 8-2 during
the Sibley East Baseball
Tournament on Saturday,
May 18.
Senior Andrew Grack and
sophomore Austin Brockhoff
contributed one single each
as the Wolverines managed
only two hits in the loss.
Grack pitched the entire
seven-inning game and suf-
fered the mound loss. The
right hander surrendered six
earned runs on 16 hits. He
also struck out three and
walked three.
Sibley East 5
Sauk Centre 0
Sophomore Lukas Bullert
tossed a two-hitter as the Sib-
ley East varsity boys baseball
team blanked visiting Sauk
Centre 5-0 during the Sibley
East Baseball Tournament on
Saturday, May 18.
Lukas Bullert, who went
the distance in the seven-in-
ning game for the mound vic-
tory, also struck out three and
walked two.
Freshman Travis Schmidt
sparked the Sibley East bats
with two singles and a dou-
ble. Sophomore Andrew
Bullert contributed a single
and a triple. Sophomore Zac
Weber, Lukas Bullert and
freshman Dylan Pauly col-
lected one single apiece.
Boys baseball team closes out regular
season with another doubleheader split
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington A’s baseball
team, due to inclement
weather, has been unable to
play a game in a long time.
The Arlington A’s and St.
Peter baseball game was
postponed due to rain on Sun-
day night, May 19.
The A’s will host Shakopee
at 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 24.
Arlington will also host
Glencoe at 7:30 p. m.
Wednesday, May 29.
Arlington to host Shakopee on Friday night
Celebrate the end of the
school year with a potential
angler-to-be by fishing for
free with a child 15 or
younger, June 7-9, during
Take-A-Kid Fishing week-
end, the Minnesota Depart-
ment of Natural Resources
(DNR) said.
“This is a great opportunity
to discover fishing, ” said
Mike Kurre, the DNR’s men-
toring program coordinator.
“Minnesotans 16 or older
who take a child 15 or
younger fishing don’t need a
license that weekend. Oppor-
tunities for beginning anglers
abound throughout Minneso-
ta.”
Getting started is easy. A
boat isn’t needed and there’s
even loaner poles and tackle
in some areas.
Start by learning some
terms, basic techniques and
shore-fishing locations. DNR
fisheries offices throughout
Minnesota also offer some
good, old-fashioned angling
advice about fishing spots
that will keep young anglers
happy and safe.
The DNR’s Fishing in the
Neighborhood (FiN) program
provides urban shore-fishing
opportunities across the
metro with family-friendly
settings, piers, loaner equip-
ment at some locations and a
real chance to catch quality
fish.
Four of Minnesota’s nine
state parks that are offering
this summer’s weekly I Can
Fish! program have sessions
scheduled during Take-A-Kid
Fishing weekend. Sessions at
each park explore the basics
of fishing, fish identification
and angling tips and tricks.
Take a kid fishing weekend June 7-9
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, May 23, 2013, page 7
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
girls track team placed sev-
enth during the Minnesota
River Conference Track and
Field Meet in Arlington on
Thursday, May 16.
Belle Plaine captured top
honors with 198 team points
while Watertown-Mayer and
Tri-City United placed sec-
ond and third with 116 and
113 team points respectively.
Jordan (70), Mayer Lutheran
(62), Norwood Young Ameri-
ca (53), Sibley East (50) and
Le Sueur-Henderson (39)
rounded out the field of eight
teams.
Sibley East tracksters
Megan Eckberg and Megan
Krentz earned all conference
honors with a first place fin-
ish each.
Eckberg placed first in the
100 meter hurdles with a per-
sonal best of 15.85 seconds.
Krentz placed first in the
discus with a throw of 101
feet.
Eckberg also placed sec-
ond in the long jump event.
Alyssa Weber contributed
a third place finish in the 400
meter dash.
The Lady Wolverines did
not have a fourth place win-
ner.
Fifth place winners for
Sibley East included Maren
Miner (3200 meter run) and
the 4 X 400 meter relay team
(Alyssa Weber, Ella Lund-
strom, Alison Eibs and Kelli
Martens).
The Sibley East 4 X 800
meter relay team collected a
sixth place finish. The four-
some included Ella Lund-
strom, Alison Eibs, Karley
Lind and Karina Robeck.
Seventh place winners for
Sibley East consisted of the 4
X 100 meter relay team (Sara
Peterson, Natalie Mesker,
Megan Krentz and Frances
Zuniga) and the 4 X 200
meter relay team (Megan
Eckberg, Megan Krentz,
Kelli Martens and Alyssa
Weber).
Alison Eibs added an
eighth place finish in the 800
meter run.
Sibley East will compete in
the sub section track and
field meet at Le Sueur on
Thursday afternoon, May 23.
Girls place 7th at MRC meet
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East varsity
boys track team placed sev-
enth during the Minnesota
River Conference Track and
Field Meet in Arlington on
Thursday afternoon, May 16.
Belle Plaine captured top
honors with 148 team points
while Jordan and Watertown-
Mayer placed second and
third with 138 1/2 and 98
team points respectively. Tri-
City United (88 1/2), Mayer
Lutheran (72), Le Sueur-Hen-
derson (58), Sibley East (45)
and Norwood Young America
(34) rounded out the field of
eight teams.
Nick Bruss earned all con-
ference honors and placed
first in the 100 meter hurdles
with a time of 15.83 seconds.
Sibley East did not have
any second or third place
winners.
Fourth place winners for
the Wolverines consisted of
Nick Bruss (300 meter hur-
dles) and Erik Danielson
(pole vault).
Fifth place winners for Sib-
ley East were Erik Danielson
(200 meter dash) and Miah
DuFrane (shot put).
Sixth place winners for the
Wolverines included Sam
Thies (3200 meter run) and
the 4 X 800 meter relay team
(Cole Bruhn, Justin Bennett,
Jack Ballalatack and Chase
Ellwood).
Seventh place winners for
Sibley East consisted of
Shayne Danielson (400 meter
dash) and Jordan Bruss (long
jump and triple jump), the 4
X 100 meter relay team
(Mason Latzke, Mitchel
Wentzlaff, Leighton Rose and
Zac Peterson) and the 4 X
200 meter relay team (Julius
Asmussen, Shayne Daniel-
son, Erik Danielson and Ben
White).
The 4 X 400 meter relay
team added an eighth place
finish. The foursome includ-
ed Mitchel Wentzlaff, Ben
White, Justin Bennett and
Leighton Rose.
Sibley East will compete in
the sub section track and field
meet at Le Sueur on Thurs-
day afternoon, May 23.
SE boys finish 7th at conference meet
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Sibley East junior Megan Eckberg placed second in
the long jump event during the Minnesota River Con-
ference Track and Field Meet in Arlington on Thurs-
day afternoon, May 16.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Sibley East junior Erik Danielson placed fourth in the
pole vault event during the Minnesota River Confer-
ence Track and Field Meet in Arlington on Thursday
afternoon, May 16.
Minnesotans are eager to
hit the water for Memorial
Day weekend, but the Depart-
ment of Natural Resources
(DNR) is reminding boaters
that warmer weather does not
mean warm water.
