7-4-13 Arlington Enterprise

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Arlington
ENTERPRISE
Serving the Communities of Arlington and Green Isle, Minnesota
www.arlingtonmnnews.com Volume 129 • Number 53 • Thursday, July 4, 2013 • Arlington, MN 55307
Single copy $1.00
The Minnesota Department
of Natural Resources
(MnDOT) has completed the
traffic signal deactivation
evaluation that was started in
April at the intersection of
Highway 5 and Main Street,
according to a news release
from MnDOT.
The evaluation, MnDOT
said, was necessary to deter-
mine the feasibility of remov-
ing the existing traffic signal
and replacing it with a two-
way stop (through-stop con-
trol.)
Throughout the evaluation
period, traffic operations at
the intersection were moni-
tored closely by the Arlington
Police Department, MnDOT,
and Sibley County. During
the evaluation, no crashes or
close calls were observed,
and motorist compliance and
acceptance of the revised
traffic control has been excel-
lent. Due to the success of
the evaluation, MnDOT will
remove the traffic signal on
Tuesday July 9 (weather per-
mitting). All signs currently
present at the intersection
will remain, and motorists on
Main Street will need to con-
tinue heeding stop signs be-
fore entering the intersection,
when it is clear. Highway 5
motorists will not need to
stop at the intersection, ex-
cept for when pedestrians are
crossing.
The signal is being re-
moved to improve traffic
flow and safety at the inter-
section. An earlier MnDOT
study determined that current
and forecasted traffic is not
high enough to warrant the
signal at Highway 5 and
Main Street that has been in
place for at least 30 years, ac-
cording to MnDOT records.
Replacing the signal with
through-stop control is ex-
pected to reduce the frequen-
cy and severity of crashes,
based on crash records from
other urban through-stop con-
trolled intersections on the
state highway system, with
similar volumes of traffic. It
is believed that through-stop
controlled intersections have
fewer crashes because mo-
torists are required to be at-
tentive and actively look for a
safe gap in traffic, rather than
relying on a traffic signal in-
dication that does not tell the
motorist if it is safe to enter
the intersection.
In addition to expected
crash reduction benefits, the
removal of the signal will re-
sult in cost savings to both
the City of Arlington and
MnDOT.
Traffic signal at Highway 5
and Main Street in Arlington
to be removed Tuesday, July 9
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Tim Schellhammer recently
began his duties as the new
senior high principal at the
Sibley East Senior High
School.
The Sibley East School
Board, during a meeting on
Monday night, May 13, voted
4-0 and approved a motion to
offer the senior high principal
position to Schellhammer
who accepted the offer on the
following morning.
Schellhammer was born in
Chatfield. He is a 2000 grad-
uate of the Chatfield High
School where he participated
in football, basketball, base-
ball, band, fall play, one-act
play and spring play.
Schellhammer is also a
2005 graduate of the Univer-
sity of South Dakota in Ver-
million where he received a
Bachelor of Science Degree
in Education to teach 5-12
mathematics. He also played
defensive end for the football
team there during his last
three years.
In the spring of 2006,
Schellhammer taught math
and coached basketball at
Chamberlain, South Dakota.
During the past seven
years, Schellhammer taught
9-12 math at the Minnetonka
High School. In addition, he
coached football on the varsi-
ty staff for two years and on
the sophomore staff for three
years.
Schellhammer and his
wife, Katie, were married two
years ago. The couple has a
daughter, Lola, who is 4 1/2
months old.
“Going through the inter-
view process, I heard some of
the highlights and strengths
of the district,” said Schell-
hammer. “One of the
strengths is the teachers and
staff. The teachers and staff
are dedicated. I’ve been en-
couraged by that. I’m also ex-
cited about the up-to-date
technology.”
Schellhammer is also very
pleased that he has the ability
to tap the experience of for-
mer Senior High Principal
Jim Amsden who now serves
as the new superintendent.
Schellhammer can also
draw a lot of similarities be-
tween Chatfield and Sibley
East.
“I’m excited to be here and
excited to meet and attend the
various events in the commu-
nities this summer,” said
Schellhammer.
Schellhammer begins duties as new senior high principal
By Dave Pedersen
Correspondent
It took a while to decide,
but the Sibley County Com-
missioners voted not to enter
a marketing agreement pro-
posal to utilize a Coast2Coast
Rx drug prescription card in-
volving user discounts and
county rebates at the meeting
on Tuesday, June. 25.
Vicki Stock, Public Health
and Human Services Direc-
tor, told the board at the May
14 meeting that the prescrip-
tion card offering discounted
rates would be used by the
public and jail inmates.
Stock said not only is there
no cost to the county to im-
plement this program, the
county would receive a small
amount of rebate money.
The pharmacy discount
card was endorsed by the As-
sociation of Minnesota Coun-
ties (AMC) and is used by
other counties. Stock said the
prescription card is for people
who are under insured, but
anybody can use it.
After County Commission-
er Bill Pinske asked about the
impact on the small drug
stores in Sibley County, the
topic was tabled until reac-
tion could be received by
local pharmacies. At the June
11 board meeting, there was
still no clarity on the impact
of the card locally and it was
tabled again.
County Administrator Matt
Jaunich presented informa-
tion received from the three
local drug stores at the June
25 meeting and asked the
board to decide one way or
another.
Stock had talked to the
three county pharmacies and
got mixed reviews. First
Choice Pharmacy in Gaylord
and Henderson ran some test
claims that showed the dis-
count card in general takes
off between five and six dol-
lars per order. It was thought
the card would apply to few
people and the store would
not encourage use of the card.
In Arlington, Les Morreim
at Morreim Pharmacy
thought the program would
benefit uninsured people, or
people that have insurance
but a very high deductible.
The store has received dis-
count cards from other com-
panies and has no issues.
Stock said Ellen Anderson
of Guidepoint Pharmacy in
Winthrop said at times pa-
tients are better off paying the
cash price rather than using a
discount card. Anderson also
saw a story in Consumer Re-
ports magazine that said the
discount card program can be
a source of identity theft. The
store would go along with the
program, but not promote it.
County Commissioner
Harold Pettis said he was at a
recent South Country Health
Alliance meeting and learned
Waseca County did not opt
for the discount card pro-
gram.
County Commissioner Jim
Nytes said he was definitely
against it. He said it will hurt
the bottom line of the small
local business.
The vote not to use the pro-
gram was unanimous.
Sibley County decides not to use
drug prescription discount card
Tim Schellhammer
Enterprise photo by Karin Ramige Cornwell
Meteorologist Jerrid Sebesta
KARE 11 meteorologist Jerrid Sebesta
was at the Sibley East Public School in
Arlington as part of the elementary
summer school program on Wednes-
day morning, June 26. Sebesta shared
his weather knowledge, conducted a
few experiments and answered ques-
tions during the event.
by Karin Ramige Cornwell
Manager
The Sibley East School
Board held a work session,
prior to the regular board
meeting on Monday, June 17.
The purpose of the meeting
was to discuss the proposed
increase to the district’s activ-
ity fees. The increase was
proposed at the May 20 meet-
ing, but tabled for further dis-
cussion.
The proposed increase of
$5 to $10 per category is due
to an increase of $1,000 in
the athletic contract with
Ridgeview Medical Center.
The increase in the contract
is for the required ImPACT
concussion testing.
The ImPACT testing had
been paid for by grant money
over the last couple of years.
That grant money has run
out.
The proposed activity fees
for varsity sports (grades 9-
12) would increase from
$100 to $110, junior high
sports (grades 7-8) and cheer-
leading from $80 to $90.
The fee for other activities,
such as plays, DECA,
Knowledge Bowl, Speech,
Jazz Band and Swing Choir,
would increase from $25 to
$30.
The activity fees for stu-
dents that qualify for free and
reduced lunches would in-
crease by five dollars.
Students qualifying for re-
duced lunches would pay a
fee of $75 for varsity sports
and $60 for junior high sports
and cheerleading.
Fees for students in the free
lunch category would be $40
for varsity sports and $35 for
junior high and cheerleading.
There is no reduced fee
schedule for activities.
The family maximum for
athletics would increase $50
to $450 excluding any fees
paid for activities.
During the meeting, the
board, along with Activity
Directory Randy Walsh,
looked at the fees for other
schools in the Minnesota
River Conference, and partic-
Activity Fees
Continued on page 5
SE Board approves activity fee hike
Due to the Fourth of July
holiday, the Arlington Enter-
prise and Sibley Shopper of-
fice will be closed on Thurs-
day, July 4.
The office will also be
closed on Friday, July 5.
The office will reopen from
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, July
8.
Enterprise/Shopper office will
be closed on Thursday, July 4
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, July 4, 2013, page 2
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
*24E25S,26SEa
Card Shower
honoring
JEAN LUEPKE
on her
91
st
Birthday
Mon., July 15
Cards may be
sent to her at:
411 7th Ave. NW,
Arlington, MN 55307
*26E27SEj
Thursday, July 4: 4th of July! Both banks will be
closed.
Monday, July 8: Arlington Chamber of Com-
merce, Sibley Medical Center, conference room A,
noon.
Arlington Township Board, Arlington Community
Center, 7:30 p.m.
Arlington VFW Post 6031 Auxiliary, veterans
building at fairgrounds, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, July 9: Arlington Legion Post #250,
veterans building at fairgrounds, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, July 10: The Minnesota River Area
Agency of Aging trained health insurance coun-
selors are available from 10:30-11:30 a.m. at the
Sibley Medical Center in Arlington. to schedule
help at a different time or location, contact the Sen-
ior Linkage Line at 800-333-2433.
Community
Calendar
EQUAL HOUSING LENDER
MAIN BANK
Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (straight thru)
DRIVE THRU
Monday - Thursday, 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.,
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Member
FDIC
Arlington State Bank
(507) 964-2256
Fax (507) 964-5550
www.ArlingtonStateBank.com
Notice:
We would like to thank
whoever is taking all of
our rhubarb. It would
be nice if you at least
asked before taking it
all. If you like it that
much, plant your own.
Mary & Don Piotter
*26Ej
News Briefs
Vehicle strikes a horse
A vehicle reportedly struck a horse along Highway 22
in McLeod County at 11:26 p.m. Thursday, June 27, ac-
cording to the Minnesota State Patrol.
Marissa J. Owen, 17, Hutchinson, was driving a 2008
Pontiac northbound on Highway 22 when a horse re-
portedly came out of the ditch. The vehicle, in turn,
struck the horse.
Owen suffered a non-life threatening injury. A pas-
senger, Kaytland E. Welsch, 18, Hutchinson, also suf-
fered a non-life threatening injury.
The Glencoe Ambulance, Glencoe Police Department
and McLeod County Sheriff’s Department also assisted
at the scene.
Radiator cores are taken
Some steel radiator cores were reportedly taken from
A & N Radiator Repair, rural Arlington, sometime on
Thursday, June 27, according to the Arlington Police
Department.
People who have any information about this incident
are encouraged to contact the Arlington Police Depart-
ment at 507-964-5200.
No injuries in 1-vehicle crash
A one-vehicle accident without injuries reportedly oc-
curred along 322nd Street in Henderson Township on
Sunday, June 30, according to the Sibley County Sher-
iff’s Department.
Maria Aguilar, 47, Le Sueur, was driving a vehicle
eastbound on County Road 18 when the vehicle entered
the north ditch, hit a culvert and then a driveway.
The vehicle sustained moderate damage.
Eagan man injured in accident
A one-vehicle crash with injuries reportedly occurred
at the intersection of County Road 18 and 351st Avenue
on Saturday, June 29, according to the Sibley County
Sheriff’s Department.
Jacob Burt, 19, Eagan, was driving a 2002 Saturn
southbound on County Road 18 when the vehicle en-
tered the west ditch, struck a field approach and then hit
a culvert.
Burt was transported by the Le Sueur Ambulance to
the Le Sueur Community Hospital where he was treated
for moderate injuries, according to the report.
The vehicle was a total loss.
Vehicles collide at intersection
A two-vehicle accident reportedly occurred at the in-
tersection of County Road 8 and County Road 18 on
Saturday, June 29, according to the Sibley County Sher-
iff’s Department.
A Dodge Caravan driven by Amanda Eisel, 28,
Cleveland, and a Dodge Stratus driven by Dana Hauer,
22, Le Sueur, collided at the intersection.
Both drivers were treated at an area hospital and re-
leased, according to the report.
The vehicles sustained severe damage. The accident
is still under investigation.
Vandalism reported in town
An individual or individuals reportedly scratched the
hood of a 2002 Grand Prix sometime on Monday, June
24, according to the Arlington Police Department.
The vehicle, owned by Bryce C. Noeldner, was
parked along the 300 block of East Alden Street.
Martens named to Dean’s List
Ashley Martens, a 2009 graduate of the Sibley East
Senior High School, was recently named to the Dean’s
List at Winona State University during the spring se-
mester.
To be named to the Dean’s List, a student must
achieve a grade point average of 3.5 or higher on a 4.0
scale.
She is the daughter of Kevin Martens, Gaylord, and
Lori Martens, Gaylord.
Petzel graduates from Bethany
Benjamin Petzel, a 2009 graduate of the Sibley East
Senior High School, graduated from Bethany Lutheran
College during recent commencement exercises.
Petzel received a Bachelor of Arts Degree. He ma-
jored in Broad Field Social Studies - Secondary Licen-
sure.
He is the son of Randy and Judy Petzel, Arlington.
Mallory named to Dean’s List
Green Isle resident Erin Mallory was recently named
to the Dean’s List at Normandale Community College
during the spring semester.
