5-29-14 Silver Lake Leader

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Vol. 113 No. 23 • Thursday, May 29, 2014 • Silver Lake, MN 55381
Single copy
$1.00
Silver Lake Leader photos by Alyssa Schauer
Memorial Day program
On Monday, the Silver Lake American Le-
gion and Silver Lake American Legion
Auxiliary hosted the annual Memorial Day
program at Legion Park. The event began
with a parade along Main Street to the
park, followed by the service. Master of
ceremonies was Larry Lhotka, past com-
mander of Post 141, and the invocation
was by the Rev. Carol Chmielewski. The
Gettysburg Address was read by Staff Sgt.
E6 Chris Yurek. Joe Niesen (bottom left)
was the guest speaker. Niesen was in the
Minnesota Air National Guard from 1975 to
1995, and retired with over 20 years of
service. During the program, the Glencoe-
Silver Lake High School band played the
National Anthem, The Navy Hymn and
“America the Beautiful.” Calling of the roll
of deceased veterans was by Post Chap-
lain Bob Sopkowiak, and Auxiliary mem-
bers placed wreaths on the wooden
crosses. Above, the Post 141 firing squad
did a gun salute. To the bottom right is
Mercedes Nowak placing a wreath for de-
ceased veterans of peace time.
Today marks the end of an
era for the Silver Lake
Leader newspaper, a fixture
in the Silver Lake commu-
nity for over 110 years.
Beginning next week on
June 4, the news and adver-
tising of the Silver Lake
Leader will be incorporated
into The McLeod County
Chronicle newspaper based
in Glencoe.
The Chronicle will add
pages to its publication to in-
tegrate the current news con-
tent of the Silver Lake
Leader, while at the same
time eliminating the duplica-
tions that occur from pub-
lishing two newspapers.
Alyssa Schauer will con-
tinue to be the Silver Lake
reporter, covering the Silver
Lake City Council, Lakeside
Elementary news, Silver
Lake events, such as ice
golf, St. Patrick’s Day,
music in the park and Pola-
Czesky Days among others,
as well as feature stories
from the area.
Her coverage also will in-
clude the Glencoe-Silver
Lake School Board.
The reason for the
Leader’s closing is econom-
ics; the Leader cannot finan-
cially support itself
anymore.
The Silver Lake Leader
began in 1901 with W.O.
“Oscar” Merrill and the help
of the Avery family and the
Hutchinson Leader.
Carlos Avery, publisher of
the Hutchinson Leader, pub-
lished the first issue of the
Silver Lake Leader on Dec.
20, 1901, and it was Oscar
Merrill who said in the first
edition he “will give his best
efforts to the paper as edi-
tor.”
The Leader office then
was over Danek’s Hardware
Store.
Oscar Merrill moved on to
be the Silver Lake postmas-
ter and his sons, Delbert and
Wilbert Merrill, took over
the business.
Delbert went into the
service and the Leader was
then operated by Wilbert and
his wife, Genevieve.
The couple continued
publishing the newspaper
until their passing, and in
1988, Ken and Dorothy
Merrill purchased the news-
paper from Ken Merrill’s
siblings.
Ken and Dorothy Merrill
managed the business and
published the Silver Lake
Leader until December
2010, when they sold the
business to McLeod Pub-
lishing, Inc.
When McLeod Publish-
ing, Inc., purchased the
Leader, the agreement guar-
anteed the newspaper would
operate for one year. It went
nearly 3-1/2 years, and
today, comes to an end.
Thank you again, to all the
advertisers and subscribers
of the Silver Lake Leader for
their continued support of
the publication. We could
not have continued for so
long without you.
Leader’s final edition today
By Ken Merrill
Back when I would write
regularly for this newspaper, I
sat down with knowledge of
what I was writing about.
This time I have been think-
ing what pearls I could come
up with. But I am drawing a
blank.
This is the last issue of the
Silver Lake Leader. A moment
in history that is taking on
greater-than-normal signifi-
cance for this writer.
The Silver Lake Leader was
a part of the Merrill lives for
over 110 years and started
with Grandpa W.O. “Oscar”
Merrill in 1901, continuing on
with Delbert and Wilbert Mer-
rill (my dad), who teamed up
with my mother Genevieve for
many years of operating the
Silver Lake Leader.
My wife, Dorothy, and I
continued production until
2010 when the McLeod
County Chronicle agreed to
purchase and operate the paper
for at least another year.
It has been three years and
now the economics have
forced the hand. Newspapers
have been changing, merging
with one another.
But one always hoped the
Silver Lake Leader would not
be one of those papers and
would somehow survive. It is
a sad time for this writer as
something, part of one’s life
since childhood, will come to
an end.
At the same time, we are
thankful the community will
be continued with dedicated
pages in The McLeod County
Chronicle.
We hope the community
will support the effort of The
Chronicle and help keep re-
porting on Silver Lake. We are
happy staff writer Alyssa
Schauer will continue writing,
as she has become the familiar
face the community has come
to rely on.
Change is constant and
newspapers are no different —
we hope the strength of the
Silver Lake community will
continue making sure the ac-
tivities are reported to the
Chronicle staff — what hap-
pened, what is happening, and
what could happen.
This issue is the final one-
the Silver Lake Leader legacy.
It is with sadness and many
other deep emotions this writer
says goodbye to the Silver
Lake Leader.
Saying goodbye to Leader
Minneapolis Tribune wrote of Silver Lake
By Alyssa Schauer
Staff Writer
In May 1978, the Minneapo-
lis Tribune published a series
of articles about the history,
culture and people of Silver
Lake in its “Saturday Neigh-
bors” section.
Ruth Hammond and Tom
Sorensen, staff writers with the
Tribune, wrote articles about
the half-Czech, half-Polish
population in town; the green
scum of Silver Lake; the de-
creasing business on Main
Street; the anticipation of au-
ditorium wedding dances; the
town of South Silver Lake that
“never was;” the wooden
windmills crafted by Robert
Wosmek; Don and Mary Wen-
dolek’s beer parlor; and the
barber shop owned by George
and Florence Warnke.
Also in that issue were pho-
tos of Leigh Anglin and Mar-
lene Kasprzyk’s wedding
ceremony and dance; a photo
of Christine and Emil Jerabek,
who at the time were Silver
Lake’s oldest couple; Elmer
Warnke trimming Richard
Goede’s hair; and a scene on
Main Street, including Rolling
Pin Bakery, G&G Bar, and
Don and Mary’s, “Home of
Turtle Soup.”
Below are excerpts from a
few of the articles published in
that section, including “Half
Czech, half Polish, folks get
along in Silver Lake;” “Swim-
mers and fish avoid Silver
Lake, home of green scum;”
and “For 75¢, an exotic treat at
Don and Mary’s place.”
‘Half Czech,
half Polish’
Mayor Francis Slanga, 53, is
half Polish and half Czech. So
is the town that elected him
last year.
The Czechs and Poles may
rib each other a lot, but they
don’t fight, said Slanga, who
owns Slanga Hardware Store.
In some aspects of their
lives, Silver Lake’s 700 resi-
dents unite. In others, such as
where they go to church and
are buried, they tend to segre-
gate by nationality.
Most of the Polish go to the
Polish Catholic Church, St.
Adalbert’s. The Czechs go to
the Czech churches: St.
Joseph’s Catholic, Czech
Bretheren Presbyterian and
Congregational.
(Although the predomi-
nance of Czech churches
makes the ratio of Czechs to
Poles look uneven, the two
Protestant churches draw in
many members from outside
the city limits.)
“They always say the Bo-
hemians pray for the Polacks
and the Polacks pray for the
Bohemians,” said Don Wen-
dolek, 56, owner of Don and
Mary’s beer parlor.
... For the past seven sum-
mers, the city has been holding
Pola-Czesky Days in honor of
both the town’s backgrounds.
Featured are the softball
tournaments, food stands, a
parade and toilet bowl races ....
Part of the accord between
the Poles and Bohemians is
natural. Their languages are
similar, so the early settlers
had little difficulty understand-
ing each other. Both ethnic
groups know how to “put on a
good feed,” testify those who
have attended funeral lunch-
eons. Children of both nation-
alities attend school together,
either at Silver Lake Public
School or at the Catholic
School of Silver Lake, which
resulted from a merger of St.
Adalbert’s and St. Joseph’s
grade schools in 1969 ....
‘Silver Lake, home
of green scum’
Silver Lake residents don’t
speak reverently of their
town’s namesake.
“It smells a lot,” said Donna
Pesina, 32, who was born and
raised in Silver Lake city.
Her sentiments are echoed
around town.
No matter how placed, how
non-overrun by noisy motor-
boats and fishermen, the lake
is polluted.
On hot still summer days,
the water looks more pea-soup
green than silver. The stench
of dying algae is strong. It
hangs over the lake and pushes
up to Main Street, a few
blocks north.
During most of its history,
the city of Silver Lake dumped
its raw sewage directly into the
lake. About 25 years ago, it in-
stalled a treatment plant that
has proved inadequate for its
needs. Now the city is apply-
ing for 90 percent federal
funds to upgrade its plant ....
During the widespread
drought in 1934 and 1935, the
1-1/2-mile by 3/4-mile lake
dried up. Gardens and
haystacks appeared where
water had been. Silver Lake’s
oldest resident, 97-year-old
Emil Jerabek, remembers that
he and his 89-year-old wife,
Christine, grew molasses cane
and prize-winning potatoes in
the lake bed.
Now the murky gray waters
are home to minnows, water-
fowl and a few off-tasting bull-
heads, but no trout or other
gamefish. Swimming ducks
provided the lake’s only visi-
ble activity last week. Wooden
wagon wheels protruded from
the water near the banks ....
Unlimited fishing is permit-
ted each winter because, when
the lake freezes, the fish die
anyway, said Don Gilbertson,
a fishery technician for the
DNR in Hutchinson.
Despite the liberties al-
lowed, Gilbertson says he has-
n’t seen anyone fish the lake
for years.
Dick Helmbrecht, 30, who
runs Dick’s Live Bait on the
lake, said he kept three or four
acres of the lake “alive” with
an aerator last winter ... “It was
a decent fishing lake about ’63
or ’64,” he said.
Fishermen caught sunfish
and crappies then. Now “it’s
nothing but a sewage basin.”
James H. Butler, 39, an elec-
trical engineer who lives on
the lake with his family and
commutes weekdays to Min-
neapolis, is chairman of the
Silver Lake Improvement As-
sociation. “It’s a scenic lake,
not a mudhole,” he said. “It’s
worth trying to clean up.”
‘Exotic treat at
Don and Mary’s’
Don Wendolek makes good
soup and he makes it snappy.
Wendolek, 56, owner of
Don and Mary’s beer parlor in
Silver Lake, adds chicken,
beef, seasoning and vegetables
to turtle meat. After cooking
for nearly six hours, he freezes
the soup, 12 gallons at a time.
On Fridays and Saturdays, he
sells up to a gallon a day at 75
cents a bowl.
“They always had turtle
soup here so I kept making it,”
said Wendolek, who bought
his 92-year-old Main Street
building in 1965. Customer re-
action to the soup varies.
“Some kind of make a face
and others come just for the
turtle soup special,” Wendolek
said.
The turtle meat comes from
the Morey Fish Co. in Motley,
Minn. Morey buys its snappers
from northern Minnesota fish-
ermen.
Wendolek’s patrons used to
donate snappers, but rarely do
now that turtle meat has soared
to $2.50 a pound. Would-be
donors eat the meat them-
selves. Even Morey Fish Co.’s
turtle supply is sporadic, so
Wendolek tries to buy 20
pounds at a time.
Wendolek runs the business
with his French-born wife,
Mary, whom he met while
working as a U.S. Air Force
interpreter during World War
II. He’s a third-generation
Pole, born on a farm six miles
north of Silver Lake. “No hos-
pital. That’s why I’m so
tough,” he said.
Michael Sundblad, a teacher
from Glencoe-Silver Lake
High School has been named
as a regional honoree in the
WEM Foundation’s 2014 Out-
standing Educator Awards
program.
Sundblad is being honored
in the Teacher Achievement
category, which recognizes
exemplary teachers who sup-
port, inspire and assist stu-
dents to attain greater learning,
as evidenced by student
achievement.
Sundblad has been teaching
for 22 years, and currently
teaches engineering and indus-
trial technology to students
ninth through 12th grade at
GSL High School.
In addition to teaching,
Sundblad runs the Super-
mileage team. It is a project-
based program where students
design, build and test a single-
person car to achieve high
mileage.
Sundblad also introduced
First Robotics at GSL High
School to inspire young peo-
ple's interest and participation
in science and technology.
Sundblad’s newest leader-
ship experience outside the
classroom is his involvement
with the training of future ed-
ucators. He was hired by St.
