7-11-13 Arlington Enterprise

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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Serving the Communities of Arlington and Green Isle, Minnesota
www.arlingtonmnnews.com Volume 130 • Number 1 • Thursday, July 11, 2013 • Arlington, MN 55307
Single copy $1.00
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Sibley East teacher/coach
Doug Flieth, Gaylord, was
charged with one count of in-
terference with privacy on
Tuesday, July 9, according to
the Sibley County Attorney’s
Office.
An adult female, who cuts
hair part-time in the basement
of her Arlington home, stated
that she was cutting Flieth’s
hair on Saturday morning,
July 6, according to the com-
plaint. While she was stand-
ing at the mirror with her
back to Flieth, she watched in
the mirror as Flieth moved
his cell phone from his right
hand to his left hand. She
then watched as Flieth
reached down with his left
hand and positioned the cell
phone under her dress from
behind.
The female indicated that
she was shocked at what had
happened and waited until
she finished with the haircut
before confronting Flieth, ac-
cording to the complaint. She
told Flieth to delete the pho-
tos. Flieth denied having any
photos. She then got Flieth to
open his cell phone and ob-
served two videos on the
phone. One video was taken
from outside her home while
the other one was taken from
inside her basement. Flieth
then left the residence.
On Monday, July 8, Flieth
gave a statement at the Sibley
County Sheriff’s Department.
During the statement, Flieth
admitted that he took a video
with his cell phone under-
neath the female’s dress, ac-
cording to the complaint.
Flieth is an elementary
physical education teacher at
the Sibley East Public School
in Arlington. He also serves
as the head coach for the Sib-
ley East varsity girls basket-
ball team and assistant coach
for the Sibley East varsity
boys and girls golf teams.
Sibley East Superintendent
Jim Amsden did not respond
to an e-mail from the Arling-
ton Enterprise on Tuesday af-
ternoon, July 9.
Flieth is scheduled to make
his first appearance in Sibley
County District Court at 9
a.m. Thursday, Aug. 8.
The maximum penalty for
one count of interference
with privacy is one year in-
carceration and/or a $3,000
fine.
Sibley East teacher/coach
charged with 1 count of
interference with privacy
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Green Isle Fire Depart-
ment will celebrate its 130th
anniversary on Saturday, July
13.
The day will kick off with a
free kids fun run which will
start at Irish Yard at 11 a.m.
Each child will receive a free
t-shirt.
A 5K walk/run will follow
and start at Irish Yard at noon.
There is a fee for this event.
The day will continue with
a parade at 1:30 p.m. The pa-
rade will start at the Industrial
Park. It will proceed down
Church Street and then turn
right on Highway 25. The pa-
rade will proceed down High-
way 25, turn right on Rail-
road Street and end up at the
Fire Hall.
There are currently 50-plus
parade entries. The parade
will not just be comprised of
fire trucks, but is open to
businesses, organizations,
churches and individuals. To
register for the parade or for
more information, call the
Green Isle Fire Hall at 507-
326-5941.
Mark Alsleben and the
Trailblazers will provide
music in back of the Fire Hall
from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Roast beef and pork sand-
wiches will be served in the
Fire Hall starting at 3 p.m. A
free will offering will be
taken. Beverages will also be
available for sale.
Locher Brothers, Green
Isle, and the Sibley County
American Dairy Association
will serve free root beer
floats.
There will also be a display
of fire department memora-
bilia in the Green Isle Com-
munity Room.
In addition, there will be a
bounce house near the Fire
Hall for the kids.
The Green Isle Fire Depart-
ment was first organized in
1888, but there is no actual
history dating back to that
time.
People who have any histo-
ry on the establishment of the
Green Isle Fire Department
are encouraged to contact Ar-
lington Enterprise Editor Kurt
Menk at kurtm@arlington-
mnnews.com.
Green Isle Fire Department to celebrate 130th anniversary
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
Sibley County has the
availability to implement
two types of taxes that
would be dedicated to rais-
ing transportation revenue,
said County Administrator
Matt Jaunich at Board of
Commissioners meeting on
Tuesday, July 9.
“If we implement a
wheelage tax (on registered
vehicles) we are looking at
an estimated income of
$148,000 each year to be
used on roads and bridges,”
said Jaunich about data
compiled by the Associa-
tion of Minnesota Counties.
“The other option is a half
cent sales tax that would
bring to Sibley County on
an annual basis about
$192,000. If you were to do
both it would roughly pro-
duce $350,000.”
The reason Jaunich
brought the subject to the
board for discussion was
because the county has to
let the state know by Aug. 1
if it plans implementation
of the wheelage tax by Jan.
1, 2014.”
Jaunich will present a
resolution for consideration
of both tax options at the
July 23 meeting. The whee-
lage tax will be $10 per
registered vehicle with
some exceptions.
Vehicles not subject to
the wheelage tax include
motorcycles and mopeds,
trailers and semitrailers and
vehicles not subject to an-
nual registration such as a
collector vehicle.
Beginning in 2018, the
tax cap will be raised to
$20, with counties having
the flexibility to set the
amount of the tax anywhere
up to the cap.
The local option half cent
sales tax would be levied
on anything that is current-
ly subject to sales tax in
each county. The revenue
can only be used for trans-
portation related projects
and can be enacted at any
time along with a 90-day
notice to the state.
The discussion that fol-
lowed indicated the com-
missioners do not like the
ideas of any new tax, but
there was receptiveness to
the wheelage tax compared
to the sales tax.
“I don’t think Sibley
County should be looking
at a sales tax,” said County
Commissioner Bill Pinske.
“I believe it would put the
local merchants in an ad-
verse situation.”
County Commissioner
Jim Nytes said he does not
like the wheelage tax or the
sales tax, but what he really
does not like is a real estate
tax that he said is killing
grandma, grandpa and
farmers.
“With the sales tax, as
much as I don’t like it, it
draws from people passing
through the county who
otherwise don’t pay taxes
here,” said Nytes. “What-
ever we can do to help keep
the real estate taxes down is
ok with me. Neither tax is
fair, but we may have to
take the least of the two
evils.”
County Commissioner
Jim Swanson also does not
like the idea of increasing
any taxes. “But the one
thing we have talked about
over the past year is how to
raise the funds to keep our
roads and bridges up. I
could see this as an avenue
to use strictly for roads in-
stead of doing the bonding
and tax levy.”
Pinske said the wheelage
tax is fairer than the sales
tax because it does not have
to affect local merchants as
much. He strongly believes
the sales tax should be con-
trolled by the state.
“It only affects our local
businesses if other counties
do not go along with the
tax,” said Nytes. “They
should be in the same
boat.”
Pinske made the motion
that Sibley County declines
the sales tax option. He
added that it is totally un-
fair. The vote was 4-1
against the motion.
“What I am hearing is I
should bring forth a resolu-
tion to consider the whee-
lage tax, ” said Jaunich.
“You can still act on the
sales tax option if you
want.”
County Commissioner
Harold Pettis said the bad
thing is that so many other
counties have the sales tax
for transportation needs
now.
Once enacted, the county
board may choose to collect
the tax directly or have the
state collect the tax as part
of the tab renewal process
and paid to the counties on
a monthly basis.
Sibley County debates rolling
out wheelage and sales tax
By Karin Ramige
Cornwell
Manager
There is never a shortage
of rocks in a farmer’s field.
Truck loads are taken out of
any given field every year.
This year is no different
for Bruce and Nelva Lilien-
thal, Arlington.
“We haul out trailer loads
every year,” Bruce said.
Bruce started keeping the
more interesting looking
rocks that now line their
flower beds at their family
farm southeast of Arlington.
In the spring of 2011,
Bruce found an especially
interesting rock.
It was heavier than any
other rock of that size, was a
rust color and had a metallic
sound to it when tapped.
You could hear the metal
clang, as Bruce drummed his
fingers on the rock on a re-
cent morning sitting at the
kitchen table.
He put it along the drive-
way with the other interest-
ing rocks and didn’t think
much more about it until this
past spring when Nelva read
an article about meteorites in
a farming magazine.
After looking closely at
the pictures that accompa-
nied the article, they thought
that the odd rock they had
found might be a meteorite.
They started to do a little
more research on meteorites,
which led them to Dr. Calvin
Alexander, professor of
earth sciences at the Univer-
sity of Minnesota.
The Lilienthals said
Alexander asked them a few
questions over the phone to
determine if it might be a
meteorite and worth taking a
further look.
He asked about the size
and weight, the sound it
makes when tapped, and if it
appeared to be magnetic.
When they answered all of
the questions positively,
Alexander was excited to see
the rock.
They visited Alexander at
his St. Paul office for some
further testing.
Alexander was able to
confirm it is in fact a mete-
orite.
The 33-pound, 16 by 12
inch rock is 90 percent iron
and around 8 percent nickel,
with a unique crystalline pat-
tern that is unique to mete-
orites, the Lilienthals were
told by Alexander.
They also learned that an-
other meteorite was found
near Arlington in 1894 and
Alexander estimates that the
two are from the same mete-
orite.
In April of 1896, the Ar-
lington Enterprise reported
another piece was found in
the area and brought into the
office.
A part of the 1894 mete-
orite (known as Arlington I)
is at the Smithsonian Muse-
um in Washington, D.C. The
Lilienthals meteorite is now
know as Arlington II.
Nelva visited the museum
within the last year. She
would have never thought
that part of a rock in the rock
pile at home might be in the
Smithsonian.
The estimated age of the
meteorite is 4.6 billion years,
about the age of the sun.
As to what they will do
with their unusual find, they
don’t know.
They have received nu-
merous calls from people
wanting to hunt for mete-
orites on their property.
As things on the farm and
interest in their find slows
down, they will take it back
to the University of Min-
nesota for further testing.
For now it is a hot topic of
conversation.
Lilienthals make rare find
on their farm near Arlington
Enterprise photo by Karin Ramige Cornwell
Bruce and Nelva Lilienthal, rural Arling-
ton, pose with the meteorite he found
on their farm during the spring of 2011.
The 32-pound, 16 X 12 inch rock is 90
percent iron and around eight percent
nickel. The estimated age of the mete-
orite is 4.6 billion years which is about
the age of the sun.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, July 11, 2013, page 2
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Advertising Deadlines:
Chronicle...........................................Monday Noon
Leader & Enterprise ........................Tuesday Noon
Advertiser, Shopper & Galaxy...Wednesday Noon
McLeod Publishing
716 East 10th St.• Glencoe
Mon.-Fri. 8-5 p.m. • 320-864-5518
The McLeod County Chronicle
Silver Lake Leader
The Glencoe Advertiser
The Sibley Shopper
Arlington Enterprise (Arlington/Green Isle)
The Galaxy (supplement to Chronicle, Leader & Enterprise)
www. GlencoeNews. com
www. ArlingtonMNnews. com
Card Shower
honoring
JEAN LUEPKE
on her
91
st
Birthday
Mon., July 15
Cards may be
sent to her at:
411 7th Ave. NW,
Arlington, MN 55307
*26E27SEj
Sunday, July 14: Arlington Conquerors 4-H
Club, senior citizens building at Four Seasons
Park, 5 p.m. Clover Buds meet at 4 p.m.
Monday, July 15: Arlington City Council, council
chambers, 6:30 p.m.
Sibley East School Board, room 149 at Arlington
Campus, 6:30 p.m.
VFW Post 6031, veterans building at fairgrounds,
8 p.m.
Tuesday, July 16: Knights of Columbus, St.
Mary’s Parish Hall, 8 p.m.
Community
Calendar
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER
MAIN BANK
Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (straight thru)
DRIVE THRU
Monday - Thursday, 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.,
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Member
FDIC
Arlington State Bank
(507) 964-2256
Fax (507) 964-5550
www.ArlingtonStateBank.com
...to those who traveled
thru the rain storm and de-
tours to come and celebrate
our 50th wedding anniver-
sary with us in the park.
...to all those who sent
cards, gifts or made calls.
...to our 11 children and
thier families for creating
such an awesome day, we
will always remember!
God bless each of you.
Our gratitude to everyone
Kelly & LuAnn Baggenstoss
*27E28Sj
In gratitude and
humility, Austin Lentz
wishes to express his
appreciation to Jerry’s
Home Quality foods for
winning the gas grill
and lovely assortment
of meat in the July 1
drawing—just in time
for the Fourth! It’s
always a pleasure to
shop locally. Thanks.
*27Ej
We would like to
thank all of you for
remembering us on
our 65th wedding
anniversary. The well
wishes and beautiful
cards were so
thoughtful. Thanks for
making this special
occasion extra nice
for us.
Bud & Shirley Locher
T
h
a
n
k
Y
o
u
!
T
h
a
n
k
Y
o
u
!
*27E28Sj
Tuesday, July 16
6:30-8 p.m.
Arlington Haus II, Arlington, MN
6:30 pm - Social, Meet & Great, Refreshments
7:00 pm - Safety & Defense Presentation
7:45 pm - Last Chance Tickets for Prize Drawing
8:00 pm - Prize Giveaways!