“For boaters and swim-
mers, our current water tem-
peratures can prove danger-
ous, or even deadly, if they
don’t consider the effect cold
water has on their body,” said
Capt. Greg Salo, DNR Re-
gion 3 enforcement manager.
“Water temperature below 70
degrees is considered cold.”
Water temperatures on
Lake Minnetonka and the St.
Croix River are currently in
the 60s, even though air tem-
peratures this week have been
in the 70s.
Falling into frigid water
can cause an immediate gasp
for air and the shock of the
icy water can also cause car-
diac arrest, even for people in
good health. Cold water robs
the body of heat 25 times
faster than air of the same
temperature, Salo added.
So far this year, there have
been no boating fatalities in
Minnesota, compared to four
deaths for the same period
last year. “This is the first
time since 2004 Minnesotans
are going into Memorial Day
weekend without a boating
fatality,” Salo said. Fifteen
people died in boating acci-
dents in 2012.
The DNR offers tips for
safe and responsible boating
including:
• State law requires a U.S.
Coast Guard-approved wear-
able life jacket for each per-
son on board all watercraft.
• All children under 10
years old are required to wear
a Coast Guard-approved life
jacket while a boat is under-
way.
• Alcohol and boating don’t
mix.
• If a watercraft becomes
swamped or capsized, try to
reboard or stay with the craft.
• Take a boater course and
receive a boat education cer-
tificate.
For information on taking a
boating course and other
boating safety information
visit the DNR’s boat and
water safety Web page.
Cold water will be dangerous to boaters this
Memorial Day weekend, according to DNR
May is the month when
most fawns are born. The
Minnesota Department of
Natural Resources (DNR) is
urging people to leave fawns
alone.
While a new fawn may ap-
pear helpless, it’s important
not to interfere with the doe’s
natural instinct for raising its
young, DNR officials said.
A doe’s method of rearing
offspring is different from a
human’s, especially for the
first few weeks.
Wildlife officials explained
it this way: Within hours of
birth, the fawn is led to a se-
cluded spot and the doe lets it
nurse. Then the doe leaves to
feed and rest herself, out of
sight but within earshot. In
four or five hours, she will re-
turn to feed her young and
take them to a new hiding
place. Only when the fawns
are strong enough to outrun
predators, do the young travel
much with their mother.
For the first week of life,
frightened fawns instinctively
freeze, making full use of
their white spotted coats, a
protective coloration. New-
born fawns are not fast
enough to outdistance preda-
tors, so they must depend on
their ability to hide for pro-
tection.
A fawn’s curiosity may en-
tice it to approach a person
who comes upon on it. The
DNR urges people not to try
to catch a fawn if they en-
counter one. Walk away.
Never feed or collar a fawn.
Feeding deer can concen-
trate animals in feeding areas
which makes them more sus-
ceptible to predation, vehicle
collisions, or other unwanted
human interactions. What be-
gins as a good intention to
help the animal ultimately
lessens the animal’s ability to
survive independently.
For questions about an in-
teraction with a wild animal,
contact a DNR area wildlife
office for suggestions. In
most cases, letting nature take
its course is the best advice.
DNR urges people to leave fawns alone
MINNESOTA RIVER
CONFERENCE
SPRING SPORTS
STANDINGS
Through May 16, 2013
Boys Golf Pts.
Jordan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .681
Mayer Lutheran . . . . . . .739
NYA Central . . . . . . . . .747
Belle Plaine . . . . . . . . . .762
Sibley East . . . . . . . . . .785
Watertown-Mayer . . . . .786
Tri-City United . . . . . . .791
LeSueur-Henderson . . . .825
Girls Golf Pts.
Belle Plaine . . . . . . . . . .806
Jordan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .811
Watertown-Mayer . . . . .832
LeSueur-Henderson . . . .844
NYA Central . . . . . . . . .1151
Sibley East . . . . . . . . .1928
Mayer Lutheran . . . . . .2604
Tri-City United . . . . . .4800
Final Baseball W L
Jordan . . . . . . . . . . . .11 3
NYA Central . . . . . . . .9 5
Tri-City United . . . . . .8 6
Watertown-Mayer . . . .8 6
Belle Plaine . . . . . . . . .7 7
Sibley East . . . . . . . . .6 8
LeSueur-Henderson . .4 10
Mayer Lutheran . . . . .3 11
Final Softball W L
NYA Central . . . . . . .12 2
Belle Plaine . . . . . . . .10 4
Watertown-Mayer . . .10 4
LeSueur-Henderson . .8 6
Jordan . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 7
Tri-City United . . . . . .7 7
Sibley East . . . . . . . . .2 12
Mayer Lutheran . . . . .0 14
Belle Plaine bowler Sharon
Carlson recently set a state
record for a woman’s three-
game series – 867 at the state
mixed bowling tournament at
Mermaid Lanes in Mounds
View, according to an article
in the Belle Plaine Herald.
The series included her
third perfect game. The old
state record, an 859, was set
by Pat Ann in 1985.
Carlson bowls her way
into state record books
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Green Isle Irish
baseball team, like more
amateur teams, have been
unable to play any recent
games due to inclement
weather,
The Irish will host
Hutchinson at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, May 24.
Green Isle will host
Young America at 6 p.m.
Monday, May 27.
The Irish will then travel
to Norwood at 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 29.
The Irish currently have a
2-0 record overall.
Irish to play Hutchinson on Friday night
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, May 23, 2013, page 8
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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Parent/Child:
$
35; All others:
$
40
Sessions 1-3 (Mon-Fri: 10 Lessons)
1. June 3-14
2. June 17-28
Lesson Times
9:00-9:45 am
10:00-10:45 am
11:00-11:45 am
4:15-5:00 pm
5:15-6:00 pm
Swimming Lesson Registration Form
Parent’s Name __________________________________
Address _______________________________________
City ____________________________Zip ___________
Phone_________________________________________
Email _________________________________________
1. Student Name__________________Age __Level ____
Preferred Session ________________Time ___________
2. Student Name__________________Age __Level ____
Preferred Session ________________Time ___________
Mail to Sibley East High School
PO Box 1000 • Arlington, MN 55307
Attn: Rene M. or drop off at the Sibley East High School’s main
office or call 507-964-8285. Payment due on first lesson.
RED CROSS SWIM LEVEL DESCRIPTIONS:
PARENT & CHILD, 18 mos.-3 yrs.
For children ages 18 mos. to 3 yrs. who have little or no previous
water experience. Parent or caregiver must accompany child in the
water.
PRE-SCHOOL AQUATICS, ages 4-5, Levels A-B-C
Throughout the three levels, pre-school age children are taught
basic aquatic safety, survival, and swimming skills, all while
increasing their comfort level in and around water.
LEVEL I – INTRODUCTION TO WATER SKILLS
For children ready to enter water without parent or guardian. Enter
and exit water safely. Supported floating and kicking on front and
back. Open eyes under water, submerge to retrieve objects.
Submerge mouth, nose and eyes. Exploring arm and hand
movements. Exhale under water. Explore swimming on front and
back. Water safety rules. Fundamentals of using a life jacket.