Cloud State University to in-
struct courses for prospective
industrial technology and en-
gineering instructors.
“During his tenure, Mr.
Sundblad has made a lot of
changes and improvements,”
said GSL Principal Paul
Sparby. “He has implemented
Project Lead curriculum; is
using iPads in the classroom
for student work, video pro-
ductions, and as a scan tool for
automotive repair class, has
implemented the use of a 3D
printer.”
In addition to the Teacher
Achievement Award, honorees
are recognized with the Ethics
in Education Award (exem-
plary educators who embody
ethical behavior and promote
ethical development for stu-
dents through classroom or
school activities, policies or
curriculum) and with the Aca-
demic Challenge Coach
Award (classroom teachers
who are exemplary coaches of
student teams that participate
and compete in academic chal-
lenges endorsed by the Min-
nesota Academic League
Council).
Educators are first nomi-
nated for the WEM Outstand-
ing Educator Awards Program
by students, parents, col-
leagues or community mem-
bers. Those who accept the
nomination provide additional
information for consideration
by Synergy & Leadership Ex-
change and a blue ribbon se-
lection panel, which reviews
and ranks the nominees.
Six educators received
statewide honors, and seven
educators were named as re-
gional honorees for the 2014
WEM Foundation Outstand-
ing Educator awards
Page 2 — Silver Lake Leader, Thursday, May 29, 2014
Staff
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Publishers;
Rich Glennie, Editor; Brenda Fogarty,
Sales; Alyssa Schauer, Staff Writer/Of-
fice.
Letters
The Silver Lake Leader welcomes let-
ters from readers expressing their
opinions. All letters, however, must be
signed. Private thanks, solicitations
and potentially libelous letters will not
be published. We reserve the right to
edit any letter.
A guest column is also available to any
writer who would like to present an
opinion in a more expanded format. If
interested, contact the editor,
richg@glencoenews.com.
Ethics
The editorial staff of the Silver Lake
Leader strives to present the news in a
fair and accurate manner. We appreci-
ate errors being brought to our atten-
tion. Please bring any grievances
against the Silver Lake Leader to the
attention of the editor. Should differ-
ences continue, readers are encour-
aged to take their grievances to the
Minnesota News Council, an organi-
zation dedicated to protecting the pub-
lic from press inaccuracy and
unfairness. The News Council can be
contacted at 12 South Sixth St., Suite
940, Minneapolis, MN 55402, or
(612) 341-9357.
Press Freedom
Freedom of the press is guaranteed
under the First Amendment to the U.S.
Constitution:
“Congress shall make no law re-
specting an establishment of religion,
or prohibiting the free exercise thereof;
or abridging the freedom of speech, or
the press…”
Ben Franklin wrote in the Pennsyl-
vania Gazette in 1731: “If printers were
determined not to print anything till
they were sure it would offend nobody
there would be very little printed.”
Deadline for news and advertising
in the Silver Lake Leader is noon,
Tuesday. Deadline for advertising in
The Galaxy is noon Wednesday.
Established Dec. 20, 1901 by W.O. Merrill
Postmaster send address changes to:
Silver Lake Leader,
P.O. Box 343, 104B Lake Ave., Silver Lake, MN 55381
Phone 320-327-2216 FAX 320-327-2530
Email slleader@embarqmail.com
Hours: Mon. 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Tues. 8 a.m.-Noon,
Wed. Closed, Thurs. 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri. Closed.
Published Every Thursday at Silver Lake, MN 55381.
Periodicals paid at Silver Lake, MN.
Subscription Rates: McLeod County and Cokato, MN
– $30.00 per year. Elsewhere in MN – $34.00 per year.
Outside of state – $38.00.
Silver Lake Leader
Brian Mikolichek: Owner • Bonded-Insured
Residential Remodel
Service Light Commercial
Complete Plumbing and Heating Systems
Air Conditioning Installation
Winsted, MN 320-395-2002
M
ikolichek
Plumbing & Heating
Business & Professional Directory
COKATO
EYE CENTER
115 Olsen Blvd., Cokato
320-286-5695 or 888-286-5695
OPTOMETRISTS
*Paul G. Eklof, O.D.
*Katie N. Tancabel, O.D.
Kid’s Glasses
$
98.00
Evening and Saturday
appts. available
• 5” Seamless Gutters
• 6” Seamless Gutters
• K-Guard Leaf-Free
Gutter System
(lifetime clog free guarantee)
PHIL GOETTL
612-655-1379
888-864-5979
www.mngutter.com
M
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For All Your Insurance needs
Home, Auto, Farm, Commercial
Call an Agent today
CITIZENS INSURANCE
AGENCY OF HUTCHINSON, LLC
Citizens Bank Building
P.O. Box 339 – 102 Main St. S, Hutchinson, MN 55350
Toll-Free: (888) 234-2910 www.ciahutch.com Fax: (320) 587-1174
K7eowAa
The Business and Professional Directory is provided each week for quick reference to businesses and
professionals in the Silver Lake area — their locations, phone numbers and office hours.
Call the Silver Lake Leader, (320-327-2216), or McLeod County Chronicle, (320-864-5518)
offices for details on how you can be included in this directory.
LUNDEEN
AUCTION
(612) 280-1725
Derek
Lundeen
Auctioneer
www.ludeenauction.com
Optician
Gerry’s Vision
Shoppe, Inc.
“Your Complete Optical Store”
(with In-House Lab)
Call for Appointment
864-6111
1234 Greeley Ave.,
Glencoe
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ELECTRIC I
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.
Residential
Farm
Industrial
Trenching
Locating
320-286-6570
Paul Pokornowski
320-286-6570 Cokato, MN
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Seniors meet Monday, June 9
The Silver Lake Senior Citizens Club will have its reg-
ular monthly meeting Monday, June 9, at 1 p.m., at the Sil-
ver Lake Auditorium.
Degree of Honor meeting set
Degree of Honor No. 182 will hold a social meeting on
Tuesday, June 10, at 1 p.m., at the Silver Lake Auditorium.
Dairy Day set Friday, June 20
The Silver Lake Business Association is sponsoring the
annual Silver Lake Dairy Day on Friday, June 20, from
5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., at Legion Park. The event includes
kids’ activities sponsored by the Silver Lake American Le-
gion Auxiliary, music by Jim’s Brewers, ice cream eating
and milk drinking contests, and much more. A meal of
pulled-pork sandwiches, chips, pickles, milk and ice cream
will be served. There is a cost for the meal. In case of in-
clement weather, the event will be held in the Silver Lake
Auditorium. The public is invited to attend. See future is-
sues of The McLeod County Chronicle for more informa-
tion.
Centershot Archery begins
Grace Bible Church of Silver Lake will start a new ses-
sion of its Centershot Archery Ministry on Sunday, June
1, beginning at 1 p.m. Centershot is a Bible-based archery
ministry that consists of a 45-minute Bible study and 45
minutes of archery instruction one day a week for eight
weeks (ages 7 through adult). This is a wonderful family
activity and a great way to get introduced to the sport of
archery. The church provides bows and arrows to use dur-
ing the class time. The cost for the entire eight weeks is
$10. Those interested can contact the church at 320-327-
2352 or Jim Richardson at 320-395-2721. Grace Bible
Church is located in Silver Lake, next to the city water
tower.
Seaside service set June 8
Members and friends of Grace Bible Church in Silver
Lake invite you to experience and participate in a unique
outdoor worship service. On Sunday, June 8, at 9:30 a.m.,
a special seaside service will be held at Swan Lake on the
north side near the pier. The service is reflective of the
times when Jesus preached from a boat on the Sea of
Galilee, a fresh water lake. This worship event includes a
message preached from a boat and congregational singing.
Dress is casual and those who attend are asked to bring
their own lawn chairs or a blanket. Boats also are wel-
come. Swan Lake is located about one mile northwest of
Silver Lake on County Rd. 16 (To get there, go to High-
way 7, and turn west and take County Road 16 north). In
the case of inclement weather, the service will be held at
the church building. Grace Bible Church is located in Sil-
ver Lake at 300 Cleveland St., next to the city water tower.
For more information call 320-327-2352.
Upcoming Events
As a prelude to Silver
Lake’s Pola-Czesky Days, the
first of six Music in the Park
Thursday gatherings will be
June 26. Watch for schedules
to be posted soon.
The Music in the Park com-
mittee is asking for donations
for prizes to be given away
during the Music in the Park
events at Legion Park on Main
Street in Silver Lake.
In order to have your dona-
tion acknowledged as being
donated by you, your business
or organization, please have
them to the committee by June
10. A listing will then be com-
piled.
Donors are encouraged to
put their names on the prizes if
they want to be acknowl-
edged. Any donations turned
in to the committee after that
date or brought to Music in the
Park will be listed as given by
an anonymous donor.
Due to the merging of the
newspapers and space avail-
ability, there may not be a list
of prize winners in the news-
paper.
If you have questions,
please call DeNeil or Lisa
Thompson at 320-327-2278 or
Ray or Sharon Bandas at 320-
327-3115.
Donations sought for
Music in the Park events
Save the date! Registration
for Silver Lake Lions fifth-
and sixth-grade football sea-
son begins Wednesday, Aug.
1, at the Hutchinson Recre-
ation Center. Hours are from
Monday through Thursday, 9
a.m. to 4 p.m.
The team will play in the
lightweight or heavyweight di-
vision.
When players are register-
ing, indicate they are a Silver
Lake Lions player.
Players are responsible for
$25 of the $50 registration fee.
The Silver Lake Lions will be
sponsoring $25 for each
player.
Equipment pickup (helmets
and pads) will be Thursday,
Aug. 21, at 7 p.m., at the
Hutchinson Recreation Center.
Players are to provide their
own football pants and shoes
(tennis or soccer shoes).
Coaches are Gary Kosek
and Brian Mikolichek. A
coaches meeting will be on
Thursday, Aug. 21, at 8 p.m.,
at the recreation center.
More information will fol-
low at a later date.
Lions representatives are
Dan Tschimperle and Sandy
Posusta.
Lions 5th-, 6th-grade
football registration
Submitted photos
May Day
On May 6, Sarah Lipke’s
and Tammy Schermann’s
classes dropped off May
Day baskets for residents
at Cedar Crest Estate in
Silver Lake. Above are
McKenzie Patnaude and
Betty Boll and, to the left,
from right to left, are Gavin
Popp, Mason Ittel, Mason
Petron, Cameron Kacz-
marek, Tage Rosenlund,
Jake Schrupp, Jesse
Dahlke, Shawn McHugh,
Carter Johnson and Brent
Lipke.
Sundblad named regional
honoree in Outstanding
Educator program
The online bill pay and web
store is now live on the City of
Silver Lake website at
www.cityofsilverlake.org.
Click on the “online pay-
ments” button on the left-hand
side of the screen.
Residents are now able to
go online to view their utility
account balances and make
payments.
In addition, residents can
also sign up for pool passes,
swimming lessons, and sum-
mer rec programs as well as
building permits.
“One simple stop for many
city services,” City Clerk
Kerry Venier said.
Online bill
pay now
available at
city offices
June 2-6
Silver Lake
Senior Nutrition Site
Monday — Swiss steak, baked
potato, corn, bread, margarine,
pineapple, low-fat milk.
Tuesday — Roast turkey,
mashed potatoes, peas, carrots,
cranberry garnish, bread, mar-
garine, strawberry shortcake, low-
fat milk.
Wednesday — Mandarin
chicken salad, fresh fruit, mari-
nated tomatoes, margarine, muf-
fin, low-fat milk.
Thursday — Pork chop,
mashed potatoes, carrots, dinner
roll, margarine, lemon angel food
cake, low-fat milk.
Friday — Meatloaf with catsup,
whole parslied potatoes, country-
blend vegetables, bread, mar-
garine, pears, low-fat milk.
Menus
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Silver Lake Leader, Thursday, May 29, 2014 — Page 3
Here we are in our final
issue of the Silver Lake
Leader.
The office is packed up, the
walls are bare, my desk is
empty and they’re making
room for me in at The Chron-
icle office in Glencoe.
Though this change has
been announced for some time
now, would you believe I’m
still not ready for it?
I know not much will
change for me job-wise, as I’ll
still be the roving reporter
covering all Silver Lake
events, including Ice Golf, St.
Patrick’s Day, Dairy Day,
Music in the Park, Pola-
Czesky Days (my favorite),
and Winterfest, along with the
ever-exciting Silver Lake City
Council meetings and school
events.
But there was something so
special about having our own
town newspaper.
The Silver Lake Leader has
been a fixture in the commu-
nity for over 110 years — a
legacy built by the Merrill
family that continued until
2010, when Ken and Dorothy
sold the business to McLeod
Publishing, Inc.