To qualify for this honor, students must be enrolled in
at least nine credits and achieve a grade point average
of 3.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
New Trees At Memorial Park
Members of Girl Scout Troop #33229 recently planted
seven young trees at Memorial Park in front of the
Sibley Medical Center in Arlington. The Sibley Medical
Center purchased the young trees. The young trees
will replace a few older trees which were removed a
few months ago in order to bring the helipad into
compliance. Left to right: Kiri In, Kiernan Louwagie,
Isabel Tigre, Jaden Kmetz, Madison Tuchtenhagen,
Alivia Strack and Sommer Brockhoff.
By Joe Kimball
Many of the laws passed in
the past Minnesota legislative
session took effect July 1, in-
cluding more money for all-
day kindergarten, higher edu-
cation and millions more for
city and county budgets.
Some of that money comes
from a new tax rate on the
highest incomes and a $1.60-
per-pack cigarette tax in-
crease.
Some of the key changes,
courtesy of House Informa-
tion Services:
Education
An estimated $15.7 billion
on K-12 over two years, an
increase of $485 million.
About half of the new money
will go on the basic school
funding formula, another
$134 million will fund op-
tional all-day kindergarten
statewide starting in the fall
of 2014. Special education
will get an additional $40
million.
An end to high-stakes state
graduation exams, but now
students will take, but not
have to achieve a minimum
score on, a new set of tests in
reading, writing and math.
Students in grade 11 will take
a nationally recognized col-
lege entrance exam such as
the ACT.
Employment &
Economic
Development
Adds $30 million to the
Minnesota Investment Fund,
for loans to assist expanding
businesses. An additional $24
million for a job creation
fund to help businesses make
capital investments and create
jobs in the state. The Min-
nesota Film and TV Board
gets $10 million to offer fi-
nancial incentives, such as
production cost rebates.
Environment &
Agriculture
$20.4 million for the Agri-
cultural Growth, Research
and Innovation program to
develop new markets for
Minnesota farmers, facilitate
livestock operations and pro-
vide for biofuel and other en-
ergy development including
renewable energy projects for
rural residents;
$2 million for the state’s
county fairs to enhance arts
access and education to pre-
serve and promote Minneso-
ta’s history and cultural her-
itage;
$300,000 to protect polli-
nator habitat.
Health &
Human Services
An overall cut of $50 mil-
lion over the next two years,
but still has increases in serv-
ices and wages for some who
recently have seen cuts to
programs and paychecks.
Nursing homes will receive a
5 percent funding increase,
with the majority earmarked
for employee pay raises. Per-
sonal care attendants will re-
ceive a 1 percent increase,
with more available based on
the quality of service they
provide
Employers with 50 or more
employees who purchase in-
surance through the individ-
ual market must include
autism spectrum disorder
coverage in their policies.
Higher
Education
An increase of $250 mil-
lion over two years, bringing
the total to $2.8 billion. A
two-year tuition freeze for
resident undergraduates at the
University of Minnesota and
for all undergraduates at the
Minnesota State Colleges and
Universities system.
Legacy Funds
A total of $496.1 million to
fund dozens of arts, parks,
trails and natural resources
projects:
Clean Water Fund —
$194.9 million;
Arts and Cultural Heritage
Fund — $115.9 million;
Outdoor Heritage Fund —
$100.05 million; and
Parks and Trails Fund —
$85.1 million.
Additionally, the Minneso-
ta State Arts Board will re-
ceive $42.6 million to support
artists and arts organizations.
New Laws
Continued on page 5
New Minnesota laws went into effect July 1
OFFICES CLOSED
Due to the
July 4
th
Holiday,
all of our offices
will be CLOSED
Thurs.,
July 4
July 4
th
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Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, July 4, 2013, page 3
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Business & Professional
Directory
CALL TODAY TO BE INCLUDED IN OUR
BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY!
507-964-5547
Arlington
Chiropractic Clinic
JUSTIN E. DAVIS, D.C.
607 W. Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
507?964?2850
arlingtonchiropracticmn.com
Office Hours:
Mon. 9am?6pm; Tues. 9am?5pm;
Wed. 8am?6pm; Thurs. 1?6pm;
Fri. 8am?4pm; 1
st
& 3
rd
Sat. 8am?11am
VETERINARIAN
RG OVREBO DVM LLC
Large Animal
Veterinary Services
Ultrasound repro, Surgical,
Medical and Nutrition
Small Animal House Call
by Appointment
Medical, Vaccination Services
and Surgical Referral
Dr. Robert G. Ovrebo
Office 507-964-2682
Cell 507-995-0507
Miller
Law Office
RAPHAEL J. MILLER
ROXANN M. BERANEK
Attorneys at Law
332 Sibley Avenue, Gaylord, MN 55334
Tel. (507) 237-2954
Wills - Family Law
Taxes - Estate Planning
General Law Practice & Trials
Free consultation on personal injury claims
MESENBRING
CONSTRUCTION
(507) 964-2864
“Your local home builder and
remodeler for over 38 years”
Member: MN River Builders Assn.
MN License #4806
ROSS R. ARNESON
ATTORNEY AT LAW
302 West Main
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-5753
Real Estate, Estate Planning,
Probate and Business Law
Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Saturdays by Appointment
Farm – Residential
Commercial
Licensed - Bonded - Insured
• 24-Hour Emergency
Service
• Free Estimates
Tyler Kranz, Owner
507-964-2525
Klehr Grading
&
Excavating, Inc.
JEFF & WENDY KLEHR
Dozer, Grader, Basements,
Septic Systems, Driveways, Backhoe Work,
Hauling Gravel/Rock/Sand, Skidloader
Jeff cell: 612-756-0595
Wendy cell: 612-756-0594
640 E. BROOKS ST., ARLINGTON, MN 55307
1-507-964-5783 • FAX: 507-964-5302
Local LAWN
Enforcement
Arlington, MN
Licensed and Insured
Mowing, fertilizing and
weed control, dethatching,
garden tilling, core aeration
www.locallawnenforcement.com
Adam and David Hansen
Adam cell: 507-327-0917
507-964-5835
• 5” Seamless Gutters
• 6” Seamless Gutters
• K-Guard Leaf-Free
Gutter System
(lifetime clog free guarantee)
PHIL GOETTL
612-655-1379
888-864-5979
www.mngutter.com
M
2
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Gustafson
Family Dentistry
Dr. John D. Gustafson, D.D.S
Dr. Jared Gustafson, D.D.S
COMPREHENSIVE CARE
FOR ALL AGES
Office Hours: Monday–Friday
New Patients Welcome
Dr. Jason Anderson, D.D.S
Orthodontists
106 3
rd
Ave. NW,
Arlington
507-964-2705
M
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BODY REPAIR
See us for factory-trained
body repair work on
your vehicle.
• Free Estimates • Glass Replacement
• Collision Repair • Rust Repair
WINDSHIELD
REPLACEMENT
We install windshields
for all vehicles
We will contact the insurance company
for you and do all paperwork. See us
for professional glass installation.
BRAU
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www.braumotors.com
Local
507-964-5539
Toll Free
800-664-2728
Buesgens
Septic Services
Septic Pumping/Pump Repair
& Portable Restrooms
507-665-3732
or 952-873-2208
Call Shane
A14El
Liberty
Station
Corner of Hwy. 5 & Chandler
Arlington, MN
507-964-5177 or
Toll-Free 866-752-9567
www.LibertyStationAutoSales.com
Jim
Heiland’s
Affordable Used Cars
BRAZIL
AUTOMOTIVE
36833 200
TH
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GREEN ISLE, MN 55338
Tires, Air Conditioning
& Maintenance
507?326?
5751
MONDAY-FRIDAY 8-5
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LIBERTY STATION’S
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JULY 4
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2005 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY ................
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2002 CAVILIER 2DR YELLOW..............................
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Corner of Hwy. 5 & Chandler, Arlington, MN
507-964-5177 or Toll-Free 866-752-9567
www.LibertyStationAutoSales.com
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A
2
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E
a
The Minnesota Municipal
Power Agency (MMPA) an-
nounces that Elk River Mu-
nicipal Utilities (ERMU) is
becoming the 12th member
of MMPA.
MMPA is comprised of
municipal utilities in Anoka,
Arlington, Brownton, Buffa-
lo, Chaska, East Grand Forks,
Le Sueur, North St. Paul,
Olivia, Shakopee, Winthrop
and now Elk River.
MMPA’s electrical power
load increases by approxi-
mately 20 percent with the
addition of ERMU. The
agency will begin providing
wholesale power to ERMU
on October 1, 2018 under a
Power Sales Agreement that
runs through 2050.
Troy Adams,
ERMU’s General Manager,
said choosing to partner with
MMPA was a careful process.
“We spent five years looking
at our future supplier partner.
As a public power municipal
utility, we sought competitive
rates, and we wanted to be
aligned with other like-mind-
ed utilities,” he said.
Adams said other factors
leading Elk River to select
MMPA are the agency’s mod-
ern facilities and innovative
renewable energy program, as
well as ERMU having a seat
on the MMPA Board of Di-
rectors along with every other
member utility. MMPA
member cities have common
interests and focus on value
creation for the agency as a
whole, which also fit with
Elk River’s long term vision.
Derick Dahlen, MMPA’s
Chief Executive Officer, said,
“Elk River is a great fit for
MMPA. It is a progressive
and growing community.
Like the other MMPA mem-
bers, ERMU is committed to
providing their community
with competitively-priced
electricity.”
ERMU serves 9,300 me-
tered electric customers in a
44 square mile area and has a
peak demand of about 60
MW. Elk River’s addition to
MMPA follows the inclusion
of Shakopee and East Grand
Forks in 2004, plus Buffalo
in 2005 to the original eight
members that formed MMPA
in 1992.
MMPA’s long-time man-
agement partner, Avant Ener-
gy of Minneapolis, is respon-
sible for all aspects of the
Agency’s strategic planning,
day to day management and
operations, and energy facili-
ty development.
Elk River to join Minnesota Municipal Power Agency
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Green Isle Fire Depart-
ment will celebrate its 125th
anniversary on Saturday, July
13.
A parade, kids fun run and
5K run will be featured dur-
ing the event.
The kids fun run will start
at 11 a.m.
The 5K run will follow at
noon.
The parade will be featured
at 1:30 p.m.
An entry form was pub-
lished in last week’s edition
of the Arlington Enterprise.
Completed forms and a $20
fee for a t-shirt in the 5K run
can be mailed to the Green
Isle Fire Department, P.O.
Box 235, Green Isle, MN,
55338.
The deadline to guarantee a
t-shirt is Sunday, June 30.
People who have any ques-
tions can call 507-326-5941.
Green Isle Fire Department to
celebrate 125th anniversary
The Sibley Medical Center
is opening a new Pain Man-
agement Center in July.
The Sibley Medical Center
is also privileged and excited
to announce the arrival of a
new physician to the team,
Dr. J. Richard Waggoner III.
Dr. Waggoner is a board
certified anesthesiologist who
has received training in Pain
Management at the Mayo
Clinic. He is an Associate
Professor in Pain Medicine.
Dr. Waggoner has joined the
Sibley Medical Center team
and will begin seeing patients
in early July at the new Pain
Management Clinic.
Dr. Waggoner is a specially
trained pain management spe-
cialist who works to reduce
chronic pain, relieve suffer-
ing, restore function and in-
dependence, and improve pa-
tients’ quality of life.
Common conditions treated
are:
• Spine and back pain
• Neuropathic pain
• Shingles pain
• Headache syndromes (mi-
graine, cluster, tension)
• Complex regional pain
syndrome (RSD)
• Cancer pain
• Complex chronic pain
problems
In addition to opening the
Pain Management Center, Dr.
Waggoner will serve in the
Emergency Department and
as the Sibley Medical Cen-
ter’s anesthesiologist.
For more information, call
888-974-2539 or visit the
Sibley Medical Center web-
site at www.sibleymedical-
center.-org.
Sibley Medical Center is opening a
new Pain Management Center in July
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Criminal charges are pend-
ing against a Henderson man
who was involved in a golf
cart accident where a juvenile
female suffered a serious in-
jury on Sunday, June 30, ac-
cording to the Sibley County
Sheriff’s Department.
Jared Reiman, 22, was op-
erating a golf cart southbound
on Turner Drive when a juve-
nile female fell and sustained
a severe head injury, accord-
ing to the report.
The juvenile female was
transported to the Le Sueur
Community Hospital and
later airlifted to St. Mary’s
Hospital in Rochester. She
was listed in serious condi-
tion on Monday morning,
July 1, according to the re-
port.
Reiman had been drinking
and was arrested with crimi-
nal charges pending, the re-
port said.
The investigation is contin-
uing.
Charges pending in golf cart accident
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Medal of Merit
Arlington resident Pauline Wiemann re-
cently received the Medal of Merit from
the Arlington Lions Club for her com-
munity service work. Wiemann is a
member of the Arlington Garden Club
and Arlington Library Board. She also
visits patients on behalf of the Ameri-
can Cancer Society.
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, July 4, 2013, page 4
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Roundabouts are becoming
a trend in Minnesota
Our View: Like them or not, roundabouts
create safer intersections
and increase the flow of traffic
Opinions
Staf f
Bill and Joyce Ramige, Publish-
ers; Kurt Menk, Edi t or; Kari n
Ramige, Manager; Marvin Bulau,
Production Manager; Barb Math-
wig, Of fice; Ashley Reetz, Sales; and Jean Olson, Proof Reading.
Letters
This page is devoted to opin-
ions and commentary . Articles appearing on this page are the opinions of the
writer . V iews expressed here are not necessarily those of the Arlington Enterprise, unless so desig-
nated. The Arlington Enterprise strongly encourages others to express opin-
ions on this page.