LEVEL II – FUNDAMENTAL AQUATIC SKILLS
Enter and exit water using ladder and side. Submerge head, bobs,
open eyes. Glide on front and back. Floating and kicking on front
and back. Explore swimming on side. Turning over front to back,
back to front. Enter water by stepping or jumping from side. Open
eyes under water, submerge to retrieve objects. Combined stroke
on front and back. Moving in water using a life jacket.
LEVEL III – STROKE DEVELOPMENT
Jumping into deep water from side. Rotary breathing. Butterfly
kicks and body motions. Changing positions from vertical to
horizontal on front to back. Dive from sitting or kneeling. Survival
float. Perform HELP and huddle positions. Submerge fully and
retrieve object. Swim front and back crawl. Reaching assists. Use
Check-Call-Care in an emergency.
LEVEL IV – STROKE IMPROVEMENT
Dive from compact or stride position. Front and back crawl,
breaststroke, backstroke and butterfly. Tread water. Swim under
water. Diving safety. Throwing assists. Perform feet-first surface
dive. Swim on side using scissors kick. Familiarity with CPR.
Open turns from front to back. Compact jump into water from
a height wearing life jacket.
LEVEL V – STROKE REFINEMENT
Alternate breathing. Improve front and back crawl. Butterfly.
Breaststroke. Sidestroke. Elementary backstroke. Shallow
dive and begin swimming. Front flip turn. Treading water
using two different kicks. Backstroke flip turn. Survival
swimming. Rescue breathing. Tuck and pike surface dives.
LEVEL VI – SWIMMING & SKILL PROFICIENCY
Prepare for advanced courses. Personal water safety.
Lifeguard readiness. Fundamentals of diving. Fitness swimmer.
RETURNING!!! FREE BREAKFAST AND LUNCH
• June 10–July 24 (None week of July 4
th
) • Mon. thru Thurs. • 8-9am & 11am-12:30pm
• 18 yrs. & Under • Served in BOTH Arlington and Gaylord • Meals must be eaten in site’s cafeteria
*Choose session,
time, level when
registering.
Note level
descriptions.
Summer Pool Hours
BEGINS ON MON., JUNE 3
6:30-7:30am M-W-F: Lap Swim
9-11:45am M thru F: Swim Lessons
1-4pm M thru Sat: Open Swim
4:15-6pm M thru F: Swim Lessons
6-7pm Tues/Thurs. H
2
0 Aerobics
7-8:30pm M thru F: Open Swim
Rates • June 1, 2013-May 31, 2014
Dive-In
Movies
Wednesdays 1-4 pm
June 12 & 26
Bring your
floaties!
Water
Aerobics
Class
“Muscles in Motion”
Tues/Thur 6-7pm
June 4 thru June 27
$
3.00 per session, or free with
yearly swim pass.
*
$
175 Family Pass (up to 4 members)
$
15 for additional members
*
$
90 Individual Adult (18 - 64 yrs.)
*
$
70 Student Pass (high school & under)
*
$
70 Senior Pass (65 yrs. +)
*
$
3 Single Session Pass
Passes can be used for all open,
lap and aerobics swims!
Looking for a place to party?
Rentals:
$
50 first hour,
$
40 additional hours
Summer Red Cross Swimming Lessons
at the Sibley East Indoor Pool in Arlington
*Friendly, certified WSI instructors
*Controlled, indoor pool
*Adult lessons available upon request
*Early sign-up encouraged
Friday, June 21
KARAOKE PARTY!!!
1:00-4:00 pm
Sibley County Court
The following misdemeanors,
petty misdemeanors and gross
misdemeanors were heard in Dis-
trict Court May 10-16: Minnesota
State Patrol (MSP); Sheriff’s Of-
fice (SO); Department of Natural
Resourced (DNR); MN Depart-
ment of Transportation
(MNDOT):
Karl R. Wolter, 50, Arlington,
proof of insurance, dismissed, Ar-
lington PD; Dominique N. Buf-
fett, 26, Gaylord, interfere with
911 call, dismissed, disorderly
conduct, stay of imposition, su-
pervised probation 12 months,
local confinement two days, cred-
it for time served two days, sen-
tence to service 40 hours for in-
determinate, keep court/attorney
informed of current address,
chemical dependency evalua-
tion/treatment, follow recommen-
dations of evaluation, complete a
diagnostic assessment within 30
days, sign probation agreement,
follow all instructions of proba-
tion, sign all releases of informa-
tion, remain law-abiding. $135,
Gaylord PD; Angela L. Ehlers,
30, Cleveland, proof of insur-
ance, driving after revocation,
$485, Gaylord PD; Randy J.
Braun, 28, Gibbon, no dog re-
straint, no dog license, $370,
Gibbon PD; Allen R. Fenske, 56,
Gibbon, no dog license, $135,
Gibbon PD; Ruiz M. Salvador,
35, Gibbon, parking in snow re-
moval zone, $32, Gibbon PD;
Taylor L. Gizzi, 19, New Prague,
possess/sale small amount of
marijuana, $135, Henderson PD;
Christopher R. Lavoy, 50, Para-
dise, Mich., speed, dismissed,
Henderson PD; Saw S. Auar, 32,
Marshall, speed, $125, MSP;
Shawn C. Borning, 24, Fairfax,
driving after suspension, contin-
ued, unsupervised probation one
year, remain law-abiding, no
driver license violations, speed,
$335, MSP; Terrance J. Danner,
28, Glencoe, seat belt, $110,
MSP; Molly K. Defoe, 29, Waco-
nia, speed, $125, MSP; Carol A.
Ellefson, 53, Hibbing, speed,
$145, MSP; Imants, A. Grotins,
45, Bloomington, speed, $135,
MSP; Crystal V. Kadlec, 28, Gib-
bon, seat belt. $110. MSP;
Daniel C. Mehls, 48, Lake Elmo,
speed, $145. MSP; Abdirahim S.
Mohamed, 28, Mankato, child
passenger restraint system not
fastened, dismissed, speed, con-
tinued, unsupervised probation
one year, no moving violations,
pay costs, $145, MSP; Ulrich T.
Nielsen, 43, Watertown, speed,
$125, proof of insurance dis-
missed, MSP; Jesse R. Odenthal,
29, Gaylord, driving without a
valid license or vehicle
class/type, dismissed, seat belt,
$110, MSP; Tyler J. Otten, 20,
Coon Rapids, speed, $125, proof
of insurance, dismissed, MSP;
James H. Owens Jr., 42, St. Paul,
seat belt, $110, MSP; Joshua R.
Pierson, 24, Glencoe, bumper re-
quired, windshield tinted or
glazed, $185, MSP; Yvonne G.