I had just moved back to
Silver Lake in November
2010 with hopes to return to
school to earn my nursing de-
gree when Grandma Genny
showed me the want ad seek-
ing a part-time reporter for the
Silver Lake Leader.
I figured part-time work as
a writer would be a good idea,
seeing as I did spend four
years of my life and $50,000
at Winona State earning a
bachelor’s degree in English
writing.
If anything, I thought my
parents would be pleased I
found something related to
writing, so I applied.
I remember getting the call
while at Grandma Genny’s
Christmas Eve afternoon from
Editor Rich Glennie that I got
the job.
Merry Christmas to me, eh?
I jumped up and down in ex-
citement and ate a few ko-
laches to celebrate the news
before the nervousness set in.
My first day was Jan. 2,
2011, and I headed to the then
Silver Lake Leader office on
Main Street to meet with Rich,
Silver Lake advertising rep
Brenda Fogarty and the Mer-
rills to learn the ropes of the
newspaper business and my
duties as a part-time reporter
for the Silver Lake commu-
nity.
I had big shoes to fill, and I
knew it. I felt as if the fate of
the Leader was in my hands,
and I was ready for the chal-
lenge, though I’ll admit, some
days I wondered what I had
gotten myself into.
That week, Ken drove me
around Silver Lake and intro-
duced me to the “key” people
I’d have to know in this busi-
ness, including Mayor Bruce
Bebo, City Clerk Kerry Ve-
nier, and Postmaster Michele
Reno, among others.
I was very grateful for his
kindness and patience as I
slowly learned the routine of
publishing a weekly newspa-
per.
It didn’t take long for others
in the community to accept me
as the new reporter, and I’m
very appreciative of that.
I’ve gotten to know many of
you now that I’ve been report-
ing and photographing stories
and events in Silver Lake for
nearly four years, and I cannot
tell you all enough how much
I enjoy these friendships.
I love running into smiling
familiar faces and talking
about the latest news, whether
it’s about the unpredictable
weather, travel plans, the
trusty Jeep, or family affairs.
Silver Lake is very special
to me; I feel as if I have one
big family here, so you can
imagine the emotional task of
cleaning out the office and
moving from the Lake Avenue
office to 10th Street in Glen-
coe.
I’ll still be living in my little
apartment, and you’ll still see
me running around taking pic-
tures, BS’ing, and covering
the latest news in Silver Lake,
but it’s just going to be a bit
different not working from
that windowfront in town.
You can all reach me at that
office at 320-864-5518, and
please keep sending me those
Silver Lake news items like
births, happenings, academic
honors, etc. I’ll try my hardest
to bring that “Silver Lake
touch” to a few pages in The
Chronicle.
Thank you, everyone, for
staying with me on this jour-
ney as a journalist. I look for-
ward to continuing the
tradition of covering the news
and sharing the latest Jeep
mishaps in “The Travel Sec-
tion.”
Believe it or not, I’m still not ready
The Travel Section
By Alyssa Schauer
Reaching out to fund auditorium project
To the Editor:
On behalf of the city of Sil-
ver Lake, I would like to take
this opportunity to reach out to
all of the present and past res-
idents of our fine city.
As you know, we are in the
process of doing some much-
needed improvements to the
auditorium. These improve-
ments were something that
have been discussed off and
on for numerous years. So a
committee was formed and
with everyone’s input, it was
decided that now is the time.
The entire downstairs epoxy
floors needed to be redone as
well as the entry floor and the
stairs. This project has been
funded through the generous
donations from local organiza-
tions. Along with that, many
of these same groups have
been putting in many hours of
volunteer help with painting,
etc.
The other big projects for
the auditorium are the new
handicapped bathroom on the
upper level, the re-working of
the bar area and the big one
which is putting in a wheel
chair lift. There has been some
great volunteer labor as well
as working with local contrac-
tors to keep these costs down.
The goal is to get the wheel-
chair lift installed in mid June.
These projects were needed
to not only make the building
handicapped accessible, but
also to make it more appealing
and used by more people.
So now we need to figure
out how to raise the funds to
pay for all these improve-
ments! Our organizations have
stepped up so many times that
it is almost impossible to ask
them for more. This building
is really the center of our city
and holds so much history for
years past. We all need to take
pride in it.
With that said, I am reach-
ing out to all people who have
ties to Silver Lake. Maybe you
had your wedding here, or
maybe your son’s or daugh-
ter’s wedding, or maybe you
celebrated yours or your par-
ents’ anniversaries in this
building. Or maybe you
wished you could have, but it
was not handicapped accessi-
ble! So with your help, that
will not be the case any longer.
I am personally reaching out
to all individuals who can find
the means to personally donate
toward helping us raise these
funds.
Some people have already
contacted us and have donated
toward this project. If you can
help us out, I personally will
come to your door, at my own
expense, and pick up your do-
nation and give you a voucher
from the city for your tax write
off. This offer stands for any-
one that lives within a 75-mile
radius of Silver Lake (Sorry, I
have to draw the line some-
where.)
Please feel free to call me at
320-327-3157, or call the city
offices at 320-327-2412 and
they will pass your info along.
Please help us anyway you
can to help us make this build-
ing a focal point of our com-
munity again!
Mayor Bruce Bebo
Silver Lake
Letters to the Editor
John (Honza) Wessale, my
great-great-grandfather, his
wife Catherine and two chil-
dren came to America in 1854.
A baby died en route and was
buried at sea.
Honza’s original name was
Vesley, but through a misun-
derstanding at the immigration
office a “V” in Czech sounds
like “W,” and was spelled the
way it sounded. Who is going
to argue with an immigration
officer when you can’t speak
English and you’ve come so
far and are almost in America?
They eventually made their
way to a homestead just south
of Waconia. They cut down
trees, built a shack, grubbed
trees for farm land, battled
mosquitoes, locusts, grass-
hoppers, fires, depressed
prices and pesky Indians.
Indians would peek through
the windows or quietly sneak
into the shack in the middle of
the day, sometimes while
Catherine was cooking. She
would turn away from the
stove, and “surprise,” there
would be an Indian standing
there. They asked for food.
From all reports, Catherine,
not being a small woman and
not afraid to stand her ground,
would loudly holler, “Pa-
cotch!” It means “Get out of
here!”
John and Catherine eventu-
ally had eight children, two of
whom died. One child was
Katherine, my great-grand-
mother, who married Joseph
Bartosh. A son, Anton, mar-
ried Anna Smida of Silver
Lake.
John and Catherine worked
hard like all the pioneers and
for 10 years improved their
farm and kept their children
fed. The Minnesota Indian
Wars were winding down; the
United States Civil War was at
its peak in 1864.
One day John, age 39, with
a wife and six kids ranging in
age from 2 to 13, decided to
join the Army and left his fam-
ily in the woods. Was it due to
patriotism? Was he promised
another homestead by the gov-
ernment? Was it for the $100
sign up bonus? Was it for the
$13 a month pay?
We can’t imagine how well
this went over with Catherine.
Probably, “Honza! Honza!
Supoc tam jalot?” “Tse a
takova loupy Dedecek!”
“Prosim, Prosim, Prosim!”
“Nerozumin!” “Tebe vsecko
zdravi, ze dalekych vlasti slet
ptactva zpevem ze vsech
koncin svetin!” and finally,
“Yanevim!” John, John, what
are you doing? etc., etc.
(Ladies, fill in your own
words if your husband, age 39,
said he was going to join the
Army and leave you in a cabin
in the woods with six chil-
dren.)
Jan. 18, 1864: Honza
walked to Fort Snelling from
Waconia, was found physi-
cally able, and was sworn in
for three years or the duration
of the War.
From John’s enlistment cer-
tificate: “I, Captain George
Keith, have minutely (notice
the word minutely) inspected
John Wesele, finding him en-
tirely ‘sober,’ is of lawful age,
and is qualified to perform the
duties of an able bodied sol-
dier.”
The Army changes his name
from Wessale to Wesele. Pri-
vate John Wesele, Third Min-
nesota Regiment U.S.
Volunteers, Company F, was
shipped from the frozen north
to hot and muggy Pine Bluff,
Ark., near Little Rock.
The Army placed the camp
in a swamp near a bend in the
river, right on the river’s edge,
with mosquitoes, slimy green
scum water, no breeze, damp
conditions and a mysterious
mist that came floating in each
evening, called “Miasma.”
The poor food, including
moldy hard tack, poor drink-
ing water, bad sanitation con-
ditions and malaria, attacked
the healthy northern soldiers.
There seemed to be no defense
against it!
Medical supplies were in
short supply or none. Of the
200 men in his camp, 89 died
of disease.
Dysentery and bloody stools
start with gripping stomach
pains, followed by vomiting
and dehydration. The bowels
start to relax accompanied by
a high fever and headaches.
There are not enough men
to pull guard or bury the dead.
“John Wesele dies on July 5th,
1864.” We don’t think he ever
fired a shot.
In 2006, we stopped at the
National Cemetery in Little
Rock, looking for John’s
gravesite.
In 1868, after being buried
in Pine Bluff for three years,
all 1,482 dead soldiers from
various camps were dug up
and shipped 50 miles to Little
Rock in bumpy wooden-
wheeled wagons and boats.
The grave diggers were paid
$4.78 per grave for exhuming
the remains.
Name tags fell off the bod-
ies; bodies were mixed up and
partially decomposed. Up
until 1868, 3,000 known and
2,000 unknown were buried in
this now very beautiful ceme-
tery.
John lies in the Minnesota
section someplace under one
of the 164 markers; 82 are un-
known.
The huge, 12-foot high
Minnesota monument has a
life-sized soldier standing on
top with his head bowed.
Erected in 1913, Minnesota is
the only state to have a huge
monument like this in the
cemetery. John’s name is listed
in a burial book and embossed
on a Civil War Memorial in
the city park in Waconia.
John’s wife, Catherine, re-
ceived $38 in back pay plus $8
a month for the death of her
husband. She raised six chil-
dren and for many years
walked two miles to Waconia
carrying supplies home on her
back.
John and Catherine’s chil-
dren grew up to be very suc-
cessful: some owning the
Waconia Sorghum Mill (em-
ployed 123 people at peak sea-
son), some farmed, some
owned the Waconia Patriot
newspaper.
Catherine died at age 91.
Her daughter, Katherine, is
buried on the Silver Lake
Presbyterian Cemetery, 30 feet
away from her husband,
Joseph Bartosh.
Katherine’s daughter Anna,
my grandmother, and her hus-
band, John Splichal, are also
buried there.
Great-great-grandfather dies in war
Tracing Roots
By Ron Pulkrabek
Editor’s note: Sara Kok-
tan traveled with her dad,
Kevin Koktan, and a few rel-
atives to their ancestral
home in the Czech Republic
four years ago. The follow-
ing is a story about their
journey.
By Sara Koktan
Joseph Zelany squinted his
deep blue eyes in concentra-
tion as he tried to form Czech
words on paper.
The envelope was addressed
to Czechoslovokia, to relatives
he had never met, kin to the fa-
ther he would never see.
His biological father, Joseph
Zelany Sr., had migrated
across mountains, oceans and
plains to a small Silver Lake
farm in 1900. In a year, he had
married a woman half his age
and died from appendicitis.
His widow remarried Frank
Ondraczeck just before Joe Jr.
entered this world.
Curious about his real pater-
nal family, Joe Jr. began a pen
pal relationship that lasted 70
years. World wars, the Great
Depression and Communism
kept him on Minnesota soil
until he lay beneath it in 1977.
In September 2010, his only
surviving child, Vivian
Osmek, 74, of St Louis Park,
flew to the Czech Republic to
meet up with these long-lost
letter correspondents.
Traveling with her were
husband Dan Osmek, 74,
daughter Marcene Bauer, 51,
from Fort Worth, Texas,
nephew Kevin Koktan, 51,
and me, his daughter, 22, from
Crystal.
As it happened, Joe Jr.’s cu-
riosity to find his father kept
his contact with the Czech rel-
atives alive even after his
death. Most immigrants even-
tually lost touch with their
families (or their children did).
Joe Jr. wrote to his uncle,
and when his uncle died, his
cousin took over.
That cousin was ill in the
hospital when we arrived in
the Czech Republic. In order
to see him in the surgery ward,
they made us wear a doctor’s
coat, plastic over our shoes,
and a hair net. But there were
only three lab coats that every
visitor shared! They claimed
that for sanitary reasons, we
had to cover ourselves with
them. This is how you know
you’re in a post-communist
country.
The surgical wing expanded
into one large room with cur-
tains wrapping around each of
the 20 patient beds.
We approached the cousin’s
cot, and he gazed at us with
shockingly deep blue eyes.