Letters from our readers are
strongly encouraged. Letters for
publication must bear the writer’ s signature and address. The Arlington Enterprise reserves the right
to edit letters for purpose of clarity
and space.
Ethics
The editorial staf f of the Arlington Enterprise strives to present the news in a
fair and accurate manner . W e appreciate errors being brought to our attention.
Please bring any grievances against
the Arlington Enterprise to the attention of the editor . Should dif ferences continue, readers are encour-
aged to take their grievances to the
Minnesota News Council, an organi-
zation dedicated to protecting the
public from press inaccuracy and un-
fairness. The News Council can be contacted at 12 South
Sixth St., Suite 940, Minneapolis,
MN 55402, or (612) 341-9357.
Press Freedom
Freedom of the press is guar-
anteed under the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitu- tion:
Established in 1884.
Postmaster send address changes to:
Arlington Enterprise.
402 West Alden Street, P.O. Box 388,
Arlington, MN 55307.
Phone 507-964-5547 FAX 507-964-2423.
Hours: Monday-Wednesday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.;
Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 2 p.m.; and Friday closed.
Entered as Periodicals postal matter at Arlington,
MN post office. Postage paid at Arlington USPS No.
031-980.
Subscription Rates: Minnesota – $33.00 per year. Out-
side of state – $38.00 per year.
Arlington ENTERPRISE
Guest Columns
Letter To The Editor
Like them or not, roundabouts are becoming a trend in
Minnesota and it looks like they are here to stay.
The purpose of roundabouts is to create safer intersections
and increase the flow of traffic. There are approximately 115
roundabouts in Minnesota to date and more are on the way.
Studies on roundabouts show that there is a 39 percent de-
crease in all crashes and an 89 percent decrease in fatal crash-
es throughout the state, according to the Minnesota Depart-
ment of Transportation.
Roundabouts can also handle high levels of traffic with less
delay than most stop signs or signals The tight curves slow
traffic so entering and exiting are easier and more efficient.
Where roundabouts replace signals, idling decreases which
reduces vehicle emissions and fuel consumption by 30 per-
cent or more, according to the Minnesota Department of
Transportation.
Construction costs for roundabouts are about the same as
intersections with traffic lights, but the long-term operating
costs are lower, according to reports. The roundabouts re-
quire no electricity and are environmentally friendly.
Change does disturb and it will take time for motorists to
become more familiar with roundabouts which are becoming
more common every day. Motorists are used to stop signs and
stoplights. However, if the new method to control traffic will
save lives and increase the flow of traffic, the new change
should be embraced by all motorists.
-K.M.
Too Tall’s Tidbits
Happy Birthday and Happy An-
niversary to the following local and
area residents compliments of the
Arlington Lions Club Community
Calendar.
July 5
Debbie Nerud, Jessica Pepin, Thea
Fallen, Karcyn Dose and Thomas
Kube.
July 6
Craig Bullert, Darla Felmlee, David
Diekmann, David Mathwig, Jay
Schuetz, John Trocke, Jonell Soeffk-
er, Lynn Tollefson, Madisyn Petree,
Mr. and Mrs. David Kreft, and Mr.
and Mrs. Richard Thomes.
July 7
Angela Archer, Carol Fisher, Ellie
Franke, Emma Lenerz, Emma
Luskey, JoLene Scheer, Justin
Kirscht, Pat Otto, Sandi Kleist, and
Mr. and Mrs. Gabe Schroeder.
July 8
Bill Godwin, Carly Hilgers, Cindy
Von Eschen, Owen Utendorfer, Rose
Thies, Mr. and Mrs. Brian Thies, Mr.
and Mrs. Clint Wibstad, and Mr. and
Mrs. Kenneth Dressen.
July 9
Abigail Reinert, Jennifer Schneider,
Joe Kistner, Kalab Stoeckman,
Marie Schneider, Dr. and Mrs. Mike
Noack, and Mr. and Mrs. Francis
Traxler.
July 10
Bob Schrupp, Jerry Schuetz, Kyle
Pioske, Phyllis Pautsch, and Mr. and
Mrs. Tim Eichens.
July 11
Ben Tollefson, Dale Meyer, Evie
Swanson, Hollie Grabitske, Julie
Schapring, Quentin Barnes, Todd
Pauly, and Mr. and Mrs. Levi Allen.
*****
What did Billy say after he
learned how to count money? “It all
makes cents now!”
*****
One day a mailman was greeted
by a boy and a huge dog.
The mailman said to the boy,
“Does your dog bite?”
“No,” replied the boy. Just then
the huge dog bit the mailman.
The man yelled, “I thought your
dog doesn't bite!”
“He doesn't,” replied the boy.
“That's not my dog!”
*****
When a three-year-old opened a
birthday gift from his grandmother,
he discovered a water pistol.
He squealed with delight and
headed for the nearest sink.
His mother was not so pleased.
She turned to Grandmom and said,
“I'm surprised at you. Don't you re-
member how we used to drive you
crazy with water guns?”
Grandmom smiled and then
replied, “I remember.”
*****
A young businessman had just
started his own firm. He rented a
beautiful office and had it furnished
with antiques. Sitting there, he saw a
man come into the outer office.
Wishing to appear busy, the busi-
nessman picked up the phone and
started to pretend he had a big deal
working. He threw huge figures
around and made giant commit-
ments. Finally he hung up and asked
the visitor, “Can I help you?”
The man said, “Sure. I’ve come
to install the phone!”
*****
Dumb Inventions
1. Glow-in-the-dark sunglasses
2. Wooden soap
3. Solar powered flashlight
4. Screen window for a submarine
5. Helicopter with an ejection seat
6. Inflatable dart board
7.A tape on how to put together a
vcr
8. The water proof tea bag
9. Water proof towel
10. A book on how to read
11. A dictionary index
12. Powdered water
13.Pedal-powered wheel chair
*****
What do you call a rabbit with
fleas? Bugs Bunny
*****
A construction worker accidental-
ly cuts off one of his ears with an
electric saw.
He calls out to a guy walking on
the street below, “Hey, do you see
my ear down there?”
The guy on the street picks up an
ear, “Is this it?”
“No,” replies the construction
worker, “mine had a pencil behind
it.”
*****
After church service, a little boy
tells the pastor that he is going to
give him a lot of money when he
grows up.
“Well, thank you,” the pastor
replies, “but why?”
“Because my daddy says you’re
one of the poorest preachers we've
ever had!”
*****
By U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar
D-Minnesota
Whether it is a cold and wet
spring, a punishing drought, or for-
eign countries unexpectedly shutting
down their markets to American
products, Minnesota farmers and
ranchers must contend with a wide
range of unpredictable variables that
can threaten their livelihood. The
U.S. Congress should not be one of
them.
Unlike the forces of Mother Na-
ture that brought us the poor plant-
ing weather this spring or the
drought this past summer, lack of
congressional action on the Farm
Bill is entirely preventable.
That’s why as a member of the
Senate Agriculture Committee I
worked with my colleagues to craft
a five-year Farm Bill that passed the
Senate with strong bipartisan sup-
port.
The Senate Farm Bill builds on
the successes of the 2008 Farm Bill,
strengthening crop insurance, elimi-
nating direct payments, reducing our
deficit by $24 billion, promoting a
strong energy title, and protecting
conservation and nutrition pro-
grams.
The Farm Bill also includes im-
portant provisions I fought for to
provide beginning farmers and
ranchers greater access to crop in-
surance and more land for grazing,
and to help protect pork and poultry
producers from catastrophic losses.
I also worked with North Dakota
Senators John Hoeven and Heidi
Heitkamp to boost agricultural re-
search, address the backlog of Rural
Development loans, support the
Rural Energy for America Program,
and enhance regional conservation
efforts like those in the Red River
Valley.
To open up new markets to Min-
nesota producers, the Farm Bill in-
cludes my provision instructing the
U.S. Departments of Agriculture and
Transportation to evaluate rural
transportation, including “captive
shipping,” to ensure that farmers
and rural businesses can move their
products as quickly and affordably
as possible.
Last year America exported $136
billion in farm products resulting in
a trade surplus of $32 billion. As the
sixth largest agricultural exporting
state, Minnesota contributed more
than $6.8 billion in 2012.
Finally, the new Farm Bill pro-
vides something very simple to Min-
nesota farmers and rural communi-
ties: certainty. It puts an end to the
unpredictable and volatile federal
farm policy that currently exists
without a strong five-year plan.
This is the second time in the last
354 days that the Senate has put for-
ward a long-term Farm Bill that
helps producers, consumers and our
entire economy. Last year, the Sen-
ate passed the bill, but the House of
Representatives failed to act.
I have heard from countless Min-
nesota farmers and ranchers who
need the support and certainty that
this bill provides, and if the House
fails to act again, they do so at their
own risk.
Congressman Collin Peterson has
been working hard to move the
Farm Bill forward in the U. S.
House, and I will work with him as
he pushes the House leadership to
take up and pass a five-year Farm
Bill.
Minnesota farmers are some of
the hardest workers in the United
States. They produce the highest
quality, lowest cost food in the
world, and they represent a proud
part of our state’s heritage and histo-
ry. Minnesota farmers deserve a
Farm Bill, and I will not stop fight-
ing until it is signed into law.
Coming together for Minnesota farmers
By Ken Martin
Chairman, Minnesota DFL
From balancing the state budget
in a fair and honest manner to in-
vestments in education and property
tax relief, the budget passed by Gov-
ernor Mark Dayton and the DFL-led
Legislature this session not only ful-
filled promises made during the
2012 campaign, but is a representa-
tion of the values DFL-elected offi-
cials have fought long and hard to
protect.
Unlike Republican legislators
who balanced the state budget on
the shoulders of hard-working Min-
nesotans, the DFL asked the top two
percent of Minnesotans (54,000 peo-
ple with an average salary of
$617,000 a year) to pay just 2 per-
cent more in taxes. They will now
pay rates that most Minnesotans
have paid for years. A recent poll
showed that this new tax is support-
ed by 58 percent of those polled,
showing it’s a clear winner with
Minnesotans.
With the additional revenue, Gov-
ernor Dayton and DFL legislators
made an historic investment in edu-
cation. Minnesota’s future work-
force will benefit from scholarships
for early childhood education, free
all-day kindergarten and increasing
funding for K-12 schools. Current
college students and their families
will feel the relief of a two-year tu-
ition freeze as well as an investment
in the State Grant Program. These
investments not only help students,
but help our colleges and universi-
ties to achieve better results and
graduate more students.
Democrats also restored the
Homestead Credit eliminated by Re-
publicans. This is a welcome respite
for Minnesotans whose property
taxes have gone up 86 percent in the
last decade alone.
As a Democrat, a Minnesotan,
and a father, I am proud of Governor
Dayton and DFL legislators’ work
the 2013 session. At a time when,
more often than not, campaign
promises are backed up not by ac-
tion, but by even more campaigning,
the 2013 legislature provided a re-
freshing glimpse of the enormous
change that can be effected by offi-
cials that place a priority on improv-
ing the lives of their constituents,
rather than touting party rhetoric.
Promises made, promises kept in state budget
To the Editor,
I would like to inform the com-
munity about our recent experience
with the Sibley Medical Center. We
have used the medical center for our
medical needs for many years; how-
ever, it has never been in an emer-
gency situation.
I was very impressed with the
care, concern and the medical deci-
sions that had to be made by Dr.
Bergseng, Dr. Durakovic, and their
medical staff in regard to my hus-
band’s recent illness. Because of the
life-threatening condition, my hus-
band had to be air-lifted to the Hen-
nepin County Medical Center
(HCMC) where once again we re-
ceived the same care and concern
not only for the patient but also for
the family. What would have hap-
pened had it not been only a seven
minute trip by ambulance to our
local area hospital where he could
receive expert care immediately?
We are grateful to have Sibley Med-
ical Center and their medical staff
available when we need them. Let’s
give the Sibley Medical Center our
support so that when our loved ones
are in a life/death situation they can
have quick and excellent care within
minutes.
Donna Zachow
Gaylord
Gaylord resident praises Sibley Medical Center
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, July 4, 2013, page 5
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
SERVICES
Foot & Ankle Hand & Wrist
Knee & Hip Shoulder & Elbow
Spine & Back Sports Medicine
Total Joint Replacement
LOCATIONS
Arlington
Chaska
Delano
Glencoe
Mound
Olivia
Waconia
Watertown
TCO Arlington
Sibley Medical Center
601 West Chandler St.
Arlington, MN 55307
(952) 442-2163 TCOmn.com
PHYSICIANS
Dr. Barnett Dr. Holthusen Dr. Mair
Dr. Marek Dr. Friedland Dr. Sanders
Dr. Wyard Dr. Meyer
History
Obituary
By Tom Steward
Watchdog Minnesota
The City of Monticello has
proposed buying out bond-
holders of the troubled mu-
nicipal Fibernet broadband
network for $5.75 million,
plus an estimated $3 million
in escrow funds, to settle an
impending class action law-
suit, Watchdog Minnesota has
learned.
The proposed settlement,
according to official docu-
ments filed online, appears to
return to investors about 25
cents to 30 cents on the dol-
lar. In exchange, bondholders
would drop all claims, includ-
ing allegations of securities
fraud and misrepresentation
related to the city’s issuance
or execution of the bonds, re-
ferred to in an “Unconfirmed
Settlement Notice” filed June
14 on the Electronic Munici-
pal Market Access website.
The city confirmed the set-
tlement in statement from
Jeff O’Neill, city administra-
tor.
“On Thursday, June 13, the
Monticello City Council ap-
proved a ‘term sheet’ provid-
ing a settlement amount and
process for addressing the
shortage of system revenue
for funding debt service on
the FiberNet revenue bond.
