6-27-13 Arlington Enterprise

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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Serving the Communities of Arlington and Green Isle, Minnesota
www.arlingtonmnnews.com Volume 129 • Number 52 • Thursday, June 27, 2013 • Arlington, MN 55307
Single copy $1.00
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Unique Bubblers
Twenty-six youngsters participated in a
craft outside the Arlington Public Li-
brary on Wednesday afternoon, June
19. Recycled water bottles and socks,
along with homemade bubble solution,
were used to make unique bubblers.
The craft made for a quick science les-
son and loads of fun, according to Ar-
lington Public Library Director Kathy
Homme. Maryn Pazdernik was one of
the participants. She is the daughter of
Stephanie Halverson, Arlington.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington City Council
talked about snow and a win-
ter activity during its most re-
cent summer meeting.
The City Council unani-
mously approved a motion to
accept a bid from Haggen-
miller Lumber, Arlington, to
provide skid loader snow re-
moval services during the
2013-2014 winter season.
The cost of $65 per hour
for five city locations is the
same total as last year.
The City Council, in anoth-
er move, unanimously ap-
proved a motion to accept a
bid from Klehr Grading &
Excavating, Inc., Arlington,
to provide snow plowing
services during the 2013-
2014 winter season.
The cost of $115 per ma-
chine, per hour is the same as
last year.
In addition, the City Coun-
cil unanimously approved a
motion to accept a bid from
William Mueller & Sons,
Hamburg, to provide snow
hauling services for the 2013-
2014 winter season.
The cost of $88 per truck,
per hour is the same as last
year.
Arli-Dazzle
Parade
The City Council unani-
mously approved a motion to
approve a route extension and
staging request as presented
by Kim Schneider for the an-
nual Arli-Dazzle Parade.
The route for the parade,
which concluded at the cor-
ner of Kick’s Bakery in the
past four years, will now ex-
tend two blocks to the west
and cross Highway 5.
Parade entries can now exit
along West Main Street to
County Road 9.
Parade entries which need
to return to the staging area
can turn left on Sixth Avenue
Southwest and then left on
West Adams Street.
The staging area will be
held from just east of the rail-
road tracks along East Main
Street all the way down to the
city garage.
The moves, according to
Schneider, will alleviate con-
gestion and open up parking
space near St. Paul’s Luther-
an Church.
City Council talks snow,
winter activity at meeting
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
After two years of a five-
year grant program, Sibley
County can see improvements
being made in the effort to de-
crease alcohol, tobacco and
drug use by students in the
community.
The claim was made by
Tami LaGow, director of the
Sibley County Partnership in
Prevention program at the
board of commissioners meet-
ing on Tuesday, June 25.
LaGow presented her annu-
al report for the Planning and
Implementation grant between
Public Health and Human
Services and the Sibley East
School District.
The program includes a
coalition comprised of 14 sec-
tors within the community, es-
tablished in November of
2011. The coalition was creat-
ed in response to receiving the
$1 million grant covering five
years from the Minnesota De-
partment of Human Services.
“The mission of the coali-
tion is to build a safe, healthy
and chemically free environ-
ment for youth by providing
support and direction,” said
LaGow. “The reason for the
five-year length of the educa-
tion program is to work at
building sustainability.”
LaGow said the program
has only been going for two
years and it will take time to
see big changes. However, im-
provement is being reported.
In the alcohol compliance
check in the Gibbon and
Winthrop areas, 100 percent
of the students were in com-
pliance.
In a recent survey, some 89
percent of Sibley East stu-
dents agree that they would
support a friend if they chose
not to drink alcohol. The sur-
vey showed that 92 percent of
parents don’t allow students to
drink alcohol in their home.
Plus, 81 percent of the stu-
dents do not take alcohol in a
given month.
Two out of three students
reported never riding with
someone who has been drink-
ing. Most students would
rather not drink when hanging
out with friends.
“We learned that the percep-
tion of the students is that
more students are using than
they actually are,” notes
LaGow. “So, it is important
that we work hard to get these
messages out and that we
bridge the gap between per-
ception and reality.
“If we know what the norms
are in the community, we tend
to follow them,” adds LaGow.
“By showing the students that
most of their peers are not
using alcohol, it will have an
impact on them.”
One of the main things done
by LaGow is to work with the
schools, implementing cur-
riculum in grades six to 10.
“It is an evidence based cur-
riculum that teaches about
chemical use, but mainly
about alcohol,” said LaGow.
“The program builds off of
each other every year, so what
is learned in sixth grade is re-
inforced in seventh grade and
so on.”
A “class action” curriculum
is offered in grades nine and
10. It is like a judicial system
where students are sitting in a
courtroom and presenting
cases.
“For example, it shows if
someone was in a drunken
driving scenario and how it
plays out in court,” said
LaGow. “It has students up
there talking to their peers
about really important issues.”
The program also provides
server training to show how to
check ID’s and the importance
of doing the job correctly so
minors are not using alcohol.
A big part of the grant pro-
gram is the advertising seen
around the county, pointing
out the positives of the pro-
gram for the student body.
“We will take a survey each
year to determine usage and
how our grant is doing, ”
LaGow adds. “The work we
are doing is very exciting.
This is definitely on the cut-
ting edge and Minnesota has
been a leader in this area.”
County grant program working to decrease student chemical use
Emergency declared
after flash floods
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
The Sibley County board
declared a state of emergency
as is warranted for conditions
resulting from the flash flood
event of June 22 at the meet-
ing on Tuesday, June 25.
Bryan Gorman, Emergency
Management Director, said
the heavy rains totaled 7.5
inches in two days, causing a
significant amount of public
property damage. He adds,
“We will beat the threshold to
qualify for assistance.”
The action was taken in
order to get FEMA funding
from the Federal government
to help in the cleanup.
In one incident, Gorman
said he got a call from the
City of New Auburn Sunday
morning asking for pumps to
remove the “river running
though the center of town.”
Gorman said the county has
one pump, while others were
brought in from area cities
such as Winthrop and Carver
County.
In Henderson the city had
to put stop logs in the levy
system and requested more
sand bags. The road south of
Henderson was said to be
closed because of flooding
from the Rush River.
In other related business,
Gorman said new Emergency
Management Deputy Joe Sav-
age is on board in his part
time position. Seth Jones is a
summer intern from North
Dakota State University
working to update the emer-
gency plan.
Gorman said the county
was approved for a grant by
the state to update its hazard
mitigation plan. Cost is esti-
mated at $40,000 with a coun-
ty match, which means
$10,000 will be covered by
Sibley County.
County learns it can get
more new staff for lower cost
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
Sibley County will receive
substantial funding to cover
the costs of new employees
that are needed to service the
Federal government’s Afford-
able Care Act (ACA).
The good news was report-
ed by Vicki Stock, Public
Health and Human Services
Director, at the county board
of commissioners meeting on
Tuesday, June 25.
At the previous meeting,
County Administrator Matt
Jaunich presented a report es-
timating Sibley County would
spend about $38,000 on two
new employees after 50 per-
cent of the cost is covered by
matching Federal dollars. The
staff is needed to service an
expected increased case load
of about 500 clients.
Stock recently learned that
the reimbursement will be 75
percent from the Federal gov-
ernment. Plus, she learned the
state is allowing the county to
claim 90 percent funding for
the two positions the first two
years.
“Overall, we are adding the
two positions, but the net cost
for the first two years will be
10 percent,” adds Stock. “We
will be doing some internal
organizing and what I want to
do is assign a couple of peo-
ple strictly to the medical as-
sistance program.”
In a different matter, Stock
said the county will be man-
dated to hire two staff for the
new MnCHOICES implemen-
tation, which will be totally
funded.
Stock is recommending the
hire of a social worker/nurse
to help pick up some case
load increases and the other to
be certified as an assessor for
those new programs.
“Based on our numbers we
should be looking at hiring
2.5 staff members, ” notes
Stock. “We will look to reor-
ganize the department inter-
nally, hoping to be able to get
by with two.”
Stock said one of the posi-
tions will be 100 percent
funded with revenue already
received. Staff is currently
bringing in more alternative
care dollars to cover the cost.
For the assessor position, the
county is being told it will be
100 percent funded because of
doing a time study for the po-
sition that starts Sept. 1.
Jaunich said to sum it all
up, the county is looking to
hire a total of four new full
time employees in public
health and human services at
a cost of a quarter of one full
time person and maybe less.
*In other business, the
board approved the hire of
Marvin Doeden as a season-
al/temporary Sheriff Deputy
and accepted the resignation
of Deputy Auditor Logan
Lauritsen.
*Approval was given for
the contract renewal with
Minnesota New Country
School and Green Isle Com-
munity School for the provi-
sion of school health services.
*A resolution was approved
allowing minor alteration of
the drainage system affecting
County Ditch 54 which direct-
ly affects County Road 63.
*A joint Sibley/McLeod
County meeting on health in-
surance is set for 11 a.m. July
11 at the McLeod County
solid waste facility in
Hutchinson.
*Century Fence was award-
ed the road maintenance strip-
ing work with a low bid of
$77,375.56.
*In commissioner reports,
Harold Pettis said the joint
powers board involving Sib-
ley and Renville counties will
meet July 17 in Olivia to talk
about cleanout costs for the
ditch on the west side of Sib-
ley County.
*Jim Swanson said Region
9 received the biggest eco-
nomic development grant in
state history of $9.3 million to
help reduce flooding on Hwy.
169 north of St. Peter.
Due to the Fourth of July
Holiday, the Arlington Enter-
prise and Sibley Shopper
Deadlines have been moved
for the July 3 and July 7 edi-
tions.
The Arlington Enterprise
will be published on Wednes-
day July 3. The deadline for
the Enterprise will be Mon-
day, July 1.
The deadline for the Sibley
Shopper will be Tuesday, July
2. The Shopper will be pub-
lished, as usual on Sunday,
July 7.
The office will be closed on
Thursday, July 4 and Friday
July 5.
Have a happy and safe
Fouth of July weekend.
Early deadlines for Enterprise and Shopper
The following students
were recently named to the
Principal’s Honor Roll, “A”
Honor Roll and “B” Honor
Roll at the Sibley East Junior
High School in Gaylord dur-
ing the fourth quarter.
Principal’s
Honors Roll
Freshmen: Samantha Car-
penter, Trevor Diehn, McK-
ayla Stumm and Alyssa
Weber.
Eighth Grade: Abigail But-
ler, Tory Knacke, Alexus
Kreft, Ella Lundstrom, Joel
Mercier and Sierra Suedbeck.
Seventh Grade: Taylor
Brinkman, Lucas Chavez,
Brenda Dabek, Kaili Diehn,
Kevin Durham, Jr., Lindsey
Flieth, Olivia Gronholz,
Mikayla Holmes, Haley
Rowher, Kristian Schow,
Alexandra Stock, Logan
Tesch, Xavier Wassather and
Jacob Willmsen.
“A” Honor Roll
Frehmen: Michael Bostel-
man, Logan Bruss, Kailey
Geib, Ashley Grack, Ian
Holmes, Logan Jorgenson,
Madeline Kjellesvig, Megan
Krentz, Mason Latzke, Sarah
Malinowski, Mitchell Math-
ews, Natalie Mesker, Collin
Pautsch, Sadie Quast, Kate-
lyn Quast, Casey Samletzka,
Travis Schmidt, Rachel
Sorenson, Emma Thompson
and Kaitlyn Tuchtenhagen.
Eighth Grade: Alli Harter,
Brooke Klehr, Sheryl Monsi-
vaiz, Megan Pederson,
Samantha Raghu, James
Schealler, Leah Serbus, Kim-
berly Velazquez and Eliza-
beth Whalen.
Seventh Grade: Gavin
Bates, Katelyn Brinkman,
Jared Burg, Rebecca Camp-
bell, Emily Doetkott, Tamara
Ehrich, Mikayla Holmes,
Samantha Klehr, Carron
Kranz, Brody Mesner, Kiana
Montes, Dayne Morton,
Veronica Oyuela, Tayler Per-
schau, Emily Peterson, Jesus
Rodriguez, Alexys Roseland,
Lacey Roseland, Paul
Schmidt, Kristian Schow,
Alexander Sell, Ahren Sell-
ner, Joshua Sorenson, Bren-
nen St. John, Morgan Stearns,
Hanna Steffer, Jaci Tourtel-
lott, Alexander Vazquez,
Jacob Willmsen, Katrina
Wolter and Faith Young.
“B” Honor Roll
Freshmen: Jack Ballalatak,
Justin Bennett, Nicholas
Doetkott, MacKenzie Dor-
weiler, Amber Frauendienst,
Stephanie Jonason, Zachary
Latzke, Rachel Loncorich,
Cailee Mathwig, Morgan
Paulsen, Dylan Pauly, Ethan
Pomplun, Kaitlyn Schauer,
Kyla Schlueter, Caitlin
Schmidt, Julia Schwartz,
Kaytlin Sellner, Lucas
Shogren, Emily Somerville,
Aaron Strack, Jacob Strack,
Tristan Von Eschen, Jacob
Wentzlaff and Bradley
Ziegler.