Cost:
$
3 per person (all ages)
Please register by e-mailing Nicole.Roepke@gmail.com
or call 612-501-3751 before the event. Seats are limited.
http://www.facebook.com/agiwomenoftoday/events
A27E28Sa
Grand Opening
Reg. Store hrs.....M-F 10-5 & Sat. 9-1
Memory
Market
F
lea M
arket
L
indt C
andy
Jew
elry
U
pcyclin
g
D
olls
Scrapbooking Supplies
B
ooks
O
ld Farm
&
G
arden
D
o-D
ads
F
u
rn
itu
re
H
om
e D
ecor
B
aby B
outique
O
ld T
oys
July 17
3-7
We would love
to see you!
7 - 4th St.
Gaylord
507-317-0326
Refreshments
Door Prizes
Discounts
News Briefs
Tools stolen from vehicle
Nearly $800 worth of tools were reportedly taken
from a vehicle in Arlington, according to the Arlington
Police Department. The incident was reported to author-
ities on Friday, July 5.
The tools were owned by Dale N. Hansen, Arlington.
The vehicle was parked along the 400 block of West
Alden Street.
Wallet stolen in Henderson
A wallet was reportedly stolen from Minneapolis resi-
dent Mary Seabloom at the Henderson RoadHaus in the
City of Henderson around 1 p.m. Thursday, July 4, ac-
cording to the Sibley County Sheriff’s Department.
The incident was reported to the sheriff’s department,
but is under investigation by the Henderson Police De-
partment.
Eggs thrown at vehicle
An individual or individuals reportedly threw eggs at
a parked vehicle in Arlington, according to the Arling-
ton Police Department. The incident was reported to au-
thorities on Thursday, July 4.
The vehicle, owned by Kuyler Soeffker, was parked
along the 300 block of East Dayton Street.
Meyer graduates from college
Megan Meyer, a 2009 graduate of the Sibley East
Senior High School, graduated from The College of St.
Scholastica during recent commencement exercises.
Meyer was awarded a Bachelor of Science Degree in
Exercise Physiology.
She is the daughter of Jeff and Deb Meyer, Gaylord.
White receives an award
Jenna White, a 2012 graduate of the Sibley East
Senior High School, recently received the Chancellor's
Award for the spring 2013 semester at the University of
Wisconsin-Stout.
The award is presented to students who have a grade
point average of 3.5 or above.
White is majoring in hotel, restaurant and tourism.
She is the daughter of Alex and Slava White, Gaylord.
Rau named to President’s List
Breanna Rau, a 2012 graduate from the Sibley East
Senior High School, was recently named to the Presi-
dent’s List at St. Cloud Technical and Community Col-
lege.
To qualify for this honor, a student must achieve a
perfect 4.0 grade point average.
Rau is majoring in Health Sciences Broad Field and
Pre-Practical Nursing. She is the daughter of Chuck and
Andrea Haggenmiller, and Dale Rau.
Area students graduate
Area students graduated from the Ridgewater College
at the Hutchinson and Willmar campuses during recent
commencement exercises.
Graduates from the Hutchinson campus were Krystal
Wendinger, Sonja Briest, Bethany Diehn, April Trebel-
horn and Benjamin Wieman (Honors List).
Graduates from the Willmar campus were Tyler
Brueggemeier, Rylie Frauendienst, Erin Farber and
Jacob Ruehling (Honors List).
Birth Announcement
Jim and Erika (Ediger)
Connolly, Belle Plaine, an-
nounce the birth of their
daughter, Bailey Jaklyn Con-
nolly, who was born at the
Ridgeview Medical Center in
Waconia on Tuesday, July 2.
Bailey weighed eight
pounds, 12 ounces and meas-
ured 20 inches.
She is welcomed home by
big brother, Jameson, 3 1/2.
The grandparents are Pat
and Deb Ediger, Belle Plaine.
A great-grandmother is Helen
Hennen, Belle Plaine.
Bailey Jaklyn
Connolly
Enterprise photos by Kurt Menk
Arlene Meyers Marek Allie Weber
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley County Histori-
cal Society (SCHS) is con-
ducting interviews, collecting
information and seeking pho-
tos to publish a book on Sib-
ley County Country Schools.
At one time, there were ap-
proximately 80 country
schools in Sibley County.
The hope is to have the
book published by the end of
this year.
Some members of the
SCHS, during a gathering on
Friday, July 5, interviewed a
small group of people who at-
tended country schools dur-
ing the 1930’s and 1940’s.
The individuals who were
interviewed included Bonnie
(Schuetz) Nagel, Lowell
Nagel, Allie Weber, Violet
(Bullert) Brockhoff, Arlene
(Liebeton) Meyers Marek,
Audrey (Willmsen) Goehl,
Lorraine (Sickmann) Rucks,
Irene (Petzel) Sickmann and
Elaine (Isenberg) Stark.
A variety of topics during
the interview ranged from the
distance to and from school,
the number of students at
school, the number of sub-
jects taught, the daily Pledge
of Allegiance, the games
played at recess, the limited
number of discipline prob-
lems, English as the only lan-
guage, and the duties and re-
sponsibilities of the teachers.
People who would like to
submit information and/or
photos for the book are en-
couraged to contact the Sib-
ley County Historical Society
at 507-248-3434, schs1@-
frontiernet.net or Ruth Ann
Buck at 507-964-2795.
SCHS working on book about country schools
U. S. Senator Amy
Klobuchar (D-MN), Vice
Chair of the U.S. Congress
Joint Economic Committee,
today held a JEC hearing on
building job opportunities for
veterans. Klobuchar invited
Benjamin G.S. Fowke III,
CEO of Xcel Energy, to testi-
fy about his company’s ef-
forts to hire veterans in Min-
nesota and across the country.
Fowke estimates that 12 per-
cent of Xcel’s roughly 11,000
employees are veterans.
“More and more companies
are realizing that veterans
have valuable, battle-tested
skills that can be transitioned
into civilian jobs, ” said
Klobuchar. “I’m encouraged
by what we’re seeing at busi-
nesses like Xcel Energy, and I
will continue to work to help
ensure the men and women
who served our country can
find good jobs when they get
home.”
Today’s hearing explored
current employment trends
for U.S. veterans and strate-
gies for helping more return-
ing service members find
good civilian jobs. Klobuchar
said Xcel’s efforts to hire vet-
erans should be a model for
other companies looking to
recruit more veterans and
strengthen their workforce.
Klobuchar has long cham-
pioned policies to help veter-
ans successfully transition the
skills they learned on the bat-
tlefield into good-paying
civilian jobs. She co-authored
legislation, passed into law
last year, to streamline the
process for receiving a com-
mercial driver’s license, as
well as introduced the Veter-
ans to Paramedics Act, legis-
lation making it easier for
veterans who trained as para-
medics in the military to earn
credentials as emergency
medical technicians.
Klobuchar introduced the
bipartisan Post-9/11 Veterans
Job Training Act to allow vet-
erans to use their GI Bill ben-
efits for job training and ap-
prenticeship programs, provi-
sions that went into effect in
2011. Also in 2011,
Klobuchar helped pass the
VOW to Hire Heroes Act into
law, legislation promoting the
hiring of unemployed veter-
ans by requiring separating
service members to partici-
pate in career training pro-
grams and providing a tax
credit to employers who
bring unemployed veterans
into their workforce.
Klobuchar highlights efforts of MN
businesses to hire more veterans
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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402 W Alden St. • Arlington, MN 55307
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Arlington ENTERPRISE
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Contact us with feedback.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, July 11, 2013, page 3
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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Arlington
Chiropractic Clinic
JUSTIN E. DAVIS, D.C.
607 W. Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
507?964?2850
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Office Hours:
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Wed. 8am?6pm; Thurs. 1?6pm;
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Miller
Law Office
RAPHAEL J. MILLER
ROXANN M. BERANEK
Attorneys at Law
332 Sibley Avenue, Gaylord, MN 55334
Tel. (507) 237-2954
Wills - Family Law
Taxes - Estate Planning
General Law Practice & Trials
Free consultation on personal injury claims
MESENBRING
CONSTRUCTION
(507) 964-2864
“Your local home builder and
remodeler for over 38 years”
Member: MN River Builders Assn.
MN License #4806
ROSS R. ARNESON
ATTORNEY AT LAW
302 West Main
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-5753
Real Estate, Estate Planning,
Probate and Business Law
Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Saturdays by Appointment
Farm – Residential
Commercial
Licensed - Bonded - Insured
• 24-Hour Emergency
Service
• Free Estimates
Tyler Kranz, Owner
507-964-2525
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JEFF & WENDY KLEHR
Dozer, Grader, Basements,
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Hauling Gravel/Rock/Sand, Skidloader
Jeff cell: 612-756-0595
Wendy cell: 612-756-0594
640 E. BROOKS ST., ARLINGTON, MN 55307
1-507-964-5783 • FAX: 507-964-5302
Local LAWN
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Arlington, MN
Licensed and Insured
Mowing, fertilizing and
weed control, dethatching,
garden tilling, core aeration
www.locallawnenforcement.com
Adam and David Hansen
Adam cell: 507-327-0917
507-964-5835
• 5” Seamless Gutters
• 6” Seamless Gutters
• K-Guard Leaf-Free
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PHIL GOETTL
612-655-1379
888-864-5979
www.mngutter.com
M
2
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Gustafson
Family Dentistry
Dr. John D. Gustafson, D.D.S
Dr. Jared Gustafson, D.D.S
COMPREHENSIVE CARE
FOR ALL AGES
Office Hours: Monday–Friday
New Patients Welcome
Dr. Jason Anderson, D.D.S
Orthodontists
106 3
rd
Ave. NW,
Arlington
507-964-2705
M
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BODY REPAIR
See us for factory-trained
body repair work on
your vehicle.
• Free Estimates • Glass Replacement
• Collision Repair • Rust Repair
WINDSHIELD
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We install windshields
for all vehicles
We will contact the insurance company
for you and do all paperwork. See us
for professional glass installation.
BRAU
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www.braumotors.com
Local
507-964-5539
Toll Free
800-664-2728
Buesgens
Septic Services
Septic Pumping/Pump Repair
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507-665-3732
or 952-873-2208
Call Shane
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Liberty
Station
Corner of Hwy. 5 & Chandler
Arlington, MN
507-964-5177 or
Toll-Free 866-752-9567
www.LibertyStationAutoSales.com
Jim
Heiland’s
Affordable Used Cars
BRAZIL
AUTOMOTIVE
36833 200
TH
ST.
GREEN ISLE, MN 55338
Tires, Air Conditioning
& Maintenance
507?326?
5751
MONDAY-FRIDAY 8-5
BEN BRAZIL,
The Back to School Com-
mittee of Sibley County is
seeking a partnership with
area businesses, churches and
organizations to donate nec-
essary school supplies for
children in the county.
“There are an increasing
number of children who ar-
rive at school that first day
without the supplies they
need,” said The Salvation
Army representative Kim
Schwich. “As a result of this,
they may feel embarrassed
and unprepared for classroom
activities.”
Last year over 250 students
received a free school sup-
plies kit that gave them the
opportunity to begin the
school year feeling confident
and prepared for the new
school year.
“These kits make a world
of difference to the children
who receive them, knowing
they can walk into school
without the worry of being
singled out because they did
not have the supplies required
by their school,” said
Schwich.
Supplies needed for school
include black, blue and red
pens, crayons (24-count
boxes), pocket folders, scis-
sors, rulers, three-ring binders
(1 1/2 inches), markers, glue
bottles (four ounces), glue
sticks and notebooks (wide
and college rule).
The drop off site is the Cor-
nerStone State Bank in Green
Isle.
Donations can also be
mailed to The Back to School
Drive, Attention: Sue Vos,
P.O. Box 128, Green Isle,
MN, 55338.
The deadline for donations
is Sunday, Aug. 18
People who have any ques-
tions can contact Schwich at
507-326-5017.
The distribution for youth
who are requested will be
held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 23. The distribu-
tion for walk-ins will be held
from 2:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Fri-
day, Aug. 23.
Donations of school supplies are sought
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
T-Ball Action
Tommy Ziegler prepared to hit the ball
during a t-ball game at Four Seasons
Park in Arlington last week. T-ball is
part of the Arlington Summer Recre-
ation Program.
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
Along with filling six staff
positions, the Sibley County
Board of Commissioners cre-
ated four more position open-
ings by accepting resigna-
tions at the meeting on Tues-
day, July 9.
At the previous meeting,
the board received the annual
report from Tami LaGow, co-
ordinator for the Planning
and Implementation grant
used to decrease alcohol, to-
bacco and drug use by stu-
dents in the community.
At the next meeting the
board accepted LaGow’s res-
ignation as part of the consent
agenda where action is taken
without discussion. LaGow
had reported on the second of
a five-year grant that totaled
$1,000,000. The position is
scheduled to end along with
the grant.
The county also accepted
the resignation of Bill Jensen
as jail administrator, Brady
Swanson as watershed grants
coordinator and Christopher
Davis as jail/dispatcher.
While some staff was mov-
ing on, others were being
welcomed. The board ap-
proved the hiring of Justin
Thaement as full-time public
works highway maintenance
worker. Ryan Kotila was
hired as a full-time account-
ant. Manessa Meyer is the
new full-time child protection
social worker.