This term sheet was devel-
oped cooperatively with the
attorney representing bond
holders. The City of Monti-
cello looks forward to work-
ing with the bond holders in
completing related legal
processes and will continue
to operate the system for the
foreseeable future.”
Watchdog Minnesota re-
ported Friday that up to 500
investors holding $26 million
in Fibernet Monticello bonds
could lose most of their in-
vestment in the muni-net-
work, which offers high-
speed Internet, cable televi-
sion and telephone. Bill
McKenzie, an Arizona re-
tiree, bought $45, 000 in
Fibernet bonds in 2011, an in-
vestment now worth about 10
percent of the purchase price.
Fibernet has attracted far
fewer subscribers than pro-
jected, leading to a shortfall
for operating costs and debt
service on the tax-free rev-
enue bonds held by McKen-
zie and others. McKenzie had
not heard about the settle-
ment until Watchdog Min-
nesota contacted him Mon-
day.
While bondholders would
still lose most of their invest-
ment, the proposed settlement
gives them a chance to re-
coup something, as opposed
to losing it all. If more than
10 percent of bondholders opt
out of the proposal, the deal
will not be approved.
“I think there’s no option. I
don’t have any option,” said
McKenzie. “While I guess
I’m not happy, 30 cents is
better than nothing.”
Local taxpayers will pay
for the proposed settlement,
adding to at least $2.6 million
in liquor fund revenue to sub-
sidize Fibernet.
“The amount will be a gen-
eral obligation of the City,
payable either from existing
funds or funds generated by
issuing a new bond,” O”Neill
said in an email.
The Minnesota Cable
Communications Association
criticized the cost to Monti-
cello taxpayers and the pro-
priety of competing with pri-
vate broadband communica-
tions providers.
“We’re very interested to
know how this settlement is
being funded, and the city
should level with the taxpay-
ers on that question,” said
Tony Mendoza, attorney for
MCCA. “The cable industry
has always been prepared to
face competition, but allow-
ing a city to get into the busi-
ness for 25 cents on the dollar
is a huge subsidy and unfair
advantage.”
The settlement appears to
be contingent on approval
from two courts. The compli-
cated legal process would in-
volve the simultaneous filing
of a federal class action law-
suit on behalf of bondholders
and a tentative agreement on
the proposed settlement.
The settlement would
allow the city to operate
Fibernet Monticello without
further obligation to the
bondholders who financed it.
Once a highly touted national
model for local government
broadband, Fibernet has
come to symbolize the chal-
lenges of government com-
peting with private providers
in a high-tech industry.
“This has taught me a real
lesson in municipal bonds,”
said McKenzie. ”I’m very
apprehensive now about stay-
ing in the municipal bond
market.”
Monticello proposes settlement
in municipal-network debacle
Green Isle resident Alex
Meeker, a senior at Central
High School in Norwood-
Young America, recently at-
tended the 65th Annual Le-
gion Boys State held at
Southwest Minnesota State
University in Marshall.
Meeker was sponsored by the
Green Isle American Legion
Post #408.
Minnesota American Le-
gion Boys State is a week-
long experience of learning
about Minnesota government
at the local, county and state
levels by “doing.” It is a
week of intensive study and
involvement. Every boy par-
ticipates in the process of
city, county and state govern-
ment. They are a citizen of a
city, a county and the state as
well as a member of a politi-
cal party. Meeker was a City
Council member for the City
of Duluth and was on the
Transportation Committee for
Rock County.
Highlights of the week in-
cluded speakers such as Min-
nesota Secretary of State
Mark Ritchie; past Senate
Majority Leader Dean John-
son; Representative Paul
Thissen, Speaker of the
House of Representatives;
and State Senator Mary
Kiffmeyer.
In addition to study and
learning about all levels of
government, Meeker played
trumpet in the Boys State
Band and performed on the
final evening at the Schwans
Performing Arts Theater at
Marshall High School. In ad-
dition, he participated in a
softball tournament for the
Boys State attendees.
Alex is the son of Todd and
Connie Meeker, Green Isle,
and the grandson of Arlene
(Meyers) Marek, Arlington.
Meeker attends Legion Boys State
Milton “Jim” Woehler, age
78, of Arlington, passed away
at the Winthrop Good Samar-
itan Center on Sunday, June
30,
F u n e r a l
service was
held at Zion
L u t h e r a n
Church in
Arlington at
11 a. m.
Wednesday,
July 3.
Visitation
was held at
the Kolden
Funeral Home in Arlington
from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tues-
day, July 2 and continued one
hour prior to the service at
the church on Wednesday,
July 3.
Interment with military
honors was at the church
cemetery in New Auburn
Township.
He was born to Milton and
Minnie (Sommerfeld)
Woehler in Michigan, N.D.,
on Oct. 10, 1934. Milton’s
family moved to the Arling-
ton area in 1935. Milton was
educated in the rural public
school system. He married
Rhoda Grapentine at St.
Paul’s United Church of
Christ in Henderson on June
6, 1959. Milton and Rhoda
farmed on the Woehler family
farm until Milton retired in
1999.
Milton is survived by his
wife, Rhoda Woehler of Ar-
lington; children, Gerald
(Brenda) Woehler of Arling-
ton, Kathleen Anderson of
Hutchinson, and Lyle
Woehler of Arlington; five
grandchildren, Kim, Matt,
and Tammy Woehler, and An-
drew and Jennifer Anderson;
siblings; Ruth (George) Hahn
of Gaylord, LeRoy (Joanne)
Woehler of Arlington, and
Grace Brinkmann of Darwin;
and many nieces and
nephews.
Milton is preceded in death
by his parents, Milton and
Minnie.
Milton ‘Jim’ Woehler, 78, Arlington
Milton ‘Jim’
Woehler
90 Years Ago
July 5, 1923
Louis Kill, Editor
The Frenzel building on Main
Street, recently occupied by
Burke’s confectionery, is being
redecorated and otherwise im-
proved on the interior. We un-
derstand a Minneapolis party
will use the building for a “five
and dime” store.
We understand the village
council is about to launch a
campaign against speeders and
have already prepared a list of
those who they know have been
continually breaking the speed
limits on our streets. A fine of
$25 and an order to leave their
cars in the garage for a month is
the sentence which we are told
the judge will hand out. And it
is none too soon.
Butcher Bigot is having con-
siderable hard luck with the new
plate glass windows recently
placed in his meat market. One
of them was cracked when it
was put in last week and another
was put out of commission
when a scale weight dropped
against it.
The annual Kinderfest of the
Green Isle Township Lutheran
church which was held in the
Martin Bullert woods last Sun-
day afternoon drew a large at-
tendance and from all reports
everybody enjoyed the occasion.
60 Years Ago
July 2, 1953
Louis Kill, Editor
The 100th anniversary of the
establishment of Sibley County
will be fittingly observed at the
Sibley County Fair this year, ac-
cording to an announcement by
Fred Sprengeler, president of the
Sibley County Agricultural As-
sociation. Elaborate plans for
the centennial observance were
made at a meeting of the associ-
ation held Tuesday evening at
the Arlington Community Hall.
A dinner meeting was held
for the staff doctors of Arlington
Municipal Hospital in the hospi-
tal dining room Monday, June
22. Present were Dr. Olson,
Belle Plaine; Drs. Olson and
Dysterhaff, Gaylord; Dr.
Traxler, Henderson; and Drs.
Martin, Gridley and Kath of Ar-
lington. Mrs. Ruth McMahon,
RN, superintendent, also was
present for a short time.
Mrs. M. L. Madden will retire
from the Board of Education of
Independent School District 71
at Green Isle after giving 25
years of service to the commu-
nity and school district. Mrs.
Madden’s term of office expires
at the annual election next Tues-
day, June 30. She did not file for
re-election. For the past 13 years
Mrs. Madden served as treasurer
of the school district.
30 Years Ago
July 7, 1983
Val Kill, Editor
A young woman from Arling-
ton has won the highest trophy
award ever given to a Minne-
sotan at the Health Occupation
Students of America National
Leadership Conference in
Texas. Jean Kramer, 17, daugh-
ter of Wayne and Virginia
Kramer, placed second in the
national medical terminology
written exam at the Conference
held June 22-26. No one from
Minnesota had ever won an
award of any kind at the Nation-
al Conference before.
Bean walkers were busy on
the Bill Beseke farm recently,
pulling weeds in a soybean field.
Included in the group were Jere-
my Clarke, Jeff Schmidt, Bobby
Mathwig, Barry Mathwig, Jeff
Clarke, Pat Perrault and Todd
Bruhjell.
Once again the Arlington and
Green Isle baseball teams will
host the University of Minneso-
ta Gophers summer traveling
team on Saturday, July 9, at the
Arlington ball park. Green Isle
starts off Saturday against the
Gophers at 3 p.m. Arlington tan-
gles with the Gophers later that
day at 7:30 p.m. The two local
teams urge everyone to come on
out and watch the games and
“root, root, root for the home
teams.”
15 Years Ago
July 2, 1998
Kurt Menk, Editor
A ceremony for the dedica-
tion of State Highway 5 from
Gaylord to Chanhassen as the
August “Augie” Mueller Memo-
rial Highway was held in Ar-
lington last Wednesday after-
noon. Well over 100 people at-
tended the dedication ceremony
on the practice football field at
the Sibley East Athletic Com-
plex along Highway 5.
Senior citizens brought along
their wedding pictures to the Ar-
lington Senior Dining Site at the
Highland Commons on Monday.
After lunch, a contest was then
held to see which person could
correctly identify the most pic-
tures. The winner was Marjorie
Ott.
Public Safety
& Judiciary
More than $100 million in
new funding, with $52 million
for the courts and $50.5 mil-
lion for public safety. Includ-
ed are salary adjustments for
Corrections Department per-
sonnel of 2 percent per year
and $2.6 million for addition-
al sex offender or chemical
dependency treatment.
State Govern-
ment
Minnesota Public Radio
gets $920,000 to buy equip-
ment and upgrades to the
AMBER Alert system;
$750,000 is appropriated each
year for the Minnesota Assis-
tance Council for Veterans, a
nonprofit that helps homeless
veterans and families.
Taxes
A new 9.8 percent top tier
for high earners that affects:
married people who file
jointly with a taxable income
of more than $250,000;
married people who file
separately with a taxable in-
come of over $125,000;
heads of household with a
taxable income of over
$200,000
single filers making over
$150,000.
State tax on a pack of ciga-
rettes will rise $1.60 to $2.83.
Part of the revenue from the
first year of the cigarette tax
increase will be used to help
fund the new stadium to
house the Minnesota Vikings,
if needed.
More backup revenue for
the stadium, if needed, will
come from closing corporate
tax loopholes, which will
raise approximately $26 mil-
lion in the first year and $20
million per year thereafter.
Local Government Aid will
increase from the current
$426 million to $507.6 mil-
lion for calendar year 2014. In
2015 and 2016, the amount is
increased by $2.5 million
each year and then frozen at
the 2016 amount.
The state will provide aid
sufficient to fund $327 mil-
lion in public infrastructure
projects during the 20-year
life of the Mayo
Clinic/Rochester expansion
project. The city is expected
to pay an additional $128 mil-
lion to qualify for the aid. The
state and the county or city
will also pay for up to $116
million of transit-related proj-
ects; with state aid covering
60 percent of this cost.
Transportation
The state highway budget
calls for:
Increasing state road con-
struction funding by almost
$360 million over the bienni-
um;
Increasing base appropria-
tions by $10 million annually
from the trunk highway fund
for use in a newly-established
Transportation Economic De-
velopment program.
A $5 million increase in the
base appropriation for opera-
tions and maintenance of state
roads.
Joe Kimball is a former
writer for the Star Tribune.
New Laws Continued from page 2
years.
Sibley East is not at the bot-
tom of the conference fee
schedule, but not at the top ei-
ther, according to Walsh.
A majority of the schools
charge different rates for dif-
ferent activities. Football at
most schools is higher than
other sports.
Most of the schools charge
around $100 per activity such
as jazz band or knowledge
bowl, where Sibley East only
charges $30.
The board had asked Walsh
about the possibility of in-
creased admission fees and/or
charging for sports like base-
ball and track that do not cur-
rently have gate fees.
Walsh said it could be a
possibility, but to charge ad-
mission for track and baseball
would require hiring staff to
work the gates. He is currently
able to get volunteers for the
gates.
He also added that most
people have season passes, so
there would be little benefit to
adding admission fees to
those events.
Board member Missy
Weber remained opposed to
the increase in activity fees.
“Parents are already
strapped, and most kids who
are in sports are also in band
and plays as well,” she said.
They are also paying for
shoes and other things needed
for a student to participate in a
sport, she added.
Weber feels the board
should focus on increasing the
number of participants, not
discourage participation with
higher fees.
During the regular meeting
later that evening, the board
voted 4-1 to approve the in-
crease in fees.
Weber voted against the in-
crease. Board member Scott
Dose was not present at the
meeting.
Concerned
Parents
Dave and Laurie Brockhoff,
during the public portion of
the meeting, expressed con-
cern over the coaching staff at
Sibley East, specifically the
varsity baseball team.
The parents said that a num-
ber of students don’t plan to
participate in baseball next
season during their senior
year.
They felt that there have
been a number of complaints
to the athletic director and
don’t feel anything has been
done to address the issues.
They asked about the re-
views for the coaches, criteria
for selecting and letting
coaches go as well as goal set-
ting for a coach each season.
They felt that the district
has to overlook person rela-
tionships of staff and do what
is best for the kids.
They talked about the
strong coaching and partici-
pation in the football and
wrestling programs.