Schroder, 58, Cosmos, speed,
$135, MSP; Terry L. Shaw, 55,
Gaylord, violate condition or fail
to carry special permits for over-
weight vehicles, $185, MSP;
Nolan A. Titchner, 21, speed,
$125, MSP; Claire R. Woit, 23,
Edina, speed, $135, MSP; Bran-
don A. Wortz, 21, Fairfax, seat
belt, $110, MSP; Ann M. Zim-
merman, 50, Becker, speed,
$125, MSP; Thomas J. Plendl,
20, Arlington, speed, $125, SO;
Zachary T. Black, 17, Fairfax,
speed, $225, Winthrop PD;
Shawn C. Borning, 24, Fairfax,
driving after revocation, $200,
Winthrop PD; Lacey R. Prescott,
20, Franklin, speed, $145,
Winthrop PD; Jon W. Zamzow,
34, Winthrop, driving after can-
cellation, stay of imposition, un-
supervised probation one year,
local confinement three days,
credit for time served three days,
no same or similar, remain law-
abiding, keep court/attorney in-
formed of current address, no
driver license violations, no mis-
demeanor moving violations, no
driving without insurance, $460,
fail to signal for turn, dismissed,
Winthrop PD.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Elders Program at Green Isle Community School
An Elders Celebration recognized and honored Vivian
Kroells, front left, and Ellerd Mathwig, front right, at
the Green Isle Community School on Friday night,
May 17. The students told the life stories of these two
individuals through songs and skits. The enthusiastic
students, along with the teachers, posed with the two
elders at the conclusion of the program. Following the
picture, refreshments were served to the students,
teachers, elders and community members in the
school cafeteria.
Gaylord Police Chief Kenn
Mueller recently expressed
concerns about potentially
dangerous dogs and at-large
dogs within the city limits,
according to an article in The
Gaylord Hub. Unlicensed
dogs have also been an issue,
Mueller reported.
Dog owners within the city
limits are required to pur-
chase a license no later than
April 1 of each year. The city
imposes a $50 fine for unli-
censed dogs and a $50 fine
for handling dogs at large.
Gaylord police chief says city has a dog problem
Former Glencoe business-
man Bryan Koepp entered an
Alford plea of guilty on four
felony counts of theft by false
misrepresentation in McLeod
County District Court on Fri-
day, May 3, according to the
McLeod County Chronicle.
Koepp entered the pleas in
exchange for the prosecution
dismissing four other felony
theft by swindle charges. The
charges span a two-year time-
frame in which Koepp, the
former owner of the Glencoe
Garden Center, obtained over
$388,500 from 15 separate
victims.
Judge Thomas McCarthy
canceled a May 14 jury trial
and ordered a pre-sentence
investigation. Sentencing has
been set for June 28 in
McLeod County District
Court.
Alford plea is entered on 4 felony counts
The G-F-W School Board
started with 17 candidates, in-
terviewed four, then a second
interview with two finalists
before selecting Tami Martin
as its new superintendent on
Tuesday, May 7, according to
an article in the Winthrop
News.
Martin agreed to enter con-
tract negotiations and the
School Board was expected
to approve a contract at its
meeting on Monday night,
May 20.
Martin offered G-F-W superintendent position
W W W . A R L I N G TO N M N N E W S . C O M
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, May 23, 2013, page 9
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
McGraw Monument
Works, Inc., LeSueur
Local Representative
Leah Schrupp
Arlington, MN 55307
612-308-8169
3 miles North of LeSueur
on Highway 169
30945 Forest Prairie Road
(507) 665-3126
HOURS: M-F 8-5
Weekends by appointment.
Visit our
INDOOR AND OUTDOOR
DISPLAYS
M31-30Ea
They are not gone until those who knew them forget to remember…
This Memorial Day, Let us Pause and Reflect.
Gone but not forgotten
Pete Glieden
who passed away Oct. 24, 2010
Dearly missed by
Corine & Greg, Alex,
Andy & Aaron Kubal
In loving memory of
Barb Panning
who passed away July 27, 2007
Sadly missed by
your children, Anne,
Amy, Jim & Mike
In loving memory of
Lowell Panning
who passed away Sept. 14, 2010
Sadly missed by
your children, Anne,
Amy, Jim & Mike
Gone but not forgotten
Robert Bade
who passed away Sept. 20, 2002
Dearly missed by
Ramona Bade
and family

We offer traditional funeral options and cremation as well
as honoring all family wishes. Did you know that some
families have a traditional visitation and funeral and then
cremation? We also provide Irrevocable Funeral Trusts so the
monies can be sheltered in the event of an extended nursing
home stay.
Feel free to contact us for a no obligation visit. Pre-plan-
ning and possibly pre-funded final expenses can relieve fami-
ly stress and even save money.
Visit our web site at www.koldenfuneralhome.com for
more information and current obituaries.
Directors:
Karl Kolden, owner
Rosemary Kolden, owner
Darrell Kolden, Greggory Borchert, Shawn Kirby, Tonya
Borth
507-964-2201
www.koldenfuneralhome.com
FUNERAL SERVICES • ARLINGTON
A20(every4thWk)Ea
Blessings
[ Life by the Spirit ] You, my brothers and sisters, were called to be
free. But do not use your freedom to indulge the flesh; rather, serve
one another humbly in love. Galatians 5:13 NIV
St. John’s Lutheran
Arlington Township
Pastor William Postel
Bible Class: 9 a.m. • Worship: 10 a.m.
Commercial and Industrial Builders
Green Isle, MN 55338
ph. 507.326.7901 fax: 507.326.3551
www.vosconstruction.com
Arlington State Bank
Serving the Community Since 1895
BANKING SERVICES
964-2256
Arlington
A & N Radiator Repair
Allen & Nicki Scharn, Owners
23228 401 Ave., Arlington
877-964-2281 or 507-964-2281 Bus.
Certified ASE Technician on Staff
Also distributor for Poxy Coat II
Industrial Grade Coatings/Paint
MID-COUNTY
CO-OP
700 W. Lake St., Box 177
Cologne, MN 55322
(952) 466-3700
or TOLL FREE: 1-888-466-3700
HUTCHINSON CO-OP
AGRONOMY
LEON DOSE,
Arlington Branch Manager
411 7
th
Ave. NW • (507) 964-2251
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
402 W. Alden, Arlington
507-964-5547
Online at
www.Arlington
MNnew.com
Arlington Haus
Your Hometown Pub & Eatery
1986-2009
Arlington • 1-507-964-2473
STATE BANK OF
HAMBURG
100 Years. 100 Reasons.
Phone 952-467-2992
statebankofhamburg.com
CONVENIENCE
STORE
Hwy. 5 N., Arlington
507-964-2920
Homestyle Pizza
Real or Soft Serve Ice Cream
Gas – Diesel – Deli – Videos
(507)
964-2212
www.
chefcraigs
.com
23180 401 Ave., Arlington Phone 507-964-2264
EQUAL
HOUSING
LENDER
CRAIG BULLERT
ARLINGTON, MN
23189 Hwy. 5 North,
Arlington, MN 55307
arlington@hutchcoop.com
Office (507) 964-2283
Cell (320) 583-4324
HC
FUNERAL SERVICE
P.O. Box 314
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-2201
Member
FDIC
Church News
Menus
ZION LUTHERAN
814 W. Brooks St.
Arlington – (507) 964-5454
James Carlson, Pastor
Sunday, May 26: 8:00 a.m.
Choir. 9:00 a.m. Worship. 10:00
a.m. Fellowship.