Jesse Schwirtz and Daniel
Rosenau were approved as
S/T public works summer
road maintenance workers.
Also approved was the pro-
motional transfer of Jamie
Grams-Petzel to eligibility
worker.
Other Business
• In other business, County
Administrator Matt Jaunich
advised the board that the im-
plementation of part of the
Affordable Care Act was
pushed back a year by the
federal government.
The county will be required
to provide health benefits to
employees working 30-plus
hours per week. Jaunich said
the county could implement
the policy by Jan. 1, 2014 or
wait until 2015, which is
what the administrator
prefers.
• After no one attended the
public hearing to consider
amendments to the code of
ordinances, two articles were
changed. Article 800 amend-
ed the aggregate removal tax
ordinance.
Article 500 involved a
complete re-write of the Sib-
ley County enhanced 911 or-
dinance, which provides a
system to assign addresses to
all principal structures locat-
ed in Sibley County outside
the incorporated limits of mu-
nicipalities.
The purpose of the system
is to promote the public’s
health, safety and general
welfare by meeting the re-
quirements of the Emergency
Telecommunications Services
Act.
Failure to comply with any
section of this ordinance will
constitute a petty misde-
meanor, punishable by a fine.
• Regarding the Gaylord
salvage yard site, Jaunich
said the next step is to techni-
cally classify the property
and put an appraised value on
it. He said the intention is to
clean it up and sell it or sell it
as is. The appraised value
will be brought back to the
board for action.
• The board approved two
improvement petitions for the
replacement of a wood rail
bridge with a box culvert on
county ditch 24B and 42.
• During commissioner re-
ports, County Commissioner
Joy Cohrs learned at the em-
ployee wellness committee
meeting that exercise equip-
ment has been installed at the
Human Resource Center and
will soon go in the county
courthouse.
Sibley County shuffles staff positions
On the first night of Sauer-
kraut Days, Taylor Gilman,
daughter of Kari Gilman and
Jerry Gilman was crowned
Miss Henderson, according to
an article in the Henderson
Independent.
A $750 scholarship was
awarded to this year’s Queen.
The honor of first princess
went to Erica Traxler, daugh-
ter of Brian and Joyce
Traxler.
A $300 scholarship was
awarded to the First princess.
This year’s second princess
was Stephanie Winter, daugh-
ter of Dawn and Chuck Win-
ter.
She will receive a $250
scholarship as Second
Princess.
Taylor Gilman crowned Miss Henderson
Dale L. Roiger, former po-
lice chief for the City of Gay-
lord, was recently sentenced
to 15 days in the Sibley
County Jail and two months
of unsupervised probation,
according to an article in The
Gaylord Hub.
Roiger had pleaded guilty
to selling alcohol to a person
under 21. This is a gross mis-
demeanor offense and
charges were filed on Feb.
12, 2013.
The offense occurred on
Jan.23, 2013 when Roiger
who was working at the Shell
Convenience Store failed an
alcohol compliance check.
According to the city attor-
ney’s office, this was the sec-
ond time Roiger sold alcohol
to a person under age 21 in a
compliance check.
Former Gaylord police chief is sentenced
to 15 days in jail, 2 months of probation
Fun Spots Close to Home!
Look for the Summer Fun Spots at
www.GlencoeNews.com to download your copy!
The Sibley Shopper
Arlington • 964-5547
Thanks to these participating businesses:
• Crow River Winery • Molly’s Cafe • Care Connection Thrift Store
• Kahnke Brothers Tree Farm • The Flower Mill • State Theatre
• Neubarth Lawn Care & Landscaping • Holasek Flower Power Garden Center
• Pines-n-tiques • The Peppermint Twist • The Glencoe Aquatic Center
• Computer restore • Fashion Interiors • Sibley County Historical Museum
• Glencoe City Center • Glencoe Farmer’s Market • Berger Interiors
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, July 11, 2013, page 4
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
State legislators give tax
break for private development
and forgive taxes on a big city
Our View: Where is the outrage?
Opinions
Staf f
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Publish-
ers; Kurt Menk, Edi t or; Kari n
Ramige, Manager; Marvin Bulau,
Production Manager; Barb Math-
wig, Of fice; Ashley Reetz, Sales; and Jean Olson, Proof Reading.
Letters
This page is devoted to opin-
ions and commentary . Articles appearing on this page are the opinions of the
writer . V iews expressed here are not necessarily those of the Arlington Enterprise, unless so desig-
nated. The Arlington Enterprise strongly encourages others to express opin-
ions on this page.
Letters from our readers are
strongly encouraged. Letters for
publication must bear the writer’ s signature and address. The Arlington Enterprise reserves the right
to edit letters for purpose of clarity
and space.
Ethics
The editorial staf f of the Arlington Enterprise strives to present the news in a
fair and accurate manner . W e appreciate errors being brought to our attention.
Please bring any grievances against
the Arlington Enterprise to the attention of the editor . Should dif ferences continue, readers are encour-
aged to take their grievances to the
Minnesota News Council, an organi-
zation dedicated to protecting the
public from press inaccuracy and un-
fairness. The News Council can be contacted at 12 South
Sixth St., Suite 940, Minneapolis,
MN 55402, or (612) 341-9357.
Press Freedom
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anteed under the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitu- tion:
Established in 1884.
Postmaster send address changes to:
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Arlington, MN 55307.
Phone 507-964-5547 FAX 507-964-2423.
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Subscription Rates: Minnesota – $33.00 per year. Out-
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Arlington ENTERPRISE
Guest Column
The Superintendent’s Note Pad
Letter To The Editor
Minnesota state legislators can give millions of dollars to a
billionaire owner to build a new football or baseball stadium
and a lot of people will get outraged. The same state legisla-
tors can give millions of dollars in a tax break for a private
development or forgive millions of greenbacks on a big city
and most people will simply turn a blind eye.
That is what happened at the State Capitol in St. Paul a cou-
ple of months ago.
The State Legislature, controlled by the DFL, voted to for-
give most of the remaining $32.7 million it loaned the City of
St. Paul to build the Xcel Energy Center years ago. Where is
the outrage? The City of St. Paul negotiated the deal with the
State Legislature years ago and should have been held re-
sponsible for the remaining balance of the loan.
The same State Legislature also voted to give a $250 mil-
lion tax break for the private development of a $1.5 billion
project at the Mall of America. Where is the outrage? The
project at the Mall of America is a private development and
should not have been subsidized with public funds.
Minnesota has money issues and the DFL-controlled State
Legislature, along with Democrat Governor Mark Dayton,
gives and forgives millions of dollars in taxes and later pass-
es a historical bill to increase taxes by $2.1 billion.
It does not really matter if the average taxpayer is outraged
or not over these actions. In the end, it seems like the wealthy
and the large cities get special treatment at the State Capitol
in St. Paul.
The average taxpayer, especially people who live in small
rural communities, are shut out once again.
-K.M.
Too Tall’s Tidbits
Happy Birthday and Happy An-
niversary to the following local and
area residents compliments of the
Arlington Lions Club Community
Calendar.
July 12
Austin Schuetz, Chad Vrklan, Laura
Schmig, Leland Klitzke, Scott
Schmidt, Todd Overson and Wayne
Swanson.
July 13
Alli Harter, Brian Bade, Danny
Saunders, Talia Gilster, Tammy
Franke, and Mr. and Mrs. Tim
Kloeckl.
July 14
Brady Jenneke, Herby Broin, Laura
Voight, Peyton Lovaas, Tim Luskey,
and Mr. and Mrs. Jason Quast.
July 15
Betina Krumwiede, Jean Luepke,
Judy Vrklan, Rebecca Maki Stone,
Zachary Johnson, Mr. and Mrs.
Jason Pautsch, Mr. and Mrs. Mark
Stien, and Mr. and Mrs. Ray
Haggenmiller.
July 16
Barry Nagel, Bill Rabe, Hunter
Voight, Mr. and Mrs. Mitch Dietz,
and Mr. and Mrs. Kevin ZumBerge.
July 17
Erin Marie Meyer, Lucy Zingsheim,
Marv Bulau, Marvin Krentz,
Richard Rose, Jr., and Mr. and Mrs.
Barrett Krantz.
July 18
Ann Dietel, Dillon Wojtowicz,
Eleanor Trocke, Elya Ling, Joshua
Halverson, Laura Tuchtenhagen,
Nicole Quast and Sue Paget.
*****
Top 10 Things People Think
About While Singing a Hymn
10. The pot roast.
9. What does pastor wear under
his robes?
8. Will the person behind me ever
hit the right note?
7. 90 minutes till kickoff.
6. Did I turn off the curling iron?
5. The likelihood of the ceiling fan
falling and hitting me on the head.
4. How many people have lost
more hair than I have?
3. How would the hymn sound if
Metallica played it?
2. Are there doughnuts at fellow-
ship?
1. How many more verses?
*****
What’s the difference between a
musician and a savings bond? One
of them eventually matures and
earns money.
*****
A boy walked into a pharmacy and
asked the pharmacist to give him
something to cure the hiccups. The
pharmacist merely leaned over and
slapped the kid on the back.
“Why did you do that to me?”
asked the boy.
“Well, you don’t have the hiccups
now, do you?” the pharmacist asked.
“No, but my Mom out in the car
still does!” the boy replied.
*****
Little girl: “My baby brother is
only one year old but he has been
walking, now, for six months.”
Little boy: “My goodness… isn’t
he awful tired?”
*****
Two boys were struggling with a
huge table in a doorway. They
pushed and pulled and upped it and
downed it until both were exhausted.
Between gasps for air, one man-
aged to say, “We better give up…
’cause we’ll never get this table into
the house.”
“Into the house?” screamed the
other. “I thought we were moving
it out of the house!”
*****
As a professional photographer,
Judy takes a lot of pride in her pic-
tures. Wherever she goes, she brings
her pictures with her, to show off her
work.
“Wow,” said her host Sandra,
“these are really nice pictures, you
must have a great camera.”
Fuming mad at the implication
that her whole talent came from her
camera, Judy waited until the end of
the meal and then thanked her host.
“Thank you the meal was deli-
cious,” and then as if an after-
thought added, “you must have
great pots.”
*****
Mr. Kipper knew he was late when
he spotted the ferry just a few feet
from the dock. Running as fast as he
could, he leaped across the water,
barely landing on the boat’s deck.
“That was sure a close one,” said
Mr. Kipper as a nearby stranger
helped him to his feet.
“What’s the hurry?” said the
stranger. “This ferry’s just arriv-
ing.”
*****
By Jim Amsden
Sibley East Superintendent
I would like to welcome you to a
regular column that will address
events happening in and affecting
Sibley East Schools. My 26th year
in our district will begin with a new
transition as I now assume the duties
and responsibilities of superintend-
ent of schools. The last 26 years
have brought many experiences as a
classroom teacher, coach, and prin-
cipal that give me a strong under-
standing of the Sibley East School
District and the communities of Ar-
lington, Gaylord, and Green Isle.
The most important piece I have
learned over the past years is what
great support community members
give to our schools.
As I begin my new role, I hope to
maintain the excellent things hap-
pening within our schools and con-
tinue to make improvements where
and when needed. My vision for ac-
complishing this broad goal includes
engaged community members who
have valued input into our schools,
an excellent staff within the schools
committed to student success, and
parents/guardians who strongly sup-
port their children making the most
of their educational opportunities.
It is with great anticipation that I
look forward to these challenges.
Working collaboratively with the
members of each community that
make up our district, a dedicated
school board, and a committed
staff, I know Sibley East Schools
will continue to be a great place to
educate children well into the 21st
century.
Please feel free to contact me any-
time by stopping by the district of-
fice in Arlington, phone (507-964-
8224), or email jamsden@sibley-
east.k12.mn.us. You can also follow
me on Twitter @SEHS_Amsden.
New superintendent writes introductory column
To The Editor,
Minnesotans deserve energy solu-
tions that make sense for their pock-
etbooks, which is why we, as your
elected representatives, oppose alter-
native wind energy mandates that
drive up electricity costs by as much
as 20 percent or more. Higher elec-
tricity costs hurt families and busi-
nesses.
According to information provid-
ed by local co-ops, clean coal and
natural gas receive tax subsidies of
less than 50 cents per mega-watt
hour (MWh). Wind energy on the
other hand, receives a tax subsidy of
over $23 per MWh, costing taxpay-
ers almost 100 times more than
clean coal or natural gas.
There are also many other con-
cerns, which include damage to Sib-
ley County roads and bridges as a
result of the excessive weight of
heavy equipment and transporting
these turbines.
Studies show that where wind tur-
bines are within 1.8 miles, property
values have declined anywhere from
25 percent to 37 percent (see web-
sites listed below for more informa-
tion).
Those who live in close proximity
to wind turbines have also expressed
health and environmental concerns.
Cornish Township in Sibley
County is currently sited for the
building of ten or more wind tur-
bines and this could be just the be-
ginning. A group of citizens has or-
ganized to oppose these energy
boondoggles. The Cornish Town-
ship board recently voted to with-
draw their permission to use town-
ship roads in the construction
process. They need your support in
order to prevent this project from
going forward.