Eighth Grade: Alison Eibs,
Seth Fredin, Samantha
Kahlow, Chloey Kellermann,
Sadie Lane, Alma Lopez,
Alyssa Louwagie, Emily
Quast, Emily Raddatz, Ash-
ley Rechtzigel, Jackson Rose,
Jenna Schuft, Patrick Spell-
man, Alyssa Stoeckman,
Amanda Thomes, Brandon
Uecker, Zachary Utendorfer,
Hannah Wentzlaff and Ana
Zuniga.
Seventh Grade: Harley Jo
Borgmann, Mark Brinkman,
Rocio Cardenas, Janessa Dal-
bec, Connor Deis, Experanza
Diaz, Samantha Engquist,
Thomaas Flannery, Norma
Gonzalez, Melissa Latchman,
Madilyn Latzke, Holden
Lindquist, Kelsey Luepke,
Ellie Messner, Anthony Pe-
tree, Jaden Podratz, Macken-
zie Pomplun, Mercedes
Roehler, Dylan Smith,
Daniela Torrez, Austin Weck-
werth, Thomas Wentzlaff, Al-
lison Zellmann and Katelyn
Zwart.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, June 27, 2013, page 2
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
A heartfelt thank-you
to everyone for all the
cards & gifts sent for
my birthday. A special
thanks to my family for
helping host my party. A
special thanks to my wife
Mary, for preparing and
doing everything else
that had to be done.
Your kindness really
made my day special.
With sincere
appreciation,
Pat Anderly
*25Ea
Thank You! I’d like to extend my gratitude to the Arlington
Area Chamber for sponsoring the Town & Country
Days Raffle. I appreciate the investment you make
in the community.
Thank you also to the Arlington Royalty for draw-
ing my name for the grand prize and other prizes.
Brad Goetsch
A25E26Sa
Bernadotte Lutheran Church
6 miles east of Lafayette on Co. Rd. 10 (515th Ave.)
Rain or
shine!
Everyone
welcome!
0: e a t E r t e : t a t r me r t
· The Little Prairie Pickers
· The Kingery Family
Cweåts| Cma:qasha:å, se:.trq 4-7 ç.m.
Swedish Meatballs, Pork Loins & All the Fixings
Ctlert 0uettar, Re|:es|merts, T-C|t:t Va|trq,
ktås' 0ala:trq, Ha:se-D:awr waqar Rtåes S Va:e!
Bernadotte's 19th Annual Family Festival
C w e å e | e s t
Sat., June 29 · 4:00-8:00 p.m.
A25Ea
Thank You
The Arlington Area Chamber of Commerce would like to
thank all of the volunteers and people who donated their time
and resources in making Town & Country Days a success.
Those who purchased and those who sold raffe tickets. A
special thanks to Terry Klages and Mike Scharping for their
efforts in selling raffe tickets.
Sponsors of the various Bounce Houses, Veterans of Foreign
Wars - Arlington, Computer Restore, Jerry’s Home Quality
Foods, Side Dish and Steve’s Copy Shop & More.
The Vendors, Knights of Columbus, Arlington Lions, Arlington
Dugout, Lisa’s Sweet Treats, and Spudsville.
Barbi Cox "Sonfower Puppet Show¨ (Kids enjoyed the show)
Bob Thomes and Felica Brockhoff for always making us
laugh with the Newlywed Game.
Amanda Fisher of TM Wellness Revolution & Jen Carpenter
for the Move Strong Run/Walk. (Job well done)
Jon Rose & Jeremy Latzke for making this years Bike Run a
great success.
Arlington A’s Baseball for Bingo.
Those who participated in the Classic Car, Tractor and Bike
Roll In.
Renville Sibley Sanitation for supplying the dumpsters.
City of Arlington for supplying the outside toilets and the
electricity.
Nuessmeier Electric for supplying the electric hookups for the
event.
Thanks to all for making Town & Country Days a success.
(Ìf we missed anyone that was not our intention.)
2013 Town & Country Rafhe Ticket Winners
Polaris RZR 800 ATV .........................................Brad Goetsch, Gaylord
Husqvarna Riding Lawn Mower.................... Jody Revord, Belle Plaine
Home Entertainment System.............................. Kat Penkert, Arlington
HP Pavilion Computer System .......................... James Eiden, Glencoe
Weber Gas Grill ....................................... Sondra Rosenlund, Arlington
Apple Ì Pad ..........................................................Bill Lensing, Arlington
Kindle Fire .......................................................................... Kevin Eiden
$500 Cash Prize ................................................Bette Nelson, Arlington
$100 Cash Prize ...................................... Lorena Guadalupe, Arlington
$100 Cash Prize ................................................ Bobbi Zaske, Arlington
$100 Cash Prize .................................................. Jodi Hefner, Arlington
$100 Cash Prize ............................................Lori Solmonson, Glencoe
$100 Cash Prize ...............................................Joe Swenson, Arlington
Rockwell Cordless Drill Driver ...........................Brad Goetsch, Gaylord
Rockwell Cordless Drill Driver ..........................Kassie Neisen, Gaylord
Evercraft Creeper Seat ....................................... Rick Wolf, Henderson
Evercraft Creeper ................................................ Dave Meyer, Winsted
$100 Cenex Gift Card ...................................... Bob Nielsen, Green Isle
$100 Arlington Dugout Gift Card............ Luria Tuchtenhagen, Arlington
HP Printer .................................................. Shawn Roehler, Henderson
MainStreet Stylist Gift Basket .......................Bruce Froehlich, Winthrop
$50 Jerry's Home Quality Gift Card .................... Kristi Neisen, Gaylord
Shear Designs Gift Basket ...................................Joel Kuphal, Gaylord
$25 Arlington Haus Gift Card .......................... Steve Schmitz, Arlington
$25 Morreim Pharmacy Gift Card ................. Kevin Isaacson, Lafayette
A25Ea
Celebrate
65
th
Wedding
Anniversary
Bud & Shirley Locher
*
2
5
E
a
Monday, July 1: Arlington City Council, council
chambers, 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, July 2: Arlington Garden Club, meet at
city parking lot to go out to Kelly Perschau’s, 6 p.m.
Wednesday, July 3: Knights of Columbus offi-
cers, St. Mary’s Parish Hall, 8 p.m.
Thursday, July 4: Both banks will be closed.
Community
Calendar
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER
MAIN BANK
Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (straight thru)
DRIVE THRU
Monday - Thursday, 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.,
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Member
FDIC
Arlington State Bank
(507) 964-2256
Fax (507) 964-5550
www.ArlingtonStateBank.com
News Briefs
Ihrke named to Dean’s List
Teresa Ihrke, a 2010 graduate of the Sibley East Sen-
ior High School, was recently named to the Dean’s List
at Winona State University during the spring semester.
To be named to the Dean’s List, a student must
achieve a grade point average of 3.5 or higher on a 4.0
scale.
She is the daughter of Alan and Jayne Ihrke, Arling-
ton.
Paine graduates from college
Gaylord resident William Paine, a graduate of the
Sibley East Senior High School, graduated from the
University of Minnesota, Morris. during the 50th annual
commencement ceremony held on Saturday, May 11.
Paine earned a bachelor of arts degree in sport man-
agement.
Students graduate from SCC
Local and area students graduated from South Central
College, Faribault and North Mankato, during recent
commencement exercises.
The students included Ryan Brown, North Mankato,
DIP; Computer Integrated Machining; Kevin Lilienthal,
North Mankato, AAS; Agribusiness Production;
Maxwell Eckberg, North Mankato, AAS; Agribusiness
Production.
Henderson man killed in crash
Peter William Johns, 53 of Henderson was killed in a
motor vehicle accident on Sunday, June 23, on CSAH
12, four miles southwest of Arlington, according to the
Sibley County Sherriff’s department.
A 2005 Chevrolet Silverado, driven by Ruby Dianne
Johns, 44, of Henderson, went through a curve in the
roadway, entered the ditch and struck a field approach.
The truck was vaulted over the field approach and
rolled.
Ruby Johns was extricated from the vehicle by rescue
personnel and flow to Hennepin County Medical Cen-
ter. She was listed in stable condition as of Monday,
June 24. She was wearing a seatbelt.
Peter Johns, who was not wearing a seatbelt, was
ejected from the vehicle. He was pronounced dead at
the scene, according to the report.
Assisting the Sibley County Sheriff’s department
were the Arlington Police Department, Arlington Fire
Department, Arlington Ambulance Service, Henderson
Police Department, Minnesota State Patrol and Life
Link III.
Local teens injured in accident
Two teens were injured in a car accident near Arling-
ton on Thursday, June 20.
Grace Stephens, 18, of Arlington was traveling west-
bound on Highway 5 when her 1994 Geo Metro rolled
about a mile west of Sibley County Road 5, according
to a report from the Minnesota State Patrol.
Stephens was taken to the Hennepin County Medical
Center to be treated for serious injuries.
A passenger, Briana Montanye, 17, of Gaylord, was
taken to the Sibley County Medical Center in Arlington
with less serious injuries.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Ribbon Cutting Ceremony
Members of the Arlington Area Chamber of Com-
merce held a ribbon cutting ceremony at TM Wellness
Revolution on Friday morning, June 21. The business,
owned by Amanda Fisher, is located in the former
Glenn’s Mobil & Towing building along Highway 5.
Front Row: (left to right) Chamber Secretary Terry
Klages, Derek Hahn, Amanda Fisher, Scott Sorenson,
Chris Welch and Chamber President Steve Gillaspie.
Back Row: (l to r) Julie Scharping, Justin Nissen,
Dave Hennies, Randy Danielson and Jim Heiland.
Students named to the Honor Roll
at Sibley East Junior High School
VIEW US ONLINE AT
WWW.ARLINGTON
MNNEWS.COM
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, June 27, 2013, page 3
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Business & Professional
Directory
CALL TODAY TO BE INCLUDED IN OUR
BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY!
507-964-5547
Arlington
Chiropractic Clinic
JUSTIN E. DAVIS, D.C.
607 W. Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
507?964?2850
arlingtonchiropracticmn.com
Office Hours:
Mon. 9am?6pm; Tues. 9am?5pm;
Wed. 8am?6pm; Thurs. 1?6pm;
Fri. 8am?4pm; 1
st
& 3
rd
Sat. 8am?11am
VETERINARIAN
RG OVREBO DVM LLC
Large Animal
Veterinary Services
Ultrasound repro, Surgical,
Medical and Nutrition
Small Animal House Call
by Appointment
Medical, Vaccination Services
and Surgical Referral
Dr. Robert G. Ovrebo
Office 507-964-2682
Cell 507-995-0507
Miller
Law Office
RAPHAEL J. MILLER
ROXANN M. BERANEK
Attorneys at Law
332 Sibley Avenue, Gaylord, MN 55334
Tel. (507) 237-2954
Wills - Family Law
Taxes - Estate Planning
General Law Practice & Trials
Free consultation on personal injury claims
MESENBRING
CONSTRUCTION
(507) 964-2864
“Your local home builder and
remodeler for over 38 years”
Member: MN River Builders Assn.
MN License #4806
ROSS R. ARNESON
ATTORNEY AT LAW
302 West Main
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-5753
Real Estate, Estate Planning,
Probate and Business Law
Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Saturdays by Appointment
Farm – Residential
Commercial
Licensed - Bonded - Insured
• 24-Hour Emergency
Service
• Free Estimates
Tyler Kranz, Owner
507-964-2525
Klehr Grading
&
Excavating, Inc.
JEFF & WENDY KLEHR
Dozer, Grader, Basements,
Septic Systems, Driveways, Backhoe Work,
Hauling Gravel/Rock/Sand, Skidloader
Jeff cell: 612-756-0595
Wendy cell: 612-756-0594
640 E. BROOKS ST., ARLINGTON, MN 55307
1-507-964-5783 • FAX: 507-964-5302
Local LAWN
Enforcement
Arlington, MN
Licensed and Insured
Mowing, fertilizing and
weed control, dethatching,
garden tilling, core aeration
www.locallawnenforcement.com
Adam and David Hansen
Adam cell: 507-327-0917
507-964-5835
• 5” Seamless Gutters
• 6” Seamless Gutters
• K-Guard Leaf-Free
Gutter System
(lifetime clog free guarantee)
PHIL GOETTL
612-655-1379
888-864-5979
www.mngutter.com
M
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E
S
A
j
Gustafson
Family Dentistry
Dr. John D. Gustafson, D.D.S
Dr. Jared Gustafson, D.D.S
COMPREHENSIVE CARE
FOR ALL AGES
Office Hours: Monday–Friday
New Patients Welcome
Dr. Jason Anderson, D.D.S
Orthodontists
106 3
rd
Ave. NW,
Arlington
507-964-2705
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E
l
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body repair work on
your vehicle.
• Free Estimates • Glass Replacement
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WINDSHIELD
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We install windshields
for all vehicles
We will contact the insurance company
for you and do all paperwork. See us
for professional glass installation.