After hearing the parents,
the board thanked them for
taking the time to attend the
board meeting.
Building Tours
The board will hold a work
session prior to the July 15th
meeting to tour the two cam-
puses with head custodian
Bob Pichelmann to go
through potential capital proj-
ects with the board.
The tour will start at 5 p.m.
at the school office in Gay-
lord. The tour of the Arlington
facility is expected to begin at
approximately 6 p.m.
The board meeting regular-
ly scheduled for 6:30 will
begin at 7 p.m. in Room 149
at the Arlington campus.
Activity Fees Continued from page 1
E-mail us at:
info@
arlingtonmnnews.com
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, July 4, 2013, page 6
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
Sports
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington A’s baseball
team defeated Gaylord and
lost to Hamburg and St. Peter
during the past week.
The A’s will host the New
Ulm Kaiserhoff at 6 p.m.
Sunday, July 7. Arlington will
also host St. Patrick at 7:30
p.m. Tuesday, July 9.
Hamburg 9
Arlington 2
The Arlington A’s baseball
team lost to visiting Hamburg
9-2 on Tuesday evening, June
25.
Brett Pioske paced the A’s
with a solo home run. Shane
Henke contributed two sin-
gles while Anthony O’Day
and Scott Dose added one
single apiece.
Dan Chies, who struck out
eight batters, pitched the first
eight innings and was tagged
with the mound loss.
Lucas Schwope worked the
ninth frame.
Arlington 11
Gaylord 4
The visiting Arlington A’s
baseball team toppled Gay-
lord 11-4 on Friday night,
June 28.
Scott Dose collected three
singles while Michael Bullert
ripped a double and a triple.
Brett Pioske recorded two
doubles while Blake Henke
contributed two singles and
knocked in five runs. Craig
Dose had a single while
Nathan Henke drew three
walks.
Scott Husfeldt pitched the
first four innings and surren-
dered three earned runs on
five hits. The lefty also
fanned two and walked five.
Matt Pichelmann worked
the final five frames and
picked up the mound victory.
The right hander yielded one
earned run on three hits. He
also struck out seven, walked
two and hit two batters.
Kyle Grams sparked the Is-
landers with a single and a
double while Trevor Vaubel
had two singles. Brian Winter
collected a double while
Collin Grams and Andrew
Grack added one single
apiece.
St. Peter 8
Arlington 4
The visiting Arlington A’s
baseball team lost to St. Peter
8-4 on Sunday night, June 30.
Blake Henke contributed
three singles while Michael
Bullert collected a single and
a double. Brett Pioske belted
a double in the top of the first
inning and then was forced to
leave the game due to a ham-
string injury. Craig Dose,
Shane Henke and Bryce Eg-
gert added one single each.
Nathan Henke drew three
walks.
Scott Dose, who has not
pitched for 13 months, hurled
the first five innings. The
right hander surrendered one
earned run on four hits. He
also fanned six, walked four
and hit one batter.
Matt Pichelmann worked
the next inning and was
tagged with the mound loss.
The right hander gave up
three unearned runs on two
hits. He also fanned one and
walked one.
Scott Husfeldt pitched the
next 1 2/3 innings in relief.
The southpaw yielded two
earned runs on two hits. He
also struck out three, walked
two and hit one batter.
Dan Chies followed and
struck out the only batter he
faced in the bottom of the
eighth inning.
Arlington defeats Gaylord,
falls to Hamburg, St. Peter
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Green Isle Irish base-
ball team split a pair of
games in action last week.
The Irish, 11-6 overall, will
travel to Victoria at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, July 6. Green Isle
will also travel to Cologne at
4 p.m. Sunday afternoon, July
7. In addition, the Irish will
host Glencoe at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, July 9.
Green Isle 12
Hamburg 4
The Green Isle Irish base-
ball team toppled visiting
Hamburg 12-4 on Thursday
night, June 27.
Cody Hallahan pitched the
first seven innings and posted
the mound victory. The right
hander gave up two earned
runs on seven hits. He also
fanned four batters.
Pat Gullickson worked
scoreless ball over the final
two frames in relief. The
right hander gave up two hits
and struck out three.
Lucas Herd sparked Green
Isle’s 16-hit attack with three
singles and a double. Pat Mo-
riarty collected a single and
belted a home run while Nate
Pilacinski and Mike Dhaene
contributed two singles each
while Austin Brockhoff,
Chris Knoll, Ed Reichenbach,
Keller Knoll, Zach Herd and
Jackson Hallahan added one
single each.
Plato 7
Green Isle 4
The visiting Green Isle
baseball team surrendered a
3-0 lead and lost to Plato on
Sunday afternoon, June 30.
Nate Pilacinski paced the
Irish with two singles and
two doubles. Brian Scher-
schligt contributed three sin-
gles while Jackson Hallahan
had two singles. Zach Herd
added a single.
Jackson Hallahan pitched
the first five innings and
yielded four earned runs on
seven hits. The right hander
struck out one and walked
two.
Dylan McCormick worked
the next two frames and suf-
fered the mound loss. The
right hander surrendered one
earned run on three hits. He
also fanned one and hit one
batter.
Chris Knoll hurled the
ninth inning and gave up one
earned run on one hit.
Irish beat Hamburg, fall to Plato
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington VFW base-
ball team pounded visiting St.
James in a doubleheader on
Saturday, June 29.
Arlington will host Lake
Crystal at 10 a.m. Saturday,
July 6.
Arlington 11
St. James 0
The Arlington VFW base-
ball team trounced visiting St.
James 11-0 during the first
game of a doubleheader on
Saturday, June 29.
Lukas Bullert pitched the
entire five-inning game and
posted the mound victory.
The right hander gave up six
hits and fanned seven.
Zac Weber contributed two
hits and drove in four runs
while Mitchell Mathews had
two hits and knocked in two
runs. Andrew Bullert scored
three runs and collected one
hit while Jake Wentzlaff and
Cody Voight added one hit
apiece.
Arlington 16
St. James 0
The Arlington VFW base-
ball team toppled visiting St.
James 16-0 during the second
game of a twinbill on Satur-
day, June 29.
Mitchell Mathews worked
the entire contest and posted
the mound win. The right
hander gave up only three
hits and struck out two bat-
ters.
Lukas Messner and Zac
Weber collected two hits each
while Lukas Bullert and
Mathews had one hit each
and drove in three runs
apiece. Andrew Bullert,
Logan Jorgenson, Nick
Doetkott, Travis Schmidt,
Seth Fredin and Jake Went-
zlaff added one hit each.
Arlington VFW sweeps St. James in twinbill
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Sibley East American
Legion baseball team cap-
tured two wins in three games
during the past week.
Sibley East will host Tri-
City United at Walsh Field in
Gaylord at 7 p.m. Monday,
July 8.
Sibley East 2
Jordan 1
The visiting Sibley East
American Legion baseball
team, behind the pitching of
Andrew Grack, edged Jordan
2-1 on Wednesday night, July
26.
Sibley East plated its first
run in the top of the third in-
ning on a single by Tanner
Walsh and a double off the
bat of Michael Uecker.
The black and gold scored
the game-winning run in the
top of the seventh frame.
Austin Brockhoff drew a
walk, advanced to third base
on a double by Colin
Mehlhop and scored on a
groundout.
Grack, who went the dis-
tance on the hill for the
mound victory, surrendered
one earned run on eight hits.
The right hander also fanned
seven batters.
Cody Doetkott also dou-
bled in the game while An-
drew Bullert contributed a
single.
Holy Family 5
Sibley East 4
The Sibley East American
Legion baseball team surren-
dered a two-run lead in the
seventh inning and lost to vis-
iting Holy Family 5-4 at
Walsh Field in Gaylord on
Saturday, June 29.
Cody Doekott paced the of-
fensive attack with two hits
while Andrew Bullert, Brody
Rodning, Ed Reichenbach,
Zac Weber, Michael Uecker
and Nathan Thomes added
one hit apiece.
Rodning pitched the first 6
1/3 innings and yielded three
hits. The lefty also struck out
13 batters.
Thomes followed in relief
and pitched the remainder of
the game.
Sibley East 7
LeSueur-Henderson 2
The Sibley East American
Legion baseball team re-
bounded with a 7-2 win over
visiting Le Sueur-Henderson
on Monday evening, July 1.
The black and gold scored
four runs in the bottom of the
first inning and never looked
back.
Cody Doetkott sparked the
rally with a run-scoring triple.
Andrew Grack pitched the
entire contest and recorded
the mound win. The right
hander gave up two runs on
four hits. He also compiled
five strikeouts.
Nathan Thomes con-
tributed three hits and drove
in two runs for the winners.
Doetkott recorded two hits
while Michael Uecker, Travis
Schmidt, Tanner Walsh and
Grack added one hit apiece.
SE American Legion baseball team
captured 2 wins in 3 recent games
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
Arlington A’s player/manager Jake
Lucas rounded third base and scored
on an RBI single by Blake Henke in the
top of the fourth inning at St. Peter on
Sunday night, June 30.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
Fifteen members of the
Sibley East Trap Team re-
cently competed in the Min-
nesota State High School
League Clay Target Tourna-
ment at the Alexandria Shoot-
ing Park.
Over 2,000 students com-
peted in the three-day state
tournament, according to Sib-
ley East head coaches Mark
Standinger and Kenn
Mueller.
Sibley East entered a five-
member team in each of the
three divisions called Novice,
Junior Varsity and Varsity.
The Sibley East Novice
Team consisted of Tyler
Keen-Savage, Riley Messner,
Austin Hahn, Abby Reinert
and Zach Latzke. The team
placed fifth out of 69 teams.
As individuals, Keen-Sav-
age placed fourth while
Messner tied for seventh
place. Reinert placed eighth
among female novice divi-
sion participants.
Keen-Savage and Reinert
were recognized as the top
male and female 8A Confer-
ence novice shooters at the
tournament.
In addition to Sibley East,
the 8A Conference consists of
Waconia, Centennial High
School of Circle Pines, Her-
mantown, Bethlehem Acade-
my of Faribault, Delano High
School, Lac qui Parle Valley
High School and Mahtomedi
High School.
The Sibley East junior var-
sity team placed 45th out of
73 teams.
The Sibley East varsity
team finished 36th out of 73
teams.
SE trap team shoots in state tourney
24 x 36
Photo Posters
$
18
.00
+ tax
Call 507?964?
5547
for details!
Arlington Enterprise
Sibley Shopper
Advertising Deadlines:
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McLeod Publishing
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Mon.-Fri. 8-5 p.m. • 320-864-5518
The McLeod County Chronicle
Silver Lake Leader
The Glencoe Advertiser
The Sibley Shopper
Arlington Enterprise (Arlington/Green Isle)
The Galaxy (supplement to Chronicle, Leader & Enterprise)
www. GlencoeNews. com
www. ArlingtonMNnews. com
NOTICE OF MORTGAGE
FORECLOSURE SALE
THE RIGHT OF VERIFICA-
TION OF THE DEBT AND IDEN-
TITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDI-
TOR WITHIN THE TIME PRO-
VIDED BY LAW IS NOT AF-
FECTED BY THIS ACTION.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
that default has occurred in con-
ditions of the following described
mortgage:
DATE OF MORTGAGE:
09/22/2006
MORTGAGOR: Marcus W.
Middleton
MORTGAGEE: Vi ctori a L.
Lang
DATE AND PLACE OF
RECORDING: Recorded
09/25/2006, Si bl ey County
Recorder Document Number A-
207472
ASSIGNMENTS OF MORT-
GAGE: none
TRANSACTION AGENT: none
TRANSACTION AGENT’S
MORTGAGE IDENTIFICATION
NUMBER ON MORTGAGE:
none
LENDER OR BROKER AND
MORTGAGE ORIGINATOR
STATED ON MORTGAGE: Victo-
ria L. Lang
RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE
SERVICER: Victoria L. Lang
MORTGAGE PROPERTY AD-
DRESS: 5202 2nd St, New
Auburn, MN 55366
TAX PARCEL I.D. #:
36.0176.010
LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
Lots 17 and 18, Block 32 in the
City of New Auburn, according to
the recorded plat thereof, Sibley
County, Minnesota
COUNTY IN WHICH PROP-
ERTY IS LOCATED: Sibley
ORIGINAL PRINCIPAL
AMOUNT OF MORTGAGE:
$97,118.76
AMOUNT DUE AND
CLAIMED TO BE DUE AS OF
DATE OF NOTICE, INCLUDING
TAXES, IF ANY, PAID BY MORT-
GAGEE: $97,118.76
That prior to the commence-
ment of this mortgage foreclosure
proceeding Mortgagee/Assignee
of Mortgagee complied with all
notice requirements as required
by statute; That no action or pro-
ceeding has been instituted at
law or otherwise to recover the
debt secured by said mortgage,
or any part thereof;
PURSUANT to the power of
sale contained in said mortgage,
the above described property will
be sol d by the Sheri ff of sai d
county as follows:
DATE AND TIME OF SALE:
07/29/2013 at 10:00 AM
PLACE OF SALE: Si bl ey
County Law Enforcement Center,
419 Harrison, Gaylord, MN 55334
to pay the debt then secured
by said Mortgage, and taxes, if
any, on said premises, and the
costs and disbursements, includ-
ing attorneys’ fees allowed by law
subject to redemption within six
(6) months from the date of said
sale by the mortgagor(s), their
personal representatives or as-
signs unless reduced to Five (5)
weeks under MN Stat. §580.07.
TIME AND DATE TO VACATE
PROPERTY: If the real estate is
an owner-occupied, single-family
dwelling, unless otherwise provid-
ed by law, the date on or before
which the mortgagor(s) must va-
cate the property if the mortgage
is not reinstated under section
580.30 or the property is not re-
deemed under section 580.23 is
12:01 a.m. on 01/31/2014.