The time is short. The Public Util-
ities Commission has already grant-
ed the permits for the construction
of these wind turbines. Construc-
tion is due to begin this September.
Preventing this energy boondog-
gle will not be an easy task, al-
though Goodhue County in Eastern
Minnesota was successful in pre-
venting the construction of proposed
wind turbines in their county.
We would like to urge citizens to
become informed and get involved.
You can go to the following web-
sites: www.goodhuewindtruth.com
and www.wind-watch.org for more
information.
If you are interested in getting
more involved please contact Kevin
and Barb Wenninger, who are resi-
dents in Cornish Township. Also,
urge your county commissioners to
assist the Cornish Township board
wherever possible.
Glenn Gruenhagen
State Representative
House District 18B
Glencoe
Scott Newman
State Senator
Senate District 18
Hutchinson
Get involved with wind turbine project
By Douglas E. Schoen
As we approach summer in Wash-
ington, policymakers and pundits
alike remain distracted by a host of
scandals. The alleged targeting of
conservative political groups by IRS
officials, while relegated to Con-
gressional hearings and calls for ad-
ditional investigations (for now),
will be red meat for candidates run-
ning in next year's midterm elec-
tions. Recent revelations that the
NSA has been monitoring phone
calls only adds to the narrative that
we'll likely see play out in the com-
ing months: government, regardless
of its reach, is increasingly misguid-
ed.
However, it would be political
malpractice to assume that funda-
mental issues - Medicare, the econo-
my, trade, etc. - will take a backseat
to today's scandals. As incumbent
policymakers know well, taking
one's eye off these fundamental is-
sues (often at the expense of entire
voting blocs) is often a recipe for
failure. This is especially relevant
for voters over 65, who are increas-
ingly drifting to the Republican
Party. Taking into account that near-
ly six in 10 seniors voted for Mitt
Romney (up from half who voted
for McCain 2008), it's critical that
Democrats right the ship before
2014.
By all accounts, 2012 marked a
period in which Democrats were in-
spired by a larger turnout of young
and non-white voters. However, two
years earlier, seniors comprised 23
percent of the vote (an increase from
16 percent in 2008). The youth vote
in 2010 was only 11 percent, down
from 18 percent in 2008. A fired up
senior electorate can easily sway a
close election.
With this idea in mind, a key issue
for Republicans and Democrats will
be establishing a permanent trust on
Medicare. Every American over 65
relies on the program in some way,
and a large swath of Medicare par-
ticipants have to deal with a chronic
Schoen
Continued on page 8
Why 2014 could be the year of the senior
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, July 11, 2013, page 5
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
SERVICES
Foot & Ankle Hand & Wrist
Knee & Hip Shoulder & Elbow
Spine & Back Sports Medicine
Total Joint Replacement
LOCATIONS
Arlington
Chaska
Delano
Glencoe
Mound
Olivia
Waconia
Watertown
TCO Arlington
Sibley Medical Center
601 West Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
(952) 442-2163 TCOmn.com
PHYSICIANS
Dr. Barnett Dr. Holthusen Dr. Mair
Dr. Marek Dr. Friedland Dr. Sanders
Dr. Wyard Dr. Meyer
R22-34CEL,23-34Aa
History
Engagements
Sierra Allison, daughter of
Walter and Sharla Allison,
Arlington, will be among the
candidates competing for the
title of Miss Teen of Min-
nesota at the 2013 state pag-
eant which will be held in St.
Cloud from Friday, July 26
through Sunday, July 28.
The winner of the pageant
competition will receive a
$1,000 cash scholarship,
award plaque, medallion of
excellence and sash. The new
state titleholder will also be
eligible to compete for the
national title of Miss Teen of
America and vie for addition-
al scholarships, awards and
prizes.
Each state candidate will
be scored in six judging cate-
gories which are Scholastic
Record, Achievement and
Service to School and Com-
munity, General Awareness
Written Test, Personal Devel-
opment of Talents and Skills,
Personality Projection in For-
mal Wear, and Interview.
National pageant founder,
Warren Alexander, said,
“This pageant truly represents
the young women of the 21st
century. Sixty percent of the
scoring involves written re-
sumes and testing, with the
strongest single category
being the interview with the
judges.”
The state pageant finals
will be held in Atwood Cen-
ter on the campus of St.
Cloud State University at 2
p.m. Sunday, July 28. The
event is open to the general
public and tickets will be
available for purchase at the
door. Special guests will in-
clude the current reigning
Miss Teen of Minnesota,
Megan Smith, Eden Prairie.
Sierra Allison is candidate
for Miss Teen of Minnesota
Recently, the Minnesota
Department of Transportation
(MnDOT), in partnership
with the Department of Em-
ployment and Economic De-
velopment (DEED), awarded
a total of $15.7 million in
grants to five state trunk
highway projects that will
support growing industry and
businesses, and improve the
transportation network for all
users. Le Sueur was one of
the cities selected. It will re-
ceive $2,072,571.
“This is great news, not
just for Le Sueur, but the sur-
rounding areas as well,” said
Senator Kevin Dahle (DFL –
Northfield). “Projects like
this extend beyond the one
community and assist the
whole region. This is a boost
for economic development in
southern Minnesota.”
The funding was awarded
under the Transportation Eco-
nomic Development Program
(TED). MnDOT and DEED
have provided nearly $70
million in grants to 29 com-
munities through the TED
program since 2011. Program
criteria emphasize improve-
ments that enhance the
statewide transportation net-
work, including all modes
and all jurisdictional systems,
and improvements that allow
existing businesses to expand
or new businesses to locate
near the project area. The
TED program also has lever-
aged more than $125 million
from public and private part-
ners who derive a direct ben-
efit from the improvement.
“The TED program is a
great example of a public-pri-
vate partnership. It brings to-
gether different interests for
the betterment of the commu-
nity. We should continue to
look for ways to expand this
program, as well as create
other initiatives based on this
successful model.”
The $15.7 million provided
this year will help leverage an
additional $25 million in
other federal, state, local, and
private funding for a total
construction program of $40
million.
“Approximately 200 jobs
will be created as a result of
this project. Highway 169 is
in need of improvements and
this grant will leverage an ad-
ditional $5 million dollars in
spending to boost job
growth.”
This project coincides with
Senator Dahle’s bill that pro-
vides for the relocation of the
Highway 169 rest area in Le
Sueur, allowing Cambria to
acquire the land it needs to
expand its business and cre-
ate as many as 500 local jobs.
“This is just another exam-
ple of helping out a local
company to create economic
growth. Cambria has been a
strong local partner and this
provision allows them to con-
tinue to expand their busi-
ness.”
MnDOT and DEED re-
ceived 25 applications re-
questing $73 million in fund-
ing. Project selection was
based on consistency with
transportation plans, econom-
ic benefits, project financing
and project readiness.
Le Sueur receives $2 million-plus grant
Keith and Kathy Eggers-
gluess, Arlington, announce
the engagement of their
daughter, Krista Marie Eg-
gersgluess, to Thomas Antho-
ny Stadick, son of Edwin and
Debra Stadick, New Ulm.
Krista is a 2005 graduate of
the Sibley East Senior High
School in Arlington. She is
currently going to South Cen-
tral College in Mankato for
her AAS as a Medical Assis-
tant. She is employed at Oak
Hills Living Center in New
Ulm.
Thomas is a 2006 graduate
of the Cathedral High School
in New Ulm. He is employed
for CEEC INC. in Wabasso
as a Millwright.
A Friday, October 25 wed-
ding is planned in Arlington.
Eggersgluess - Stadick
90 Years Ago
July 12, 1923
Louis Kill, Editor
We take pride in the fact that
Arlington had a wonderful pa-
rade at the Fourth of July cele-
bration last Wednesday. Most of
our business places were repre-
sented with floats which re-
quired much time and expense
to build. It was a wonderful pa-
rade containing more than 20
representative floats besides
decorated cars and other vehi-
cles.
This year the annual school
election falls on Saturday, July
21st, and will take place in the
assembly room of the public
schools at 7:30 p.m. The mem-
bers of the school board whose
terms will expire are R. L.
Sander and C. F. Maurer, both
of whom have filed for re-elec-
tion.
Sibley County with 2,949 au-
tomobiles and trucks, stands
47th among the 87 counties in
Minnesota in number of motor
vehicles according to figures
published by the Farmer, St.
Paul. According to the Farmer
there are now 64-1/2 miles of
trunk highways in Sibley Coun-
ty.
60 Years Ago
July 9, 1953
Louis Kill, Editor
Announcement was made this
week of a change of ownership
in the Schumann furniture and
undertaking business in this city,
which has been owned and con-
ducted by Paul Schumann for
the past ten years. The new
owner is Alfred H. Olson, Madi-
son, Minn., who will take pos-
session July 15.
Private Loren Reichenbach,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Re-
ichenbach, Arlington, who is
stationed at Chaumont, France,
with the 843rd Engineer Avia-
tion Battalion, was flown home
from Frankfurt, Germany, in
about 24-1/2 hours to be at the
bedside of his father who suf-
fered a stroke June 29. The
telegram was sent Monday
forenoon from Gaylord and Pvt.
Reichenbach was started on his
journey home Tuesday morning
from Chaumont, France, by
train, arriving in Frankfurt, Ger-
many, late the same day, where
he had to wait 24 hours for a
plane which took him to Prest-
wig, Scotland, arriving there at
midnight. After a short stopover
of two hours, he was again on
his way across the Atlantic.
After a short stop in Iceland, he
arrived at Westmore Air Force
Base, Mass., 10-1/2 hours after
leaving Scotland. He boarded
another plane, arriving in Min-
neapolis at 7:30 a.m. Friday
morning.
30 Years Ago
July 14, 1983
Val Kill, Editor
The newly organized A-GI
school board gave the go ahead
to the science lab remodeling
project by accepting contracting
bids for $23,162 at a special
meeting on July 5. Work already
begun in the Arlington science
room is expected to be complet-
ed before school starts.
Twelve bands from Arlington,
Green Isle, Henderson and
Chaska and even from as far
away as St. Cloud, Paynesville
and West St. Paul played from 2
p.m. until midnight at the 13th
annual Green Isle country music
jamboree on Sunday. The crowd
was enthusiastic but smaller
than last year because of it being
one of the hottest days of the
year.
The first clean sweep at Red-
wood Falls Speedway was ac-
complished Sunday night by
Brian Schmidt of Arlington in
the sportsman class. Schmidt
won all events entered: his heat,
the trophy dash and the A fea-
ture.
15 Years Ago
July 9, 1998
Kurt Menk, Editor
Arlington three-year-old
Courtney Schwirtz recently re-
ceived a special certificate from
the Arlington Ambulance Asso-
ciation. Courtney received the
special recognition after she
alerted her grandmother about a
medical emergency on her
grandparents’ farm near Green
Isle last fall. Courtney is the
daughter of Joe and Mary Beth
Schwirtz, Arlington.
Five members of the Min-
nesota State Class A Baseball
Champions were recently
named to the 1998 Minnesota
River Conference All - Confer-
ence Baseball Team. The five
players included seniors Ryan
Sauter, Eric Nesvig and Nathan
Kube, junior Jon Werner and
sophomore Rudy Rios.
A Retirement/Retreat Cere-
mony in honor of Major Sharon
A. W. Buckley was recently
held at the United States Air
Force Weather Agency, Offutt
Air Force Base, Nebraska. Sev-
eral people from Minnesota at-
tended the event including her
parents, Earl and Janet Wieman
of Arlington. Major Buckley is
the Commander of Headquarters
Squadron, Headquarters Air
Force Weather Agency, Offutt
Air Force Base.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Fireworks
The NAPA Fireworks Show was dis-
played after the races at the Arlington
Raceway on Saturday night, July 6.
Thomas Stadick and
Krista Eggersgluess
Barbknecht - Brockhoff
Kris Willmsen, Arlington,
and the late Virgil Brockhoff
announce the engagement of
their son, Eric Brockhoff, to
Brooke Barbknecht, daughter
of David and Vicki Barb-
knecht, Janesville.
Eric is employed as an area
sales representative for
Locher Brothers, Green Isle.
He is the grandson of Violet
and the late Marvin Brock-
hoff, Arlington, and the late
Earl and Betty Machemehl,
Lester Prairie.
Brooke is employed as a re-
altor with Nustar Realty.
A wedding is planned for
Saturday, July 27.
Eric Brockhoff and
Brooke Barbknecht
Bryan Koepp, 49, owner of
the former Glencoe Garden
Center, was recently sen-
tenced on four felony charges
of theft by false representa-
tion for allegedly obtaining
$367,475 in loans from 15
separate parties over a two-
year time span; loans which
were never repaid, according
to an article in the McLeod
County Chronicle.
Koepp will serve 360 days
in the McLeod County Jail,
20 years of probation to the
Department of Corrections
and was ordered to pay resti-
tution of $367,475 to the vic-
tims.
Koepp gets 20 years probation
One Stop Shopping
Just place your ad in one stop for any of these papers:
The Sibley Shopper /
Arlington ENTERPRISE
402 West Alden, Arlington • 507-964-5547
info@ArlingtonMNnews.com
McLeod
Publishing
Glencoe Advertiser • The Galaxy
McLeod County Chronicle • Silver Lake Leader
Arlington ENTERPRISE
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, July 11, 2013, page 6
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Sports
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Sibley East graduates Eric
Thies and Andrew Thies
placed first and second at the
annual Freedom Fun Run in
St. Peter on Thursday morn-
ing, July 4.