BRAU
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Local
507-964-5539
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800-664-2728
Buesgens
Septic Services
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& Portable Restrooms
507-665-3732
or 952-873-2208
Call Shane
A14El
Liberty
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Corner of Hwy. 5 & Chandler
Arlington, MN
507-964-5177 or
Toll-Free 866-752-9567
www.LibertyStationAutoSales.com
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Tires, Air Conditioning
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MONDAY-FRIDAY 8-5
BEN BRAZIL,
SERVICES
Foot & Ankle Hand & Wrist
Knee & Hip Shoulder & Elbow
Spine & Back Sports Medicine
Total Joint Replacement
LOCATIONS
Arlington
Chaska
Delano
Glencoe
Mound
Olivia
Waconia
Watertown
TCO Arlington
Sibley Medical Center
601 West Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
(952) 442-2163 TCOmn.com
PHYSICIANS
Dr. Barnett Dr. Holthusen Dr. Mair
Dr. Marek Dr. Friedland Dr. Sanders
Dr. Wyard Dr. Meyer
R22-34CEL,23-34Aa
Arlington-Green Isle
Class of 1977
Get Together
Sat., Aug. 3
5 p.m.
Arlington Haus Too
Contact:
AGIClass77@yahoo.com
or 507-964-5651
*25Ea
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
June is Dairy Month
Sibley County Dairy Princess Victoria
Riebe, left, Sibley County Dairy Ambas-
sador Hayley Riebe, middle, and Sibley
County Ambassador Jennifer Oelfke,
right, recently served dairy treats to
customers at the CornerStone State
Bank in Green Isle.
WASHINGTON – The
long battle to passage of a
new five-year federal Farm
Bill came to a halt last Thurs-
day when the U.S. House of
Representatives defeated the
bill 234-195. The U.S. Senate
passed the Farm Bill by a 66-
27 margin on June 10.
The loss in the House was
bitter for 7th District Rep.
Collin Peterson, D-Minn.,
who is the U.S. House Agri-
culture Committee ranking
member.
Pet erson
made the
f ol l owi ng
s t a t e me nt
after the
House of
Representa-
tives failed
to approve a
new farm
bill: “The
farm bill
failed to
pass the
House today
(June 20) because the House
Republicans could not control
the extreme right wing of
their party. From day one I
cautioned my colleagues that
to pass a farm bill we would
have to work together. In-
stead, the House adopted a
partisan amendment process,
playing political games with
extreme policies that have no
chance of becoming law.
“This flies in the face of
nearly four years of biparti-
san work done by the Agri-
culture Committee. I’ll con-
tinue to do everything I can
to get a farm bill passed but I
have a hard time seeing
where we go from here.”
Doug Peterson, Minnesota
Farmers Union president,
said: “Minnesota Farmers
Union is disappointed that the
House failed family farmers
and consumers by not passing
a farm bill.
“I would like to thank Rep-
resentatives Peterson, Kline,
Walz, and Paulsen for their
support of rural Minnesota
and the consumers our hard-
working family farmers feed.
MFU will continue to work
hard for the interests of fami-
ly farmers and push for the
necessary changes in the leg-
islation to get this farm bill
passed in the House.”
Both U.S. Sen. Amy
Klobuchar, D-Minn, and U.S.
Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn,
supported the Senate bill.
Klobuchar said after the
House vote: “Two years in a
row the Senate passed a
strong, long-term Farm Bill
that is critical for producers,
consumers and our entire
economy. I have heard from
countless Minnesota farmers
and ranchers who need the
support and certainty that this
bill provides.
“I know Congressman Pe-
terson worked hard to move
the Farm Bill forward, and
the House needs to come to-
gether and figure out a way to
get this done so our farmers
have the continuity they need
to thrive and succeed.”
Franken stated: “With one
in five Minnesota jobs linked
to the farm economy, the
House’s failure to pass a five-
year Farm Bill is a huge dis-
appointment and a real dis-
service to producers and rural
communities in Minnesota
and across the country.
“We were able to pass a
strongly bipartisan bill in the
Senate, and I hope the House
will revisit this soon so that
we can finally pass this legis-
lation that is so important to
the economic future of Min
Farm Bill
Continued on page 5
Farm Bill defeated 234-195
U.S. Rep.
Collin
Peterson
Honl begins
residency at Mayo
Health Systems in
Mankato
Cody Honl, D.O. recently
graduated from the West Vir-
ginia School of Osteopathic
Medicine with a degree of
Doctor of Osteopathic Medi-
cine. He will do his first year
of residency at the Mayo
Health Systems in Mankato.
After his three years of resi-
dency Honl will be a fully-li-
censed family practice physi-
cian. Honl, a 2001 graduate
of the GFW High School, is
the son of David and Sheila
Honl of Winthrop.
-Winthrop News
A piece of history
visits Fairfax
Twenty-eight “motor cars”,
former railroad inspection
vehicles, made their way
from North Redwood to Fair-
fax by rail. The small, motor-
ized rail cars represented
members of the North Ameri-
can Rail Car Operators Asso-
ciation. They gave rides to
local residents who wanted to
see the rail line from a differ-
ent perspective.
-Standard-Gazette
Council moves
ahead with liquor
store plans
The Glencoe City council au-
thorized plans and specifica-
tions to be drawn up for the
$400,000 liquor store expan-
sion project with a bid open-
ing scheduled for late Octo-
ber or early November. The
goal is to keep the liquor
store open throughout the re-
modeling and expansion
work which is scheduled to
begin on January 2.
-McLeod County Chronicle
Belle Plaine, Area
police train for
school shooter
rampage
Oak Crest Elementary
School was the scene of
some school emergency-re-
lated simulated training drills
for Belle Plaine police offi-
cers last week. It was a jam-
packed three days of training
which included efforts to de-
escalate a situation and nego-
tiate when possible and shoot
when necessary. Belle Plaine
Police Chief Tom Stolee said
“I don’t gamble. I don’t play
the odds. I’m not going to
say it won’t happen here.”
“We’re trying to be pro-ac-
tive versus reactive.”
-Belle Plaine Herald
Sounds like
multiplication?
It’s newspaper
talk for a one
column by 2 inch
ad. Too small to
be effective?
You’re reading
this one!
Put your 1x2 in
the Arlington
Enterprise.
507-964-5547
1
x
2
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, June 27, 2013, page 4
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Consent agendas have a
purpose in public meetings
Our View: Creates the notion that issues
are being hidden from the public
Opinions
Staf f
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Publish-
ers; Kurt Menk, Edi t or; Kari n
Ramige, Manager; Marvin Bulau,
Production Manager; Barb Math-
wig, Of fice; Ashley Reetz, Sales; and Jean Olson, Proof Reading.
Letters
This page is devoted to opin-
ions and commentary . Articles appearing on this page are the opinions of the
writer . V iews expressed here are not necessarily those of the Arlington Enterprise, unless so desig-
nated. The Arlington Enterprise strongly encourages others to express opin-
ions on this page.
Letters from our readers are
strongly encouraged. Letters for
publication must bear the writer’ s signature and address. The Arlington Enterprise reserves the right
to edit letters for purpose of clarity
and space.
Ethics
The editorial staf f of the Arlington Enterprise strives to present the news in a
fair and accurate manner . W e appreciate errors being brought to our attention.
Please bring any grievances against
the Arlington Enterprise to the attention of the editor . Should dif ferences continue, readers are encour-
aged to take their grievances to the
Minnesota News Council, an organi-
zation dedicated to protecting the
public from press inaccuracy and un-
fairness. The News Council can be contacted at 12 South
Sixth St., Suite 940, Minneapolis,
MN 55402, or (612) 341-9357.
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Established in 1884.
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Phone 507-964-5547 FAX 507-964-2423.
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Arlington ENTERPRISE
Share your opinion through a letter to the editor.
Email your letter to KurtM@ArlingtonMNnews.com
Guest Columns
Letter To The Editor
In most public meetings, smaller items such as, approval of min-
utes from previous meetings, current meeting agenda, hiring or fund
raising requests are placed on a consent agenda. These items usually
require little or no discussion and supporting information is provided
to those involved in advance. The items are then voted on in one
lump motion.
Along with such smaller items, Sibley East will put the approval
of bills and personnel contract approvals on the consent agenda with
what appears to be little or no information.
These usually pass with little information given and little if any
discussion.
Over the last months, board member Missy Weber has taken the
time to bring up questions that she had about different items among
the more than $1 million in payments that the Sibley East District
pays each month.
At the last meeting, Weber was informed that if she wanted to dis-
cuss anything on the consent agenda, a motion would have to be
made to remove it from the consent agenda and placed on the regu-
lar agenda. Can you say pain in the you know what?
Said motion was made, passed, items were discussed. Weber then
requested that she would like to see the bills and payments taken off
the consent agenda to be a part of the main meeting agenda.
She said she felt it was important that questions she had and had
discussed previously with Business Manager Jana Thompson be
brought up in the public meeting. She said that as a board member
she represents the taxpayers of Sibley East. If there are things that
she questions, others would probably do the same.
Kudos to Missy Weber, incoming Superintendent Jim Amsden and
the Sibley East School board for making this move. Though it might
seem like a small gesture, it does a lot to eliminate the appearance
that items are being kept from the public.
-K.R.C.
Too Tall’s Tidbits
Happy Birthday and Happy An-
niversary to the following local and
area residents compliments of the
Arlington Lions Club Community
Calendar.
June 28
Amanda Mae Thomes, Ava Elaine
Pinske, Duane Kistner, Isabelle
Stier, Kai Jacobus, Kim Bade, Lisa
Otto, Pierson Brau, Ryan Gustafson,
Zoey Thomes, Mr. and Mrs. Dustin
Voight, Mr. and Mrs. Eric Kaeser-
mann, Mr. and Mrs. Mark Pauly, and
Mr. and Mrs. Roger Schneider.
June 29
In Memory Of Elvera Mathwig, Ann
Pioske, Brittany Krohn, Gage
Lenert, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Rabe, Mr.
and Mrs. Jay Rickert, and Mr. and
Mrs. Ralph Soeffker.
June 30
Marie Rose, Elin Burnevik, Jill
Warzecha, Lori Tackmann, Mr. and
Mrs. Mark Vrklan, and Mr. and Mrs.
Ross Arneson.
July 1
Brook Latzke, Chris Pichelmann,
Lorraine Lieske and Tom Pomplun.
July 2
Bethany Trout, George Grabitske
and Jeron Hellermann.
July 3
In Memory Of Gregory Nagel, Brian
Thomes, Darnell Halverson, Jacia
Duenow, Jordan Uecker, Marcy
Burnevik, Mason Nemitz, Mitchell
Kranz and Shawn Battcher.
July 4
Margo Trocke, Nicole Lieske, Don
Wolter, Mary Jaszewski, Trenton
Schmidt and Wendy ZumBerge.
*****
An elderly husband and wife visit
their doctor when they begin forget-
ting little things. Their doctor tells
them that many people find it useful
to write themselves little notes.
When they get home, the wife
says, “Dear, will you please go to
the kitchen and get me a dish of ice
cream? And maybe write that down
so you won't forget?”
“Nonsense,” says the husband, “I
can remember a dish of ice cream.”
“Well,” says the wife, “I’d also
like some strawberries and whipped
cream on it.”
“My memory’s not all that bad,”
says the husband. “No problem -- a
dish of ice cream with strawberries
and whipped cream. I don't need to
write it down.”
He goes into the kitchen; his wife
hears pots and pans banging around.
The husband finally emerges from
the kitchen and presents his wife
with a plate of bacon and eggs.
She looks at the plate and asks,
“Hey, where's the toast I asked
for?”
*****
A man comes home from work
and sits in his recliner in front of the
television.
“Hey, wife!” he yells. “Gimme a
beer before it starts!” She gives him
his beer. Fifteen minutes pass.
“Hey, wife!” he yells. “Gimme a
beer before it starts!” She gives him
his beer. Five minutes pass.
“Hey, wife!” he yells. “Gimme a
beer before it starts!”
“Hey, you' ve already had two
beers in twenty minutes! Don't you
think that's a lot? I'm not getting you
another!”
“Now it starts,” exclaims the
husband.
*****
A funeral service is held for a
woman who just passed away. As the
pallbearers carry the casket out, they
accidentally bump into a wall.
They hear a faint moan. They
open the casket and find that the
woman is actually alive.
She lives for 10 more years and
then dies. They have another funeral
for her. At the end of the service, the
pallbearers carry out the casket.
As they are walking, the hus-
band cries out, “Watch out for the
wall!”
*****
A married couple walks up to a
wishing well. The guy leans over,
makes a wish and throws in a penny.
His wife decides to make a wish,
too, but she leans over too far, falls
into the well and drowns.
The guy says, “Wow, it really
works.”
*****
To The Editor,
We would like to thank the people
of the Arlington United Methodist
Church.
We are flooded with gratitude,
precious memories, and forever
friendships as we scan these past-
fast fourteen years with you. God is
so good!
In hindsight, the greatness and
goodness of God are even more
vividly displayed. Thank you to all
who took baby steps of faith toward
Jesus and for doing it together with
us. We encourage you to keep mov-
ing closer to Jesus as you take “the
road less traveled.” Many folks will
choose to navigate easier routes, but
there will always be a gathering of
precious souls “looking to be what
God is looking for”!
Keep searching, keep stepping,
keep the faith. Thank you, Jesus!
Thank you, Church!
On the road again,
Pastor Wayne, Holly,
and the Swanson family
Pastor Swanson thanks members
Klobuchar: Cut Red Tape to Boost Economy
WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Sen-
ator Amy Klobuchar, Vice Chair of
the U.S. Congress Joint Economic
Committee (JEC), today called for a
commonsense approach to regula-
tions that protects consumers and the
public interest without stifling inno-
vation and economic growth.