“Just like Grandpa’s!”
Marcene said.
He mostly wanted to visit
with Vivian.
“He gripped my hand so
tightly and didn’t want to let
go,” she said.
That night we visited his
other relatives. A crucifix hung
over their kitchen door, and we
all sat around the table with
Nestle coffee so strong our
spoon could stand up in it.
Only two people understood
both Czech and English, so the
conversation was frustrating to
translate with our thousands of
questions.
Then someone brought out a
metal tin box. Inside were all
the letters! They’d kept every
single one over that 70-year
stretch.
They pulled out pictures of
Vivian and her sisters as little
girls modeling their winter
coats, Joe Jr. smiling on his
front steps, and Joe Jr. learning
to drive his first car.
Driving home in the dark,
our car lights flashed over
fields of corn, forests of knot-
ted trees, and farmhouses
twinkling in the distance. It
was just like leaving
Grandpa’s.
Discovering home in Czech Republic
Silver Lake Leader photos
by Rich Glennie
Season finale
Members of the the GSL
Choir, above, performed at
the May 22 awards and
senior recognition concert
in the high school audito-
rium. It also marked the
final concert at GSL for
choir director Randi Er-
landson, at right, who re-
ceived several departing
gifts. She is leaving the
district for another teach-
ing position. At her side is
Jenny Rose, who held a
sign indicating what the
choir members thought of
their director.
By Lori Copler
Staff Writer
The McLeod County Board
of Commissioners awarded a
long list of bids May 20 in
preparation of the summer
road construction season.
The major projects for the
season tend to center around
the western half of the county,
with a primary project being
the reconstruction of County
State Aid Highway (CSAH)
25 (also known as Page and
Plum avenues), between
CSAH 115 (Airport Road)
near Hutchinson and CSAH
26, just north of Brownton.
Duininck, Inc., of Prinsburg
was the low bidder at $1.862
million, about 14.4 percent
less than the engineer’s esti-
mate of $2.175 million for the
project.
County Highway Engineer
John Brunkhorst said most of
the project will be a mill and
overlay, with the exception of
a short stretch between County
Road 62 and CSAH 115,
which will be an under seal
and overlay.
Brunkhorst said the project
is expected to take about 30
working days, within a win-
dow of July 7 and September
26.
Also on tap this summer is
work on the west side of Lake
Marion.
Brunkhorst said the county
will use the new technology of
a prime, seal and fog on
County Road 54 (Tagus Av-
enue) from the lake to CSAH
7, as well as Sunset Circle and
Sunset Drive North, both
Collins Township roads,
which will provide a pave-
ment-like surface on the cur-
rently gravel roads. The two
Sunset roads provide access to
homes on the west side of the
lake.
The County Board approved
an agreement with Collins
Township for the work on
Sunset Circle and Sunset
Drive.
Also on tap for the new
prime, seal and fog method are
the gravel in Lake Marion
Park.
The cost for Tagus Avenue
will be $157,377, the cost for
the Lake Marion Park is
$31,295, and the cost for the
Collins Township roads is
$30,937, for a total of
$219,604. The engineer’s esti-
mate for the work was
$306,655. The bid went to
Pearson Bros., Inc., of
Hanover.
The project should take ap-
proximately five working
days, said Brunkhorst, with a
contract window of June 22 to
Aug. 1.
The Unit Avenue project
was included in the county’s
total seal coating work for the
summer, which also includes
about 50 miles of seal coating.
The low bid was submitted
by Scott Construction of Wis-
consin at $899,951, 14.4 per-
cent under the engineer’s
estimate of $1.052 million.
Work for all the seal coating
is expected to take 10 working
days between June 16 and July
11.
There were four township
box culverts that were bid
upon, two in Lynn Township
and two in Round Grove
Township.
Midwest Contracting sub-
mitted the low bid of $477,300
for all four, about 4.7 percent
under the engineer’s estimate
of $500,765.
The final bid approved was
for $417,204 to AAA Striping
Services Co. for in-ground
pavement markings.
The low bid was 6.12 per-
cent higher than the engineer’s
estimate of $393,165, but was
the lowest of the three bids re-
ceived.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
300 Cleveland Ave.,
Silver Lake
Dr. Tom Rakow, Pastor
320-327-2265
http://silverlakechurch.org
Sat., May 31 — Men’s Bible
study, 7 a.m.; women’s Bible
study, 9 a.m.
Sun., June 1 — “First Light”
radio broadcast on KARP 106.9
FM, 7:30 a.m.; fellowship and re-
freshment time, 9 a.m.; pre-ser-
vice prayer time, 9:15 a.m.;
morning worship service, 9:30
a.m.; Sunday school for all ages,
10:35 a.m.; new session of Cen-
tershot Archery Ministry begins,
1 p.m.
Wed., June 4 — Prayer time, 7
p.m.
Sat., June 7 — Men’s Bible
study, 7 a.m.; women’s Bible
study, 9 a.m.
Sun., June 8 — “First Light”
radio broadcast on KARP 106.9
FM, 7:30 a.m.; seaside service at
Swan Lake, 9:30 a.m.; all-church
potluck following the service;
Centershot Archery Ministry, 1
p.m.
Mon., June 9 — Church Board
meeting, 7 p.m.
Dial-A-Bible Story, 320-327-
2843.
FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
108 W. Main St.,
Silver Lake
320-327-2452
Fax 320-327-6562
E-mail: faithfriends
@embarqmail.com
Carol Chmielewski, pastor
Office hours: Tuesdays,
Wednesdays, Thursdays from
1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Sun., June 1 — Worship serv-
ice with fellowship to follow, 10
a.m.
CHURCH OF THE HOLY
FAMILY
700 W. Main St.,
Silver Lake
Anthony Stubeda, Pastor
Thurs., May 29 — Mass at
Cedar Crest, 10:30 a.m.
Fri., May 30 — Mass, 8 a.m.
Sat., May 31 — Server train-
ing, 10 a.m.-noon; Mass, 4 p.m.
Sun., June 1 — Mass, 8 a.m.
(Rosary Society to sit as a body);
Mass, 8 p.m.
Mon., June 2 — No Mass.
Tues., June 3 — Mass, 8 a.m.;
eucharistic adoration, 8:30 a.m.-
10 p.m.
Wed., June 4 — Mass, 8 a.m.;
parish office closed for calendar-
ing meeting at Holy Trinity.
Thurs., June 5 — Mass at
Cedar Crest, 10:30 a.m.; CCW, 7
p.m.
Fri., June 6 — Mass, 8 a.m.;
First Friday calls.
Sat., June 7 — Reconciliation,
noon; Braem/Wehri wedding, 2
p.m.; Mass, 4 p.m.
WORD OF LIFE CHURCH
950 School Rd. S.W.
Hutchinson
320-587-9443
E-mail: infor@
loversoftruth.com
Jim Hall, Pastor
Sun., June 1 — Worship, 9:30
a.m. and 6 p.m.
THE CHURCH OF JESUS
CHRIST OF LATTER DAY
SAINTS
770 School Rd.,
Hutchinson
Kenneth Rand,
Branch President
320-587-5665
Sun., June 1 — Sunday school,
10:50 a.m.-11:30 a.m.; priest-
hood, relief society and primary,
11:40 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
RIVERSIDE ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
20924 State Hwy. 7 W.,
Hutchinson
320-587-2074
E-mail: assembly@
hutchtel.net
Dr. Lee Allison, pastor
Sun., June 1 — Worship, 8:30
a.m. and 10:30 a.m.
FIRST CONGREGATION
UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST
31 Fourth Ave. S.W.,
Hutchinson
320-587-2125
E-mail: jmm@hutchtel.net
Sun., June 1 — Sunday school,
9 a.m.; worship, 10:15 a.m.
ST. PIUS X CHURCH
1014 Knight Ave., Glencoe
Anthony Stubeda, Pastor
Thurs., May 29 — Morning
prayer, 7 a.m.; Mass, 7:20 a.m.;
junior choir and year-end
party/recognition, 2:50 p.m.;
Schoenstatt boys group, 2:50 p.m.
Fri., May 30 — Last day of
school; closing school Mass with
grade 6 recognition, 1 p.m.; Span-
ish Mass, 5:30 p.m.
Sat., May 31 — Noon reconcil-
iation; Alexis Perez quinceanera,
2 p.m.; Mass, 6 p.m.
Sun., June 1 — Mass, 10 a.m.;
Spanish Mass, 11:30 a.m.; Mass at
Holy Family, Silver Lake, 8 p.m.
Mon. June 2 — No Mass; St.
Pius X teacher workshop.
Tues., June 3 — Evening
prayer, 5:40 p.m.; Mass, 6 p.m.
Wed., June 4 — AFC calendar-
ing at Holy Trinity, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.;
evening prayer, 5:40 p.m.; Mass,
6 p.m.
BETHEL LUTHERAN
77 Lincoln Ave.,
Lester Prairie
Bethany Nelson, pastor
320-395-2125
Sun., June 1 — Worship, 9
a.m.; coffee and fellowship, 10
a.m.
Wed., June 4 — Education
meeting at One Eyed Willys, 6
p.m.
Page 4 — Silver Lake Leader, Thursday, May 29, 2014
Open House
Golden Anniversary Party
honoring
LeRoy & Judy
Pokornowski
Saturday, June 7
Starting at 6 p.m.
Crow River Winery
Hutchinson, MN
Hosted by their children.
~ No Gifts Please ~
*20-21L,21-22ACa
GRHS0570 (4/14)
Pregnancy care is our specialty.
Whether it’s your first pregnancy or your last, your experience should be what you want
it to be. Choose your pregnancy care provider from our team of three family medicine
physicians, two certified nurse midwives, an OB-GYN physician and a certified physician
assistant. Pregnancy care is available at our clinics in Glencoe, Lester Prairie and Stewart.
Call our scheduling team at 320-864-7816 or toll free 1-800-869-3116 for assistance in
finding the perfect provider. Or visit www.grhsonline.org/birth-center to learn more.
We have what you need.
F18C21CLj
75 YEARS AGO - JUNE 3, 1939 —
Wednesday, June 7, has been set for the first
concert of the season by Silver Lake’s recently
reorganized Concert Band. Clarence Erickson
is the director of the band.
On Thursday, June 8, the Rev. Father Joseph
J. Bouska, pastor of the St. Joseph Church, will
celebrate the 25th anniversary of his ordination
to the priesthood. The Silver Jubilee celebration
will begin with a Solemn High Mass followed
by a dinner.
The White Eagle Society of St. Adalbert’s
Church will hold an ice cream social and Bingo
on Sunday, June 4, at the church grounds.
Memories of oldtimers as well as World War
veterans were stirred by a collection of sou-
venirs, pictures and relics displayed in Joseph
Lowy’s store window over the weekend.
Edward Oliva, employed at Lowy’s I.G.A.
Store, seriously injured his right hand, cutting
it to the bone while slicing meat.
Dr. Daniel Holton, 59, Silver Lake’s veteri-
narian, died at the Veterans Hospital at Fort
Snelling. Funeral services were held on Monday
forenoon and burial was in the Crystal Lakes
Cemetery in Minneapolis.
Frank Herzan, 44, died on Friday, May 19, at
the Veterans Hospital in Minneapolis. Funeral
services were conducted at the I.O.O.F. Hall in
Hopkins on Sunday.
Frank Tupa, 55, died on Saturday, May 27.
Funeral services were held on Wednesday after-
noon from the Nuwash Funeral Home in Silver
Lake.
Shirley Prieve and Larry Chapek were united
in marriage on Saturday afternoon, May 20, at
the Faith Lutheran Church in Minneapolis.
Wednesday evening, May 24, Lorraine
Smutka and Walter Dummer wer married at the
Trinity Lutheran Church Parsonage in Hutchin-
son.
50 YEARS AGO - MAY 28, 1964 — Memo-
rial Day Services, sponsored by Silver Lake Le-
gion Post 141, will be observed on Saturday,
May 30, at the Legion Park. Ancher Nelson,
Second District congressman, will give the Me-
morial Day address.
The summer recreation program for boys and
girls in fourth through 11th grades will begin on
Monday, June 1, and continue through July 24
at the Silver Lake Public School.
The Gary-Lee Studio will be taking pictures
of your children and any family member on Fri-
day, June 5, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., at Ruz-
icka’s Super Market. No appointment is neces-
sary. You will receive an 8x10 portrait for only
75¢.
Twelve neighbor farmer friends and relatives
of Victor Pulkrabek gathered at his farm in Rich
Valley Township on Monday morning to plow
a 35-acre field. Victor was hospitalized from
May 2 through May 10 with serious sciatic back
trouble.