Eric, a 24-year-old former
University of Nebraska run-
ner, won the 8K (five miles)
with a time of 26 minutes, 57
seconds.
Andrew, a member of the
track and cross country teams
at South Dakota State Univer-
sity, placed five seconds be-
hind his brother.
Eric won the race in 2008
and 2009. He placed fourth
last year.
Andrew, 20, also placed
second last year.
They are the sons of Kevin
and Kathleen Thies, rural Ar-
lington.
Thies brothers place first and second
at annual Freedom Fun Run in St. Peter
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington Summer
Recreation Night will be
held at the Arlington Base-
ball Park on Tuesday night,
July 16.
The Arlington A’s base-
ball team will host the
Veseli Warriors at 7:30 p.m.
Children and their par-
ents are invited to attend
the game.
There will be prizes
awarded throughout the
evening. In addition, free
root beer floats will also be
served.
The staff for the Summer
Recreation Program con-
sists of Director Matt
Pichelmann and assistants
Ed Reichenbach and Jordan
Thomes.
Summer Recreation Night is
set for Tuesday night, July 16
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Craig Dose and Matt
Pichelmann, both members of
the Arlington A’s baseball
team, have been selected to
the 2013 River Valley League
All Star Team.
Dose has played with the
A’s for 16 years while Pichel-
mann has played with Arling-
ton for three years.
The seventh annual Town
Ball All Star Game between
the River Valley League All
Stars and the Dakota-Rice-
Scott League All Stars will be
held at Veseli at 8 p.m. Thurs-
day, July 12. A home run
derby will start at 7 p.m.
Gaylord Islanders named to
the River Valley League All
Star Team are Collin Grams
and Brad Walsh.
Mike Walsh, Gaylord, will
be one of the managers for
the River Valley League All
Star Team.
Craig Dose and Matt Pichelmann
selected to all star baseball team
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Green Isle Irish base-
ball team compiled two wins
in action last week.
The Irish, 13-6 overall, will
travel to Winsted at 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, July 11. Green Isle
will travel to Mayer at 4 p.m.
Saturday, July 13. The Irish
will also travel to Hamburg at
2 p.m. Sunday, July 14. In ad-
dition, Green Isle will host
Watertown at 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, July 17.
Green Isle 8
Norwood 1
The Green Isle Irish base-
ball team toppled visiting
Norwood 8-1 on Tuesday
night, July 2.
Cody Hallahan pitched the
entire game and picked up the
mound win. The right hander
allowed one earned run on
three hits. He also struck out
nine.
Jackson Hallahan, Lucas
Herd and Chris Knoll con-
tributed two singles apiece.
Keller Knoll belted a home
run while Dylan McCormick,
Pat Moriarty, Zach Herd and
Cody Hallahan added one
single each.
Green Isle 20
Cologne 2
The visiting Green Isle
Irish baseball team pounded
Cologne 20-2 in seven in-
nings on Sunday afternoon,
July 7.
Pat Moriarty sparked the
lumber company with two
singles and two doubles.
Zach Herd had a single and a
triple while Matt Breyer
recorded two singles. Zac
Weber, Mike Dent and Keller
Knoll ripped one double
apiece while Brian Scher-
schligt, Nate Pilacinski, Pat
Gullickson, Lucas Herd and
Chris Knoll added one single
each.
Gullickson hurled scoreless
ball over the first three
frames. The right hander also
fanned three batters.
Moriarty pitched the next
four innings and posted the
mound victory. The right han-
der gave up one earned run.
He also issued one walk.
Green Isle Irish compile 2 wins
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington A’s baseball
team, in a game called after 8
1/3 innings due to rain, lost to
visiting New Ulm 11-3 in
league play on Sunday night,
July 7.
The A’s scored their first
run in the bottom of the third
inning. Cody Doekott drew a
leadoff, advanced to second
base and scored on a one-out
single by Craig Dose.
Arlington plated its two
other runs in the bottom of
the sixth frame. The A’s tal-
lied the two runs on a leadoff
walk to Scott Dose, a single
by Jake Lucas, a hit by pitch
to Shane Henke, an RBI sin-
gle off the bat of Michael
Bullert and an RBI groundout
by Doekott.
Craig Dose and Michael
Bullert paced the offense
with two singles each while
Lucas and Doekott added one
single apiece.
Matt Pichelmann pitched
the first seven innings and
suffered the mound loss.
Dan Chies and Bryce Eg-
gert worked the eighth in-
ning.
The A’s will travel to Fair-
fax at 6 p.m. Sunday, July 14.
Arlington will then host
Veseli at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday,
July 16.
Arlington A’s fall to New Ulm 11-3
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East American
Legion baseball team split
two games during the past
week and captured the league
championship with a 6-2
record overall.
Sibley East will close out
its regular season against vis-
iting Waconia at Walsh Field
in Gaylord on Thursday
night, July 11.
Sibley East will begin play
in the district tournament
next week. The district tour-
nament is being hosted by
Norwood Young America and
Cologne.
Norwood Young America 6
Sibley East 2
The visiting Sibley East
American Legion baseball
team fell behind early and
lost to Norwood Young
America 6-2 on Tuesday
night, July 2.
Michael Uecker paced the
offense with a double while
Brody Rodning, Andrew
Brockhoff and Austin Brock-
hoff added one single each.
Nick Haupt pitched the
first three innings and was
tagged with the mound loss.
The right hander also fanned
three.
Uecker, Travis Schmidt and
Brockhoff all pitched in re-
lief.
Sibley East 3
Tri-City United 2
The Sibley East American
Legion baseball team edged
visiting Tri-City United 3-2 at
Walsh Field in Gaylord on
Monday night, July 8.
Cody Doetkott, Zac Weber,
Michael Uecker and Andrew
Grack contributed one hit
apiece.
Brody Rodning pitched the
first five innings and posted
the mound victory. The lefty
yielded two runs on five hits.
He also struck out eight.
Grack tossed scoreless ball
over the final two frames and
recorded the save.
Legion baseball team
wins league title with
a 6-2 record overall
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The visiting Arlington
VFW baseball team lost to
Sleepy Eye 6-1 on Monday
night, July 1.
Zac Weber paced the Ar-
lington eight-hit attack with a
single and a double. Nick
Doekott contributed two sin-
gles while Austin Brockhoff,
Lukas Bullert, Collin Pautsch
and Logan Jorgenson collect-
ed one single each.
Jason Meyer pitched the
first three innings and suf-
fered the mound loss. The
right hander surrendered just
one earned run on four hits.
He also fanned one and
walked three.
Brockhoff worked score-
less ball over the final three
innings. The right hander
gave up two hits. He also
recorded two strikeouts.
Arlington will play a dou-
bleheader at Wells at 10 a.m.
Saturday, July 13.
Arlington VFW falls to Sleepy Eye 6-1
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Green Isle first baseman Pat Moriarty
smacked a double in the top of the first
inning at Cologne on Sunday after-
noon, July 7.
Submitted Photo
All Star Football Game
Tyler Bates, a 2013 graduate of the Sibley East Senior
High School, played in the Minnesota High School All
Star Football Game at Husky Stadium at St. Cloud
State University on Saturday afternoon, June 29.
Bates played tight end for the South Team which de-
feated the North Team 24-14. Bates, who did not
catch a pass, played half of the snaps in the first half
and most of the offensive plays in the second half.
Only two passes were thrown his way during the
game. He is the son of Eric and Kris Bates, Arlington.
Brody Rodning, a junior
on the Sibley East varsity
boys baseball team, was re-
cently named to the New
Ulm Journal All Area Base-
ball Team.
Rodning, who tossed a no
hitter this past season, has
been a dominating pitcher for
the Wolverines the past two
seasons, according to Sibley
East head coach Dan Tack-
mann. He was 4-0 on the
mound with 50 strikeouts and
a 0. 58 ERA during the
weather-shortened season.
He was named Minnesota
River Conference pitcher of
the year and All-Conference
two years in a row.
Rodning named
to all area team
Greys to play
in Stillwater
on Sat., July 20
The Arlington Greys Base
Ball Club will play two
games in Stillwater during a
tournament on Saturday, July
20.
The Greys will face the
Rochester Roosters at 11
a.m. and the Red Stockings
at 2 p.m.
The matches are played at
the Old Athletic Field in
Stillwater.
Arlington ENTERPRISE
Classifieds in print & online
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> Buy and sell the easy way with the Classifieds.
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, July 11, 2013, page 7
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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Arlington Raceway
Karts Jr. Sportsman
- Feature
1. 7L Jackson Lewis, Lakeville
2. 14 Jonathan Schroeder, Hen-
derson
3. 00 Andrew Grussendorf, Gay-
lord
4. 3J Jason Reimers, Belle Plaine
5. 43 Scott Simmons, Lakeville
6. 95 Vincent Knutson, Monti-
cello
7. 9Z Zach Meyer, Silver Lake
8. 55 Sunshine -Wight Tripp, no
town
9. 137 Parker Buesgens, no town
10. 13 Brodie Buesgens, no town
Karts Stock - Feature
1. 42X Terry Lang, St. Paul
2. 44 Blake Schnobrich, New
Ulm
3. 07 Daulton Lamont, Elko
4. 3X Nicole Hall, Mankato
5. 1J Holli Reimers, no town
6. 7J Matt Roepke, Arlington
Karts Rookie - Heat
1. 1J Joey Reimers, Belle Plaine
2. 1M Jackson Metzger, Jordan
3. 4 Michael Stien, Gaylord
4. 12 Zoe Porter, M a d i s o n
Lake
5. 14K Logan Kotasek, Belle
Plaine
6. 30 Matt Johnson, St. Peter
7. 72 Tate Isaacson, no town
8. 77 Emma Allen, St. Peter
9. 79 Chaldin Wisch, Arlington
10. 99 Chayton Buesgens, no
town
IMCA SportMods - Feature
1. 7L Eric Larson, Madison Lake
2. 2X Jesse Marshall, Chanhas-
sen
3. 0 Justin Remus, Sleepy Eye
4. 38M Mark Garver, Wells
5. 23 Brett Trebesch, Sleepy Eye
6. 13 Adam Revier, Glencoe
7. 3X Jeremy Brown, Rosemount
8. 71 Josh Larsen, Glencoe
9. 74 Dustin Engelke, Lester
Prairie
10. 7S Shawn Harms, Green Isle
11. 35 Joe Maas, Howard Lake
12. 26 Derek Wolters, Arlington
13. 48 John Albrecht, Glencoe
14. 74X Zack Malchow, Hutch-
inson
Stock Cars - Feature
1. 33 Matthew Schauer, Arling-
ton
2. 92 Dan Mackenthun, Ham-
burg
3. 25 Brent Reierson, Arlington
4. 1m Jeff Mccollum, Mankato
5. 28 Jeff Holstein, New Ulm,
6. 31 John Polifka, Glencoe
7. 23M David Moriarty, Jordan
8. 10E Darrell Eckblad, St Peter
9. 2D Mori Oestreich, Henderson
10. 87 Brent Uecker, Hutchinson
11. 71M Chris Meyer, Silver
Lake
Sprint Cars - Feature
1. 4S Mike Stien, Gaylord
2. 2R Ron Guentzel, no town
3. 55 Bruce Allen, Mankato
4. 79 Aaron Wisch, Arlington
5. 1300 Brett Allen, Gaylord
6. 14K Victoria Knutson, Monti-
cello
7. 5 Gary Serbus, Olivia
8. 33S Jeremy Schultz, Hutchin-
son
Modifieds - Feature
1. 33 Jason Helmbrecht, Howard
Lake
2. 12 Chad Porter, Madison Lake
3. M8 Dalton Magers, Redwood
Falls
4. 32 Nick Helmbrecht, Winsted
5. 74T Tim Pessek, Hutchinson
6. 10 Andrew Timm, Mankato
7. 6Z Nate Zimmerman,
Janesville
8. 111 Adam Voss, Arlington
9. 56 Bill Johnson, St. Peter
10. 3C Chet Atkinson, Hugo
11. 8 Jeff Coon, Elysian
IMCA Sport Compact
- Feature
1. 43 Terry Blowers, Waseca
2. 15 Kyren Porter, Madison
Lake
3. 81 Ryan Sturges, Silver Lake
4. 17 Ashelyn Moriarty, Jordan
5. 42 Tyler Archer, Plato
6. 30 Logan St. John, Arlington
7. 83X Kalab Stoeckman, Ar-
lington
8. 54 Alan Lahr, Nicollet
9. 64 Dave Revier, Glencoe
10. 22 Robert Rutt, Norwood
11. 27 Jed Trebelhorn, Winthrop
Outlaw Hobby - Feature
1. 92 Dan Mackenthun, Ham-
burg
2. 4X Scott Oestreich, Belle
Plaine
3. 21W Tony Winters, Green Isle
4. 3J Jessie Johnson, Belle Plaine
5. 01X Perry Oestreich, Belle
Plaine
6. 45 Brad Roepke, Mayer
7. 44 Bryan Apitz, New Ulm
IMCA Hobby - Feature
1. 72 Chris Isaacson, New Ulm
2. 00 Cody Schnepf, Waseca
3. 38B Brad Becker, Gaylord
4. 75 Josh Telecky, Hutchinson
5. 16 Ryan Grochow, New Ulm
6. 100 Brad Schnepf, Waseca
7. 6T Tim Heidecker, Silver
Lake
8. 34 Dakota Robinson, Arling-
ton
9. 03 Tory Harazin, Redwood
Falls
10. 1S Sarah Voss, Belle Plaine
11. 57 Brian Loscheider,
Cologne
12. 27Z Jeremy Ziemke, Janes-
ville
13. 32 Jason Baune, Hutchinson
14. 78 Kevin Latour, Le Sueur
15. 1K Kristin Voss, Belle Plaine
16. 56M Matt Olson, Franklin
17. 10S Trevor Serbus, Olivia
18. 777 Spencer Pitzele, White
Bear
19. 22 Todd Sievert, Gibbon
20. 39 Mike Voigt, New Auburn
21. 01X Patrick Oestreich, Belle
Plaine
22. 4X Brad Strauss, Janes-
ville
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
T-Ball at Summer Rec
These boys and girls took a break from their t-ball game and posed
for a group picture last week. Front Row: (left to right) Grace Straub,
Ava Neubarth, Abby Stender, Sasha Bovard, Jadyn Krueger, Maya
Kumar, Jada Henke, Morgan Johnson and Morgan Haggenmiller.