Klobuchar invited the founder of
Minneapolis-based CVRx, a compa-
ny that makes medical devices, to
testify at the Joint Economic Com-
mittee hearing about how federal
regulations have impacted his com-
pany and the larger medical device
community in Minnesota. Minnesota
Congressman Erik Paulsen also at-
tended the hearing.
“From farmers to manufacturers to
medical device companies like Min-
nesota’s CVRx, American businesses
need greater simplicity in the tax
code and a more sensible approach
to regulation,” Klobuchar said. “We
need policies that protect consumers
with clarity and consistency, not end-
less red tape, and I will continue to
work to create a regulatory climate
that promotes growth and innovation
while still maintaining safety and se-
curity standards.”
During the hearing, Klobuchar fo-
cused on the continued need for clear
and consistent policies at the Food
and Drug Administration (FDA), the
primary regulatory agency charged
with approving medical devices
made by Minnesota’s roughly 400
medical device firms. Klobuchar,
who successfully pushed the Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency (EPA)
to curb unnecessary dust regulations
in 2011, also stressed the need to cut
red tape for farmers and ranchers.
Klobuchar has made reducing the
regulatory burden for businesses and
farmers one of her top priorities in
the Senate. She authored bipartisan
legislation, passed into law in 2012,
to help streamline the Food and Drug
Administration's regulation of med-
ical devices without compromising
public safety. As founder and co-
chair of the bipartisan Senate
Tourism Caucus, she has also
worked to cut red tape in the U.S.
tourism industry by cutting back on
wait times for tourist visas.
Klobuchar also introduced the Rep-
resentation for Farmers Act to ensure
that American farmers are represent-
ed in the decision-making process
for environmental policies and regu-
lations that would affect U.S. agri-
culture.
WASHINGTON, D.C.
[06/26/13]—In a speech delivered
from the Senate floor, U.S. Sen. Al
Franken (D-Minn.) urged action to
prevent the rate hike on student loans
slated to take place on July 1. With-
out Congressional action, the interest
rate on subsidized Stafford loans will
jump from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent.
“Countless students at schools
across Minnesota demonstrate
tremendous perseverance and grit in
getting a college education and in
cobbling together the resources to
pay for it,” Sen. Franken said in his
speech. “They are working incredi-
bly hard, and they are still taking on
significant amounts of debt—debt
that will stay with them for a good
portion of their lives. Paying for col-
lege shouldn’t have to be that hard.”
You can read the full text of the
speech here
<http://www.franken.senate.gov/?p=
news&id=2472> and watch the
video here <http://www.franken.sen-
ate.gov/files/video/130626Student-
Loan.mp4> .
Senator Franken has long been a
champion of making the cost of col-
lege more affordable. He is a
cosponsor of the Student Loan Af-
fordability Act—which received ma-
jority support but did not pass in the
Senate earlier this month—that
would have locked in the current
lower interest rate on new subsidized
Stafford loans for two years. He is
also a cosponsor of the Bank on Stu-
dents Loan Fairness Act, introduced
by Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.),
which would allow students to pay
the same interest rate on their student
loans that banks pay on the money
they borrow from the Federal Re-
serve's discount window, currently
0.75 percent.
Sen. Franken is also the author of
the Understanding the True Cost of
College Act, which would clarify
what financial aid families will re-
ceive from a school and create stan-
dard terms for the aid offered so that
students can accurately compare of-
fers from different schools. Current-
ly, schools do not use standard defi-
nitions or names for different types
of aid, so students and families often
report having difficulty differentiat-
ing between grant aid, which does
not need to be repaid, and student
loans, which do need to be repaid.
Lastly, he is the author of the Ac-
celerated Learning Act—which was
recently incorporated into the Senate
bill to reform the so-called “No
Child Left Behind” law—that would
help make college affordable by ex-
panding access to accelerated learn-
ing models like AP, IB, dual enroll-
ment, and early college high schools
for low-income students. This would
allow students to get college credit
while in high school and earn their
college degree more quickly.
Franken: Prevent Student Loan Rate Hike
nesota and the entire nation.”
*****
Prior to the vote, Peterson
got up in the House and spoke
on June 18. Here is his
speech:
“Today, the House of Rep-
resentatives finally begins de-
bating a new, five year farm
bill. This process has gone on
long enough and it’s time to
pass a bill.
“The farm bill gives farm-
ers and ranchers the necessary
tools to provide American
consumers with the safest,
most abundant and most af-
fordable food supply in the
world. The bill includes farm,
conservation, trade, nutrition,
credit, rural development, re-
search, forestry, energy and
specialty crop programs.
“With roughly 16 million
American jobs tied to agricul-
ture, the farm bill is a jobs
bill. The rural economy re-
mained strong during our na-
tion’s financial crisis and that
has continued during our re-
covery; this is in large part
due to agriculture. And this is
why the farm bill is so impor-
tant. Failing to pass a new,
five-year farm bill could po-
tentially devastate our rural
economy. Why would we
want to jeopardize the one
part of the economy that has
been, and continues to be,
working?
“I often tell people that the
Agriculture Committee is per-
haps the least partisan of all
the Committees in Congress.
We listen to each other, try to
understand each other and
work together in the best in-
terests of our constituents.
“The bill before us today is
a compromise that reflects
that tradition. It is a compro-
mise between commodities
and regions, and urban and
rural members. I didn’t get
everything I wanted; Chair-
man Lucas didn’t get every-
thing he wanted but that’s
how the legislative process is
supposed to work.
“The bill makes major re-
forms to farm programs. Re-
pealing direct payments saves
taxpayers nearly $40 billion
dollars and will ensure that
farmers won’t get a govern-
ment subsidy for doing noth-
ing. Instead, producers are
given the choice between two
counter-cyclical farm safety
net programs, addressing ei-
ther price declines or revenue
losses, which only support
farmers during difficult times.
The bill also sets new income
requirements so individual
millionaires won’t receive
farm payments and it contin-
ues the no cost sugar program.
“H.R. 1947 also makes sig-
nificant reforms to dairy pro-
grams, the result of more than
four years of work and com-
promise by the dairy industry.
The new dairy safety net will
address the volatility in the
dairy market, helping con-
sumers by making all milk
prices more stable and elimi-
nating the price spikes that are
normal in today’s market-
place.
“The 2008 Farm Bill was
the first farm bill to address
the growing demand for fresh
fruits and vegetables, local
foods and organics. The 2013
Farm Bill continues this in-
vestment by increasing fund-
ing for specialty crop block
grants, providing support for
the Farmers Market and Local
Food Promotion Program, and
authorizing the very first or-
ganic checkoff for research
and promotion.
“We also recognize the
challenges facing many be-
ginning farmers by including
support for outreach and edu-
cation to beginning, socially
disadvantaged and military
veteran farmers and ranchers.
The bill also streamlines and
reforms current conservation
programs, better targeting re-
sources to allow farmers and
ranchers to continue to pre-
serve our valuable natural re-
sources.
“A lot of attention has been
given to the bill’s cuts to nu-
trition programs, more than
$20 billion over ten years.
Personally, I would prefer to
update the income and asset
limits in the SNAP program
so we don’t have these situa-
tions where bordering states
use different eligibility re-
quirements, but the support
wasn’t there for that.
“The cuts to nutrition
spending have received most
of the attention but we were
able to provide additional sup-
port for TEFAP, increase
funding for the Community
Food Projects, with a focus on
low-income communities and
provide more resources to
help USDA’s anti-trafficking
efforts.
“While I think it’s ridicu-
lous to cut hundreds of bil-
lions of dollars, as some
members have called for, it’s
also just not realistic to refuse
to cut one penny from these
programs. I do believe that we
can make some reasonable,
responsible reforms and, at
the end of the day, find some
middle ground that will allow
us to complete our work on
this bill.
“I know we are going to
have a lot of amendments but
it’s my opinion that in order
for the bill to be conferenced,
to be able to get a new bill
signed into law before Sept.
30, we need to keep this a bi-
partisan bill and not stray too
far from what was approved
in Committee. I know that
compromise is rare around
here but it’s what is needed to
finally get a new five-year
farm bill completed.”
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, June 27, 2013, page 5
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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507-964-2310
414 W. Main, Arlington
History
Obituary
Michael “Whitey” Allen
Herd was born on July 1,
1960, in Gaylord, Minnesota.
He was the son of Don and
M a r y
E i l e e n
( O’ Ne i l )
H e r d .
W h i t e y
was bap-
tized as an
infant and
was later
confirmed
in his faith
as a youth,
both at St.
Brendan’s Catholic Church in
Green Isle. He received his
education in Arlington and
was a 1978 graduate of the
Arlington High School.
Whitey furthered his educa-
tion at Mankato State Univer-
sity and earned a Degree in
Business Administration with
a Minor in Economics, gradu-
ating in 1982.
On June 14, 1986, Whitey
was united in marriage to
Kris Kuphal at St. Michael’s
Catholic Church in Gaylord.
After their marriage the cou-
ple resided in Gaylord. This
union was blessed with two
sons. Whitey and Kris shared
27 years of marriage. He was
employed with the Principal
Financial Group for more
than 25 years.
Whitey was a member of
St. Michael’s Catholic
Church in Gaylord.
Whitey enjoyed baseball,
coaching for youth organiza-
tions and high school ath-
letes, hunting, and having a
general passion for all sports.
He played for the Green Isle
Irish for 35 years and then
coached the team for three
years. Whitey was a referee
for basketball and an umpire
for baseball. He especially
loved watching his sons play
ball. Whitey loved spending
time with his family and
friends.
Whitey passed away sud-
denly on Tuesday, June 18,
2013, at the Sibley Medical
Center in Arlington at the age
of 52 years. Blessed be his
memory.
Whitey is survived by his
wife Kris Herd; sons Zach
Herd amd Lucas Herd both of
Mankato; Mother Mary
Eileen Herd of Green Isle
brothers, John (Marneé) Herd
of Alexandria and James
(Lisa) Herd of Waconia; Fa-
ther-In-Law and Mother-In-
Law, Karl and Sue Kuphal of
Gaylord; Nieces, Nephews,
other relatives and friends.
Whitey was preceded in
death by his Father, Don
Herd.
Arrangements by Egesdal
Funeral Home in Gaylord,
Minnesota. Online obituaries
and guest book available at
www.hantge.com.
Michael A. ‘Whitey’ Herd, 52, Gaylord
Michael
“Whitey”
Herd
98 Years Ago
July 1, 1915
Buck & Didra, Publishers
Fishermen of Henderson were
over here Monday with 175
pounds of catfish, all dressed.
They sold them at ten cents per
pound.
Corn is making some progress
the past week so that one can no-
tice it. With favorable weather
from now on there are still
prospects of a good crop.
Henry Hillemann and E. L.
and A. J. Dresser are putting in
the cribbing for the concrete
work of the new Lutheran church
in Arlington Township.
A notice of intention to circu-
late a petition for change of the
county seat to Gaylord is pub-
lished in this issue of the paper.
Over a year ago a committee was
appointed by the citizens of Gay-
lord to ascertain the sentiment
among the voters on this ques-
tion, and it is said they found it
very favorable. Elec-tions were
held on this same question 25, 18
and 13 years ago.
68 Years Ago
June 28, 1945
Louis Kill, Editor
While fishing at Clearwater
Lake last Sunday, Herb Kruger
landed a bullhead which tops
them all for size. It weighed 2-1/4
pounds and is said to be the
largest ever caught at that lake.
Herb was elated over the catch.
Last Thursday, June 21st, was
the birthday anniversary of
Grandma Caroline Schatz, one of
this community’s most beloved
pioneers. She was 89 years of age
that day, and was able to receive
the congratulations of many rela-
tives and friends who came to
pay her a visit. Grandma Schatz
has made a remarkable recovery
from the effects of a paralytic
stroke last fall, after which she
was in a comatose condition for
many weeks.
Manifesting a true spirit of
progressiveness, the musicians of
Arlington and surrounding com-
munity have organized a band.
Several rehearsals have already
been held and a concert is sched-
uled for the near future. The fol-
lowing officers were elected at
the first meeting of the new Com-
munity Band: John Henschke,
president; Norbert Brau, vice
president; Patty Meyer, secretary
and Rudy Sander, librarian.
38 Years Ago
June 26, 1975
Val Kill, Editor
An eight-plex apartment build-
ing is being built by Harold and
Roger Wahldick of Morton. The
units are located in the Brau addi-
tion on the north side of Arling-
ton. The building will have brick
on the bottom story and shingles
on the top.
This year’s county fair will
provide fairgoers with many
changes, New buildings have
been erected, buildings have been
painted, a new carnival, and an
entirely different grandstand en-
tertainment program has been
arranged, according to John Paul-
mann, fair board secretary.
Carl Nygaard of Green Isle re-
turned home June 11th from a
plane trip to Norway. He left May
15th to visit relatives who he had
been corresponding with but had
never seen. He visited many
places while in Norway. His fa-
ther came to America in 1888
when he was 18 years old.