Mrs. John Picha will hold an auction at her
place west of the Great Northern at South Silver
Lake on Thursday, June 4.
Mr. and Mrs. Emil Machemehl will observe
their golden anniversary with an open house on
Sunday, May 31, at the Village Hall in Lester
Prairie.
Mr. and Mrs. John Kasprzyk will celebrate
their golden wedding annniversary with an open
house on Saturday, May 30, at their home in Sil-
ver Lake.
25 YEARS AGO - JUNE 1, 1989 —Forty-
one Silver Lake High School seniors will re-
ceive their diplomas at commencement
exercises on Thursday night, June 1. Com-
mencement speeches will be given by valedic-
torian Tara McKim and Lisa Lhotka,
salutatorian, members of the class of 1989.
The Silver Lake City Council has named
Kevin Hagen to the position of Silver Lake
chief of police effective July 1. Current Chief
of Police James Jurek Jr. will be retiring on July
1.
A joint effort by the Silver Lake Sportsmen’s
Club and the Silver Lake Lions Club to clean
up Swan Lake will be held on Saturday, June 3,
starting at the county park.
Kyle Wawrzyniak, shot put; Tracy Jaskowiak,
100-meter dash; Gordy Chmielewski, 1600-
meter run and 3200-meter run; and Jamie
Yurek, high jump, members of the Silver Lake
High School track team, advanced to the Region
IV meet to be held in Brooklyn Center on Sat-
urday, June 3.
The Silver Lake swimming pool will open on
Saturday, June 3.
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Cuhel have moved to
Richville, Minn.
An open house 50th Jubilee to the priesthood
honoring the Rev. Michael Skoblik will be held
on Sunday, June 4, at the St. Joseph Church
basement.
Down Memory Lane
Compiled by Margaret Benz
Church News
Submitted photo
Installation of Legion officers
At the regular monthly meeting on May 19
of the Silver Lake American Legion Post
141, new officers and returning officers
were installed with the ceremonies
presided over by Third District 1st Vice
Commander James Entinger (right) and
Third District Commander Duane Ander-
son. From left to right are Leon Pesina, re-
turning sargeant at arms; Ron Paggen
(partially hidden), 2nd vice commander;
Ron Miskosky (standing in for new 1st
vice commander Tom Zanoth; Bob Sop-
kowiak, returning chaplain; Larry Ardolf,
returning finance officer; Gary Mallak, ad-
jutant; John Otteson, commander, and
Larry Lhotka, past commander.
County Board awards bids
for summer road projects
By Josh Randt
Sports Editor
It was nearly a perfect game
Saturday at home for Panther
pitcher Cole Petersen, who only
allowed one base runner through
seven innings, as Glencoe-Silver
Lake advanced to the second
round of the Section 2 playoffs
with a 1-0 victory over Jordan.
While it wasn’t quite a perfect
game for the lefty, the Panthers
needed every bit of the one walk,
no-hit performance he displayed
before coming away with a
walk-off victory on a single by
fellow captain Carter Pinske in
the bottom of the seventh.
Pinske’s single with two outs
plated Cole Petersen, who was
on second after leading off with
a single.
“I want to be the guy that can
come out and provide either a
clutch hit or a shutout when
needed,” Cole Petersen said after
the game.
“I guess he took care of that,”
Head Coach Dean Schwirtz said
dryly of Cole Petersen’s aspira-
tions.
“Cole was absolutely phe-
nomenal on the mound,”
Schwirtz said. “Throwing 91
pitches, a no-hitter … almost a
perfect game. You couldn’t ask
more out of him.”
Pinske got his fair share of
credit as well, as teammates
swarmed the center fielder after
his RBI single clinched an open-
ing round playoff win.
“All I was thinking was slap
my hands at it, put it in play and
put it in a gap somewhere,”
Pinske said of the at-bat. Adding
about his fellow captain, “All the
credit goes out to Cole. He
pitched a great game … And he
put me in the position to be able
to come in and win that game.”
Jordan pitcher Jacob Allen
had a fine game as well, holding
the Panthers to just five hits be-
fore falling in the final inning.
Allen gave up a total seven hits,
one run and no walks, while fan-
ning four of 27 batters faced.
Cole Petersen struck out 15 of
21 batters faced, and only
walked one, just missing a per-
fect game.
GSL also defeated Lester
Prairie 9-2 on May 20.
It’s now double elimination in
the Section 2 playoffs. GSL de-
feated No.3 Watertown-Mayer
Tuesday 8-2 in a rematch from
the section semifinals of last sea-
son, where the Royals ended the
Panthers’ journey with a 3-1 vic-
tory. The Panthers now face
No.4 Holy Family Catholic
Thursday, in Glencoe. The win-
ner of that game advances to the
section semifinal game, which
will be played in Belle Plaine at
11 a.m. Saturday morning. The
loser of Thursday’s game falls
into the loser’s bracket, and must
win out in order to reach the sec-
tion championship. All remain-
ing games in Section 2 will be
held at Belle Plaine until the
state tournament.
Panthers 1,
Jordan 0
Cole Petersen didn’t waste a
lot of time getting started on the
15 strikeouts he accrued by
game’s end – striking out Derek
Karsky and Trevor Hentges after
getting Mitchell Martin to pop
out.
It looked like the Panther of-
fense might get started early, as
Teddy Petersen led off with a
single, but Bennett Bielke hit
into a fielder’s choice before
Nolan Lepel grounded out, and
Mason Goettl hit a fly ball di-
rectly at the center fielder.
The Hubmen couldn’t catch
up to Cole Petersen’s speed in
the second either, as the lefty
struck out all three batters.
A Jordan batter finally
reached base as Mitchell Martin
led off the fourth with the only
walk for the Hubmen on the day.
Karsky went down swinging
again, before Hentges hit a line
drive at Bielke. Bielke squeezed
his glove for the second out and
fired the ball over to first before
Martin could get back and
turned a 4-3 double play to get
out of the inning.
The Hubmen never threat-
ened for the rest of the game, as
Cole Petersen struck out seven
of the last nine batters he faced,
with the other two popping and
grounding out.
GSL had a scoring opportu-
nity in the bottom of the sixth, as
Bielke and Lepel led off with
back-to-back singles. But Goettl
followed with a fly ball to the
right fielder for out one before
the Panthers committed a mental
error. With one out and two men
on, Levi Vorlicek hit a ground-
ball at Titus Schmitt at third
base. Schmitt forced Bielke out
at third and faked a throw to first,
where Vorlicek was about to
touch the bag. Lepel bit on the
fake and overran second,
prompting a throw from
Schmitt, where Noah Miller
tagged Lepel for the third out.
Despite the folly, Cole Pe-
tersen didn’t blink, and struck
out all three batters in the top of
the seventh, before batting lead-
off for the Panthers in the bot-
tom.
Cole Petersen went opposite
field to left for a single before
Tanner Grack executed a sacri-
fice bunt to move him over to
second. Josh VonBerge came to
the plate after singling and strik-
ing out in his previous at-bats,
and popped out to the first base-
man.
With two out and the winning
run on second, Pinske lined
Allen’s second pitch between the
second and first baseman, as
Cole Petersen started to cele-
brate while rounding third.
Silver Lake Leader, Thursday, May 29, 2014 — Page 5
Sports
BOYS’ GOLF
BASEBALL
SOFTBALL
GSL Panther
Spring
Sports
April
01.....at Lester Prairie ....Canceled
11.....at Mound Wtka.........W,11-1
15.....NLS............................W,6-1
21.....at Hutchinson ..............L,3-2
22.....Orono .........................W,2-1
25.....at Annandale.............W,11-7
29.....Holy Family ........Postponed
May
02.....Dassel-Cokato............W,2-0
05.....at Dassel-Cokato ......L,10-1
06.....at NLS......................W,12-3
09.....Waconia.......................L,9-0
12.....Litchfield....................W,1-0
13.....Delano........................W,9-7
14.....at Litchfield.................L,5-4
15.....Annandale ................W,11-5
17.....at Mpls Edison Invite...........
(W,17-3 vs MEI) (W,7-1 vs Mi-
laca)
20.....at Lester Prairie ..............9-2
24.....Jordan (subsection) ....W,1-0
27.....Watertown-Mayer (subsec-
tion) .....................................W,8-3
29.....Holy Family Catholic (sub-
section) ..................................5:00
April
04.....NYA......................Canceled
10.....Lester Prairie..............W,9-3
11.....Mound Wtka.............W,11-1
15.....at NLS ......................W,11-1
21.....Hutchinson................L,13-9
22.....at Orono.....................L,11-0
25.....Annandale ..................W,7-3
29.....at Holy Family ....Postponed
May
02.....at Dassel-Cokato........W,9-3
06.....NLS............................W,6-5
08.....at Litchfield..........................
..............................W,20-1/W,12-4
12.....at Delano.................L,15-14
13.....at Annandale...............W,7-1
16.....Belle Plaine (subsection) .....
...........................................L,14-5
April
07.....at NYA..................Canceled
21.....GSL Invite ......................3rd
22.....at Litchfield ....................6th
24.....at New Ulm.....................6th
29.....GSL.....................Postponed
May
01.....at NLS ................Postponed
02.....at Hutchinson..................6th
05.....at Annandale .................13th
06.....at Dassel-Cokato.............5th
08.....at Becker ..............Canceled
09.....at NLS ........................T 8th
15.....at Annandale ................(5th)
21.....at Dassel-Cokato...........10th
GIRLS’ GOLF
April
07.....at NYA..................Canceled
15.....at Annandale ...................4th
21.....GSL Invite.......................1st
22.....at Dassel-Cokato ............2rd
24.....at New Ulm.....................4th
28.....at Annandale........Postponed
May
01.....GSL .....................................
.............(2nd front 9) (4th back 9)
06.....at Litchfield..........................
.............(4th front 9) (2nd back 9)
08.....at Becker ..............Canceled
15.....at NLS..................................
.........(2nd front 9) (3rd back 9)
19.....at Dassel-Cokato..................
...........................(5th front 9 only)
19.....at Annandale Scramble ...5th
TRACK AND FIELD
TRAP TEAM
April
08.....at Mankato West ..................
...................(Boys 3rd) (Girls 4th)
10.....at Willmar ............................
...................(Boys 6th) (Girls 5th)
14.....at Holy Family ......Canceled
21.....at Shakopee..........................
.................(Boys 7th) (Girls 10th)
22.....at Dassel-Cokato..................
..................(Boys 3rd) (Girls 2nd)
28.....GSL conf. meet ...Postponed
29.....GSL invite ...........Postponed
May
01.....at Waconia ............Canceled
05.....at Mound Wtka....Postponed
06.....at Litchfield..........................
...................(Boys 5th) (Girls 7th)
13.....at Annandale conf. ...............
...................(Boys 7th) (Girls 6th)
15.....at Waconia............................
....................(Boys 1st) (Girls 4th)
22.....GSL subsection. ...................
....................(Boys 3rd)(Girls 3rd)
Cole Petersen, left, and Teddy Petersen celebrate after
the former scored the game-winning run Saturday to
defeat Jordan 1-0 in the first round of the Section 2
playoffs.
Silver Lake Leader photo by Josh Randt
Emily Muetzel, left, takes off after Taylor
Novak, right, hands her the baton during
the 4x200-meter relay. Novak took a spill
after the handoff, but GSL’s relay team
still managed to take first at the event
held in Glencoe on May 22.
Silver Lake Leader photo by Josh Randt
All competitions take
place at Winthrop Game
Protective League except
championship and state
tourney events
April
14.....Reserve Scoring...................
21.....First Competition............6th
May
05.....Second Competition .......5th
12.....Third Competition ..........4th
19.....Fourth Competition .......4th
26.....Fifth Competition ...........4th
June
06.....Championship meet .....TBD
07.....Championship meet .....TBD
08.....Championship meet .....TBD
14.....State tournament ..........TBD
Buffalo Creek
BMX underway
Buffalo Creek BMX has
begun its seventh season with
USA BMX sanctioned racing on
May 20. The Bicycle Motocross
(BMX) track is located at
Sterner-Meyer BMX Park in
Glencoe behind the Napa-Do-It-
Best at 1017 9th Street.
This year will see many im-
provements to the park. A new
riders canopy will provide shade
near the starting hill. A new
playground is set to be installed
in late May, providing a play
area for youngsters on the north-
west corner of the park. New
paved walking surfaces through-
out the park will provide safer
pedestrian travel, as well as cre-
ate buffer areas for new grass.
The above improvements are
made possible by sponsorships
from the business community
and support of the City of Glen-
coe and Parks Department.
This year will also have
themed nights featuring other
youth organizations, special
guests, and fundraisers for char-
itable causes. One of the high-
lights will be an Olympic Night
featuring USA Olympians from
recent games on June 20. A big
weekend will be during the
Glencoe Days event June 20-22.