MORTGAGOR(S) RELEASED
FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGA-
TION ON MORTGAGE: None
“THE TIME ALLOWED BY
LAW FOR REDEMPTION BY
THE MORTGAGOR, THE MORT-
GAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRE-
SENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS,
MAY BE REDUCED TO FIVE
WEEKS IF A JUDICIAL ORDER
IS ENTERED UNDER MIN-
NESOTA STATUTES, SECTION
582.032, DETERMINING,
AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT
THE MORTGAGED PREMISES
ARE IMPROVED WITH A RESI-
DENTIAL DWELLING OF LESS
THAN FIVE UNITS, ARE NOT
PROPERTY USED IN AGRICUL-
TURAL PRODUCTION, AND
ARE ABANDONED.”
Victoria L. Lang
Mortgagee
Gregory A. Lang #59894
Attorney for Mortgagee
17800 Old Excelsior Blvd.
Minnetonka, MN 55345
Publish: June 6, 13, 20, 27,
July 4 and 11, 2013
CALL FOR QUOTES
A their regular School Board
meeting held on June 17, 2013,
the Sibley East Public/School In-
dependent School District No.
2310 Board of Education called
for quotes on Milk/Dairy, Bakery
Products, Fuel/Diesel and Refuse
Col l ecti on for the 2013-2014
school year. Specifications are
available at the district office of
Sibley East Arlington campus.
Quotes must be submitted by July
10, 2013, at 1:00 p.m. in the Dis-
trict Office in Arlington.
By Order Of:
Sibley East Public Schools
Independent School District
No. 2310
Arlington, MN 55307
Publish: June 20, 27 and
July 3
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, July 4, 2013, page 7
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
combined
WET BASEMENT?
R22-34CEL,23-34Aa
Arlington Raceway
Legals
The following is a list of
results from the Arlington
Raceway on Saturday, June
29.
Truck Auto Cross -
Feature
1. 20 John Theis, Le Center
2. 85 Dustin Theuringer, Hutch-
inson
3. XX Adam Mehlhop, Arlington
4. 51 Scott Ernsting, Le Sueur
5. 02 Isaac Arnst, Henderson
6. 47 Ryan Hoff, Winthrop
7. 29 Brianna Thies, Le Center
8. 09 Josh Kunz, no town
9. 9 Kalab Stoeckman, Arlington
10. 01 Joe Scheffler, Henderson
11. 138 Trevor Falk, Glencoe
IMCA SportMods -
Feature
1. 9 Matthew Looft, Swea, Iowa
2. 13 Adam Revier, Glencoe
3. 71 Josh Larsen, Glencoe
4. 3X Jeremy Brown, Rose-
mount
5. 38M Mark Garver, Wells
6. 23 Brett Trebesch, Sleepy Eye
7. 20 Randy Fischer, Sleepy Eye
8. 7L Eric Larson, Madison Lake
9. 7S Shawn Harms, Green Isle
10. 74 Dustin Engelke, Lester
Prairie
11. 48 John Albrecht, Glencoe
12. 0 Justin Remus, Sleepy Eye
13. 2X Jesse Marshall, Chanhas-
sen
14. 35 Joe Maas, Howard Lake
15. 28 Paul Konakowitz, New
Ulm
16. 74X Zack Malchow,
Hutchinson
17. 24 Glenn Martner, Bloom-
ington
Stock Cars - Feature
1. 110 Kenneth Tietz, Belle
Plaine
2. 81 Matt Speckman, Sleepy
Eye
3. 92 Dan Mackenthun, Ham-
burg
4. 33 Matthew Schauer, Arling-
ton
5. 15 Brad Lange, Prior Lake
6. 71M Chris Meyer, Silver Lake
7. 87 Brent Uecker. Hutchinson
8. 31 John Polifka, Glencoe
9. 2D Mori Oestreich, Hender-
son
10. 28 Jeff Holstein, New Ulm
11. 10E Darrell Eckblad, Saint
Peter
12. 25 Brent Reierson, Arling-
ton
13. 1m Jeff Mccollum, Mankato
14. 19K Patrick Kohn, Hutchin-
son
Sprint Cars - Feature
1. 4S Mike Stien, Gaylord
2. 55 Bruce Allen, Mankato
3. 79 Aaron Wisch, Arlington
4. 14 Gary Kasten, Hutchinson
5. 14K Victoria Knutson, Monti-
cello
6. 2R Ron Guentzel, no town
7. 5 Gary Serbus, Olivia
8. 1300 Brett Allen, Gaylord
9. 11 Dalyn Cody, Prior Lake
10. 33S Jeremy Schultz,
Hutchinson
Modifieds - Feature
1. 5 Brandon Beckendorf,
Danube
2. 33 Jason Helmbrecht, Howard
Lake
3. X Josh Rogotzke, Sanborn
4. M8 Dalton Magers, Redwood
Falls
5. 32 Nick Helmbrecht, Winsted
6. 12 Chad Porter, Madison Lake
7. 10 Andrew Timm, Mankato
8. 6Z Nate Zimmerman,
Janesville
9. 1M Jeff Maasch, Vesta
10 74 Tim Pessek, Hutchinson
11. 111 Adam Voss, Arlington
12. 3C Chet Atkinson, Hugo
13. 74C Clint Hatlestad, Glencoe
14. 72 Tyler Limoges, Redwood
Falls
IMCA Sport Compact -
Feature
1. 54 Alan Lahr, Nicollet
2. 83X Kalab Stoeckman, Ar-
lington
3. 81 Ryan Sturges, Silver Lake
4. 27 Jed Trebelhorn. Winthrop
5. 17 Ashelyn Moriarty, Jordan
6. 15 Kyren Porter, Madison
Lake
7. 23 Randy Roush, no town
8. 64 Dave Revier, Glencoe
9. 42 Tyler Archer, Plato
10. 30 Logan St. John, Arlington
Outlaw Hobby - Feature
1. 44 Bryan Apitz, New Ulm
2. 11 Rodney Manthey, Nor-
wood
3. 4X Scott Oestreich, Belle
Plaine
4. 92 Bill Braunworth, no town
5. 01X Perry Oestreich, Belle
Plaine
6. 21W Tony Winters, Green Isle
7. 3J Jessie Johnson, Belle
Plaine
8. 29X Fred Heidecker, Brown-
ton
IMCA Hobby - Feature
1. 00 Cody Schnepf, Waseca
2. 27Z Jeremy Ziemke,
Janesville
3. 75 Josh Telecky, Hutchinson
4. 6T Mike Christensen,
Hutchinson
5. 39 Mike Vogt, New Auburn
6. 56M Matt Olson, Franklin
7. 01X Patrick Oestreich, Belle
Plaine
8. 1K Kristin Voss, Belle Plaine
9. 78 Kevin Latour, Le Sueur
10. 0 Charlie Rustman, Saint
Peter
11. 16 Ryan Grochow, New Ulm
12. 4X Brad Strauss, Janesville
13. 57 Brian Loscheider,
Cologne
14. 1S Sarah Voss, Belle
Plaine
15. 34 Dakota Robinson, Arling-
ton
16. 17 Corey Schultz, Arlington
17. 10E Daniel Eckblad, Saint
Peter
Enterprise photo by Carrie Pioske
The following members of the Arlington Greys were
present for the Mankato Baltics Vintage Base Ball
Festival on Saturday, June 29. Front Row: (left to
right) Pat “Fish” Nienaber, Steve “Little Bill” Pioske
and batboy Oscar “The Big O” Kreft. Middle Row:
Roger “The Preacher” Hoeben, manager Kurt “Skip”
Menk, Tim “Pillowcase” Kloeckl, Dan “Young Blood”
Spletts-toeser and assistant manager Mark “No
Show” Pauly. Back Row: Scorekeeper Dwight “Ike”
Grabitske, Jake “Louie” Lucas, Jeff “The Babe” Menk,
Mike “One Way” Feterl, Chad “Part-Time” Bachman
and Jim “Yukon” Kreft.
By Kurt Menk
Editor
The Arlington Greys posted
a 2-0 record and won the
traveling trophy again at the
Mankato Baltics Vintage
Base Ball Festival on Satur-
day, June 29.
The Greys have won all
seven games played in
Mankato during the past three
years.
The cranks (fans) were
treated to three matches on a
beautiful afternoon for base
ball as played in 1860. The
artists (proficient players)
were able to demonstrate
their ability to strike the
onion (ball) for safeties, the
muckles (power hitters)
struck the ball deep into the
garden (outfield), and the
scouts (outfielders) made
some fine plays on the well
struck balls. The muffins
(enthusiastic but unskilled
player) made the play inter-
esting when they hit safely or
managed to catch a sky ball
(high fly ball). The ballists
(players) demonstrated base
ball of 1860’s showing it to
be a gentlemen’s game with
no disputes.
Arlington 9
Mankato 4
The Greys rallied from a 3-
0 deficit after the first inning
and defeated the Mankato
Baltics 9-4 during the open-
ing round of the Mankato
Baltics Vintage Base Ball
Festival on Saturday, June 29.
The Greys found their
game with seven aces in the
top of the fourth inning. Ar-
lington plated one run in each
of the next two frames and
cruised to the 9-4 win.
Steve “Little Bill” Pioske
sparked the Greys with a sin-
gle and two doubles. Roger
“The Preacher” Hoeben con-
tributed two singles and a
double while Mike “One
Way” Feterl and Dan “Young
Blood” Splettstoeser collect-
ed three singles each. Jake
“Louie” Lucas had a double
and belted a home run which
sailed over the walking path
in left field and bounced over
a seven-foot residential fence.
Pat “Fish” Nienaber, Jeff
“The Babe” Menk and Chad
“Part-Time” Bachman
recorded two singles apiece.
Tim “Pillowcase” Kloeckl
posted one single.
The match also featured
some fine fielding by Jim
“Yukon” Kreft in left field.
Arlington 18
Menomonie 6
The Arlington Greys
pounded out a team record 28
hits and defeated the
Menomonie Blue Caps 18-6
during the second round of
the Mankato Baltics Vintage
Base Ball Festival on Satur-
day, June 29.
The Greys, who fell behind
2-0 in the top of the second
inning, rallied for 18 unan-
swered runs.
The Blue Caps were first
organized in 2012, but did not
play their first match until
this year. Their match with
the Greys was only their
fourth one. Their “ballists”
are mostly “muffins,” but
they play with “ginger” and
know how to “leg it” when
given the opportunity.
Pat “Fish” Nienaber, Jeff
“The Babe” Menk and Jake
“Louie” Lucas sparked the
Greys with two singles each
and two doubles apiece. Tim
“Pillowcase” Kloeckl had
four singles while Chad
“Part-Time” Bachman and
Dan “Young Blood”
Splettstoeser tallied three sin-
gles each while Mike “One
Way” Feterl, Steve “Little
Bill” Pioske and Roger “The
Preacher” Hoeben had two
singles apiece.
Arlington Greys win the traveling trophy again
at Mankato Baltics Vintage Base Ball Festival
Call us at:
320-864-5518
The McLeod County Chronicle
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, July 4, 2013, page 8
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
2013 Safe Routes to School
S.P. 072-591-002
SRTS 7213 (183)
City of Arlington
Arlington, MN
RECEIPT AND OPENING OF PROPOSALS: Sealed proposals for the work described below will
be received at the Office of the City Administrator, City of Arlington, 204 Shamrock Drive, Arlington,
MN, 55307 until 2:00pm on Monday, July 15, 2013 at which time the bids will be opened and publicly
read.
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The work includes the construction of approximately:
Clearing/Grubbing Tree 14 TREE Concrete Curb and Gutter, B618 500 LF
Remove Curb and Gutter 500 LF 7” Concrete Driveway Pavement 200 SY
Remove Concrete Walk or Driveway 6000 SF Truncated Domes 200 SF
Remove and Replace Bituminous Pavement 150 SY Deciduous Tree 2” 10 EA
4” Concrete Walk 10,000 SF Sodding, Type Lawn 2,000 SY
6” Concrete Walk 1,000 SF Crosswalk Marking – Epoxy 1,000 SF
together with numerous related items of work, all in accordance with Plans and Specifications.
PLANHOLDERS LIST, ADDENDUMS AND BID TABULATION: The planholders list, adden-
dums and bid tabulations will be available for download on-line at www.bolton-menk.com or
www.questcdn.com. Any addendums may also be distributed by mail, fax or email.
TO OBTAIN BID DOCUMENTS: Complete digital project bidding documents are available at
www.bolton-menk.com or www.questcdn.com. You may view the digital plan documents for free by
entering Quest project #2767098 on the website’s Project Search page. Documents may be down-
loaded for $20.00. Please contact QuestCDN.com at 952-233-1632 or info@questcdn.com for assis-
tance in free membership registration, viewing, downloading, and working with this digital project in-
formation. An optional paper set of project documents is also available for a nonrefundable price of
$50.00 per set, which includes applicable sales tax and shipping. Please make your check to payable to
Bolton & Menk, Inc. and send it to 1960 Premier Drive, Mankato, MN 56001, (507) 625-4171, fax
(507) 625-4177.
BID SECURITY: A certified check or proposal bond in the amount of not less than 5 percent of the
total amount bid, drawn in favor of City of Arlington shall accompany each bid.
OWNER’S RIGHTS RESERVED: The Owner reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to
waive any irregularities and informalities therein and to award the Contract to other than the lowest
bidder if, in their discretion, the interest of the Owner would be best served thereby.