8 Years Ago
June 30, 2005
Kurt Menk, Editor
The first annual Mike Hag-
genmiller Memorial Bike Run
raised $3,200 for the Minneapo-
lis Heart Institute, according to
local organizers. Approximately
70 bikers participated in the 140-
mile ride.
Strong winds and heavy rain
caused damage to primarily trees
throughout the City of Arlington
at 5:30 p.m. Friday, June 24. The
Arlington Fire Department as-
sisted city employees in clearing
trees and big branches off local
streets. The Gaylord Fire De-
partment and Green Isle Fire De-
partment also provided assistance
for two hours.
Elsie Luff, an honorary mem-
ber of the Arlington Garden Club,
recently attended the Minnesota
State Horticultural Society Dis-
trict 2 convention at the Arlington
Community Cen-ter. Luff, who is
103, resides at the Gaylord Lake-
view Home.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Green Isle Fire Depart-
ment will celebrate its 125th
anniversary on Saturday, July
13.
A parade, kids fun run and
5K run will be featured dur-
ing the event.
The kids fun run will start
at 11 a.m.
The 5K run will follow at
noon.
The parade will be featured
at 1:30 p.m.
An entry form was pub-
lished in last week’s edition
of the Arlington Enterprise.
Completed forms and a $20
fee for a t-shirt in the 5K run
can be mailed to the Green
Isle Fire Department, P.O.
Box 235, Green Isle, MN,
55338.
The deadine to guarantee a
t-shirt is Sunday, June 30.
People who have any ques-
tions can call 507-326-5941.
Green Isle Fire Department to
celebrate 125th anniversary
Farm Bill Continued from page 3
Sibley County Court
The following misdemeanors,
petty misdemeanors and gross mis-
demeanors were heard in District
Court June 14-20:
Minnesota State Patrol (MSP);
Sheriff’s Office (SO); Department
of Natural Resourced (DNR); MN
Department of Transportation
(MNDOT):
Lori R. Dressen, 37, Arlington,
disorderly conduct, stay of imposi-
tion, supervised probation one
year, sentence to service 40 hours
for indeterminate, restitution re-
served for 60 days, domestic abuse
evaluation, follow all instructions
of probation, follow recommenda-
tions of evaluation, sign all releas-
es of information, sign probation
agreement, remain law-abiding, no
same or similar, no assault, no dis-
orderly conduct, $135, Arlington
PD;
Cassandra L. Rabe, 27, Arling-
ton, failure to display current regis-
tration-expired plates, $115, Ar-
lington PD; Jose J. Sanchez Jr., 24,
Arlington, driving after suspen-
sion, proof of insurance, continued,
unsupervised probation six months,
obtain driver’s license, no same or
similar, no drivers license viola-
tions, no driving without insurance,
$400, Arlington PD; Tanner J.
Sommers, 18, Arlington, speed,
$135, proof of insurance, dis-
missed, Arlington PD; Steven L.
Wieland, 51, New Ulm, speed,
$135, Arlington PD;
Alberto Zavala-Valdovinos, 31,
Arlington, speed, continued, unsu-
pervised probation 180 days, no
driver license violations, pay costs,
$145, Arlington PD; Jesus P.
Abrego, 64, Gaylord, theft-
take/use/transfer moveable proper-
ty, $185, Gaylord PD;
Michael L. Rettmann, 48,
Winthrop, DWI-alcohol concentra-
tion 0.08 within two hours, dis-
missed, DWI, stay of imposition,
supervised probation 12 months,
local confinement three days, cred-
it for time served three days, sen-
tence to service 40 hours for inde-
terminate, chemical dependency
evaluation/treatment, follow rec-
ommendations of evaluation, sign
all releases of information, attend
MADD impact panel, keep
court/attorney informed of current
address, remain law-abiding, no al-
cohol-related offenses, sign proba-
tion agreement, follow all instruc-
tions of probation, no driver li-
cense violations, no misdemeanor
moving violations, $575.30, Gay-
lord PD;
Alan E. Gramentz, 60, New
Ulm, speed, $125, Henderson PD;
Larry L. Lindemeier, 60, Waconia,
speed, $125, Henderson PD; Clay
G. Mogard, 18, Gaylord, speed,
$125, proof of insurance, dis-
missed, Henderson PD; Luke D.
Pfarr, 18, Le Sueur, seat belt, $110,
Henderson PD;
William L. Riesch, 44, Lons-
dale, proof of insurance, dismissed,
Henderson PD; Michael A. Roy,
40, Burnsville, vehicle registration
required, $115, Henderson PD;
Timothy D. Adams, 36, Belton,
Texas, speed, $135, MSP ;Michael
P. Brophy, 35, Montrose, speed,
$125, MSP; Sara N. Gabrielson,
33, Minnetonka, speed, continued,
unsupervised probation one year,
pay costs, no moving violations,
$135, MSP; Stacy L. Gustafson,
43, Belle Plaine, speed, $125,
MSP; Jerry D. Hawton, 71, New
Brighton, speed, $125, MSP;
Danny G. Heldberg, 60, Le
Sueur, seat belt, $110, MSP;
Christie M. Hendel. 19, New Ulm,
unlawful passing, $135, MSP;
Wayne R. Johnson, 26, Winthrop,
driver fails to stop at entrance of
through highway, unsupervised
probation six months, write letter
of apology, submit to court admin-
istration and they will forward on
to victim, restitution reserved for
30 days, $125, MSP; Jose E. Mar-
tinez, 41, Glencoe, speed, $135,
proof of insurance, dismissed,
MSP;
Dann L. Morris, 64, Glencoe,
speed, $125, MSP; Jorge Munoz,
48, Gibbon, no trailer brakes,
$285, proof of insurance, dis-
missed, MSP; Linda L. Nicolay,
46, Hutchinson, keep to the right,
$135, MSP; Cristobal R. Ro-
driguez, 50, St. Peter, speed, $145,
MSP; Jacob D.A. Smith, 21,
Hutchinson, seatbelt violation in
commercial vehicle, gross weight
single axle restriction-violation,
$810, MSP; Cara J. Uken, 31, Ren-
ner, S.D., speed, $135, MSP; Mari-
on J. VanMoorlehem, 64, Arling-
ton, driver fails to stop at entrance
of through highway, $135, MSP;
Eric R. Wilson, 49, Deephaven,
speed, $135, MSP; Sarah A. Bohn-
ert, 38, St. Louis , Mo, speed,
$125, SO;
Mark P. Hobday, 48, Le Sueur,
speed, $145, SO; William H. Kr-
uschke, 75, Belle Plaine, speed,
$125, SO; Ramiro, M. Moreno, 35,
Winthrop, driving without a valid
license or vehicle class/type, $185,
SO; Dale L. Roiger, 65, Gaylord,
liquor-purchase/sell/barter/fur-
nish/give to under 21 years, stay of
imposition, unsupervised probation
two months, local confinement 15
days, $385, SO; Marcus J.
Schmidt, 20, Gibbon, DWI, Stay of
imposition, unsupervised probation
one year, chemical dependency
evaluation/treatment within 30
days, may revert to supervised pro-
bation if treatment is recommend-
ed, follow recommendations of
evaluation, sign all releases of in-
formation, attend MADD impact
panel, keep court/attorney in-
formed of current address, remain
law-abiding, no alcohol-related
traffic offenses, no driver license
violations, no same or similar, no
alcohol/controlled substance use,
until the age of 21 or until CUA
has been completed if done after
birthday, no possession of alcohol
or drugs, until the age of 21 or
until CUA has been completed if
done after birthday, random test-
ing, until age 21, $535, DWI-
fourth degree driving while im-
paired, dismissed, liquor consump-
tion by persons under 21, dis-
missed, SO;
Earl H. Schuth, 75, Plato, speed,
$135, SO; James E. Wickland, 30,
Winthrop, speed, $125, SO; Velia
Z. De La Cruz, 44, Gaylord, proof
of insurance, continued, unsuper-
vised probation one year, no driv-
ing without insurance, no driver li-
cense violations, remain law-abid-
ing, pay costs, no registration vio-
lations, no moving violations,
$100, Winthrop PD.
The following felonies were
heard in District Court June 14-20:
Lori R. Dressen, 37, Arlington,
assault, dismissed, Arlington PD.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, June 27, 2013, page 6
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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Front Row: (left to right) Megan Bachman, Maryn Pazdernik, Kerigan
Brau, Jadyn Krueger, Taelyn Pomplun, Morgan Haggenmiller and
Kendra Schmidt. Middle Row: (l to r) Jada Henke, Kaitlyn Scherer,
Jessica Widmer, Olivia Halquist, Elliana Renneke and Peyton
Wolverton. Back Row: (l to r) Rachel Dose, Luci Bruch, Alia Meyer,
Brea Utendorfer, Yzaelyah Rendon, Elizabeth Sell and Karcyn Dose.
First Row: (left to right) Sommer Brockhoff, Briana Kranz, Emily
Holmquist, Alaina DeVlaemnick, Lilly Dose, Taylor Kube, Tegan
Biron, Adriana Kruger and Taylor Bachman. Second Row: (l to r)
Ellie Kreft, Shaylee Exsted, Alivia Strack, Morgan Halquist, Ashtyn
Bullert, Elle Groniga, Hannah Ebert, Lexi Stock and McKenzie
Latzke. Third Row: (l to r) Lily Benneke, Kiernan Louwagie, Audrey
Parrot, Megan Weber, Molly Krentz, Gabbi Bates, Jaden Kmetz and
Camryn Pomplun. Fourth Row: (l to r) Faith Otto, Libby Bartels,
Madison Tuchtenhagen, Rylie Rosenfeld, Jasmine Klancke, Olivia
Klompken, Breanna Krueger and Elizabeth Battcher.
Very Front: McKayla Stumm. First Row: (left to right) Britany Reier-
son, Jessica Garza, Audrey Ziegler, Hannah Steffer, Emily Doetkott,
Morgan Sterns, Ali Stock and Lindsey Flieth. Second Row: (l to r)
Karissa Sorenson, Rachel Rettman, Hailey Haggenmiller, Taylor Per-
schau, Kelli Martens, Breann Walsh, Allison Eibs, Alli Harter and
Emma Samletzka. Third Row: (l to r) Emily Tuchtenhagen, Madison
Petree, Taylor Brinkman, Madison Krentz, Mya Lycek, Madison
Grove and Kim Kurtzweg. Fourth Row: (l to r) Katie Tuchtenhagen,
Alyssa Weber, Autumn Dose, Liz Thies, Maren Miner, Megan Eck-
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Sibley East Girls
Basketball Camp
Photos by
Kurt Menk
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The 2013 Miller Lite Invi-
tational, co-hosted by the
Green Isle Irish and Ham-
burg Hawks was cancelled
on early Saturday morning,
June 22.
The announcement was
made after heavy rains again
fell in the area late Friday
night, June 21 and early Sat-
urday morning.
The Irish, during the open-
ing round in Green Isle on
Thursday night, June 20,
edged Prior Lake 3-2.
Chris Knoll pitched the en-
tire contest and picked up the
mound win. The right hander
yielded two earned runs on
nine hits. He also fanned five
and walked one.
Mike Dent, Alex Twenge,
Pat Moriarty and Mike
Dhaene contributed one sin-
gle each as the Irish managed
only four hits.
Green Isle, 10-5 overall,
will host Hamburg at 7:30
p.m. Thursday, June 27. The
Irish will then travel to Plato
at 2 p.m. Sunday, June 30. In
addition, Green Isle will host
Norwood at 7:30 p.m. Tues-
day, July 2.
Green Isle,
Hamburg
tournament
washed out
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The 2013 Miller High Life Invite, co-hosted
by the Arlington A’s and Gaylord Islanders,
was cancelled on early Sunday, June 23.
The announcement was made after heavy
rains again fell in the area on late Saturday
night, June 22 and early Sunday, June 23.
The Arlington A’s baseball team, which re-
placed Pipestone, lost to New London-Spicer
12-4 during the opening round of the tourna-
ment in Arlington on Saturday afternoon, June
22.
Craig Dose ripped three doubles while
Michael Bullert contributed three singles. Jake
Lucas belted a double while Nathan Thomes
added a single.
Bullert pitched the first 4 1/3 innings and
suffered the mound loss. The right hander sur-
rendered six earned runs on seven hits. He
struck out one and walked five.
Thomes worked the final 1 2/3 frames in re-
lief. The right hander gave up two earned runs
on three hits. He also struck out three and hit
one batter.
Nick Doetkott made his debut for the local
nine as the A’s were short of players due to a
pair of weddings.
The A’s will travel to Gaylord at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, June 28. Arlington will then travel to
St. Peter at 6 p.m. Sunday, June 30. The A’s
will also host Plato at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, July
2.
A’s, Islanders tournament
cancelled due to rain
Open Gym
in Arlington
The Sibley East school gym
will be open on Sundays in
July (July 7, 14, 21 and 28)
from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Every-
one is welcome.
“Players entering grades 7-
12 are encouraged to come
work with their teammates
on their skills,” said Chip
Wolverton.
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, June 27, 2013, page 7
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
E-Mail us at
info@ArlingtonMNnews.com
E-Mail us at
info@ArlingtonMNnews.com
Phone and Internet Discounts Available
to CenturyLink Customers
The Minnesota Public Utilities Commission
designated CenturyLink as an Eligible
Telecommunications Carrier within its service area for
universal service purposes. CenturyLink’s basic local
service rates for residential voice lines are $14.96-$15.76
per month and business services are $34.61-$43.29 per
month. Specific rates will be provided upon request.