Regular racing is every Tues-
day at 7:30 p.m. Practice is on
Saturday mornings from 10 a.m.
to noon. Spectators are free and
concessions are available on site.
The park is open to the public
for practice most days through-
out the summer and fall. A be-
ginner’s clinic is scheduled for
May 31 at 10 a.m. New riders
will learn about proper equip-
ment, safe riding, and race tips
for the sport.
For more information con-
tact Ryan Voss at 320-510-0404
or visit
www.buffalocreekbmx.com
By Josh Randt
Sports Editor
Hosting the first home track
meet in over a year, the Glen-
coe-Silver Lake track teams
advanced in 24 events from
the subsection meet on May
22.
The boys advance 11 indi-
viduals and two relay teams,
while the girls will bring seven
individuals and two relay
teams to the section meet at
Mankato West on Saturday,
May 31.
“It’s pretty impressive to get
that many kids to move on,”
said Josh Metcalf, head boys’
coach. “Hopefully the kids get
in the top two, or otherwise
challenge the state standard,
because you have to be in the
top two to get to state.”
Both teams finished third
overall, with the girls scoring
136.5 points, and the boys
178. Belle Plaine/Holy Family
Academy claimed first for
both divisions. Their girls
scored 273.5 points, while
their boys managed 282.
Mankato will be teeming
with athletes from all over the
state as 27 schools converge
on the site Saturday, for a
chance to move on to the state
meet at Hamline University
starting June 6.
Top placers
GSL had a total of eight first
place finishes Thursday in
Glencoe. For the boys, they in-
cluded: Brandon Richter, 800-
meter run; Jac Chelman,
3,200-meter run; Dalton
Clouse, 110-meter hurdles;
Adam Eberhard, shot put; and
the 4x800-meter relay team of
Chelman, Garret Ardolf,
Michael Schaefer and Richter.
First place finishers for the
girls included: Kelly Arnold,
100 and 200-meter dashes;
and the 4x200-meter relay
team of Arnold, Taylor Novak,
Emily Muetzel and Shelby
Clouse.
The Panthers turned in
seven second place finishes.
For the boys, they included:
Kyle Beck, 200-meter dash;
Aaron Giesen, 400-meter
dash; and the 4x100-relay
team of Keenan Mehlos, Gus
Mendoza, Beck and Patrick
Kunkel. The girls included:
Muetzel, 400-meter dash; Tori
Burr, 3,200-meter run; Zoe
Christensen, shot put; and the
4x4 relay team of Muetzel;
Illg, Hecksel and Monahan.
Track teams finish third at home subsection
Panthers were nearly perfect
Captains play huge role in GSL’s 1-0 playoff rout of Jordan
By Josh Randt
Sports Editor
It all came to an abrupt end in
Belle Plaine for the Panther soft-
ball team on May 20, as Glen-
coe-Silver Lake fell 14-5 to the
Tigers in the first round of the
Section 2 playoffs.
Belle Plaine scored a pair of
touchdowns in the first two in-
nings - seven runs each - while
GSL managed three in that same
span. The Panthers scored two
more in the third, and shut down
the Tigers defensively for the rest
of the game to avoid getting 10-
runned.
But after winning the West Di-
vision of the Wright County
Conference, the Panthers’ hopes
for a playoff run were high.
“We’re proud of what we did.
We won our conference on our
side. That was our first goal, and
we did that,” Head Coach Steve
Davis said. “It’s just tough. We
would’ve liked to play a few
more games.”
Batting first as the visitors,
GSL took a 1-0 lead before the
Tigers teed off on Moriah
Maunu.
The Tigers racked up all of
their runs and all but one of their
hits in the first two innings as
Layne Herrmann came in with
one out left in the bottom of the
second. Herrmann pitched well
in relief, but 14 runs proved too
much for the Panther offense,
which went cold after the third
inning.
“To give up back-to-back
seven-run innings is tough, but
we didn’t get 10-runned, which
would have been easy to do,”
said Coach Davis. “It was just a
tough way to lose it. We wish we
could have played our best.
Then, win or lose, it’s not as bad.
But we obviously didn’t play our
best game.”
Departing from the Panthers
will be seniors Steph Klockmann
and Amanda Meyer. Other than
the departure of those two, GSL
returns a full squad that took
some big strides in the right di-
rection this year.
Steph Klockmann, left, and Becca Green, right, sport
somber faces after dropping out of the Section 2 playoffs
when the Belle Plaine Tigers trounced GSL 14-5 on May
20.
Silver Lake Leader photo by Josh Randt
Belle Plaine downs
GSL 14-5 in playoffs
Page 6 — Silver Lake Leader, Thursday, May 29, 2014
City of Silver Lake
A SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE 79 AMENDING CHAPTER 18, FLOODPLAIN
MANAGEMENT OF THE SILVER LAKE CODE
The legislature of the State of Minnesota has, in Minnesota Statutes Chapter 103F and Chapter 462 delegated the respon-
sibility to local government units to adopt regulations designed to minimize flood losses.
The full text of Section 18 is available for inspection at Silver Lake City Hall during regularly scheduled business hours.
Section 18.1.0 Statutory Authorization, Findings of Fact and Purpose
18.1.1..............................................................................................................................Statutory Authorization
18.1.2 ......................................................................................................................................................Purpose
Section 18.2.0 General Provisions
18.2.1 ..........................................................................................................Lands to Which Ordinance Applies
18.2.2 ........................................................................................................................................Overlay Districts
18.2.3..........................................................................................................Incorporation of Maps by Reference
18.2.4......................................................................................................Regulatory Flood Protection Elevation
18.2.5..............................................................................................................................................Interpretation
18.2.6..........................................................................................................Abrogation and Greater Restrictions
18.2.7..........................................................................................................Warning and Disclaimer of Liability
18.2.8 ................................................................................................................................................Severability
18.2.9..................................................................................................................................................Definitions
18.2.10........................................................................................................................Annexations/Detachments
Section 18.3.0 Establishment of Zoning Districts
18.3.1 ......................................................................................................................................................Districts
18.3.2 ................................................................................................................................................Compliance
Section 18.4.0 Floodway District
18.4.1 ..........................................................................................................................................Permitted Uses
18.4.2....................................................................................................Standards for Floodway Permitted Uses
18.4.3........................................................................................................................................Conditional Uses
18.4.4 ................................................................................................Standards for Floodway Conditional Uses
Section 18.5.0 Flood Fringe District
18.5.1 ..........................................................................................................................................Permitted Uses
18.5.2 ..............................................................................................Standards for Flood Fringe Permitted Uses
18.5.3........................................................................................................................................Conditional Uses
18.5.4............................................................................................Standards for Flood Fringe Conditional Uses
Section 18.6.0 RESERVE FOR FUTURE USE
Section 18.7.0 Land Development Standards
18.7.1 ..................................................................................................................................................In General
18.7.2 ..............................................................................................................................................Subdivisions
18.7.3 ......................................................................................................Design Criteria for Flood-Prone Areas
Section 18.8.0 Public Utilities, Railroads, Roads, and Bridges
18.8.1............................................................................................................................................Public Utilities
18.8.2..................................................................................................................Public Transportation Facilities
18.8.3 ............................................................................On-site Water Supply and Sewage Treatment Systems
Section 18.9.0 Manufactured Homes, Manufactured Home Parks and Recreational Vehicles
18.9.1 ........................................................................................................................Manufactured Home Parks
18.9.2 ..........................................................................................................Placement of Manufactured Homes
18.9.3 ................................................................................................................................Recreational Vehicles
Section 18.10.0 Administration
18.10.1 ..............................................................................................................................Zoning Administrator
18.10.2................................................................................................................................Permit Requirements
18.10.3................................................................................................................Board of Adjustment/Variances
18.10.4......................................................................................................................................Conditional Uses
Section 18.11.0 Nonconformities
18.11.1 ............................................................................................................Continuance of Nonconformities
Section 18.12.0 Penalties and Enforcement
18.12.1 ......................................................................................................Violation Constitutes a Misdemeanor
18.12.2 ................................................................................................................................Other Lawful Action
18.12.3 ............................................................................................................................................Enforcement
Section 18.13.0 Amendments
18.13.1 ................................................................................Floodplain Designation – Restrictions on Removal
18.13.2 ....................................................................................................Amendments Require DNR Approval
18.13.3 ....................................................................................Map Revisions Require Ordinance Amendments
Section 2. Effective Date. This ordinance shall take effect after its passage and publication.
Adopted by the City Council this 19
th
day of May, 2014.
CITY OF SILVER LAKE
By: /s/ Bruce Bebo
Mayor
ATTEST:
By: /s/ Kerry Venier
City Clerk
(Published in the Silver Lake Leader May 29, 2014)
Legal Notices
Silver Lake Leader photos
by Rich Glennie
Band concert
The GSL spring band con-
cert was held May 19.
Above are members of the
concert band, including, in
front, Lizzy Gran and April
Brady on clarinets. In the
back are Allison Johnson,
trumpet, Lili Mallak, Alyson
Winn, clarinets, and par-
tially obscured is Josie
Schmitt. Standing is per-
cussionist Austin Cooper.
At the right are members
of the ninth and 10th-grade
band, including Robin
Swift, Gabe Schweikert,
Amanda Husted (percus-
sionist in back), D.J.
Wemhoff, Marissa Kir-
choff, Kelli Bailey, Grei
Butterfield, Erica Hecksel
and Daria Fegley.
Fresh Strawberries and Amaretto Pie
Ingredients:
3/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup cold butter, cubed
2 tablespoons shortening
3 to 4 tablespoons ice water
Filling:
4 cups sliced fresh strawberries, divided
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/2 cup water
1/2 cup sugar
1/4 cup cornstarch
4 to 6 drops red food coloring, optional
Amaretto Cream:
1 cup heavy whipping cream
2 tablespoons sour cream
1 tablespoon confectioners’ sugar
2 tablespoons amaretto or 1/2 teaspoon almond
extract
Additional strawberries and almonds for top-
pings
Directions:
Place almonds in a food processor; cover and
pulse until almonds are finely ground. Add
flour, confectioners’ sugar and salt; pulse until
blended. Add butter and shortening; pulse until
butter and shortening are the size of peas. While
pulsing, add just enough ice water to form moist
crumbs. Shape dough into a disk; wrap in plas-
tic wrap. Refrigerate for 30 minutes or until
easy to handle. On a lightly floured surface, roll
dough to a 1/8-inch thick circle; transfer to a 9-
inch deep dish plate. Trim pastry to 1/2-inch be-
yond edge of plate; flute edges. Line unpricked
pastry shell with a double thickness of heavy-
duty foil. Fill with dried beans, uncooked rice
or pie weights. Bake at 425˚ for 8 minutes. Re-
move foil and weights; bake 5 to 7 minutes
longer or until golden brown. Cool on a wire
rack. In a large bowl, mash 1 cup strawberries
with the lemon juice. Add water. In a large
saucepan, combine sugar and cornstarch; stir in
mashed berry mixture. Bring to a boil over
medium heat, stirring constantly. Cook and stir
for 2 minutes or until thickened. Transfer to a
large bowl; stir in food coloring if desired. Re-
frigerate for 20 minutes or until cooled slightly,
stirring occasionally. Fold in remaining sliced
berries and transfer to crust. Refrigerate at least
3 hours or until set. In a small bowl, beat whip-
ping cream until it begins to thicken. Add the
sour cream, confectioners’ sugar and amaretto;
beat until stiff peaks form. Spread over filling.
Top with additional strawberries and almonds.
Rhubarb Blueberry Crumble
Ingredients:
2/3 cups sugar
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1/4 teaspoon salt
3 cups fresh blueberries
3 cups sliced fresh or frozen rhubarb, thawed
Topping:
3/4 cup sup biscuit baking mix
1/3 cup sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup cold unsalted butter, cubed
1/2 cup old-fashioned oats
1/2 cup chopped almonds
Directions:
Preheat oven to 375˚. In a large bowl, mix
sugar, cornstarch and salt. Add blueberries and
rhubarb; toss to coat. Transfer to a greased 8-
inch square baking dish. For topping, in a small
bowl, mix baking mix, sugar and salt. Cut in
butter until crumbly; stir in oats and almonds.
Sprinkle over filling. Bake 40 to 45 minutes or
until filling is bubbly and topping is golden
brown.
Dreamy S’more Pie
Ingredients:
1 package (8 ounces) cream cheese, softened
1-1/4 cups heavy whipping cream
1 jar (13 ounces) Nutella
1 graham cracker crust (9 inches)
3 cups miniature marshmallows
Directions:
In a large bowl, beat cream cheese and cream
until thickened. Add Nutella; beat just until
combined. Spoon into crust. Cover and refrig-
erate for at least 3 hours. Just before serving,
top with marshmallows; press gently into fill-
ing. Broil six inches from the heat for 1 to 2
minutes or until marshmallows are golden
brown.