Tuesday, May 28: 6:00 to
7:00 p.m. TOPS in church base-
ment. Pastor leads Good Sam
worship.
Wednesday, May 29: 7:00
p.m. Stewardship meeting.
ZION LUTHERAN
Green Isle Township
Friday, May 24: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, May 26: 9:00 a.m.
Contemporary worship.
CREEKSIDE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Christian & Missionary
Alliance
Ben Lane, Pastor
114 Shamrock Drive
Arlington – 507-964-2872
www.creekside-church.com
email: creeksidecc@media-
combb.net.
Thursday, May 23: 1:00 or
7:00 p.m. Women’s Bible study
- Experiencing God. 6:30 p.m.
Men’s Bible study of Luke at
Oak Terrace in Gaylord.
Sunday, May 26: 10:30 a.m.
Worship service.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
(507) 304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
507-234-6770
Saturday: Church services at
9:30 a.m. Bible study at 11:00
a.m. Fellowship dinner at 12:00
p.m. All are welcome.
UNITED METHODIST
Arlington
Wayne Swanson, Pastor
www.arlingtonunited
methodist.org
Saturday, May 25: 8:00 a.m.
A-Men men’s group. 10:00 a.m.
Bible study at Bette Nelson’s.
Sunday, May 26: 9:00 and
11:00 a.m. Worship. 10:15 a.m.
Fellowship time and adult class.
Thursday, May 30: 10:00
a.m., 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. Wor-
ship on cable TV. 1:00 and 7:00
p.m. Bible study at Jean
Olson’s.
EVANGELICAL
COVENANT CHURCH
107 W. Third St., Winthrop
Pastor Kyle Kachelmeier
507-647-5777
Parsonage 507-647-3739
www.wincov.org
Sunday, May 26: 9:30 a.m.
Worship.
Wednesday, May 29: 9:00
a.m. Prayer coffee. 7:30 p.m.
Senior High Youth Group.
Thursday, May 30: 9:30 a.m.
Women’s Bible study. 4:30 p.m.
Exercise.
ST. PAUL LUTHERAN
(WELS),
Arlington
Bruce Hannemann, Pastor
WEBSITE:
www.stpaularlington.com
EMAIL:
Bruce.Hannemann@stpaul
arlington.com
Sunday, May 26: 10:00 a.m.
Worship with Communion.
Monday, May 27: No school.
Tuesday, May 28: 6:00 p.m.
Counting Committee.
Wednesday, May 29: Last day
of school. 10:30 a.m. Awards
presented in the gym. School
family picnic. 8:00 p.m. Finance
Board meeting.
Thursday, May 30: 10:00 a.m.
Bulletin information due. 11:00
a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Service on
cable TV, channel 8.
GAYLORD ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
Gaylord
Bob Holmbeck, Pastor
Sunday, May 26: 9:00 a.m.
Sunday school. 10:00 a.m. Sun-
day worship service. Pot bless-
ing noon fellowship meal.
Wednesday, May 29: 6:30
p.m. Evening Bible classes and
Youth Focused.
ST. PAUL’S EV.
REFORMED CHURCH
15470 Co. Rd. 31, Hamburg
Dan Schnabel, Pastor
952-467-3878
www.stpaulsrcus.org
Sunday, May 26: 8:30 a.m.
Sunday school and adult Bible
study. 9:30 a.m. Worship serv-
ice. Choir practice after wor-
ship.
Wednesday, May 29: 6:30 to
8:00 p.m. Catechism class.
ORATORY OF
ST. THOMAS
THE APOSTLE
Jessenland
507-248-3550
Fr. Sam Perez
Thursday: Weekly Mass at
5:00 p.m.
ST. PAUL’S UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Henderson
(507) 248-3594 (Office)
Rev. Brigit Stevens, Pastor
Find us on Facebook:
St. Paul’s UCC - Henderson
Friday, May 24: Fundraiser
softener salt arrives.
Sunday, May 26: First Sun-
day of summer schedule. 9:00
a.m. Worship.
ST. MARY, MICHAEL
AND BRENDAN AREA
FAITH COMMUNITY
Fr. Keith Salisbury, Pastor
Friday, May 24: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar).
Saturday, May 25: 5:00 p.m.
Mass (Mar).
Sunday, May 26: 7:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m. Mass
(Mic). 10:30 a.m. Mass (Mar).
Monday, May 27: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar). 8:00 p.m.
AA and AlaNon (Mar).
Tuesday, May 28: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar).
Wednesday, May 29: 7:30
a. m. Mass (Mar). 8:30 a. m.
Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m. Word and
Communion (Oak Terrace).
Thursday, May 30: 7:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar). 8:30 a.m. Mass
(Bre and Mic). 9:00 a.m. Scrip-
ture study (Srs. residence in
Gaylord). 7:30 p.m. Narcotics
Anonymous (Mic).
TRINITY LUTHERAN
32234 431st Ave., Gaylord
Rev. James Snyder,
Interim Pastor
Sunday, May 26: 9:45 a.m.
Fellowship. 10:30 a.m. Worship.
Monday, May 27: Memorial
Day service at Trinity.
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Pastor William Postel
Phone 507-964-2400
Sunday, May 26: 9:00 a.m.
Bible class. 10:00 a.m. Worship
with Holy Communion. Potluck
dinner. Ladies Aid meeting.
Thursday, May 30: 5:30 p.m.
Deadline for bulletin informa-
tion.
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN
Green Isle
Friday, May 24: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, May 26: 7:45 a.m.
Worship with Communion. Pas-
tor Bob Hines. 9:00 a.m. Sunday
school.
PEACE LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Kurt Lehmkuhl, Pastor
Sunday, May 26: 9:30 a.m.
Worship service.
SENIOR DINING
Call 326-3401 for a meal
Suggested Donation $3.85
Monday: Tator tot casserole,
green beans, peaches, bread with
margarine, bar, low fat milk.
Tuesday: Roast pork, whole po-
tatoes, buttered cabbage, bread
with margarine, rosy applesauce,
low fat milk.
Wednesday: Lasagna, Califor-
ni a bl end vegetabl es, l ettuce
salad with dressing, garlic bread
with margarine, pudding, low fat
milk.
Thursday: Ginger citrus chick-
en, rice, fruit, mixed vegetables,
cake, low fat milk.
Friday: Meaty beef stew with
carrots and potatoes, cole slaw,
breadstick with margarine, fruit
cobbler, low fat milk.
SIBLEY EAST ELEMENTARY
BREAKFAST MENU
Arlington and Gaylord
Breakfast i s served at 8:00
a.m. daily. A 1/2 pint of milk is
served with each meal daily. Menu
is subject to change.
Monday: No school.
Tuesday: Cooks’ choice.
Wednesday: Cooks’ choice.
Thursday: Cooks’choice.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Arlington
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: No school.
Tuesday: Cooks’ choice.
Wednesday: Cooks’ choice.
Thursday: Cooks’ choice.
SIBLEY EAST SCHOOL
MENU
Gaylord
A 1/2 pint of milk and an en-
riched grain product is served with
each meal. Additional milk is avail-
able for 40 cents each. Menu is
subject to change.