CenturyLink participates in a government benefit
program (Lifeline) to make residential telephone
service more affordable to eligible low-income individuals
and families. Eligible customers are those that meet
eligibility standards as defined by the FCC and state
commissions. Residents who live on federally
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Tribal benefits if they participate in certain additional
federal eligibility programs. The Lifeline discount
is available for only one telephone per household,
which can be either a wireline or wireless telephone. A
household is defined for the purposes of the Lifeline
program as any individual or group of individuals who live
together at the same address and share income and
expenses. Lifeline service is not transferable, and
only eligible consumers may enroll in the program.
Consumers who willfully make false statements in order to
obtain Lifeline telephone service can be punished by fine
or imprisonment and can be barred from the program.
Lifeline eligible subscribers may also qualify for
reliable home high-speed Internet service up to 1.5Mbps for
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based on meeting income level or program participation eligibility requirements, and
requires remaining eligible for the entire offer period. First bill will include charges for the
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installation to bill date, and one-time charges and fees described above. Qualifying
customers may keep this program for a maximum of 60 months after service activation
provided customer still qualifies during that time. Listed High-Speed Internet rate of
$9.95/mo. applies for first 12 months of service (after which the rate reverts to $14.95/
mo. for the next 48 months of service), and requires a 12-month term agreement. Customer
must either lease a modem/router from CenturyLink for an additional monthly charge or
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terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees, and
Surcharges – Applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges include a carrier Universal Service
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R24-25Ea
We offer traditional funeral options and cremation as well
as honoring all family wishes. Did you know that some
families have a traditional visitation and funeral and then
cremation? We also provide Irrevocable Funeral Trusts so the
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Visit our web site at www.koldenfuneralhome.com for
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Directors:
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Rosemary Kolden, owner
Darrell Kolden, Greggory Borchert, Shawn Kirby, Tonya
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507-964-2201
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FUNERAL SERVICES • ARLINGTON
A20(every4thWk)Ea
McGraw Monument
Works, Inc., LeSueur
Local Representative
Leah Schrupp
Arlington, MN 55307
612-308-8169
3 miles North of LeSueur
on Highway 169
30945 Forest Prairie Road
(507) 665-3126
HOURS: M-F 8-5
Weekends by appointment.
Visit our
INDOOR AND OUTDOOR
DISPLAYS
M31-30Ea
Blessings
“‘Do not seek revenge or bear a grudge against anyone among
your people, but love your neighbor as yourself. I am the Lord.
Leviticus 19:18 NIV
Seventh Day Adventist
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
507-304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
Church Service: Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Commercial and Industrial Builders
Green Isle, MN 55338
ph. 507.326.7901 fax: 507.326.3551
www.vosconstruction.com
Arlington State Bank
Serving the Community Since 1895
BANKING SERVICES
964-2256
Arlington
A & N Radiator Repair
Allen & Nicki Scharn, Owners
23228 401 Ave., Arlington
877-964-2281 or 507-964-2281 Bus.
Certified ASE Technician on Staff
Also distributor for Poxy Coat II
Industrial Grade Coatings/Paint
MID-COUNTY
CO-OP
700 W. Lake St., Box 177
Cologne, MN 55322
(952) 466-3700
or TOLL FREE: 1-888-466-3700
HUTCHINSON CO-OP
AGRONOMY
LEON DOSE,
Arlington Branch Manager
411 7
th
Ave. NW • (507) 964-2251
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
402 W. Alden, Arlington
507-964-5547
Online at
www.Arlington
MNnew.com
Arlington Haus
Your Hometown Pub & Eatery
1986-2009
Arlington • 1-507-964-2473
STATE BANK OF
HAMBURG
100 Years. 100 Reasons.
Phone 952-467-2992
statebankofhamburg.com
CONVENIENCE
STORE
Hwy. 5 N., Arlington
507-964-2920
Homestyle Pizza
Real or Soft Serve Ice Cream
Gas — Diesel — Deli — Videos
(507)
964-2212
www.
chefcraigs
.com
23180 401 Ave., Arlington Phone 507-964-2264
EQUAL
HOUSING
LENDER
CRAIG BULLERT
ARLINGTON, MN
23189 Hwy. 5 North,
Arlington, MN 55307
arlington@hutchcoop.com
Office (507) 964-2283
Cell (320) 583-4324
HC
FUNERAL SERVICE
P.O. Box 314
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-2201
Member
FDIC
Menu
Church News
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
(507) 304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
507-234-6770
Saturday: Church services at
9:30 a.m. Bible study at 11:00
a.m. Fellowship dinner at 12:00
p.m. All are welcome.
UNITED METHODIST
Arlington
Rodney J. Stemme, Pastor
www.arlingtonunited
methodist.org
Saturday, June 29: 8:00 a.m.
A-Men men’s group.
Sunday, June 30: 9:00 and
11:00 a.m. Worship with new
pastor. 10:15 a.m. Fellowship.
Tuesday, July 2: 6:30 p.m.
Worship team. 7:30 p.m. Stew-
ardship Finance.
Thursday, July 4: 10:00 a.m.,
2:00 and 7:00 p.m. Worship on
cable TV.
EVANGELICAL
COVENANT CHURCH
107 W. Third St., Winthrop
Pastor Kyle Kachelmeier
507-647-5777
Parsonage 507-647-3739
www.wincov.org
Sunday, June 30: 9:30 a.m.
Worship. 10:45 a.m. Fellowship
hour.
Monday, July 1: 7:30 a.m.
Walking at the track.
Thursday, July 4: 7:30 a.m.
Walking at the track.
ST. PAUL LUTHERAN
(WELS),
Arlington
Bruce Hannemann, Pastor
WEBSITE:
www.stpaularlington.com
EMAIL:
Bruce.Hannemann@stpaul
arlington.com
Sunday, June 30: 9:00 a.m.
Worship.
Monday, July 1: 7:30 p.m.
Worship.
Tuesday, July 2: Pastor and
Mrs. Hanneman will be on vaca-
tion until next Thursday. 7:00
p.m. Elders’ meeting.
Wednesday, July 3: 10:00 a.m.
Bulletin information due.
Thursday, July 4: 11:00 a.m.
and 3:00 p.m. Services on cable
TV, channel 8.
GAYLORD ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
Gaylord
Bob Holmbeck, Pastor
Sunday, June 30: 9:00 a.m.
Sunday school. 10:00 a.m. Sun-
day worship service. Noon pot
blessing fellowship meal. 1:15
and 1:30 p.m. Oak Terrace serv-
ices.
Wednesday, July 3: 6:30 p.m.
Evening Bible classes and Youth
Focused.
ST. PAUL’S EV.
REFORMED CHURCH
15470 Co. Rd. 31, Hamburg
Dan Schnabel, Pastor
952-467-3878
www.stpaulsrcus.org
Sunday, June 30: 9:30 a.m.
Worship service.
ORATORY OF
ST. THOMAS
THE APOSTLE
Jessenland
507-248-3550
Fr. Sam Perez
Thursday: Weekly Mass at
5:00 p.m.
ST. PAUL’S UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Henderson
(507) 248-3594 (Office)
Rev. Brigit Stevens, Pastor
Find us on Facebook:
St. Paul’s UCC - Henderson
Sunday, June 30: 9:00 a.m.
Worship.
June 26 through July 5: Pastor
Brigit and family attending UCC
General Synod in Long Beach,
California.
ST. MARY, MICHAEL
AND BRENDAN AREA
FAITH COMMUNITY
Fr. Keith Salisbury, Pastor
Friday, June 28: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar). 4:30 to 8:00 p.m.
Jump For Joy (Mar).
Saturday, June 29: 5:00 p.m.
Mass (Mar).
Sunday, June 30: 7:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m. Mass
(Mic). 10:30 a.m. Mass (Mar).
Monday, July 1: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar). 8:00 p.m.
AA and Ala-Non (Mar).
Tuesday, July 2: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar).
Wednesday, July 3: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m. Word and
Communion (Oak Terrace). 5:00
p.m. Mass (Mar).
Thursday, July 4: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mic). 7:30 p.m.
Narcotics Anonymous (Mic).
TRINITY LUTHERAN
32234 431st Ave., Gaylord
Rev. James Snyder,
Interim Pastor
Sunday, June 30: 8:30 a.m.
Worship.
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Pastor William Postel
Phone 507-964-2400
Sunday, June 30: 9:00 a.m.
Worship.
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN
Green Isle
Thursday, June 27: Private
Communions.
Sunday, June 30: 7:45 a.m.
Worship without Communion.
Pastor Bob Hines.
Wednesday, July 3: 10:00 a.m.
Senion citizens meeting at Assis-
tant Living Center, Arlington.
PEACE LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Kurt Lehmkuhl, Pastor
Sunday, June 30: 9:00 a.m.
Worship service.
Monday, July 1: 7:00 p.m.
Worship service.
ZION LUTHERAN
814 W. Brooks St.
Arlington – (507) 964-5454
James Carlson, Pastor
Sunday, June 30: 9:00 a.m.
Worship. 10:00 a.m. Fellowship.
ZION LUTHERAN
Green Isle Township
Thursday, June 27: Private
Communions.
Sunday, June 30: 10:30 a.m.
a.m. Worship without Commun-
ion. Pastor Bob Hines.
Thursday, June 27: Private
Communions.
Wednesday, July 3: 10:00 a.m.
Senior citizens meeting at Assis-
tant Living Center, Arlington.
CREEKSIDE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Christian & Missionary
Alliance
Ben Lane, Pastor
114 Shamrock Drive
Arlington – 507-964-2872
www.creekside-church.com
email: creeksidecc@media-
combb.net.
Thursday, June 27: 1:00 or
7:00 p.m. Women’s Bible study -
Experiencing God. 6:30 p.m.
Men’s Bible study of Luke at
Chuck Peik’s home in Gaylord.
Sunday, June 30: 10:30 a.m.
Worship service.
Enterprise photo by Barb Mathwig
Lacey Scharping and Gabbi Bates per-
formed “Walk in the Spirit of Love” in the
Music Under the Stars concert presented
at Peace Lutheran Church on Sunday,
June 23. The event turned into Music in
the Church due to questionable weather
forecasts. Gabbi will be in fifth grade next
year. She is the daughter of Jason and
Rhonda Bates . Lacey will be in eighth
grade next year. She is the daughter of
Matt Scharping and Shelly Sharping.
Music Under the Stars
President Dorothy Brock-
hoff called the monthly meet-
ing of the ladies VFW Auxil-
iary Post 6031 to order on
Monday night June 10. The
Flag pledge and roll call
were given with 10 members
present. Secretary and trea-
surer’s reports were read and
approved.
Old Business: Poppy sales,
which were outstanding this
year. Thank you to all mem-
bers who donated their time
and effort to this cause.
New Business: The Char-
ter was draped for our de-
parted sister, Anne Kienitz. A
discussion was held regard-
ing the Sibley County Fair
and some changes would be
made with Sunday’s work
schedule.
Reminder ladies to contin-
ue to save your cancelled
postage stamps and bring
them to the meetings or drop
them off at Y-Not Plumbing
and Heating.
Donna Wolter won the
door prize.
Being there was no further
business, the meeting was
adjourned.
The next meeting will be
held at 7:30 p.m. on Monday,
Ladies VFW
Auxiliary to
meet July 8
SENIOR DINING
Call 326-3401 for a meal
Suggested Donation $3.85
Monday: Roast beef, mashed
potatoes, carrots, dinner roll with
margarine, pudding dessert, low
fat milk.
Tuesday: BBQ pork, potato
salad, cauliflower, bun with mar-
garine, fruit crisp, low fat milk.
Wednesday: Brat, baked
beans, cole slaw, bun with mar-
garine, watermelon wedge, low
fat milk.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, June 27, 2013, page 8
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
2013 Safe Routes to School
S.P. 072-591-002
SRTS 7213 (183)
City of Arlington
Arlington, MN
RECEIPT AND OPENING OF PROPOSALS: Sealed proposals for the work described below will
be received at the Office of the City Administrator, City of Arlington, 204 Shamrock Drive, Arlington,
MN, 55307 until 2:00pm on Monday, July 15, 2013 at which time the bids will be opened and pub-
licly read.
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The work includes the construction of approximately:
Clearing/Grubbing Tree 14 TREE Concrete Curb and Gutter, B618 500 LF
Remove Curb and Gutter 500 LF 7” Concrete Driveway Pavement 200 SY
Remove Concrete Walk or Driveway 6000 SF Truncated Domes 200 SF
Remove and Replace Bituminous Pavement 150 SY Deciduous Tree 2” 10 EA
4” Concrete Walk 10,000 SF Sodding, Type Lawn 2,000 SY
6” Concrete Walk 1,000 SF Crosswalk Marking – Epoxy 1,000 SF
together with numerous related items of work, all in accordance with Plans and Specifications.
PLANHOLDERS LIST, ADDENDUMS AND BID TABULATION: The planholders list, adden-
dums and bid tabulations will be available for download on-line at www.bolton-menk.com or
www.questcdn.com. Any addendums may also be distributed by mail, fax or email.