Kitchen Delights
& Other Things
Silver Lake Leader photo by Alyssa Schauer
Community schools luncheon
Last Thursday afternoon, Glencoe-Silver
Lake hosted the final “Community in the
Schools” luncheon of the school year at
the high school media center. Community
members are invited to interact with stu-
dents from Helen Baker Elementary, Lake-
side Elementary, Lincoln Junior High and
GSL High School to get to know each
other. Jason Schmitz, special education
teacher at GSL high school, gave a pres-
entation on the work-based learning pro-
gram at the school. Above, second grader
Andrew Bandas and fifth grader Majkya
Metcalf talk with David Nelson, president
of the Glencoe Area Chamber of Com-
merce.
By Lori Copler
Staff Writer
The McLeod County Board
of Commissioners approved a
joint powers agreement May
20 with the city of Biscay “to
construct a community waste-
water treatment system and
also install a series of individ-
ual sewage treatment systems
(SSTS) where necessary.”
County Environmentalist
Roger Berggren said the total
project will cost about $1.5
million, “but there are no
county funds going into this,
except for some administrative
costs.”
Berggren said the city of
Biscay has received $400,000
in Clean Water grant funding
to put toward the project. The
county will act as the fiscal
agent for administering the
grant funding, and Biscay is
hoping for more grant money.
The County Board also ap-
proved Berggren’s request to
hire a contractor to inspect and
review the design for Biscay’s
sanitary sewer system.
In other business May 20,
the County Board:
• Approved the annual hous-
ing contract with Renville
County to board inmates at the
Renville County Jail when
needed. The cost is $55 per
day per inmate, the same as a
similar contract McLeod
County has with Carver
County.
• Agreed to buy a new John
Deere tractor with a mower
deck, snow blower and broom
from Midwest Machinery of
Glencoe for a net cost of
$12,775 with the trade-in of an
older tractor. Building Mainte-
nance Supervisor Wayne
Rosenfeld said the county has
not owned a broom in the past,
and said a broom will help in
cleaning sidewalks after snow-
falls.
• Approved the annual grant
from the state of Minnesota for
the boat and water safety pro-
gram in the amount of $6,966,
which is a 50-50 match with
the county.
• Approved spending
$25,269 in 2014 to add main-
tenance coverage of ARMER
radio equipment that is no
longer under warranty.
• Approved a request from
Assistant Veterans Services
Officer Cassandra Carrigan to
attend the National Associa-
tion of County Veteran Serv-
ices Officer training in Grand
Rapids, Mich., in June. The
training will help Carrigan
complete her certification as a
veterans service officer.
• Approved a one-day tem-
porary on-sale liquor license
for Slow Food Minnesota,
Minneapolis, for an event set
for the Star Thrower Farm,
rural Glencoe, on June 1.
• Appointed Doug Johnson
of Lynn Township and Ron
Rausch of Acoma Township as
representatives on the
Hutchinson Joint Planning
Board.
County, city of Biscay enter
into joint powers agreement
AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
LIESKE TRACTOR
Wanted: Your OLD TRACTORS,
any condition, make or model. We
also specialize in new and used
TRACTOR PARTS AND REPAIR.
Call Kyle. Located west of Hender-
son. (612) 203-9256.
AUTOMOTIVE
Parts, Repair
$$ DOLLARS PAID $$ Junk vehi-
cles, repairable cars/trucks. FREE
TOWING. Flatbed/ wrecker service.
Immediate pick up. Monday-Sun-
day, serving your area 24/7. (952)
220-TOWS.
EMPLOYMENT
Business Opportunity
DIRECT SALES: Conklin dealers
needed, to use or market “green”
products made in Minnesota. For a
FREE catalog, call Ken and Myra
Franke at (320) 238-2370.
www.frankmarketing.com.
Help Wanted
Female wanted for
caregiver/housekeeper for para-
lyzed woman in her home.
$12/hour. Full time, part time and
weekends open. Will train. Call Kari
(507) 426-6000.
Paramedical exam company seek-
ing part-time help with mobile life in-
surance exams in Glencoe and the
surrounding area. Applicants must
be experienced in Phlebotomy.
Email resume to:
karen.l.winiecki@examone.com.
Semis with step-deck trailers for
hauling in lower 48 states and
Canada. Call Kohout Trucking,
(320) 444-4108.
Wanted: Cosmetologist and Mas-
sage Therapist. Full or part time.
Call Tanya (320) 864-6033.
Work Wanted
HANDYMAN: Will do remodeling of
kitchens, bathrooms, hanging
doors and windows, painting, sheet
rocking, texturizing or any minor re-
pairs inside or outside. Will also do
cleaning of basements/garages.
Call (320) 848-2722 or (320) 583-
1278.
FOR SALE
Heating/Air Conditioning
Special-95% Goodman gas furnace
and programmable thermostat,
$2,200 installed or AC unit, $1,900
installed. J&R Plumbing Heating
AC, Lester Prairie (320) 510-5035.
Household Goods
Oak china hutch; leaded, beveled
glass doors, glass shelves, interior
lights, $200. (320) 864-5644.
One year old Whirlpool 25 cu. ft re-
frigerator. French doors, bottom
freezer drawer, ice maker, $500.
(320) 864-5644.
Wanted To Buy
BUYING JUNK BATTERIES
We buy used batteries. Paying $10
for automotive batteries. We pick
up. Call 800-777-2243.
Wanted: Motorcycles and ATVs.
Buying most brands. All years, run-
ning or not. Jungclaus Motorsports,
(320) 864-8526.
WANTED TO BUY: Old signs all
types, farm primitive painted furni-
ture all types, cupboards, cubby
units, locker and pool wire baskets,
wood & metal pieces with lots of
drawers, old pre-1960 holiday dec-
orations, industrial/school items
such as metal racks, stools, work-
benches, lightning rods and balls,
weather vanes, architectural items
like corbels and stain glass win-
dows. Gas station and oil related
items from signs to pumps, dress
forms, old store fixtures, chande-
liers, old lighting fixtures, mantels,
hardware store parts, bins,
feed/grain/seed related items and
old cement statuary/bird baths. We
buy one item and entire estates.
Check out the barns, attic and
basement. Don’t get a dumpster
until you call us first. We are local.
(612) 590-6136 or email
rb7579@msn.com.
LIVESTOCK, PETS
Cattle
For rent: Beef bulls. (507) 237-
2196.
REAL ESTATE
Houses
Immaculate kept 2BR, 2BA, MF
laundry, hardwood floors, 4-season
porch, deck, over-sized garage,
close to park, quiet neighborhood.
$151,900. Call (320) 864-4436 or
(320) 510-0957 schedule appoint-
ment.
Immaculate kept 4BR, 4BA. Over
3,000 sq. ft. finished living! Two
lots, MF laundry, master BR suite,
formal dining, storage. $187,000.
Brian O’Donnell, Priority One-
Metrowest Realty. (320) 864-4877.
OPEN HOUSE-YOUNG AMER-
ICA. Beautiful rambler with full
walkout. 3BR, 1.5BA with 1 non-
conforming room. New siding, roof
and windows, Entire home is newly
remodeled. Fantastic backyard with
shed and garden. Walking distance
to schools, parks and businesses.
Move-in ready! Open house Sun-
day, June 1, 1:00-3:00 p.m. FSBO.
$174,500. 15 3rd St. SE, Y.A. Early
inquiries (952) 607-8497.
Mobile Homes
3BR, 2BA on 2.26 acres, close to
town, ready to move in due to relo-
cation. $75,000. Brian O’Donnell,
Metrowest Realty (320) 864-4877.
RENTAL
Apartment
2BR Apartment with garage,
water/sewer/garbage included. No
pets. New Auburn (320) 327-2928.
Updated, spacious one and two BR
apartments in Renville. Includes
heat, water garbage. New stove,
fridge, air conditioner. Pet-friendly.
Call (320) 564-3351 for appoint-
ment.
RENTAL
Apartment
Now Taking Applications. 1BR
apartment in Glencoe. Must be 62
years of age or older, or disabled.
Some income restrictions apply.
Rent based on 30% of income. Call
(320) 864-5282.
Want To Rent
Want to rent farmland for 2014 and
beyond. (320) 510-1604.
Wanted: Farmland to rent. Call Paul
at (320) 327-2763.
Young farmer looking for land to
rent for 2014 and beyond. Compet-
itive rates and reference available.
Call Austin Blad (320) 221-3517.
SERVICES
Building Contractors
30 Years professional home repair
service. Interior/exterior. Fair rates
for quality work. Call (320) 359-
0333.
Garden, Lawn Care
Will do garden tilling in Hutchin-
son/Silver Lake area. Call Duane
(320) 327-2309 or (320) 583-3046.
Misc. Service
CUSTOM LOG SAWING- Cut at
your place or ours. White oak lum-
ber decking and buy logs. Give Vir-
gil a call. (320) 864-4453.
Musical Services
DJ. Wedding receptions, events,
parties. Onlytoonsdj.com or (612)
760-4557.
Silver Lake Leader, Thursday, May 29, 2014 — Page 7
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AGRICULTURE AUTOMOTIVE EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE LIVESTOCK
& PETS
LIVESTOCK
& PETS
REAL ESTATE SERVICES RENTAL RENTAL
All ads appear online
at GlencoeNews.com
Silver Lake Leader
To place an ad: Call: 320-327-2216; Fax: 320-327-2530; E-Mail: slleader@embarqmail.com; Mail: P.O. Box 343, Silver Lake, MN 55381
Advertising
Deadlines
The McLeod County Chronicle Mondays at Noon
The Arlington Enterprise & The Silver Lake Leader Tuesdays at Noon
The Glencoe Advertiser, The Sibley Shopper
& The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
GlencoeNews.com
NOW
HIRING
– LIFEGUARDS
– WSI
Call 320-864-2696
GSL Community
Education
K
1
9
L
2
0
A
C
a
MANUFACTURING SUPERVISOR
Metal Fabrication
Privately held ISO 9000 Certified
metal fabrication company is
expanding and seeks to add a
“hands on” Supervisor. Prior
supervisory experience preferred.
Competitive wages, generous
benefits & profit sharing; strong
team-based work environment
focused on customer needs and
lean principles. Stable workforce
comprised of operators, set-up
staff, welders and support functions.
Please fax, mail or email your resume to:
Engel Diversified
Industries, Inc.
P.O. Box 85,
Jordan, MN 55352
FAX: 952-492-3790 or
vengelsteffan@engeldiversified.com
*
2
0
-
2
1
L
E
2
1
-
2
2
A
S
G
C
a
THE EMMET COUNTY
Board of Supervisors is seeking a County
Engineer. Requires registration as Pro-
fessional Engineer in Iowa. Salary nego-
tiable based on qualifications/experience.
Application and resume due 6/15/14.
To obtain application or more informa-
tion, contact Dan Burton 712/362-4846
or burton32@emmetcountyia.com Email
application and resume to Al Mad-
den maddenal@plantpioneer.com EOE
EXPERIENCED DRIVER
or recent Grad? With Swift, you can grow
to be an award-winning class ACDL driv-
er. We help you achieve Diamond Driver
status with the best support there is. As a
Diamond Driver, you earn additional pay
on top of all the competitive incentives we
offer. The very best, choose Swift. Great
miles = great pay. Late-model equip-
ment available. Regional opportunities.
Great career path. Paid vacation. Excel-
lent benefits. Please call: 866/975-8141
LINSMEIER TRUCKING
A MN based company is now hiring
Drivers and Owner/Operators to pull
hopper bottom in the upper Midwest.
Home weekends. Call 320/382-6644
WANTED GROUND LABORERS
Operators & Foremen. A right of way
management company based in MN
is seeking to hire for year round em-
ployment. Call 218/326-5872 ext. 17
REMEMBERING THE FIRST
Minnesota Volunteer Regiment this Me-
morial Day. In production: a documen-
tary told in their own words. They saved
our nation. Your contribution makes it
happen www.firstminnesotafilms.org
BASEMENT PROBLEMS SOLVED
Leaky Basement? Walls Bowing?
Cracked Walls or Floors? Over 45 years
of service. Basement Water Controlled.
800/348-6247 safedrybasement.com
Providing Realistic Solutions.