Monday: No school.
Tuesday: Cooks’ choice.
Wednesday: Cooks’ choice.
Thursday: Cooks’ choice
Volunteers are eagerly
working to prepare the Sib-
ley County Museum for the
season’s opening from 2
p.m. to 5 p.m. on Memorial
Day, according to Curator
Sharon Haggenmiller.
The museum building,
which is the former A.F.
Poehler home, was pur-
chased by the Sibley Coun-
ty Historical Society in
1948. After a year of refur-
bishment, the museum was
ready to open on Memorial
Day in 1949. This tradition
has followed for 64 years.
After Memorial Day, the
museum will be open from
2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays
through October.
“We encourage everyone
to stop by to see our fea-
tured displays about Coun-
try Schools,” said Haggen-
miller. “For some it will be
a blast from the past, for
others it will be a learning
experience of what school
was like until the mid
1950’s when country
schools began to decline.
These displays also lead us
into our next mission of
publishing a history book
about Country Schools in
Sibley County, including
parochial schools.”
Haggenmiller added,
“There were 80 school dis-
tricts in Sibley County. The
challenge is collecting in-
formation surrounding
these districts. We are
looking for photos of the
buildings, students, teach-
ers, any memorabilia, etc.,
scan or photocopy, to use in
the publication. Do you
have any stories about your
school days? How did you
get to school? What was a
typical day like? What did
you take for lunch? Name
some games you played at
recess, etc. These are just
some of the stories that we
are looking for.”
People who can help with
some information are en-
couraged to contact the Sib-
ley County Museum at 507-
248-3434.
The Sibley County His-
torical Society holds meet-
ings on the fourth Tuesday
of the month.
The first meeting of the
season will be held at the
City Hall in New Auburn at
7 p.m. Tuesday, May 28.
Kathy Ringo will be the
speaker and talk about New
Auburn history. Everyone
is welcome to attend.
Sibley County Museum will open
for the season on Memorial Day
1-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION FORM
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402 West Alden Street, P.O. Box 388 • Arlington, MN 55307
Phone 507-964-5547 FAX 507-964-2423
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Get your subscription to the
Arlington ENTERPRISE
Your source for local news,
sports and entertainment!
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, May 23, 2013, page 10
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
LIES KE TRAC TOR
Want ed: Your OLD TRAC TORS,
any con di tion, make or mod el. We
also spe cial ize in new and used
TRAC TOR PARTS AND RE PAIR.
Call Kyle. Lo cat ed west of Hen -
der son. (612) 203-9256.
$$ DOL LARS PAID $$ Junk ve -
hi cl es, re pai r abl e cars/trucks.
FREE TOW ING. Flatbed/ wreck er
serv ice. Im me diate pick up. Mon -
day-Sun day, serv ing your area
24/7. (952) 220-TOWS.
2006 Hon da CBR 600rr, orange
with trib al flames, 7,200 miles,
$5,500. Call Brian at (320) 510-
0819.
BOOM Op era tor/ Pan el Set ter.
40+ hours wk./ Class A Li cense,
able to lift 90+ lbs. Com peti tive
pay, ben e fits. Hir ing im me diate ly.
(952) 888-9330.
CON KLIN® DEAL ERS NEED ED!
Life time ca reer in mar ket ing, man -
age ment and ap ply ing “Green”
pro ducts made in Amer i ca. Full
time/ part time. For a free cat a log,
call Franke’s Con klin Serv ice now
at (320) 238-2370. www.frank e -
mar ket ing.com.
Five bed as sist ed liv ing in Prins -
burg. Hir ing part time home care
aides for all shifts. We will train.
Must pass back ground stu dy. Ap -
ply at: cen tralmn se nior care.com or
cal l (320) 978-8075 or Deb at
(320) 441-7001.
FT driv er and op era tor of con crete
pump. Valid DL and health card.
Ex peri ence pre ferred, but wi l l
train. (612) 282-1583.
Look ing for CDL li censed truck
driv ers. A or B CDL ac cept able.
Start ing pay $15-$18 de pend ing
upon ex peri ence. (952) 657-1181
or www.ex per tasphal tinc.com.
Own er/Op era tor for OTR Haul ing
with step deck trail er (trail er not re -
quired.) Home most wee kends.
Paid week ly on per cent age. Must
be 23 years old with clean MVR
and 2 years ex peri ence. Call Koh -
out Truck ing Inc. (320) 523-1648.
Poured Wal l Form Set ter. 40+
hours/wk. Non-Union. Able to lift
90+ lbs. Ve hi cle re quired. Com -
peti tive pay, ben e fits. Hir ing im me -
diate ly. (952) 888-9330.
HAND Y MAN: Will do re mo del ing
of kitch ens, bath rooms, hang ing
doors and wi nd ows, pai nt i ng,
sheet rock ing, tex tur iz ing or any
minor re pairs in side or out side.
Wi l l al so do cl ean i ng of base -
ments/ga rag es. Call (320) 848-
2722 or (320) 583-1278.
2005 39 ft. Wil der ness Ad van tage,
sleeps 8, 2 queen beds, 2 slide-
outs, mas ter bed room with pri vate
en try, air, pa tio door, ex cel lent
con di tion, $17,500. (507) 317-
7172.
Spe cial- 95% Good man gas fur -
nace and pro gram ma ble ther mo -
stat $2,200 in stalled or AC unit
$1,900 in stalled. J&R Plumb ing
Heat ing AC, Lester Prair ie (320)
510-5035.
We are in full bloom at THIS OLD
HOUSE Gar den and Gifts in Ar -
ling ton! Thou sands of per en ni als,
an nuals, shrubs and unique gar -
den iron, gar den art, hand made
gifts and more! There will be ac -
cess dur ing all phas es of con -
struc tion! High way 5 SW, Ar ling -
ton. (507) 964-5990.
Min ne so ta Twins sea son tick ets
for 2013 sea son. Sec ti on 121
seats. Pack age in cludes 2 seats.
5, 10 or 15 game pack ag es avail -
able. Con tact Rick at (952) 224-
6331 for more in for ma tion.
Want ed: Look ing for large grove to
cut down. Will cut down for free.
Please call (320) 212-3217.
WANT ED TO BUY: Old signs all
types, farm primi tive paint ed fur ni -
ture all types, cup boards, cub by
units, lock er and pool wire bas -
kets, wood & metal piec es with
lots of draw ers, old pre-1960 holi -
day dec o ra tions, in dus tri al/school
items such as metal racks, stools,
work bench es, light n ing rods and
balls, weath er vanes, ar chi tec tur al
items like cor bels and stain glass
wind ows. We buy one item and
en tire es tates. Don’t get a dump -
ster un til you call us first! We are
lo cal. (612) 590-6136.
Hob by Farm F.S.B.O. Beau ti ful
5BR, 2.5BA, 3 types of heat, AC,
at tached in su lat ed ga rage, out
build ings, horse ready on 7 acr es.
Green Isle (612) 756-2021.
Zero down RHA fi nanc ing is avail -
able for this prop er ty. 11798 155th
St., Glen coe. Hob by farm for sale.