TO OBTAIN BID DOCUMENTS: Complete digital project bidding documents are available at
www.bolton-menk.com or www.questcdn.com. You may view the digital plan documents for free by
entering Quest project #2767098 on the website’s Project Search page. Documents may be down-
loaded for $20.00. Please contact QuestCDN.com at 952-233-1632 or info@questcdn.com for assis-
tance in free membership registration, viewing, downloading, and working with this digital project in-
formation. An optional paper set of project documents is also available for a nonrefundable price of
$50.00 per set, which includes applicable sales tax and shipping. Please make your check to payable
to Bolton & Menk, Inc. and send it to 1960 Premier Drive, Mankato, MN 56001, (507) 625-4171, fax
(507) 625-4177.
BID SECURITY: A certified check or proposal bond in the amount of not less than 5 percent of the
total amount bid, drawn in favor of City of Arlington shall accompany each bid.
OWNER’S RIGHTS RESERVED: The Owner reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to
waive any irregularities and informalities therein and to award the Contract to other than the lowest
bidder if, in their discretion, the interest of the Owner would be best served thereby.
Dated: June 17, 2013.
/s/ Liza Donabauer
City Administrator
Published:
Finance and Commerce: June 20, 2013, June 27, 2013, July 3, 2013
Arlington Enterprise: June 20, 2013, June 27, 2013, July 4, 2013
Minimum wage rates to be paid by the Contractors have been predetermined and are subject to the
Work Hours Act of 1962, P.L. 87-581 and implementing regulations.
READ CAREFULLY THE WAGE SCALES AND DIVISION A OF THE SPECIAL
PROVISIONS AS THEY AFFECT THIS/THESE PROJECT/PROJECTS
The Minnesota Department of Transportation hereby notifies all bidders:
in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Act), as amended and Title 49, Code of
Federal Regulations, Subtitle A Part 21, Non-discrimination in Federally-assisted programs of the De-
partment of Transportation, it will affirmatively assure that in any contract entered into pursuant to
this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded maximum opportunity to par-
ticipate and/or to submit bids in response to this invitation, and will not be discriminated against on
the grounds of race, color, disability, age, religion, sex or national origin in consideration for an
award;
in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as amended, and Title 23, Code of Federal
Regulations, Part 230 Subpart A-Equal Employment Opportunity on Federal and Federal-Aid Con-
struction Contracts (including supportive services), it will affirmatively assure increased participation
of minority groups and disadvantaged persons and women in all phases of the highway construction
industry, and that on any project constructed pursuant to this advertisement equal employment oppor-
tunity will be provided to all persons without regard to their race, color, disability, age, religion, sex or
national origin;
in accordance with the Minnesota Human Rights Act, Minnesota Statute 363A.08 Unfair discriminato-
ry Practices, it will affirmatively assure that on any project constructed pursuant to this advertisement
equal employment opportunity will be offered to all persons without regard to race, color, creed, reli-
gion, national origin, sex, marital status, status with regard to public assistance, membership or activi-
ty in a local commission, disability, sexual orientation, or age;in accordance with the Minnesota
Human Rights Act, Minnesota Statute 363A.36 Certificates of Compliance for Public Contracts, and
363A.37 Rules for Certificates of Compliance, it will assure that appropriate parties to any contract
entered into pursuant to this advertisement possess valid Certificates of Compliance.
If you are not a current holder of a compliance certificate issued by the Minnesota Department of
Human Rights and intend to bid on any job in this advertisement you must contact the Department of
Human Rights immediately for assistance in obtaining a certificate.
The following notice from the Minnesota Department of Human Rights applies to all contractors:
“It is hereby agreed between the parties that Minnesota Statute, section 363A.36 and Minnesota Rules,
parts 5000.3400 to 5000.3600 are incorporated into any contract between these parties based on this
specification or any modification of it. A copy of Minnesota Statute 363A.36 and Minnesota Rules,
parts 5000.3400 to 5000.3600 is available upon request from the contracting agency.”
“It is hereby agreed between the parties that this agency will require affirmative action requirements
be met by contractors in relation to Minnesota Statute 363A.36 and Minnesota Rules 5000.3600. Fail-
ure by a contractor to implement an affirmative action plan or make a good faith effort shall result in
revocation of its certificate or revocation of the contract (Minnesota Statute 363A.36, Subd. 2 and 3).”
A24-26Ea
Legals
NOTICE OF MORTGAGE
FORECLOSURE SALE
THE RIGHT OF VERIFICA-
TION OF THE DEBT AND IDEN-
TITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDI-
TOR WITHIN THE TIME PRO-
VIDED BY LAW IS NOT AF-
FECTED BY THIS ACTION.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
that default has occurred in con-
ditions of the following described
mortgage:
DATE OF MORTGAGE:
09/22/2006
MORTGAGOR: Marcus W.
Middleton
MORTGAGEE: Vi ctori a L.
Lang
DATE AND PLACE OF
RECORDING: Recorded
09/25/2006, Si bl ey County
Recorder Document Number A-
207472
ASSIGNMENTS OF MORT-
GAGE: none
TRANSACTION AGENT: none
TRANSACTION AGENT’S
MORTGAGE IDENTIFICATION
NUMBER ON MORTGAGE:
none
LENDER OR BROKER AND
MORTGAGE ORIGINATOR
STATED ON MORTGAGE: Victo-
ria L. Lang
RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE
SERVICER: Victoria L. Lang
MORTGAGE PROPERTY AD-
DRESS: 5202 2nd St, New
Auburn, MN 55366
TAX PARCEL I.D. #:
36.0176.010
LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
Lots 17 and 18, Block 32 in the
City of New Auburn, according to
the recorded plat thereof, Sibley
County, Minnesota
COUNTY IN WHICH PROP-
ERTY IS LOCATED: Sibley
ORIGINAL PRINCIPAL
AMOUNT OF MORTGAGE:
$97,118.76
AMOUNT DUE AND
CLAIMED TO BE DUE AS OF
DATE OF NOTICE, INCLUDING
TAXES, IF ANY, PAID BY MORT-
GAGEE: $97,118.76
That prior to the commence-
ment of this mortgage foreclosure
proceeding Mortgagee/Assignee
of Mortgagee complied with all
notice requirements as required
by statute; That no action or pro-
ceeding has been instituted at
law or otherwise to recover the
debt secured by said mortgage,
or any part thereof;
PURSUANT to the power of
sale contained in said mortgage,
the above described property will
be sol d by the Sheri ff of sai d
county as follows:
DATE AND TIME OF SALE:
07/29/2013 at 10:00 AM
PLACE OF SALE: Si bl ey
County Law Enforcement Center,
419 Harrison, Gaylord, MN 55334
to pay the debt then secured
by said Mortgage, and taxes, if
any, on said premises, and the
costs and disbursements, includ-
ing attorneys’ fees allowed by law
subject to redemption within six
(6) months from the date of said
sale by the mortgagor(s), their
personal representatives or as-
signs unless reduced to Five (5)
weeks under MN Stat. §580.07.
TIME AND DATE TO VACATE
PROPERTY: If the real estate is
an owner-occupied, single-family
dwelling, unless otherwise provid-
ed by law, the date on or before
which the mortgagor(s) must va-
cate the property if the mortgage
is not reinstated under section
580.30 or the property is not re-
deemed under section 580.23 is
12:01 a.m. on 01/31/2014.
MORTGAGOR(S) RELEASED
FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGA-
TION ON MORTGAGE: None
“THE TIME ALLOWED BY
LAW FOR REDEMPTION BY
THE MORTGAGOR, THE MORT-
GAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRE-
SENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS,
MAY BE REDUCED TO FIVE
WEEKS IF A JUDICIAL ORDER
IS ENTERED UNDER MIN-
NESOTA STATUTES, SECTION
582.032, DETERMINING,
AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT
THE MORTGAGED PREMISES
ARE IMPROVED WITH A RESI-
DENTIAL DWELLING OF LESS
THAN FIVE UNITS, ARE NOT
PROPERTY USED IN AGRICUL-
TURAL PRODUCTION, AND
ARE ABANDONED.”
Victoria L. Lang
Mortgagee
Gregory A. Lang #59894
Attorney for Mortgagee
17800 Old Excelsior Blvd.
Minnetonka, MN 55345
Publish: June 6, 13, 20, 27,
July 4 and 11, 2013
Advertisement For Bids
The City of Arlington is accept-
ing sealed bids for a 1998 Brava-
da (4W, 4-Door), 148,256 miles.
Bidders may view the vehicle
in person at the City Offices Park-
ing lot, 204 Shamrock Drive, from
9:00 a.m. on Monday, June 24th
to 12:00 p.m. on Friday, July 5th
(City Hall closed July 4th) or on
the City’s website at www.arling-
tonmn.com. Bids should be sent
to Arlington City Offices, Office of
the City Administrator, attention
Sealed Vehicle Bid, 204 Sham-
rock Drive, Arlington, MN 55307.
Sealed bids will be received until
Noon on Tuesday, July 9. Bids
will be opened and read aloud at
2:00 p.m. on July 9th in City Of-
fices, 204 Shamrock Drive, and
wi l l be presented at the Ci ty
Council meeting on Monday, July
15th at 6:30 p.m. for bid accept-
ance. The bid winners will be re-
sponsible for all filing and record-
ing fees. Vehicle is being sold as
is. The bidder should include
their name, bid offer, and contact
information. The City reserves
the right to reject any and all bids
for any reason. For more infor-
mation contact City Offices at
(507) 964-2378.
Publish: June 20 and June
27
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Bituminous Seal Coat – 2013
City of Arlington
Arlington, Minnesota
Sealed bids for the construc-
tion of a bituminous seal coat
project will be received at the Of-
fice of the City Administrator, City
of Arlington, 204 Shamrock Drive,
Arlington, MN 55307 until 11:00
a.m. on July 11, 2013. The bids
should be in a lump sum (not-to-
exceed) amount. Seal ed bi ds
should be labeled as “seal coat
bi d”. Bi ds wi l l be opened and
read aloud at 11:00 a.m. on July
11, 2013 in the Council Cham-
bers at the Ci ty Offi ces, 204
Shamrock Drive, and will be pre-
sented at the City Council meet-
ing on Monday, July 15th at 6:30
p.m. for bid acceptance.
The work to be done consists
of the construction of bituminous
seal coat on streets within the
City. The Contractor shall calcu-
late the quantity of square yards
to be seal coated and provide this
quantity to the City with their lump
sum bid price. It is the Contrac-
tor’s responsibility to verify the
square yards. Specifications and
a map of the streets and parking
lots to be seal coated are avail-
abl e at Ci ty Offi ces or on the
city’s website at www.arlington-
mn.com.
All bids delivered to the City of
Arlington become property of the
City. All bids must be signed by
the individual. The City reserves
the right to reject any or all bids
and to waive any irregularities
and informalities therein and to
award the Bid to other than the
lowest bidder if, in their discre-
tion, the interest of the City would
be best served thereby. For addi-
tional information, or to set up a
time to inspect the streets, con-
tact Mai ntenance Supervi sor
Jason Lovaas at (507) 380-6533.
Publish: June 20 and June
27
CALL FOR QUOTES
At their regular School Board
meeting held on June 17, 2013,
the Sibley East Public School/In-
dependent School District No.
2310 Board of Education called
for quotes on Milk/Dairy, Bakery
Products, Fuel/Diesel and Refuse
Col l ecti on for the 2013-2014
school year. Specifications are
available at the district office of
Sibley East Arlington campus.
Quotes must be submi tted by
July 10, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. in the
District Office in Arlington.
By Order of:
Sibley East Public Schools
Independent School District
No. 2310
Arlington, MN 55307
Publish June 20, 27 and July
3.
Photo by Rich Glennie
McLeod County Chronicle
The Sibley County Fair Royality were all
smiles Saturday, June 22, as they rode in
the Glencoe Days Parade. Pictured from
left to right are Miss Congeniality Tina
Kunkel, Miss Sibley County Meghan
Kammerlander and Second Princess
Makinsey Scharping.
All Smiles
Legals
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ARLINGTON:
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PO Box 343
Silver Lake, MN 55381
320-327-2216
Fax: 320-327-2530
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www.amberfieldplace.com
A24-27E,25-28Sa
LIES KE TRAC TOR
Want ed: Your OLD TRAC TORS,
any con di tion, make or mod el. We
also spe cial ize in new and used
TRAC TOR PARTS AND RE PAIR.
Call Kyle. Lo cat ed west of Hen -
der son. (612) 203-9256.
$$ DOL LARS PAID $$ Junk ve -
hi cl es, re pai r abl e cars/trucks.
FREE TOW ING. Flatbed/ wreck er
serv ice. Im me diate pick up. Mon -
day-Sun day, serv ing your area
24/7. (952) 220-TOWS.
CON KLIN® DEAL ERS NEED ED!
Life time ca reer in mar ket ing, man -
age ment and ap ply ing “Green”
pro ducts made in Amer i ca. Full
time/ part time. For a free cat a log,
call Franke’s Con klin Serv ice now
at (320) 238-2370. www.frank e -
mar ket ing.com.