Back Row: (l to r) Coach Ed Reichenbach, Joe Jordan, Spencer
Tuchtenhagen, Ethan Groninga, Will Feterl, Parker Burdorf, Jack
Feterl, Tommy Ziegler, Brock Lucas and coach Jordan Thomes.
The wolf population re-
mains firmly established on
Minnesota’s landscape, ac-
cording to a comprehensive
population survey conducted
by the Department of Natural
Resources (DNR).
The latest survey results es-
timate that within Minneso-
ta’s wolf range there were
438 packs and 2,211 wolves
last winter – down 710
wolves from the survey five
years ago. Minnesota’s wolf
range generally covers the
state’s forested region.
The DNR intends on put-
ting in place another conser-
vative wolf season in fall and
winter 2013.
Although lower than the
2008 wolf population survey
estimate of 2,921 wolves, the
population exceeds the state’s
minimum goal of at least
1,600 wolves and is above the
federal recovery goal range of
1,251 to 1,400 animals.
“Results from the 2013
wolf survey continue to
demonstrate that Minnesota’s
wolf population is fully re-
covered from its once threat-
ened status and the population
is responding naturally to the
availability of deer, wolves’
primary food source,” said
Dan Stark, DNR large carni-
vore specialist.
One of the primary factors
influencing the wolf popula-
tion estimate was a 13 percent
increase in average wolf pack
territory size to about 62
square miles. The increase in
territory size likely is caused
by fewer deer per square
mile, which has declined 25
percent since 2008 in the
forested region of Minnesota.
A 12 percent decrease in
the average number of wolves
per pack from 4.9 to 4.3 also
contributed to the lower pop-
ulation estimate. John Erb,
DNR research biologist, said
the reduction in average pack
size likely is a combination of
reduced prey and the harvest
of wolves in the two months
immediately preceding the
mid-winter wolf pack counts.
Survey data is collected in
mid-winter before pups are
born. The birth of pups signif-
icantly boosts the wolf popu-
lation each spring. With an
estimated 438 packs in Min-
nesota and an average litter
size of six, as many as 2,600
wolves were added to the
population when pups were
born this spring.
“This is part of the annual
population cycle for wolves
in which many pups are born
each spring and then the pop-
ulation declines through the
rest of the year through vari-
ous sources of mortality until
the next whelping season the
following spring,” Erb said.
The DNR periodically con-
ducts comprehensive wolf
population surveys and annu-
ally monitors wolf population
indicators such as carnivore
scent post surveys, winter
track surveys and wolf depre-
dation trends. Survey data al-
lows wildlife biologists to as-
sess the population’s status
and help ensure the long-term
survival of the wolf in Min-
nesota.
The DNR will more closely
monitor pack and territory
sizes in the next few years.
Minnesota’s wolf population remains strong
More frequent radio collar-
ing of wolf packs will provide
additional data on the popula-
tion’s response to wolf season
harvest.
Compared to previous
years, wolf populations had
added mortality as a result of
the 2012 wolf season and
higher than normal livestock
depredation control but con-
tinue to thrive. Wolves are
widely distributed throughout
their range and total wolf
range has expanded in several
areas along the southern and
western boundaries since the
last survey in 2008.
The DNR will continue to
monitor and regulate the take
of wolves, to ensure that
human-caused mortality will
not exceed safe levels for
long-term population sustain-
ability.
The DNR’s fall and winter
2013 wolf season will be
based on the framework es-
tablished for the 2012 season.
Season details along with ap-
plication information for
prospective hunters and trap-
pers will be available in late
July once DNR biologists de-
velop a final proposal and
tribal authorities are consulted
on the season framework.
The DNR’s goal for wolf
management, as outlined in
the state’s wolf management
plan, is to ensure the long-
term survival of wolves in
Minnesota while addressing
wolf-human conflicts that in-
evitably result when wolves
and people live in the same
vicinity. The DNR’s wolf
management plan includes
wolf-specific population and
health monitoring, research,
depredation management,
public education and law en-
forcement efforts.
Visit the DNR website at
www.mndnr.gov/wolves to
find the full report, an FAQ,
and an overview of wolf man-
agement in the state, including
the wolf management plan.
E-Mail us at
info@ArlingtonMNnews.com
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, July 11, 2013, page 8
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
www.mmcjd.com · www.wegotgreen.com
"DRIVE GREEN
EVENT"
SHOW ROOM will be open 4-6 pm
FEED A
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Bring a non-perishable
food item for local
food shelves
Midwest Machinery will match the total
dollar amount of food donated.
Sponsored by the United Way.
10% OFF John Deere Licensed Merchandise
Offer valid Tues., July 16, 2013 and Thur., July 18, 2013 only. Prices and model availability may vary by dealer. Some restrictions
apply; other special rates and terms may be available, so see your dealer for details. Available at participating dealers.
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We thank you for your business
and support throughout the year!
Join us for - Door Prizes
- Refreshments 5-7pm
CUSTOMER APPRECIATION DAY
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Tuesday nights with normal trap open.
Teams forming now. Individual, 2 man, 5 man.
For more info, call Kenny
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A27-29E28-30Sj
Sibley County Court
Legals
NOTICE OF MORTGAGE
FORECLOSURE SALE
THE RIGHT OF VERIFICA-
TION OF THE DEBT AND IDEN-
TITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDI-
TOR WITHIN THE TIME PRO-
VIDED BY LAW IS NOT AF-
FECTED BY THIS ACTION.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
that default has occurred in con-
ditions of the following described
mortgage:
DATE OF MORTGAGE:
09/22/2006
MORTGAGOR: Marcus W.
Middleton
MORTGAGEE: Vi ctori a L.
Lang
DATE AND PLACE OF
RECORDING: Recorded
09/25/2006, Si bl ey County
Recorder Document Number A-
207472
ASSIGNMENTS OF MORT-
GAGE: none
TRANSACTION AGENT: none
TRANSACTION AGENT’S
MORTGAGE IDENTIFICATION
NUMBER ON MORTGAGE:
none
LENDER OR BROKER AND
MORTGAGE ORIGINATOR
STATED ON MORTGAGE: Victo-
ria L. Lang
RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE
SERVICER: Victoria L. Lang
MORTGAGE PROPERTY AD-
DRESS: 5202 2nd St, New
Auburn, MN 55366
TAX PARCEL I.D. #:
36.0176.010
LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
Lots 17 and 18, Block 32 in the
City of New Auburn, according to
the recorded plat thereof, Sibley
County, Minnesota
COUNTY IN WHICH PROP-
ERTY IS LOCATED: Sibley
ORIGINAL PRINCIPAL
AMOUNT OF MORTGAGE:
$97,118.76
AMOUNT DUE AND
CLAIMED TO BE DUE AS OF
DATE OF NOTICE, INCLUDING
TAXES, IF ANY, PAID BY MORT-
GAGEE: $97,118.76
That prior to the commence-
ment of this mortgage foreclosure
proceeding Mortgagee/Assignee
of Mortgagee complied with all
notice requirements as required
by statute; That no action or pro-
ceeding has been instituted at
law or otherwise to recover the
debt secured by said mortgage,
or any part thereof;
PURSUANT to the power of
sale contained in said mortgage,
the above described property will
be sol d by the Sheri ff of sai d
county as follows:
DATE AND TIME OF SALE:
07/29/2013 at 10:00 AM
PLACE OF SALE: Si bl ey
County Law Enforcement Center,
419 Harrison, Gaylord, MN 55334
to pay the debt then secured
by said Mortgage, and taxes, if
any, on said premises, and the
costs and disbursements, includ-
ing attorneys’ fees allowed by law
subject to redemption within six
(6) months from the date of said
sale by the mortgagor(s), their
personal representatives or as-
signs unless reduced to Five (5)
weeks under MN Stat. §580.07.
TIME AND DATE TO VACATE
PROPERTY: If the real estate is
an owner-occupied, single-family
dwelling, unless otherwise provid-
ed by law, the date on or before
which the mortgagor(s) must va-
cate the property if the mortgage
is not reinstated under section
580.30 or the property is not re-
deemed under section 580.23 is
12:01 a.m. on 01/31/2014.
MORTGAGOR(S) RELEASED
FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGA-
TION ON MORTGAGE: None
“THE TIME ALLOWED BY
LAW FOR REDEMPTION BY
THE MORTGAGOR, THE MORT-
GAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRE-
SENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS,
MAY BE REDUCED TO FIVE
WEEKS IF A JUDICIAL ORDER
IS ENTERED UNDER MIN-
NESOTA STATUTES, SECTION
582.032, DETERMINING,
AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT
THE MORTGAGED PREMISES
ARE IMPROVED WITH A RESI-
DENTIAL DWELLING OF LESS
THAN FIVE UNITS, ARE NOT
PROPERTY USED IN AGRICUL-
TURAL PRODUCTION, AND
ARE ABANDONED.”
Victoria L. Lang
Mortgagee
Gregory A. Lang #59894
Attorney for Mortgagee
17800 Old Excelsior Blvd.
Minnetonka, MN 55345
Publish: June 6, 13, 20, 27,
July 4 and 11, 2013
Government Public Notice
Frontier provides basic resi-
dential services for rates from
$8.30-$22.01 for flat rate service.
Frontier also provides basic busi-
ness servi ces for rates from
$10.51-$44.03. Other taxes, fees,
and surcharges may apply. Fron-
tier offers single party service,
touch tone, toll blocking, access
to long distance, emergency serv-
ices, operator assistance, and di-
rectory assistance. Use of these
services may result in additional
charges. Budget or economy
services also may be available. If
you have any questions regarding
Fronti er' s rates or servi ces,
please call us at 1-800-921-8101
for further information or visit us
at www.Fronti er.com
<http://www.Frontier.com>.
Publish: July 11, 2013
Submitted Photo
Girl Scout Tour
Girl Scout Troop 4221 recently received
a tour of the Arlington Area Ambulance
Service and the Sibley Medical Center
to receive their badge My Best Self.
Adeline Willems, Rachel Scott, Kaitlyn
Patrin, Riley Neubarth, Anna Meeker,
Morgan Kroells and Arlington Area Am-
bulance Service Manager Kevin Sulli-
van.
The University of Min-
nesota Extension Service
continues its recognition of
Outstanding Farm Families in
various counties throughout
the state.
KNUJ Radio, AM 860, and
SAM Radio, FM 107.3, will
interview Dale and Julie
Schwartz, Arlington, at 6:15
p.m. Tuesday, July 16.
Dale and Julie Schwartz
have been chosen as the Sib-
ley County Outstanding Farm
Family of the Year.
KNUJ Radio to interview Schwartz family
The following misdemeanors,
petty misdemeanors and gross
misdemeanors were heard in
District Court June 28-July 5:
Minnesota State Patrol (MSP);
Sheriff’s Office (SO); Depart-
ment of Natural Resourced
(DNR); MN Department of
Transportation (MNDOT):
Luis A. Lopez, 48, Gaylord,
traffic regulations-U turn, $135,
Arlington PD; Brian D. Reier-
son, 41, Arlington, fail to license
animal, dismissed, dog not on
leash, dismissed, Arlington PD;
Claire L. Schierman, 17,
Hutchinson, speed, $125, Arling-
ton PD; Michael A. Andrews, 32,
Rockford, Ill., uninsured vehicle,
dismissed, Gibbon PD; Donna
K. Freidrichs, 40, Gibbon, no
current dog license, $135, Gib-
bon PD; Aaron T. Crawford, 21,
Green Isle, proof of insurance,
dismissed, Henderson PD;
Manuela C. Arredondo, 21,
Green Isle, uninsured vehicle,
continued, unsupervised proba-
tion 12 months, remain law-abid-
ing, pay costs, no driving with-
out insurance, $100, MSP;
Robert A. Boltmann, 69, Ham-
burg, seat belt, $110, MSP;
Corey L. Carpenter, 39, Arling-
ton, failure to stop at stop signs
or stop lines, $135, MSP; Ashley
R. Jennings, 32, Arlington,
speed, $125, MSP; William K.