6 +/- acr es, beau ti ful 4BR home.
Very new out bui l d i ngs. MLS#
4338091, $275,000. Con tact me
for a pri vate show ing. Paul Krueg -
er, Edi na Re al ty, (612) 328-4506,
Paul Krueg er@edi nare al ty.com.
75’ Sand on Di a mond Lake, At wa -
ter. 2BR, 1BA ca bin on large lev el
beau ti ful south fac ing lot. Sun all
day! All up dat ed. Call Agent Re -
bec ca at (320) 905-4992.
Lake home for sale 7 miles north
of Will mar on Ea gle Lake. (320)
235-8648, af ter 6 p.m.
2BR Apart ment with ga rage, wa -
ter/sew er/gar bage i n cl ud ed.
$450/mo. New Au burn (320) 327-
2928.
Newly remodeled apartments for
rent i n Renvi l l e. Water, heat,
garbage i ncl uded. New appl i -
ances, air conditioners. (320) 564-
3351.
1BR up stairs apart ment on Main
Street in Ar ling ton. Two ref er enc es
re quired. Call Da vid (507) 964-
2256.
2BR apart ment in Oli via. Util i ties
in clud ed: heat, wa ter, elec tric i ty,
ca ble, in ter net and gar bage. Call
(320) 212-3217.
Avail able soon. 1BR and 2BR/
2BA, laun dry in apart ment. Ga -
rage avail able. Ar ling ton. Call 800-
873-1736, Am ber Fi el d Pl ace
Apart ment.
Avail able soon. 2BR, 2BA, laun dry
in apart ment, ga rage avail able,
Gay lord. Call 800-873-1736, Am -
ber Field Place Apart ment.
Com mer cial Build ing avail able
now! 900 sq. ft. down town Gay -
lord. Call Sar ah at (507) 237-5339
days, (507) 237-4166 even ings.
Hip Hop Fam i ly Shop Con sign -
ment. New, gent ly used. (507)
964-5654, Ar ling ton. Clip and save
25% on any 1 piece cloth ing item.
GREAT STUFF.
CUS TOM LOG SAW ING- Cut at
your place or ours. White oak lum -
ber deck ing and fire wood. Give
Vir gil a call. Schau er Con struc tion,
Inc. (320) 864-4453.
LIMO/ PAR TY BUS. Wed dings,
busi ness, sports, birth days, etc.
Check us out www.theur ba nex -
press.com or call Dina (612) 940-
2184, Gl en coe busi ness. DOT
375227.
Plas tic re pair. Don’t throw it. Let
me weld it. Call Mike, Bird Is land,
an y time (320) 579-0418.
AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
AUTOMOTIVE
Motorcycles
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
Work Wanted
FOR SALE
Campers
Heating/Air Cond.
Lawn, Garden
Miscellaneous
Wanted To Buy
REAL ESTATE
Hobby Farm
Lake Homes
RENTAL
Apartment
Business, Office
SALES
Sales
SERVICES
Misc. Service
RENTAL
Apartment
Classifieds
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AGRICULTURE AUTOMOTIVE EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE LIVESTOCK
& PETS
LIVESTOCK
& PETS
REAL ESTATE SERVICES RENTAL RENTAL
All ads appear online
at GlencoeNews.com
Enterprise
To place an ad: Call: 507-964-5547; Fax: 507-964-2423; E-Mail: info@ArlingtonMNnews.com; Mail: P.O. Box 388, Arlington, MN 55307
Advertising
Deadlines
The McLeod County Chronicle Mondays at Noon
The Arlington Enterprise & The Silver Lake Leader Tuesdays at Noon
The Glencoe Advertiser, The Sibley Shopper
& The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
Available...
1 & 2 Bedroom
Apartments Available
All utilities,
except electric
Income based
Must be 62 or older
or handicapped
Highland Commons
Arlington
507-964-5556 HANDICAP
ACCESSIBLE
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Call (507) 964-2256
A18-21E,19-22Sa
MOVING SALE
Sat., May 25
10 a.m.-5 p.m.
24474 361
st
Ave.
(Co. Rd. 12 East of Arlington)
Miscellaneous
furniture, clothes,
appliances, and
yard equipment.
*20Ea
ATTN: COMPUTER WORK
Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500
part time to $7,500/mo. Full time. Train-
ing provided. www.WorkServices2.com
FOREMEN
to lead utility field crews. Outdoor physical
work, many positions, paid training, $17/
hr. plus weekly performance bonuses after
promotion, living allowance when travel-
ing, company truck and benefits. Must
have strong leadership skills, good driv-
ing history, and be able to travel in Min-
nesota and central states. Email resume to
Recruiter6@osmose.com or apply online at
www.OsmoseUtilities.com EOE M/F/D/V
CASH FOR CARS:
All cars/trucks wanted. Running or not! Top
dollar paid. We come to you! Any make/
model. Call for instant offer: 800/871-9145
NEW ALUMINUM ROLL-IN
Walks on Water dock 32’ long, 8’ pa-
tio, cedar deck, plastic wheels. De-
livery available. Call 320/743-2020
info@clearlakedockandsports.com
CONCRETE
FOUNDATION COMPANY
looking for laborers, carpenters, rod bust-
ers and finishers that are motivated, expe-
rienced and willing to travel. Housing pro-
vided. 218/462-2607 www.strongform.net
SMALL MINNESOTA
BASED COMPANY
seeking motivated flatbed driv-
ers and owner operators. Estab-
lished mid-central lanes, home often
with great income potential. Contact
Deb 218/462-2611 Astle’s Trucking.
SAWMILLS
from only $3,997.00 - Make & save
money with your own bandmill - cut
lumber any dimension. In stock ready
to ship. Free info/DVD: 800/578-1363
Ext. 300N www.NorwoodSawmills.com
EVER CONSIDER
A REVERSE MORTGAGE?
At least 62 years old? Stay in your
home & increase cash flow! Safe
& effective! Call now for your free
DVD! Call now 888/610-4971
DISH NETWORK
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
high speed internet starting at $14.95/month
(where available). Save! Ask about same
day installation! Call now! 866/785-5167
CANADA DRUG CENTER
is your choice for safe and affordable med-
ications. Our licensed Canadian mail order
pharmacy will provide you with savings of
up to 75% on all your medication needs.
Call today 800/259-1096 for $10.00 off
your first prescription and free shipping.
DONATE YOUR CAR
Truck or Boat to heritage for the blind. Free
3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing,
all paperwork taken care of 888/485-0398
MISCELLANEOUS
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Pinske Real Estate
& Auctioneers
(507) 964-2250
Arlington
• 3 BR, 1-1/2 story home,
newer roof, newl y re-
decorated, in Arlington.
$
69,000.
We need listings of
homes, farms and hobby
farms. If you are thinking
about selling it will pay for
you to call us.
REAL ESTATE
A16SGEa
Independent Living 55+
Arlington Sr. Apartment ONLY
FREE Application
FREE Damage Deposit
FREE 1
st
Month Rent
Apply by June 15
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Move in by September 1
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Lease Today!