Lo cal truck driv ers need ed. Must
have 3 months of driv ing ex peri -
ence with school ing or 6 months
just driv ing. Class A CDL re quired.
Clean record is a must. Con tact
Shel l ey at Stock man Trans fer
(320) 864-2381 or email at sstock -
man@em barq mail.com.
HAND Y MAN: Will do re mo del ing
of kitch ens, bath rooms, hang ing
doors and wi nd ows, pai nt i ng,
sheet rock ing, tex tur iz ing or any
minor re pairs in side or out side.
Wi l l al so do cl ean i ng of base -
ments/ga rag es. Call (320) 848-
2722 or (320) 583-1278.
21” Emer son TV with con vert er
box and re motes. Works great. Af -
ter 5 p.m. (320) 237-2541.
Spe cial- 95% Good man gas fur nace
and pro gram ma bl e ther mo stat
$2,200 in stalled or AC unit $1,900
in stalled. J&R Plumb ing Heat ing AC,
Lester Prair ie (320) 510-5035.
Min ne so ta Twins sea son tick ets
for 2013 sea son. Sec ti on 121
seats. Pack age in cludes 2 seats.
5, 10 or 15 game pack ag es avail -
able. Con tact Rick at (952) 224-
6331 for more in for ma tion.
OLD MO TOR CY CLES WANT ED:
Cash paid, pre fer ably non run ning
con di tion, ti tle or no ti tle, Hon da,
Su zu ki, Ka wa sa ki, Ya ma ha, Tri -
umph and oth er makes. Please
call Dar ick at 507-381-3405.
BUY ING JUNK BAT TER IES
We buy used bat ter ies and lead
weights. Pay ing top dol lar for junk
bat ter ies. Pay ing $12 for au to mo tive
bat ter ies We pick up with 18 bat tery
min i mum. Call 800-777-2243.
WANT ED TO BUY: Old signs all
types, farm primi tive paint ed fur ni -
ture all types, cup boards, cub by
units, lock er and pool wire bas -
kets, wood & metal piec es with
lots of draw ers, old pre-1960 holi -
day dec o ra tions, in dus tri al/school
items such as metal racks, stools,
work bench es, light n ing rods and
balls, weath er vanes, ar chi tec tur al
items like cor bels and stain glass
wind ows. We buy one item and
en tire es tates. Don’t get a dump -
ster un til you call us first! We are
lo cal. (612) 590-6136.
Red Door Ken nel Board ing and
Train ing. Fair fax. (507) 430-1319.
www.red doorken nel.org.
11-Acre horse farm. 70x140 sand
base rid ing ar e na, 30x60 shed, 30x50
8-stall barn with a 12x40 at tached
lean-to, 50x60 6-stall barn, heat ed
tack rooms in each, barn. $199,500.
Pri or i ty One-Met ro west Re al ty, Brian
O’Don nell (320) 864-4877.
Hob by Farm F.S.B.O. Beau ti ful
5BR, 2.5BA, 3 types of heat, AC,
at tached in su lat ed ga rage, out
build ings, horse ready on 7 acr es.
Green Isle (612) 756-2021.
Bird Is land: 2BR, 1.5 story, 2BA,
ja cuz zi, 2.5 stall heat ed ga rage
with at tic, main floor laun dry, beat
board ceil ing, Wains coat ing, lam.
floor ing, porch, pa tio. Must see!
$79,900. (320) 522-0462.
House built in 1982, 5 acr es, 3BR,
1.5BA, ma chine shed, out build -
ings, new shin gles, new wind ows,
new AC. Near Hec tor. $169,000.
(320) 848-6840.
2BR Apart ment wi th ga rage, wa -
ter/sew er/gar bage in clud ed. $450/mo.
New Au burn (320) 327-2928.
2BR ground floor apart ment avail -
abl e Jul y 1. Rent re duced. In -
cludes wa ter, heat, gar bage. Call
(320) 564-3351 for ap point ment.
2 BR Apartments, Arlington. Rent
starting at $653. Central AC, pri-
vate porch, walk-in closets, wash-
er/dryer in each apt. Garage avail.
AMBERFIELD PLACE APART-
MENTS. (800) 873-1736.
1BR up stairs apart ment on Main
Street in Ar ling ton. Two ref er enc es
re quired. Call Da vid (507) 964-2256.
New l y up dat ed apart ments i n
Ren ville. Wa ter, heat, gar bage in -
clud ed. New ap plianc es in clud ing
new air con di tion er. On-site laun -
dry facil i ties. Off-street park ing
avail able with elec tri cal out lets.
Pet friend ly. (320) 564-3351.
4BR Home with walk out base -
ment in coun try. Avail able June
15. (507) 964-2546.
Arlington, 3BR, 1-3/4 bath, house,
fireplace, large family room, dou-
ble garage, corner lot. (507) 380-
7675 for more details.
2BR house with ga rage for rent in
Oli via. Also: 3BR house with 2
stall ga rage for rent in Ren ville.
Call (320) 212-3217.
5BR for rent on Main Street. 1,750
sq. ft. Yard, W/D hook-ups, 1 car
ga rage. Uti l i ti es not i n cl ud ed.
(507) 351-1324.
Re cent ly re mo deled lake home.
Coun try liv ing in town. Three-stall
ga rage. Pri vate fish ing dock. Must
see to ap pre ci ate. Avail able Au -
gust 1. (320) 864-5478 or (320)
582-1294.
Young farmer looking for land to
rent for 2014 and beyond. Com-
petitive rates and references avail-
able. Call Austin Blad at (320)
221-3517.
Hip Hop Fam i ly Shop Con sign -
ment. New/ Gent ly used. (507)
964-5654, Ar ling ton. Clip and save
50% on any one piece cloth ing
item. (GREAT STUFF!)
CUS TOM LOG SAW ING- Cut at
your place or ours. White oak lum -
ber deck ing and fire wood. Give
Vir gil a call. Schau er Con struc tion,
Inc. (320) 864-4453.
Pro fes sion al Care tak ers on per -
son al ba sis with rea son able rates.
In teri or and ex te ri or sched uled
clean ing, pet care, grounds keep -
ing, main tenance, bob cat work,
de bris re mov al. Matt and Mary
(320) 510-2211.
AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
AUTOMOTIVE
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
Work Wanted
FOR SALE
Give Aways
Heating/Air Cond.
Miscellaneous
Wanted To Buy
LIVESTOCK, PETS
Animal Care
REAL ESTATE
Hobby Farm
Houses
RENTAL
Apartment
House
Lake Home
Want To Rent
SALES
Sales
Misc. Service
FOR SALE REAL ESTATE RENTAL
House
SERVICES
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, June 27, 2013, page 9
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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The Glencoe
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Arlington Enterprise
The Galaxy
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AGRICULTURE AUTOMOTIVE EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE LIVESTOCK
& PETS
LIVESTOCK
& PETS
REAL ESTATE SERVICES RENTAL RENTAL
All ads appear online
at GlencoeNews.com
Enterprise
To place an ad: Call: 507-964-5547; Fax: 507-964-2423; E-Mail: info@ArlingtonMNnews.com; Mail: P.O. Box 388, Arlington, MN 55307
Advertising
Deadlines
The McLeod County Chronicle Mondays at Noon
The Arlington Enterprise & The Silver Lake Leader Tuesdays at Noon
The Glencoe Advertiser, The Sibley Shopper
& The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
Commercial
Building and
Business
Opportunity
Call (507) 964-2256
A22-25E,23-26Sa
Sibley Electric Inc, located in Gaylord, has
an opening for a permanent, full-time, experi-
enced Apprentice or Journeyman Electrician.
Applicant must possess a valid driver’s license.
Must be willing to travel, if the project requires it.
Travel pay and perdiem will be negotiated. Com-
petitive wages, holiday and vacation pay, along
with 401K.
Contact Becky at 507-237-2025 for more
information and an application.
A24-25CE25-26ASj
Great Pay • Great
Company • Great People
Family Owned Business
for 65+ years.
We have an immediate
need to expand our company
and owner operator fleet.
If you have a valid class A
CDL at lest 2years of experi-
ence and are at least 23
years of age. Have a clean
driving record and a GREAT
work ethic call us.
We currently have full time
and part time positions avail-
able hauling Local, Regional
and OTR.
Give us a call and we will
put you to work: Shelly at 800-
422-1347 or email shellyg@
bartelstruckline.com.
BARTELS
TRUCK LINE, INC.
A23-26E24-27Sj
Sibley County Public
Health and Human
Services is seeking
individuals interested in
becoming foster parents
for children throughout
Sibley County.
Individuals should be
committed and dedicated to
meeting the needs of a foster
child. Licensed foster homes
are currently needed for
children of all age groups, and
also to provide respite services.
For more information,
contact 507-237-4000.
A23-25SEj
Available...
1 & 2 Bedroom
Apartments Available
All utilities,
except electric
Income based
Must be 62 or older
or handicapped
Highland Commons
Arlington
507-964-5556
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HANDICAP
ACCESSIBLE
Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington
is seeking the following positions:
Hiring Bonus up to
$
500
• Full-Time Benefit eligible LPN/RN –
evening shifts with every other weekend
for Full-Time LPN/RN position
• LPN/RN - every other weekend with potential to pick
up more hours
• Certified Nursing Assistant - every other weekend with
potential to pick up more hours as needed
• Universal Worker at Assisted Living - On Call/Resource
hours only - must be 18 years of age
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information,
call Tiffany Brockhoff,
Human Resource Director at
507-964-2251 or email:
tbrockof@good-sam.com
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap Drug-Free Workplace
Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life.
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a
June 28 • 8 am-8 pm
June 29 • 8 am-1 pm
410 Lynch, Arlington
Kitchenware, antiques,
Coca-Cola memorabilia, misc.
Everything Must Go!
All proceeds for
Miracles for Mitch.
*
2
5
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a
A25-26Ej
OWN A COMPUTER?
Put it to work! Up to $1,500 to $7,500/mo
PT/FT. Free Info. www.mvklifestyle.com
NOW HIRING!
Truck Driving School Instructors and
Management. JOIN CRST’s brand new
training school in Cedar Rapids, Iowa!
Relocation assistance provided. Call:
866/419-9395; email: mknoot@crst.com
TAKE YOUR CAREER
to the next level - with RDTC you
can earn your CDL-A and start a re-
warding driving career! Call Kim -
800/535-8420 GoRoehl.com AA/EOE
DRIVERS/OWNER OPERATORS
wanted. Contact 540/280-0194. In-
dustry leading rates, 90% of line
haul rate. 100% of fuel surcharge.
CASH FOR CARS:
All cars/trucks wanted. Running or not! Top
dollar paid. We come to you! Any make/
model. Call for instant offer: 800/871-9145
DISH TV RETAILER
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12
mos.) & High Speed Internet start-
ing at $14.95/month (where avail-
able.) Save! Ask About same day In-
stallation! Call now! 800/297-8706
CANADA DRUG CENTER
is your choice for safe and affordable med-
ications. Our licensed Canadian mail order
pharmacy will provide you with savings of
up to 75% on all your medication needs.
Call today 800/259-1096 for $10.00 off
your first prescription and free shipping.
DONATE YOUR CAR
Truck or Boat to heritage for the blind. Free
3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing,
all paperwork taken care of 888/485-0398
MEDICAL ALERT
for Seniors - 24/7 monitoring. Free
equipment. Free shipping. Nation-
wide service. $29.95/month. Call
Medical Guardian today 888/918-3581
GUARANTEED INCOME
for your retirement. Avoid market risk
& get guaranteed income in retire-
ment! Call for free copy of our safe
money guide plus annuity quotes from
A-rated companies! 800/631-4558
MISCELLANEOUS HELP WANTED
MISCELLANEOUS
AUTOS WANTED
HELP WANTED - DRIVERS
Advertise here
statewide
in 270 newspapers
only $249
per week!
Less Than $1 per
newspaper!
Call 800-279-2979
or this newspaper
ONLY $249 to reach a statewide audience
of 3 million readers!!! 1-800-279-2979
S
H
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your area
businesses
appreciate
it when
you do!
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, June 27, 2013, page 10
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Get a Subscription
to the Arlington
Enterprise!
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Subscriptions
starting at
$
33.00/yr.
507-964-5547
Check us out
online at
Arlingtonmnnews.com
combined
WET BASEMENT?
Be a part of the 144
th
SIBLEY COUNTY
FAIR!
July 31 – August 4, 2013
Here’s your chance to reach the people that attend the Sibley County Fair.
With 11,000 copies being distributed, this special section will give you
excellent coverage and reach all those potential customers in your trade area.
This year’s fair supplement will be inserted the weekend of July 21 into
The Sibley Shopper and also distributed in the Fairfax Standard
and LeSueur News-Herald to give you the largest market coverage.
Call today to reserve advertising space
in this exciting special edition!
Contact Ashley Reetz at:
Sibley Shopper
402 W. Alden St. • PO Box
388
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone: 507-964-5547
Fax: 507-964-2423
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!
Enterprise Photo by Barb Mathwig
Heavy rains over the weekend left many low grounds
filled with water all around the area. The site of the for-
mer Arlington Elevator looked like a pond on Sunday
evening. The sign maker could have used our proof
reader.
Hmmm?
This document is © 2013 by admin - all rights reserved.