Dated: June 17, 2013. /s/ Liza Donabauer
City Administrator
Published:
Finance and Commerce: June 20, 2013, June 27, 2013, July 3, 2013
Arlington Enterprise: June 20, 2013, June 27, 2013, July 4, 2013
Minimum wage rates to be paid by the Contractors have been predetermined and are subject to the
Work Hours Act of 1962, P.L. 87-581 and implementing regulations.
READ CAREFULLY THE WAGE SCALES AND DIVISION A OF THE SPECIAL
PROVISIONS AS THEY AFFECT THIS/THESE PROJECT/PROJECTS
The Minnesota Department of Transportation hereby notifies all bidders:
in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Act), as amended and Title 49, Code of
Federal Regulations, Subtitle A Part 21, Non-discrimination in Federally-assisted programs of the De-
partment of Transportation, it will affirmatively assure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this
advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded maximum opportunity to partici-
pate and/or to submit bids in response to this invitation, and will not be discriminated against on the
grounds of race, color, disability, age, religion, sex or national origin in consideration for an award;
in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as amended, and Title 23, Code of Federal
Regulations, Part 230 Subpart A-Equal Employment Opportunity on Federal and Federal-Aid Con-
struction Contracts (including supportive services), it will affirmatively assure increased participation
of minority groups and disadvantaged persons and women in all phases of the highway construction
industry, and that on any project constructed pursuant to this advertisement equal employment oppor-
tunity will be provided to all persons without regard to their race, color, disability, age, religion, sex or
national origin;
in accordance with the Minnesota Human Rights Act, Minnesota Statute 363A.08 Unfair discriminato-
ry Practices, it will affirmatively assure that on any project constructed pursuant to this advertisement
equal employment opportunity will be offered to all persons without regard to race, color, creed, reli-
gion, national origin, sex, marital status, status with regard to public assistance, membership or activi-
ty in a local commission, disability, sexual orientation, or age;in accordance with the Minnesota
Human Rights Act, Minnesota Statute 363A.36 Certificates of Compliance for Public Contracts, and
363A.37 Rules for Certificates of Compliance, it will assure that appropriate parties to any contract
entered into pursuant to this advertisement possess valid Certificates of Compliance.
If you are not a current holder of a compliance certificate issued by the Minnesota Department of
Human Rights and intend to bid on any job in this advertisement you must contact the Department of
Human Rights immediately for assistance in obtaining a certificate.
The following notice from the Minnesota Department of Human Rights applies to all contractors:
“It is hereby agreed between the parties that Minnesota Statute, section 363A.36 and Minnesota Rules,
parts 5000.3400 to 5000.3600 are incorporated into any contract between these parties based on this
specification or any modification of it. A copy of Minnesota Statute 363A.36 and Minnesota Rules,
parts 5000.3400 to 5000.3600 is available upon request from the contracting agency.”
“It is hereby agreed between the parties that this agency will require affirmative action requirements
be met by contractors in relation to Minnesota Statute 363A.36 and Minnesota Rules 5000.3600. Fail-
ure by a contractor to implement an affirmative action plan or make a good faith effort shall result in
revocation of its certificate or revocation of the contract (Minnesota Statute 363A.36, Subd. 2 and 3).”
A minimum goal of 5.0%Good Faith Effort to be subcontracted to Disadvantaged Business Enterpris-
es.
A24-26Ea
FSA Matters
Sibley County Court
The following misdemeanors,
petty misdemeanors and gross
misdemeanors were heard in Dis-
trict Court June 21-28: Minnesota
State Patrol (MSP), Sheriff’s Of-
fice (SO), Department of Natural
Resources (DNR), MN Depart-
ment of Transportation (Mn-
DOT):
Rachel E.-A. K. Adams, 22,
Minneapolis, speed, $125, Ar-
lington PD; Casper R. Casey, 33,
Arlington, driving after revoca-
tion, $275, Arlington PD; Daniel
M. Jacobus, 23, Arlington, failure
to stop at stop signs or stop lines,
$135, Arlington PD; Taylor C.
Jordan, 19, Winthrop, proof of in-
surance, dismissed, Arlington
PD; Duane R. Wolters, 60, Ar-
lington, failure to display current
registration - expired plates,
$115, Arlington PD; Alexander J.
Zila, 18, Hutchinson, speed,
$125, Arlington PD; Anthony T.
Bergstrom, 22, Minneapolis, do-
mestic assault, dismissed, domes-
tic abuse, stay of imposition, su-
pervised probation one year, local
confinement one day, credit for
time served one day, sentence to
service 160 hours for indetermi-
nate, sign probation agreement,
follow all conditions set forth in
the probation agreement, keep
court/attorney informed of cur-
rent address, sign all releases of
information, seek and maintain
full time (at least 32 hours per
week) employment, keep current
on child support, psychological
evaluation/treatment, follow rec-
ommendations of evaluation, re-
main law-abiding, domestic
abuse evaluation, domestic no
contact, $385, Gaylord PD;
Erik N. Grove, 20, Gaylord,
driving after revocation, contin-
ued, unsupervised probation one
year, pay costs, no driver license
violations, $100, Gaylord PD;
Taylor C. Jordan, 19, Winthrop,
proof of insurance, dismissed,
Gaylord PD; Christopher I.
Larsen, 29, Mankato, proof of in-
surance, dismissed, Gaylord PD;
Jessica T. G. Schauer, 34, Gay-
lord, proof of insurance, dis-
missed, Gaylord PD; Randy L.
Dreier, 56, Gibbon, no dog li-
cense, $125, Gibbon PD; Cynthia
E. Tilton, 55, Gibbon, no dog li-
cense, $125, Gibbon PD; Kanji
C. L. Wright, 39, Gibbon, no dog
license, $125, Gibbon PD; Bren-
da C. Colvin, 29, Plymouth,
proof of insurance, continued,
unsupervised probation one year,
provide proof of insurance to
prosecutor for a total of 12
months, pay costs, remain law-
abiding, no driving without insur-
ance, $150, speed, dismissed,
Henderson PD; Ronald P. Halver-
son, 61, Henderson, speed, $125,
Henderson PD; Joseph B. Kack,
22, Minneota, speed, dismissed,
Henderson PD; Hootie M.
Lieske, 19, Henderson, seat belt,
$110, Henderson PD; Robert A.
Boltmann, 69, Hamburg, seat
belt, $110, MSP;
Brian J. Carlson, 28, Gibbon,
speed, $125, MSP; Clark T. Cor-
bett, 25, Eden Prairie, speed,
$225, MSP; Marcus G. Dalbec,
21, Delano, speed, $135, MSP;
Christopher A. Egert, 39, Min-
netonka, speed, $135, MSP;
Tanya Y. Guerra, 48, Gaylord,
driving after revocation, contin-
ued, unsupervised probation one
year, remain law-abiding, no
driver license violations, $100,
MSP; Scott M. Gunther, 34, Ar-
lington, speed, $135, MSP;
Robert G. Halvorson, 49, North-
field, speed, $135, MSP; James
M. Haugen, 63, Hutchinson,
speed, $125, MSP; Aquiles J.
Hernandez, 63, Arlington, driving
without a valid license or vehicle
class/type, $185, MSP; Krista F.
Hiltner, 23, Truman, vehicle reg-
istration required, $115, MSP;
Duane K. Kohls, 58, Mankato,
seat belt violation in a commer-
cial vehicle, $110, MSP; Todd R.
Laubach, 49, Lakeville, speed,
$125, MSP; Daniel J. Leifer-
mann, 21, Waconia, speed, $225,
MSP; Amanda J. Lopez, 26,
Hutchinson, seat belt, $110,
MSP; James R. Moore, 37, Sav-
age, speed, $135, proof of insur-
ance, dismissed, MSP; Theresa
M. Olson, 60, Gaylord, speed,
$125, MSP; Bruce D. Quick, 60,
Fargo, N.D., speed, $135, MSP;
Joel C. Simon, 63, Bloomington,
speed, $125, MSP;
Craig S. Wagner, 51, Maple
Grove, speed, $125, MSP; Amani
S. Yassin, 20, Sartell, speed,
$135, MSP; Lexi A. Anderson,
20, St. Peter, liquor consumption
by persons under 21, $185, SO;
Shelly K. Berger, 37, Gibbon,
neglect child - knowingly permit
physical/sex abuse, continued,
supervised probation two years,
local confinement 30 days, psy-
chological evaluation/treatment
within 30 days upon release from
jail, follow recommendations of
evaluation, follow all instructions
of probation, sign probation
agreement, follow all recommen-
dations in the Renville County
Protection Files, sign all releases
of information, remain law-abid-
ing, consecutive other case, $85,
SO; Andrew J. Carlson, 18, Hen-
derson, possess over 1.4 grams
marijuana in motor vehicle, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
$570, SO; David N. Cohrs, 27,
Glencoe, speed, $125, SO;
Michael J. Fahey, 19, Belle
Plaine, possess/sale small amount
of marijuana, $135, SO; Reyna J.
Garcia, 34, Gaylord, uninsured
vehicle, continued, unsupervised
probation one year, no driving
without insurance, remain law-
abiding, pay costs, $100, SO;
Ryan C. Hartung, 37, Mayer,
speed, $135, SO;
Thomas R. Knoll, 37, Annan-
dale, speed, $125, SO; Teresa A.
Kroehler, 50, Henderson, speed,
$145, SO; Kevin J. Maus, 18,
New Prague, liquor consumption
by persons under 21, $185, SO;
Joshua D. Turum, 25, New
Auburn, failure to obtain new dri-
ver’s license after changing name
or address, $105, SO; Tia K.
Grunke, 32, Winthrop, DWI, stay
of imposition, unsupervised pro-
bation one year, chemical de-
pendency evaluation/treatment
within 60 days, follow recom-
mendations of evaluation, sign all
releases of information, attend
MADD impact panel, file proof,
keep court/attorney informed of
current address, remain law-abid-
ing, no alcohol-related traffic of-
fenses, no driver license viola-
tions, $460, failure to stop at stop
signs or stop lines, dismissed,
failure to obtain new driver’s li-
cense after changing name or ad-
dress, dismissed, Winthrop PD;
Jesse M. Kranz, 34, Gaylord, seat
belt, $110, Winthrop PD; Joel
Munoz, 18, Gibbon, proof of in-
surance, dismissed, Winthrop PD;
Jessica R. Olson, 34, Winthrop,
proof of insurance, dismissed,
Winthrop PD; Maria T. Vasquez,
64, Winthrop, driving without a
valid license or vehicle
class/type, $185, Winthrop PD.
The following felonies were
heard in District Court June 21-
28: Anthony T. Bergstrom, 22,
Minneapolis, terroristic threats,
dismissed, Gaylord PD; Christo-
pher L. Jochum, 37, Glencoe,
criminal sex conduct, dismissed,
SO.
Lori Weckwerth
Sibley FSA
DCP Signup Continues
The sign-up period for
DCP is still open. Producers
are encouraged to sign up for
DCP before the August 2
deadline.
The 2013 DCP program
provisions are unchanged
from 2012. Please remember
to provide all changes to your
farm records to the local FSA
office for the current crop
year before you make an ap-
pointment. If you are chang-
ing your operation entity
type, adding or dropping
cropland or farms, or adding
entities to your operation,
please notify the FSA county
office to update your file so
we can have the necessary
computer and paperwork
completed.
Contact the FSA Sibley
County Office to set up an
appointment to enroll.
Crop Certification
After spring planting, pro-
ducers should certify their
2013 acreage. Filing an accu-
rate acreage report for all
crops and land uses, includ-
ing failed acreage and pre-
vented planting acreage, can
prevent the loss of benefits
for a variety of programs.
Failed acreage must be re-
ported within 15 days of the
disaster event and before dis-
position of the crop.
The reporting of prevented
planting acreage has been ex-
tended from the 15 days after
the final planting date to July
15, 2013. Please call to set
up an appointment at 507-
237-2948, extension 2.
In addition, any existing
stands of alfalfa, mixed for-
age, grass or winter wheat
that is carried over into 2014
must be reported no later than
Nov. 15 for your 2014 crop
acreage report. Acreage re-
ports for these crops filed
after Nov. 15 will be consid-
ered late-filed and applicable
late-filed acreage reporting
fees will apply.
Enterprise photo by Kurt Menk
High Waters
Although it has receded during the past
week, the water from the High Island
Creek was still rather high behind the
homes located along the 400 block of
Creekview Lane in Arlington. This pic-
ture was taken early Tuesday morning,
July 2.
After 46 years of doing the
play-by-play for basketball
games, finding music that
makes people tap their toes,
staying on top of local break-
ing news and selling ads to
keep his station on the air,
Bob Johnson is being recog-
nizes for his hard work.
In a ceremony on Septem-
ber 29, Johnson, a long-time
Le Sueur/St. Peter radio sta-
tion owner will be inducted
into the Minnesota Broad-
casting Hall of Fame, accord-
ing to an article in the Le
Sueur News Herald.
“It was a lot of work, ”
Johnson admits of his time as
owner of KRBI AM and FM.
“I used to work 17 hour
days.”
Johnson will be inducted into
the Broadcasting Hall of Fame
Gaylord resident John
Siewert, a volunteer driver
with Trailblazer Transit, was
recognized with the Voyageur
Award in June, according to
an article in The Gaylord
Hub.
The award was presented at
the Trailblazer Transit Annual
Volunteer Driver Apprecia-
tion and Training.
The Voyageur Award, also
known as the Volunteer of the
Year Award, is presented to a
volunteer driver who has
gone above and beyond the
call of duty in the number of
service miles, service hours,
trips and one-way rides pro-
vided during the 2012 calen-
dar year.