Long, 54, Topeka, Kan., speed,
$250, MSP; Robert T. Pendleton,
70, Morton, seat belt, $110,
MSP; Lawrence V. Sterzinger,
Jr., 76, Ivanhoe, speed, contin-
ued, unsupervised probation 12
months, remain law-abiding, pay
costs, no moving violations,
$135, MSP; Craig S. Wagner, 51,
Maple Grove, speed, $125, MSP;
Curtis L. Bell. 21, Cokato, in-
struction permit violation, $135,
Winthrop PD.
medical condition. Seniors are
often afraid of losing their
benefits and having programs
they rely on cost more money
or get cut altogether.
Case in point is Medicare
Part D, the popular prescrip-
tion drug benefit. This is a
program that has been a ster-
ling success, in a time when
confidence in government is
reaching all-time lows. Part D
is a rare example of a govern-
ment program that has consis-
tently cost less year after year
than originally budgeted. To
be specific, it has cost $348
billion less than original esti-
mates. The Congressional
Budget Office found every
one percent increase in pre-
scriptions filled results in a
.20 percent decrease in spend-
ing on other Medicare servic-
es.
Key take-away for seniors:
what works in health care is
likely to be well received
heading into next year's elec-
tion. While Obamacare con-
tinues to experience stagnant
approval ratings (the latest
polls continue to trend down-
ward), it's clear that seniors
will gravitate toward public
policies that meet their needs
and help to address health
care spending.
For both Democrats and
Republicans, the good news is
that the senior vote is still get-
table. However, a good por-
tion of voters over 65 pay
close attention to policy
specifics, making it more im-
portant to ensure that both
parties recognize this. Pre-
serving programs that work,
while prioritizing seniors'
long-term interests, will yield
significant political dividends
in 2014 and beyond.
Neither side can afford los-
ing them.
Douglas Schoen is a politi-
cal strategist and author of
Hopelessly Divided: The New
Crisis in American Politics
and What it Means for 2012
and Beyond, published by
Rowman & Littlefield Pub-
lishers.
Schoen Continued from page 4
Call us at:
320-864-5518
The McLeod County Chronicle
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, July 11, 2013, page 9
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
McGraw Monument
Works, Inc., LeSueur
Local Representative
Leah Schrupp
Arlington, MN 55307
612-308-8169
3 miles North of LeSueur
on Highway 169
30945 Forest Prairie Road
(507) 665-3126
HOURS: M-F 8-5
Weekends by appointment.
Visit our
INDOOR AND OUTDOOR
DISPLAYS
M31-30Ea
Blessings
being confident of this, that he who began a good work in you will carry
it on to completion until the day of Christ Jesus. Philippians 1:6 NIV
Zion Lutheran Church
Green Isle Township
Worship: Sunday 9:00 a.m.
Commercial and Industrial Builders
Green Isle, MN 55338
ph. 507.326.7901 fax: 507.326.3551
www.vosconstruction.com
Arlington State Bank
Serving the Community Since 1895
BANKING SERVICES
964-2256
Arlington
A & N Radiator Repair
Allen & Nicki Scharn, Owners
23228 401 Ave., Arlington
877-964-2281 or 507-964-2281 Bus.
Certified ASE Technician on Staff
Also distributor for Poxy Coat II
Industrial Grade Coatings/Paint
MID-COUNTY
CO-OP
700 W. Lake St., Box 177
Cologne, MN 55322
(952) 466-3700
or TOLL FREE: 1-888-466-3700
HUTCHINSON CO-OP
AGRONOMY
LEON DOSE,
Arlington Branch Manager
411 7
th
Ave. NW • (507) 964-2251
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
402 W. Alden, Arlington
507-964-5547
Online at
www.Arlington
MNnew.com
Arlington Haus
Your Hometown Pub & Eatery
1986-2009
Arlington • 1-507-964-2473
STATE BANK OF
HAMBURG
100 Years. 100 Reasons.
Phone 952-467-2992
statebankofhamburg.com
CONVENIENCE
STORE
Hwy. 5 N., Arlington
507-964-2920
Homestyle Pizza
Real or Soft Serve Ice Cream
Gas — Diesel — Deli — Videos
(507)
964-2212
www.
chefcraigs
.com
23180 401 Ave., Arlington Phone 507-964-2264
EQUAL
HOUSING
LENDER
CRAIG BULLERT
ARLINGTON, MN
23189 Hwy. 5 North,
Arlington, MN 55307
arlington@hutchcoop.com
Office (507) 964-2283
Cell (320) 583-4324
HC
FUNERAL SERVICE
P.O. Box 314
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-2201
Member
FDIC
Church News
Menu
Submitted Photo
Three Generations of Fourth Degree Knights
Tim Kloeckl, middle, and Bryce Kloeckl, right, recent-
ly became Fourth Degree Knights at the Minnesota
Knights of Columbus Fourth Degree Spring Exemplifi-
cation held in Rochester. Father and grandfather Tony
Kloeckl, left, has been a Fourth Degree Knight since
April 29, 1995. The purpose of the Fourth Degree of
the Knights of Columbus is to instill a love of country
and impress the duties of citizenship. Their motto is
“Patriotism enlightened and informed by religion.
After seven years of faith-
ful service, Rev. Ben Lane
has felt God’s leading to re-
sign as pastor of Creekside
Community Church in Ar-
lington.
In recognition of Pastor
Ben’s ministry and as an ex-
pression of Creekside’s love
for the whole Lane family, a
farewell/appreciation day is
planned for Sunday, July 14.
Creekside invites everyone
to be part of this special day.
Service will start at 10:30 fol-
lowed by a meal prepared by
members of Creekside Com-
munity Church.
Farewell/Appreciation Day
is planned for Lane family
EVANGELICAL
COVENANT CHURCH
107 W. Third St., Winthrop
Pastor Kyle Kachelmeier
507-647-5777
Parsonage 507-647-3739
www.wincov.org
Sunday, July 14: 9:30 a.m.
Worship. 10:45 a.m. Fellowship
hour. Blood pressure screenings
before and after service.
Monday, July 15: 7:30 a.m.
Walking at the track.
Wednesday, July 17: 9:00
a.m. Prayer coffee.
Thursday, July 18: 7:30 a.m.
Walking at the track.
GAYLORD ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
Gaylord
Bob Holmbeck, Pastor
Friday, July 12: 7:00 p.m.
Home Bible study - Ducas, Far-
mington.
Sunday, July 14: 9:00 a.m.
Sunday school. 10:00 a.m. Sun-
day worship service.
Wednesday, July 17: 6:30
p.m. Evening Bible classes and
Youth Focused, prophet Tom
Stamman will be coming. All
are welcome - all will be prayed
over.
ST. PAUL’S EV.
REFORMED CHURCH
15470 Co. Rd. 31, Hamburg
Dan Schnabel, Pastor
952-467-3878
www.stpaulsrcus.org
Sunday, July 14: 9:30 a.m.
Worship service.
Tuesday, July 16: 7:30 p.m.
Men’s Brotherhood.
ORATORY OF
ST. THOMAS
THE APOSTLE
Jessenland
507-248-3550
Fr. Sam Perez
Thursday: Weekly Mass at
5:00 p.m.
ST. PAUL’S UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Henderson
(507) 248-3594 (Office)
Rev. Brigit Stevens, Pastor
Find us on Facebook:
St. Paul’s UCC - Henderson
Sunday, June 30: 9:00 a.m.
Worship.
ST. MARY, MICHAEL
AND BRENDAN AREA
FAITH COMMUNITY
Fr. Keith Salisbury, Pastor
Friday, July 12: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Mar).
Saturday, July 13: 5:00 p.m.
Mass (Mar).
Sunday, July 14: 7:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m. Mass
(Mic). 10:30 a.m. Mass (Mar).
Monday, July 15: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar). 8:00 p.m.
AA and Ala-Non (Mar).
Tuesday, July 16: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar).
Wednesday, July 17: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m. Word
and Communion (Oak Terrace).
5:00 p.m. Mass (Mar).
Thursday, July 18: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mic). 7:30 p.m.
Narcotics Anonymous (Mic).
TRINITY LUTHERAN
32234 431st Ave., Gaylord
Rev. James Snyder,
Interim Pastor
Sunday, July 14: 8:30 a.m.
Worship with Communion.
Monday, July 15: 7:00 p.m.
Summer evening worship at St.
Paul’s with Communion.
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Pastor William Postel
Phone 507-964-2400
Sunday, July 14: 9:00 a.m.
Worship with Holy Communion.
Wednesday, July 17: 7:00
p.m. Men’s Club.
Thursday, July 18: 5:30 p.m.
Deadline for bulletin and calen-
dar information.
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN
Green Isle
Friday, July 12: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, July 14: 7:45 a.m.
Worship with Communion. Pas-
tor Bob Hines. 9:00 a.m. Voters
meeting.
Tuesday, July 16: 8:30 p.m.
Joint Elders meeting at St.
Paul’s.
PEACE LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Kurt Lehmkuhl, Pastor
Sunday, July 14: 9:00 a.m.
Worship service with Holy
Communion.
Monday, July 15: 7:00 p.m.
Worship service.
Thursday, July 18: 7:30 p.m.
Church Council meeting.
ZION LUTHERAN
814 W. Brooks St.
Arlington – (507) 964-5454
James Carlson, Pastor
Sunday, July 14: 9:00 a.m.
Worship. 10:00 a.m. Fellowship.
Tuesday, July 16: 6:00 to
7:00 p.m. TOPS in church base-
ment.
Thursday, July 18: 9:00 a.m.
and 1:00 p.m. Zion service on
cable. 6:00 p.m. Africa Partner-
ship Ministry at Christ Lutheran
in Glencoe.
ZION LUTHERAN
Green Isle Township
Friday, July 12: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, July 14: 10:30 a.m.
a.m. Worship without Commun-
ion. Pastor Bob Hines.
Tuesday, July 16: 8:30 p.m.
Joint Elders meeting at St.
Paul’s.
CREEKSIDE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Christian & Missionary
Alliance
Ben Lane, Pastor
114 Shamrock Drive
Arlington – 507-964-2872
www.creekside-church.com
email: creeksidecc@media-
combb.net.
Thursday, July 11: Men’s
study at Chuck Peik’s home.
Friday, July 12: 9:00 to 11:00
a. m. Memorial gathering in
honor of David Gustafson. Me-
morial service begins at 11:00
a.m., lunch to follow.
Saturday, July 13: REACH
youth group kickball tournament
at Jaycee park in Gaylord, regis-
tration begins at 9:00 a.m.
Sunday, July 14: 10:30 a.m.
Worship service with the Lord’s
Supper and potluck lunch to fol-
low.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
(507) 304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
507-234-6770
Saturday: Church services at
9:30 a.m. Bible study at 11:00
a.m. Fellowship dinner at 12:00
p.m. All are welcome.
UNITED METHODIST
Arlington
Rodney J. Stemme, Pastor
www.arlingtonunited
methodist.org
Saturday, July 13: 8:00 a.m.
A-Men men’s group.
Sunday, July 14: 9:00 and
11:00 a.m. Worship. 10:15 a.m.
Fellowship.
Tuesday, July 16: 6:30 p.m.
SPPRC. 7:30 p.m. Ad. Council.
Thursday, July 18: 10:00
a.m., 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. Wor-
ship on cable TV. 7:00 p.m.
Women’s Bible study.
SENIOR DINING
Call 326-3401 for a meal
Suggested Donation $3.85
Monday: Ginger citrus chicken,
ri ce, frui t, mi xed vegetabl es,
cake, low fat milk.
Tuesday: Roast pork, whole
potatoes, buttered cabbage,
bread with margarine, rosy ap-
plesauce, low fat milk.
Wednesday: Lasagna, Califor-
ni a bl end vegetabl es, l ettuce
salad with dressing, garlic bread
with margarine, pudding, low fat
milk.
Thursday: Tator tot casserole,
green beans, peaches, bread
with margarine, bar, low fat milk.
Friday: Meaty beef stew with
carrots and potatoes, cole slaw,
breadstick with margarine, fruit
cobbler, low fat milk.
ST. PAUL LUTHERAN
(WELS),
Arlington
Bruce Hannemann, Pastor
WEBSITE:
www.stpaularlington.com
EMAIL:
Bruce.Hannemann@stpaul
arlington.com
Sunday, July 14: 9:00 a.m.
Worship service.
Monday, July 15: 7:30 p.m.
Worship.
Tuesday, July 16: 10:00 a.m.
Good Samaritan service. 6:30
p.m. CES plan meeting.
Thursday, July 18: 10:00 a.m.
Bulletin information due. 11:00
a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Services on
cable TV, channel 8.