IF YOU USED
the blood thinner Pradaxa and suffered
internal bleeding, hemorrhaging, re-
quired hospitalization or a loved one
died while taking Pradaxa between Oc-
tober 2010 and the present, you may be
entitled to compensation. Call Attor-
ney Charles H. Johnson 800/535-5727
10 PERCENT OF AMERICANS
have a drug/alcohol addiction. You can’t
fight it alone! Start your recovery now. Most
insurance accepted. Call 800/688-0562
DONATE YOUR CAR
truck or boat to Heritage For The Blind. Free
3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing,
all paperwork taken care of 800/439-1735
DISH TV RETAILER
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12
mos.) & High Speed Internet start-
ing at $14.95/month (where avail-
able.) Save! Ask About same day In-
stallation! Call now! 800/297-8706
CANADA DRUG CENTER
is your choice for safe and afford-
able medications. Our licensed Cana-
dian mail order pharmacy will pro-
vide you with savings of up to 75%
on all your medication needs. Call to-
day 800/259-1096 for $10.00 off your
first prescription and free shipping.
ARE YOU
in big trouble with the IRS? Stop wage &
bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax re-
turns, payroll issues, & resolve tax debt fast.
Seen on CNN. ABBB. Call 800/402-0732
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
WANTED
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HELP WANTED - PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYMENT
MISCELLANEOUS
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newspapers
for only $279 per week! Call 800-279-2979
Check out our
Photo Gallery @
glencoenews.com
Click on
Photo Gallery
in the top navigation,
then choose the gallery
you’d like to view.
Silver Lake LEADER
104B Lake Ave.
Silver Lake, MN
320-327-2216
Call us to place
your HAPPY ad.
McLeod County Chronicle /
Glencoe Advertiser
320-864-5518
By Lori Copler
Staff Writer
Trailblazer Transit will con-
tinue with its plans to provide
transit service in Wright
County, the Joint Powers
Board indicated Wednesday
afternoon, May 21.
At a meeting the previous
week, the Joint Powers Board
had voted to provide three
buses a day starting July 1 to
provide morning and evening
transportation to clients of
Functional Industries, with
service to the general public in
between. It also had to decided
to provide up to seven buses
for service before the end of
2014 once it had drivers and
another full-time dispatcher
hired.
At the same time, it’s work-
ing with a coalition of Wright
County cities to provide more
transportation within the
county.
But the Board’s decision
came under a cloud when it
learned that Wright County
commissioners had ap-
proached the Minnesota De-
partment of Transportation
(MnDOT) about entering into
a contract with another service
provider or getting its current
provider, River Rider, to ex-
tend service past its July 1 dis-
solution date.
Mike Schadauer of MnDOT
said he had been at the Wright
County Board meeting when
Commissioner Pat Sawatzke
brought up the idea of engag-
ing a third-party operator to
provide transportation service
in Wright County.
Schadauer said he thought
MnDOT was “making good
progress with Trailblazer” and
was a little surprised by the re-
quest.
There also were representa-
tives from two Wright County
cities who were at the Wright
County Board meeting and
had expressed support for
Sawatzke’s request “and that
kind of threw me for a loop”
because Schadauer was under
the impression that the cities
wanted to work with Trail-
blazer.
Schadauer said he tried to
“buy a little time” to meet with
his MnDOT co-workers to
“make sure MnDOT is still
moving forward with Trail-
blazer and to make sure that
the cities are still on board.”
Schadauer said officials
walked away from that
MnDOT meeting “with very
clear priorities to go ahead
with Trailblazer, Functional
Industries and the cities. If for
some reason that fell apart,
then we would consider Com-
missioner Sawatzke’s pro-
posal.
“I’m sorry if that threw con-
fusion into the mix,”
Schadauer continued. “We’re
gung ho for this, and we hope
Trailblazer is as well.”
Sibley County Commis-
sioner Bill Pinske said that he
had “a little heartburn” the
previous week when he
learned of the Wright County
Board discussion.
“But it’s gratifying to have
MnDOT clarify things,” said
Pinske. “Sibley County is on
board with moving forward.”
McLeod County Commis-
sioner Sheldon Nies said that
even with Wright County’s
discussion, he felt Trailblazer
always had MnDOT’s backing
on providing service in Wright
County.
“I feel very, very comfort-
able with how this is going,”
said Nies.
Gary Ludwig, Trailblazer
executive director, said the
next steps include advertising
for drivers and a dispatcher,
transferring ownership of
some River Rider buses to
Trailblazer, and looking for a
facility in Wright County as a
“hub” for buses and employ-
ees.
And Merton Auger, city ad-
ministrator for Buffalo, said
cities in Wright County are
continuing to move forward
on a joint powers agreement to
work with Trailblazer on pro-
viding additional transporta-
tion.
“Our resolve is even
stronger,” said Auger. “We’ve
seen the professionalism of
your board and staff. You’ve
shown that you are very pro-
fessional and able to do the
job.”
Ludwig said that while he
appreciates Auger’s com-
ments, he asked that the cities
in Wright County do some
“marketing” to explain why
Trailblazer can’t do a start-up
of full service in Wright
County by July 1, when River
Rider dissolves.
“There may be a perception
that Trailblazer is not every-
thing it promised to be,” said
Ludwig. “But collectively, the
government response was not
there to ensure a smooth tran-
sition.”
The Trailblazer Board also
got an apology from Wright
County Commissioner Mike
Potter, who said that all the
cities in his district are “going
through the joint powers
process” to work with Trail-
blazer.
Potter also said it isn’t Trail-
blazer’s fault that it couldn’t
get service in place by July 1.
“This is all the fault of the
Wright County Board,” said
Potter. “The citizens of Wright
County are very much disap-
pointed in their board, and I’m
hearing it every day.”
The next Trailblazer Joint
Powers Board meeting is set
for June 26 at 9 a.m.
Page 8 — Silver Lake Leader, Thursday, May 29, 2014
Call Your
Sales Rep
TO
D
AY!
We have a great way for you to show what gift ideas
you have available for dad this Father’s Day.
In the June 8 Glencoe Advertiser and
the June 11 McLeod County Chronicle,
we will be publishing a special
FULL COLOR section promoting all the
great items to give this Father’s Day.
Advertising Deadline:
Wednesday, June 4 at Noon
FATHER’S
DAY
Advertising Section
CHRONICLE/ADVERTISER
320-864-5518
716 East 10
th
St. • Glencoe
Sue Keenan, suek@glencoenews.com;
Brenda Fogarty, brendaf@glencoenews.com;
Karin Ramige Cornwell, karinr@glencoenews.com
Silver Lake Leader photos
by Alyssa Schauer
Mock Crash
Last Wednesday, Glencoe-
Silver Lake High School
partnered with Glencoe
Regional Health Services,
Glencoe Police Depart-
ment, the McLeod County
Sheriff’s Department and
other local resuce squads
to host the annual “mock
crash” for senior students
about the consequences
of drinking and driving.
Above, EMTs work with
student Matt Brelje and to
the left is Samantha Lange
as one of the victims.
We’ll stay warm and slightly muggy this week as it looks
like we’ve skipped the pleasant 70-degree late spring tem-
peratures once again. We warmed well into the 80s over
the weekend and had a few more bouts of soaking rain.
Highs this week will stay in the 80s due to a warm front
holding just to our north. If we stay clear any given day,
we could rise even higher, but it’s hard to say if a 90 could
make it up our way.
We’ll dry out after our wet start to the week with plenty
of sunshine all the way to mid-Saturday. Rain and thunder
chances, unfortunately, move back in late Saturday into
Sunday and Monday.
At this point, we’ll be very close to the frontal boundary
the entire time, so we could see decent rainfall totals if this
forecast holds firm. Stay tuned to more up-to-date fore-
casts. Some models are hinting at as much as 2 to 4 inches
of rain for the hardest-hit areas, so that is definitely a bit
more than we need at this point.
The long range forecasts keep us warm/wet with no big
shots of Canadian air to cool us off, so I’m hoping the fore-
cast models change their minds and cool us back off.
Ma dobry weekendem Mit dobry vikend
Thursday — Highs 78-84; lows 62-68; clear.
Friday — Highs 79-86; lows 62-68; mostly clear.
Saturday — Highs 79-86; lows 62-68; partly cloudy/af-
ternoon thunder.
Sunday — Highs 74-82; rain/thunder.
Weather Quiz: Why has the severe weather season been
slow-going for the most part again this year?
Answer to last week’s question: What are some of
June’s weather extremes? Highest temperature, 104 de-
grees (June 27, 1934); lowest temperature, 34 degrees
(June 3, 1945); most precipitation, 3.48 inches (June 29,
1877). The average high goes from 74 to start the month
to 83 at the end.
Remember: I make the forecast, not the weather!
Weather Corner
By Jake Yurek
Trailblazer Transit continues plans
to provide service in Wright County
Glencoe-Silver Lake High
School recently announced
that it has received national
certification for its Project
Lead The Way (PLTW) pro-
gram that has been offered for
the first time this school year.
PLTW, a nonprofit organi-
zation and the nation’s leading
provider of STEM (science,
technology, engineering, and
mathematics) education pro-
grams, offers a rigorous
world-class curriculum that al-
lows students to apply what
they are learning in math and
science class to real-life engi-
neering and technology proj-
ects.
PLTW also prides itself on
high-quality professional de-
velopment of its teachers and
an engaged network of busi-
ness, community and univer-
sity partners to give students
the fullest experience.
The national PLTW recog-
nition program distinguishes
schools for successfully
demonstrating a commitment
to PLTW’s national standards.
Additionally, certification as a
PLTW school provides stu-
dents with the opportunity to
apply for college credit or re-
ceive college-level recognition
at PLTW affiliate universities
when they successfully com-
plete select PLTW courses in
high school.
PLTW has more than 40 af-
filiate college and university
partners, including the Univer-
sity of Minnesota.
In order to remain competi-
tive in the global economy,
America needs approximately
400,000 STEM college gradu-
ates annually, according to a
National Business Roundtable
report.
Currently, the U.S. is gradu-
ating only 265,000 annually.
PLTW is providing students
with the skills, foundation, and
proven path to college and ca-
reer success in STEM areas to
increase the number of STEM
graduates.
Paul Sparby, principal of
Glencoe-Silver Lake High
School, said, “We’ve seen
how the PLTW program draws
more students to engineering
and technology courses and
gets them thinking about col-
lege and their careers. We are
extremely proud to be PLTW
certified and ecstatic that our
students are eligible for col-
lege-level recognition, which
may include college credit for
select PLTW courses, scholar-
ships and admissions prefer-
ence.”
As part of the recognition
process, Sparby and a team
composed of teachers, staff,
students and members of the
community submitted a self-
assessment of the school’s im-
plementation of PLTW’s
engineering program.
A site visit by a PLTW-
trained team followed.
PLTW’s team met with teach-
ers, school administrators,
counselors, students and mem-
bers of the school’s Partner-
ship Team.
A PLTW school’s Partner-
ship Team (sometimes re-
ferred to as an advisory
council) is comprised of teach-
ers, counselors, administra-
tors, post-secondary represen-
tatives, business and industry
professionals, and other com-
munity members who actively
support the PLTW program
within a school.
“Glencoe-Silver Lake High
School should be congratu-
lated for demonstrating once
again its commitment to
PLTW’s quality standards,”
said PLTW President and
CEO Vince Bertram.
“The real winners here,
however, are GSL’s students.
Students benefit from PLTW’s
innovative, project-based cur-
riculum that encourages cre-
ativity, problem solving, and
critical thinking. We look for-
ward to many more years of
working together to prepare
GSL students to become the
most innovative and produc-
tive in the world,” Bertram
said.
Mike Sundblad, GSL indus-
trial technology and engineer-
ing instructor, added, “The
beauty of PLTW courses is
that our kids get to experience
how a concept they learned in
science applies to real-world
projects, including robotics.
“Rather than sit passively
and listen to a lecture, kids are
building, developing and cre-
ating,” Sundblad said. “It’s the
kind of hands-on experience
that will engage more students
in science, technology, engi-
neering and math—fields that
they might otherwise never
have considered.”
GSL receives national
certification for PLTW
featured online all summer at
www.GlencoeNews.com
Enter at these participating locations for a chance to
win a pair of Chanhassan Dinner Theatre tickets!
• Neubarth Lawn Care & Landscaping • Crow River Winery
• Stockholm Karting Center • Pines-n-tiques • Molly’s Cafe
• State Theatre • Holasek Flower Power Garden Center
• The Peppermint Twist • The Glencoe Aquatic Center
• Glencoe Farmers’ Market • The Flower Mill
• Sibley County Historical Museum • Bongards’ Creameries
• City of Silver Lake • Kahnke Brothers Tree Farm
Or register for a chance to win at one of our offices:
Fun
Spots
S
u
m
m
er
Chronicle/Advertiser
716 E. 10
th
St., Glencoe
Arlington Enterprise
402 W. Alden St., Arlington
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