800-873-1736 or 507-642-8701
kanderson@amberfieldplace.com
www.amberfieldplace.com
A20E21Sa
CLEANER
Hiring full-time, second shift cleaner and substitute
cleaners at Central Public Schools.
Requirements: detail oriented, ability to work inde-
pendently, organized.
References and background check will be required.
For more information or application, contact Todd
Nelson of Dashir Management, at: 320-808-9066 or e-
mail resume to: tnelson@central.k12.mn.us
F20E21Sa
Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington
is seeking the following positions:
• Part-Time Certified Nursing Assistant –
evening shifts includes every other
weekend/holiday
• Full-Time Benefit eligible LPN/RN –
evening shifts with every other weekend
Hiring Bonus up to
$
500 for Full-Time
LPN/RN position
• LPN/RN - every other weekend with potential to pick
up more hours
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information,
call Tiffany Brockhoff,
Human Resource Director at
507-964-2251 or email:
tbrockof@good-sam.com
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap Drug-Free Workplace
Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life.
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We are more than just a newspaper!
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, May 23, 2013, page 11
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Your Partner in Care for Life
SibleyMedical.org
In a vapid!y changing hca!th cavc cnvivonmcnt, thc boavd and
!cadcvship oI Sib!cy Mcdica! Ccntcv (SMC) is wovking to cnsuvc
community mcmbcvs continuc to havc acccss to qua!ity cavc.
Thc SMC Boavd and thc Av!ington City Counci! havc bccn in
discussions vcgavding a dccpcv vc!ationship bctwccn SMC and
Ridgcvicw Mcdica! Ccntcv. This is an impovtant and cxciting
dcvc!opmcnt in thc Iutuvc oI hca!th cavc Iov ouv community
and wc want to invitc cvcvyonc to comc and !cavn about thc
syncvgics bctwccn ouv ovganizations and thc bcnchts an
am!iation wou!d bving to ouv communitics.
Comc hcav what's
happcning at
Sib!cy Mcdica! Ccntcv.
Co
h h
h t'
Com
happcni
y Sib!cy M
mc hcav wh wh
happcning
Mcdica! C
hat's
at
cdica! Ccnt v. cv.
Ina vapid!y changing
!cadcvship II Sib! M
Thursday,
Arling
g hca!thcavc cnv nvivonmcn
Mcdica! C nt (SMC) i
y, May 30, 2013 - 7:00
PUBLIC FORUM
ington Community Center
nt, thc boavd and
king t
7:00 pm
enter
!cadcvship I oI y Sib!cy M
community ty mcmbcv
Thc SMC Boavd and thc
discussions vcgavdin
Ridgcvi w cw Mcdica! C
dcvc!opmcnt in thc Iutuv
and wc want to inv nvitc
syncvgics bctwccn ou
am!iation wou!d bvin
Mcdica! Ccnt v cv (SMC) is w
s continuc to hav avc acccss
thc Av!ington y City Counci
ng a dccpcv vc!ationship b
ca! Ccntcv. This is an impovtant
Iutuvc I oI hca!th cavc Io Iov ouv
c cvcvyonc to comc and !cavn
uv ovganizations and thc
ng to ouv communitics.
wovking tocnsuvc
toqua!ity ty cavc.
ounci av ! havc bccn in
ctwccn SMCand
mpovtant and cxciting
ouv community
and !cavn about thc
c bcnchts an
am!iation wou!d bvin
Questions? Call 888-
ng to ouv communitics.
888-974-2539
SibleyMedical.org
Your Partner in Care for Life
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Art Awards
These three students received major
art awards during the Sibley East
Awards Night in Arlington on Wednes-
day evening, May 15. Left to right:
Paige Nelson (Most Dedicated Award),
Bailey Brockoff (Art Student of the Year
Award) and Samantha Lane (Most Cre-
ative Award).
By Sgt. Jacalyn Sticha
Minnesota State Patrol
Do you know what hap-
pens in the first fatal second
after a car going 55 miles per
hour hits a solid object?
1. In the first 10th of a sec-
ond, the front bumper and
grill collapse.
2. The second 10th of a
second finds the hood crum-
bling, rising and striking the
windshield as the spinning
rear wheels lift from the
ground. Simultaneously,
fenders begin wrapping them-
selves around the solid ob-
ject. Although the car ’s
frame has been halted, the
rest of the car is still going 55
miles per hour. Instinct caus-
es the driver to stiffen his
legs against the crash, and
they snap at the knee joint.
3. During the third 10th of
a second, the steering wheel
starts to disintegrate and the
steering column aims for the
driver’s chest.
4. The fourth 10th of a sec-
ond finds two feet of the car’s
front end wrecked, while the
rear end still moves at 35
miles per hour. The driver’s
body is still traveling at 55
miles per hour.
5. In the fifth 10th of a sec-
ond, the driver is impaled on
the steering column, and
blood rushes into his lungs.
6. The sixth 10th of a sec-
ond, the impact has built up
to the point that the driver’s
feet are ripped out of tightly
laced shoes. The brake pedal
breaks off. The car frame
buckles in the middle. The
driver’s head smashes into
the windshield as the rear
wheels, still spinning, fall
back to the earth.
7. In the seventh 10th of a
second, hinges rip loose,
doors fly open and the seats
break free, striking the driver
from behind.
8. The seat striking the
driver does not bother him
because he is already dead.
The last three 10ths of a sec-
ond mean nothing to the driv-
er.
Moral: You may choose to
break the law and not buckle
up; however, you cannot
break the laws of physics.
The first second of a fatal crash
Budget Continued from page 1
FY ‘14 budget proposed, with
budget adjustments, the esti-
mated unreserved (undesig-
nated) general fund balance
would be $2,042,404 at year
end June, 30, 2014.
• “The proposed FY ‘14
budget takes into considera-
tion a minimal decline in en-
rollment, small increases in
contract settlement, estimated
insurance premiums and one
percent addition dollars in the
state general education.
• “The food service fund
balance is projected to be ap-
proximately $117,095 at the
end of FY 13 and $114,793 at
the end of FY 14. Due to fed-
eral requirements it will again
be necessary to increase lunch
prices.
• “The community service
fund is projected to be ap-
proximately -$79,183 at the
end of the current school year,
and -$99,611 at the end of the
2013-14 school year.
“With continued budget ad-
justments and a possible one
time transfer from the undes-
ignated fund balance to the
community service fund a bal-
anced budget would be estab-
lished.”
Langenbrunner added that a
lot of work has been done
during the last year to work
towards a balanced budget.
He again stressed to the
board that a balanced budget
is extremely important and the
district needs to work to only
spend what it brings in each
year.
The budget will be revised
as enrollment numbers and
solidified and it is better
known what the state formu-
las will be once approved by
the Governor.
Closed Meeting
The board closed the regu-
lar meeting due to attorney-
client privilege.
Langenbrunner reported the
purpose of the closed one
hour and 15 minute meeting
was in regards to the ongoing
litigation MKM vs. Kevin
David Jones and Sibley East.
He added that the board took
no action at the meeting. He
said mediation is scheduled
for Thursday, May 30.
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