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ARLINGTON:
401 W. Alden St.
PO Box 388
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-5547
Fax: 507-964-2423
BarbM@ArlingtonMNnews.com
GLENCOE:
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PO Box 188
Glencoe, MN 55336
320-864-5518
Fax: 320-864-5510
advertising@glencoenews.com
SILVER LAKE:
104B Lake Avenue
PO Box 343
Silver Lake, MN 55381
320-327-2216
Fax: 320-327-2530
slleader@embarqmail.com
OR OR
LIES KE TRAC TOR
Want ed: Your OLD TRAC TORS,
any con di tion, make or mod el. We
also spe cial ize in new and used
TRAC TOR PARTS AND RE PAIR.
Call Kyle. Lo cat ed west of Hen -
der son. (612) 203-9256.
$$ DOL LARS PAID $$ Junk ve -
hi cl es, re pai r abl e cars/trucks.
FREE TOW ING. Flatbed/ wreck er
serv ice. Im me diate pick up. Mon -
day-Sun day, serv ing your area
24/7. (952) 220-TOWS.
2007 Pontiac G6 GT 3.5L, V6. Red
cloth interior, 79,000 miles. $8950.
Call (320) 510-2223.
Small plastic company for sale.
Operate full or part time. Move to
your area. (563) 213-2458.
CON KLIN® DEAL ERS NEED ED!
Life time ca reer in mar ket ing, man -
age ment and ap ply ing “Green”
pro ducts made in Amer i ca. Full
time/ part time. For a free cat a log,
call Franke’s Con klin Serv ice now
at (320) 238-2370. www.frank e -
mar ket ing.com.
HAND Y MAN: Will do re mo del ing
of kitch ens, bath rooms, hang ing
doors and wi nd ows, pai nt i ng,
sheet rock ing, tex tur iz ing or any
minor re pairs in side or out side.
Wi l l al so do cl ean i ng of base -
ments/ga rag es. Call (320) 848-
2722 or (320) 583-1278.
Spe cial- 95% Good man gas fur nace
and pro gram ma bl e ther mo stat
$2,200 in stalled or AC unit $1,900
in stalled. J&R Plumb ing Heat ing AC,
Lester Prair ie (320) 510-5035.
Min ne so ta Twins sea son tick ets
for 2013 sea son. Sec ti on 121
seats. Pack age in cludes 2 seats.
5, 10 or 15 game pack ag es avail -
able. Con tact Rick at (952) 224-
6331 for more in for ma tion.
BUY ING JUNK BAT TER IES
We buy used bat ter ies and lead
weights. Pay ing top dol lar for junk
bat ter ies. Pay ing $12 for au to mo tive
bat ter ies We pick up with 18 bat tery
min i mum. Call 800-777-2243.
OLD MO TOR CY CLES WANT ED:
Cash paid, pre fer ably non run ning
con di tion, ti tle or no ti tle, Hon da,
Su zu ki, Ka wa sa ki, Ya ma ha, Tri -
umph and oth er makes. Please
call Dar ick at 507-381-3405.
WANT ED TO BUY: Old signs all
types, farm primi tive paint ed fur ni -
ture all types, cup boards, cub by
units, lock er and pool wire bas -
kets, wood & metal piec es with
lots of draw ers, old pre-1960 holi -
day dec o ra tions, in dus tri al/school
items such as metal racks, stools,
work bench es, light n ing rods and
balls, weath er vanes, ar chi tec tur al
items like cor bels and stain glass
wind ows. We buy one item and
en tire es tates. Don’t get a dump -
ster un til you call us first! We are
lo cal. (612) 590-6136.
Red Door Ken nel Board ing and
Train ing. Fair fax. (507) 430-1319.
www.red doorken nel.org.
Arlington. 3 Bedroom, 1-3/4 bath,
house, fi repl ace, l arge fami l y
room, double garage, corner lot.
(507) 380-7675 for more details.
2BR Apart ment wi th ga rage, wa -
ter/sew er/gar bage in clud ed. $450/mo.
New Au burn (320) 327-2928.
New l y up dat ed apart ments i n
Ren ville. Wa ter, heat, gar bage in -
clud ed. New ap plianc es in clud ing
new air con di tion er. On-site laun -
dry facil i ties. Off-street park ing
avail able with elec tri cal out lets.
Pet friend ly. (320) 564-3351.
1BR up stairs apart ment on Main
Street in Ar ling ton. Two ref er enc es
re quired. Call Da vid (507) 964-2256.
Duplex, 2BR, oversized garage, W/D
on main level, AC, Arlington. No
smoking or pets. $600 rent plus utili-
ties and deposit. (952) 758-7622
2BR ground floor apart ment avail -
abl e Jul y 1. Rent re duced. In -
cludes wa ter, heat, gar bage. Call
(320) 564-3351 for ap point ment.
2 BR Apartments, Arlington. Rent
starting at $653. Central AC, pri-
vate porch, walk-in closets, wash-
er/dryer in each apt. Garage avail.
AMBERFIELD PLACE APART-
MENTS. (800) 873-1736.
Arlington, 3BR, 1-3/4 bath, house,
fireplace, large family room, dou-
ble garage, corner lot. (507) 380-
7675 for more details.
2BR house with ga rage for rent in
Oli via. Also: 3BR house with 2
stall ga rage for rent in Ren ville.
Call (320) 212-3217.
Young farmer looking for land to
rent for 2014 and beyond. Com-
petitive rates and references avail-
able. Call Austin Blad at (320)
221-3517.
Hip Hop Fam i ly Shop Con sign -
ment. New/ Gent ly used. (507)
964-5654, Ar ling ton. Clip and save
50% on any one piece cloth ing
item. (GREAT STUFF!)
Remember the Past
Occassional Sale
is Open in the Hutchinson Mall
1060 Hwy. 15 South
July 11-13
July 17-21
Hours:
Wed.-Fri. 10-8
Saturday 10-6
Sunday 12-5
Vintage, Home decor, Furniture,
Salvaged Junk, Rustic, Cottage,
Country, Victorian, Kitchen, And
Many Misc. Unique Treasures For
The Yard, Cabin, or Home.
320-583-9519
Buying and Selling
TWO OLD GOATS JULY SALE,
WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 12 p.m.-6
p.m.; THURSDAY, JULY 11, 12
p.m.-6 p.m. Garden furniture, fun
stuff. Everything will be 20% OFF.
317 Main Street, Arlington, MN.
CUS TOM LOG SAW ING- Cut at
your place or ours. White oak lum -
ber deck ing and fire wood. Give
Vir gil a call. Schau er Con struc tion,
Inc. (320) 864-4453.
Pro fes sion al Care tak ers on per -
son al ba sis with rea son able rates.
In teri or and ex te ri or sched uled
clean ing, pet care, grounds keep -
ing, main tenance, bob cat work,
de bris re mov al. Matt and Mary
(320) 510-2211.
AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
AUTOMOTIVE
Cars
EMPLOYMENT
Business Opportunity
Help Wanted
Work Wanted
FOR SALE
Heating/Air Cond.
Miscellaneous
Wanted To Buy
LIVESTOCK, PETS
Animal Care
REAL ESTATE
Houses
RENTAL
Apartment
House
Want To Rent
SALES
Sales
SERVICES
Misc. Service
EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE
Wanted To Buy
RENTAL
Apartment
SALES
Sales
Independent Living
55+ Arlington Sr. Apartment ONLY
FREE Application
FREE Damage Deposit
FREE 1
st
Month Rent
Apply by July 15
th
Move in by September 1
st
Lease Today!
800-873-1736 or 507-642-8701
kanderson@amberfieldplace.com
www.amberfieldplace.com
A24-27E,25-28Sa
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, July 11, 2013, page 10
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Classifieds
ADD ANOTHER PAPER
FOR ONLY
$
2.00 PER PAPER
(based on first week pricing)
The McLeod
County Chronicle
Silver Lake Leader
The Glencoe
Advertiser
The Sibley Shopper
Arlington Enterprise
The Galaxy
3-WEEK SPECIAL: ONE WEEK:
$
15
80
2
nd
Week 1/2 Price
3
rd
Week FREE
McLeod
Publishing
All Six Papers Reach Over 50,000 Readers Weekly in over 33 Communities
For 20 words, one time in
ANY TWO PAPERS and on the internet.
30¢ per word after first 20 words.
AGRICULTURE AUTOMOTIVE EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE LIVESTOCK
& PETS
LIVESTOCK
& PETS
REAL ESTATE SERVICES RENTAL RENTAL
All ads appear online
at GlencoeNews.com
Enterprise
To place an ad: Call: 507-964-5547; Fax: 507-964-2423; E-Mail: info@ArlingtonMNnews.com; Mail: P.O. Box 388, Arlington, MN 55307
Advertising
Deadlines
The McLeod County Chronicle Mondays at Noon
The Arlington Enterprise & The Silver Lake Leader Tuesdays at Noon
The Glencoe Advertiser, The Sibley Shopper
& The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
Commercial
Building and
Business
Opportunity
Call (507) 964-2256
A22-25E,23-26Sa
Available...
1 & 2 Bedroom
Apartments Available
All utilities,
except electric
Income based
Must be 62 or older
or handicapped
Highland Commons
Arlington
507-964-5556
A
1
6
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2
8
E
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7
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2
9
A
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G
a
HANDICAP
ACCESSIBLE
TOUGH ENOUGH TO WEAR WYLIE?
$1,000 flatbed sign-on. Home Weekly.
Regional dedicated routes. 2,500 miles
weekly. $50 tarp pay. 888/691-5705
www.drive4ewwylie.com
DRIVERS/OWNER OPERATORS
wanted. Contact 540/280-0194. In-
dustry leading rates, 90% of line
haul rate. 100% of fuel surcharge.
SEMI-DRIVER WANTED:
Owner/Operator or Company Driver
with 3 years experience hauling live-
stock. CDL, Good Driving Record,
Drug Test Required. 563/380-7852
Dale or 563/380-4535 Kevin.
CASH FOR CARS:
All cars/trucks wanted. Running or not! Top
dollar paid. We come to you! Any make/
model. Call for instant offer: 800/871-9145
IF YOU USED
the Mirena IUD between 2001-pres-
ent and suffered perforationor embed-
ment in the uterus requiring surgical
removal, or had a child bornwith birth
defects you may be entitled to compen-
sation. Call Johnson Lawand speak with
female staff members 800/535-5727
CANADA DRUG CENTER
is your choice for safe and affordable med-
ications. Our licensed Canadian mail order
pharmacy will provide you with savings of
up to 75% on all your medication needs.
Call today 800/259-1096 for $10.00 off
your first prescription and free shipping.
DISH TV RETAILER
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12
mos.) & High Speed Internet start-
ing at $14.95/month (where avail-
able.) Save! Ask About same day In-
stallation! Call now! 800/297-8706
MEDICAL ALERT
for Seniors - 24/7 monitoring. Free
equipment. Free shipping. Nation-
wide service. $29.95/month. Call
Medical Guardian today 888/918-3581
GUARANTEED INCOME
for your retirement. Avoid market risk
& get guaranteed income in retire-
ment! Call for free copy of our safe
money guide plus annuity quotes from
A-rated companies! 800/631-4558
MISCELLANEOUS
MISCELLANEOUS
AUTOS WANTED HELP WANTED - DRIVERS
MEDICAL
Your ad here!
Only $249 to reach a statewide audience of
3 million readers!!! 1-800-279-2979
YOUR AD HERE!
One phone call & only $249
to reach a statewide audience
of 3 million readers!!!
1-800-279-2979
Pinske Real Estate
& Auctioneers
(507) 964-2250
Arlington
• 48 acres good bare
farm land. All tillable. 1/4
mi . SE of Arl i ngton.
$9,500 per tillable acre.
We need listings of
homes, farms and hobby
farms. If you are thinking
about selling it will pay for
you to call us.
REAL ESTATE
A27E28SGj
A27-28Ej
A26-27Ej
Sibley Electric Inc, located in Gaylord, has
an opening for a permanent, full-time, experi-
enced Apprentice or Journeyman Electrician.
Applicant must possess a valid driver’s license.
Must be willing to travel, if the project requires it.
Travel pay and perdiem will be negotiated. Com-
petitive wages, holiday and vacation pay, along
with 401K.
Contact Becky at 507-237-2025 for more
information and an application.
A27-29AS27-28CEa
PHOTO CLASSIFIED
11 PUBLICATIONS
5 WEEKS f
o
r
f
o
r
p
l
u
s
p
l
u
s
For $50 your ad will run for 5 weeks in these 11 publications:
The Glencoe Advertiser • The Sibley Shopper • Renville County Register
Arlington Enterprise • The McLeod County Chronicle • Silver Lake Leader
Renville County Shopper • The Galaxy • Western Peach
www.GlencoeNews.com • www.ArlingtonMNnews.com
716 E. 10th St., P.O. Box 188, Glencoe, MN 55336 • 320-864-5518 • trishak@glencoenews.com
Help Wanted
Golden Hearts Assist-
ed Living has an open-
i ng for an eveni ng
caregi ver. Approxi -
mately 64 hours every
two weeks i ncl udi ng
every other Saturday
and Sunday.
Apply in person:
Golden Hearts
602 Marion Dr., Arlington
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