Volunteer driver honored by Trailblazer Transit
W W W . A R L I N G TO N M N N E W S . C O M
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, July 4, 2013, page 9
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
FLATBED DRIVERS
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weekly. $50 tarp pay. 888/691-5705
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Midnite Express wants experienced
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plan available. Call 800/726-8639.
Apply online www.midnitexpress.com
OTR DRIVERS
& Owner Operators for small com-
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arounds. Competitive pay & ben-
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CASH FOR CARS:
All cars/trucks wanted. Running or not! Top
dollar paid. We come to you! Any make/
model. Call for instant offer: 800/871-9145
UNIQUE LAKE HOME
near Mankato with level lake-
shore and sand beach; info and
video at www.familylakehome.com
R Tietz, True Life Realty 952/393-5030
ARTS & CRAFTERS NEEDED
32nd Annual Maple Lake Arts and
Crafts Festival, July 6 & 7, 2013
Maple Lake Pavilion, Mentor, MN.
To pre-register: 701/885-5266
DISH TV RETAILER
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12
mos.) & High Speed Internet start-
ing at $14.95/month (where avail-
able.) Save! Ask About same day In-
stallation! Call now! 800/297-8706
CANADA DRUG CENTER
is your choice for safe and affordable med-
ications. Our licensed Canadian mail order
pharmacy will provide you with savings of
up to 75% on all your medication needs.
Call today 800/259-1096 for $10.00 off
your first prescription and free shipping.
DONATE YOUR CAR
Truck or Boat to heritage for the blind. Free
3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing,
all paperwork taken care of 888/485-0398
MEDICAL ALERT
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McGraw Monument
Works, Inc., LeSueur
Local Representative
Leah Schrupp
Arlington, MN 55307
612-308-8169
3 miles North of LeSueur
on Highway 169
30945 Forest Prairie Road
(507) 665-3126
HOURS: M-F 8-5
Weekends by appointment.
Visit our
INDOOR AND OUTDOOR
DISPLAYS
M31-30Ea
Blessings
[Humble Service in the Body of Christ] For by the grace given me I say
to every one of you: Do not think of yourself more highly than you ought,
but rather think of yourself with sober judgment, in accordance with the
faith God has distributed to each of you. Romans 12:3 NIV
Zion Lutheran Church (ELCA)
814 W Brooks St, Arlington • 507-964-5454
Pastor James Carlson
Worship: Sunday 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School/Fellowship 10:00 a.m.
Commercial and Industrial Builders
Green Isle, MN 55338
ph. 507.326.7901 fax: 507.326.3551
www.vosconstruction.com
Arlington State Bank
Serving the Community Since 1895
BANKING SERVICES
964-2256
Arlington
A & N Radiator Repair
Allen & Nicki Scharn, Owners
23228 401 Ave., Arlington
877-964-2281 or 507-964-2281 Bus.
Certified ASE Technician on Staff
Also distributor for Poxy Coat II
Industrial Grade Coatings/Paint
MID-COUNTY
CO-OP
700 W. Lake St., Box 177
Cologne, MN 55322
(952) 466-3700
or TOLL FREE: 1-888-466-3700
HUTCHINSON CO-OP
AGRONOMY
LEON DOSE,
Arlington Branch Manager
411 7
th
Ave. NW • (507) 964-2251
Arlington
ENTERPRISE
402 W. Alden, Arlington
507-964-5547
Online at
www.Arlington
MNnew.com
Arlington Haus
Your Hometown Pub & Eatery
1986-2009
Arlington • 1-507-964-2473
STATE BANK OF
HAMBURG
100 Years. 100 Reasons.
Phone 952-467-2992
statebankofhamburg.com
CONVENIENCE
STORE
Hwy. 5 N., Arlington
507-964-2920
Homestyle Pizza
Real or Soft Serve Ice Cream
Gas — Diesel — Deli — Videos
(507)
964-2212
www.
chefcraigs
.com
23180 401 Ave., Arlington Phone 507-964-2264
EQUAL
HOUSING
LENDER
CRAIG BULLERT
ARLINGTON, MN
23189 Hwy. 5 North,
Arlington, MN 55307
arlington@hutchcoop.com
Office (507) 964-2283
Cell (320) 583-4324
HC
FUNERAL SERVICE
P.O. Box 314
Arlington, MN 55307
Phone (507) 964-2201
Member
FDIC
Church News
Menu
UNITED METHODIST
Arlington
Rodney J. Stemme, Pastor
www.arlingtonunited
methodist.org
Saturday, July 6: 8:00 a.m. A-
Men men’s group. 10:00 a.m.
Bible study at Bette Nelson’s.
Sunday, July 7: 9:00 and
11:00 a.m. Worship with Com-
munion. 10:15 a.m. Fellowship.
Tuesday, July 9: 6:30 p.m.
Education Outreach.
Thursday, July 11: 10:00
a.m., 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. Wor-
ship on cable TV. No Bible
study this week.
EVANGELICAL
COVENANT CHURCH
107 W. Third St., Winthrop
Pastor Kyle Kachelmeier
507-647-5777
Parsonage 507-647-3739
www.wincov.org
Sunday, July 7: 9:30 a.m.
Worship. 10:45 a.m. Fellowship
hour.
Monday, July 8: 7:30 a.m.
Walking at the track.
Tuesday, July 9: 7:00 p.m.
Executive Board. 7:30 p.m. All
boards.
Wednesday, July 10: 9:00
a.m. Prayer coffee.
Thursday, July 11: 7:30 a.m.
Walking at the track.
ST. PAUL LUTHERAN
(WELS),
Arlington
Bruce Hannemann, Pastor
WEBSITE:
www.stpaularlington.com
EMAIL:
Bruce.Hannemann@stpaul
arlington.com
Sunday, July 7: 9:00 a. m.
Worship with Communion.
Monday, July 8: 7:30 p.m.
Worship with Communion.
Tuesday, July 9: 8:30 a.m.
Counting Committee. 7:00 p.m.
Council meeting.
Thursday, July 11: 10:00 a.m.
Bulletin information due. 11:00
a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Services on
cable TV, channel 8. 6:30 p.m.
Worship Committee.
GAYLORD ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
Gaylord
Bob Holmbeck, Pastor
Sunday, July 7: 9:00 a. m.
Sunday school. 10:00 a.m. Sun-
day worship service with Com-
munion.
Wednesday, July 10: 6:30
p.m. Evening Bible classes and
Youth Focused.
ST. PAUL’S EV.
REFORMED CHURCH
15470 Co. Rd. 31, Hamburg
Dan Schnabel, Pastor
952-467-3878
www.stpaulsrcus.org
Sunday, July 7: 9:30 a. m.
Worship service.
ORATORY OF
ST. THOMAS
THE APOSTLE
Jessenland
507-248-3550
Fr. Sam Perez
Thursday: Weekly Mass at
5:00 p.m.
ST. MARY, MICHAEL
AND BRENDAN AREA
FAITH COMMUNITY
Fr. Keith Salisbury, Pastor
Friday, July 5: 8:30 a.m. Mass
(Mar).
Saturday, July 6: 5:00 p.m.
Mass (Mar).
Sunday, July 7: 7:30 a. m.
Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m. Mass
(Mic). 10:30 a.m. Mass (Mar).
1:00 to 2:00 p.m. Eucharistic
Adoration (Mar).
Monday, July 8: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar). 9:00 a.m.
to 9:00 p.m. Eucharistic Adora-
tion (Mar). 8:00 p.m. AA and
Ala-Non (Mar).
Tuesday, July 9: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mar).
Wednesday, July 10: 8:30
a.m. Mass (Bre). 9:00 a.m. Word
and Communion (Oak Terrace).
5:00 p.m. Mass (Mar).
Thursday, July 11: 8:30 a.m.
Mass (Bre and Mic). 7:30 p.m.
Narcotics Anonymous (Mic).
TRINITY LUTHERAN
32234 431st Ave., Gaylord
Rev. James Snyder,
Interim Pastor
Sunday, July 7: 8:30 a. m.
Worship with Holy Communion.
Monday, July 8: 7:00 p.m.
Summer evening worship with
Communion.
Wednesday, July 10: 1:30
p.m. WELCA.
Thursday, July 11: 1:30 p.m.
Oak Terrace Communion.
ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN
Green Isle
Friday, July 5: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, July 7: 7:45 a. m.
Worship without Communion.
Pastor Bob Hines.
PEACE LUTHERAN
(Missouri Synod), Arlington
Kurt Lehmkuhl, Pastor
Sunday, July 7: 9:00 a.m.
Worship service.
Monday, July 8: 7:00 p.m.
Worship service with Holy
Communion.
ZION LUTHERAN
814 W. Brooks St.
Arlington – (507) 964-5454
James Carlson, Pastor
Wednesday, July 3: 5:30 p.m.
Board of Worship and music
meeting.
Sunday, July 7: 9:00 a.m.
Worship with Holy Communion.
10:00 a.m. Fellowship. 10:15
a.m. Board of Education meet-
ing.
Tuesday, July 9: 6:00 to 7:00
p.m. TOPS in church basement.
Wednesday, July 10: 6:30
p.m. Deacons meeting. 7:00
p.m. Church Council meeting;
ZCW Wednesday group at Mary
Seeman home.
Thursday, July 11: 9:00 a.m.
and 1:00 p.m. Zion service on
cable.
ZION LUTHERAN
Green Isle Township
Friday, July 5: 10:00 a.m.
Deadline for Sunday bulletin.
Sunday, July 7: 10:30 a.m.
a.m. Worship with Communion.
Pastor Bob Hines.
Monday, July 8: 8:00 p.m.
Voters’ meeting.
CREEKSIDE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Christian & Missionary
Alliance
Ben Lane, Pastor
114 Shamrock Drive
Arlington – 507-964-2872
www.creekside-church.com
email: creeksidecc@media-
combb.net.
Thursday, July 4: No men’s or
women’s studies this week -
enjoy the holiday.
Sunday, July 7: 10:30 a.m.
Worship service.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST
7th Ave. N.W., Arlington
(507) 304-3410
Pastor Robert Brauer
507-234-6770
Saturday: Church services at
9:30 a.m. Bible study at 11:00
a.m. Fellowship dinner at 12:00
p.m. All are welcome.
SENIOR DINING
Call 326-3401 for a meal
Suggested Donation $3.85
Monday: Swedish meatballs,
paprika potatoes, spinach, bread
with margarine, ice cream, low
fat milk.
Tuesday: Li ver or pepper
steak, buttered boiled potatoes,
peas, bread with margarine, apri-
cots, low fat milk.
Wednesday: Chef sal ad -
turkey, ham, cheese, lettuce with
salad dressing, tomato, cucum-
ber slices, muffin with margarine,
brownie, low fat milk.
Thursday: Beef tips with gravy,
mashed potatoes, broccoli, bread
with margarine, peaches, low fat
milk.
Friday: Pork chow mein, rice,
chow mein noodles, oriental veg-
etables, mandarin oranges, cook-
ie, low fat milk.
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ARLINGTON:
401 W. Alden St.
PO Box 388
Arlington, MN 55307
507-964-5547
Fax: 507-964-2423
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Glencoe, MN 55336
320-864-5518
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OR OR
The Arlington
Enterprise
402 W. Alden St.
Arlington, MN
55307
507-964-5547
52 Weeks
a Year!
IS
S
U
E
S
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w
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multiplication?
It’s newspaper
talk for a one
column by 2 inch
ad. Too small to
be effective?
You’re reading
this one!
Put your 1x2 in
the Arlington
Enterprise.
507-964-5547
1
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2
LIES KE TRAC TOR
Want ed: Your OLD TRAC TORS,
any con di tion, make or mod el. We
also spe cial ize in new and used
TRAC TOR PARTS AND RE PAIR.
Call Kyle. Lo cat ed west of Hen -
der son. (612) 203-9256.
$$ DOL LARS PAID $$ Junk ve -
hi cl es, re pai r abl e cars/trucks.
FREE TOW ING. Flatbed/ wreck er
serv ice. Im me diate pick up. Mon -
day-Sun day, serv ing your area
24/7. (952) 220-TOWS.
2007 Pontiac G6 GT 3.5L, V6. Red
cloth interior, 79,000 miles. $8980.
Call (320) 510-2223.
Small plastic company for sale.
Operate full or part time. Move to
your area. (563) 213-2458.
CON KLIN® DEAL ERS NEED ED!
Life time ca reer in mar ket ing, man -
age ment and ap ply ing “Green”
pro ducts made in Amer i ca. Full
time/ part time. For a free cat a log,
call Franke’s Con klin Serv ice now
at (320) 238-2370. www.frank e -
mar ket ing.com.
HAND Y MAN: Will do re mo del ing
of kitch ens, bath rooms, hang ing
doors and wi nd ows, pai nt i ng,
sheet rock ing, tex tur iz ing or any
minor re pairs in side or out side.
Wi l l al so do cl ean i ng of base -
ments/ga rag es. Call (320) 848-
2722 or (320) 583-1278.
21” Emer son TV with con vert er
box and re motes. Works great. Af -
ter 5 p.m. (320) 237-2541.
Spe cial- 95% Good man gas fur nace
and pro gram ma bl e ther mo stat
$2,200 in stalled or AC unit $1,900
in stalled. J&R Plumb ing Heat ing AC,
Lester Prair ie (320) 510-5035.
Min ne so ta Twins sea son tick ets
for 2013 sea son. Sec ti on 121
seats. Pack age in cludes 2 seats.
5, 10 or 15 game pack ag es avail -
able. Con tact Rick at (952) 224-
6331 for more in for ma tion.
OLD MO TOR CY CLES WANT ED:
Cash paid, pre fer ably non run ning
con di tion, ti tle or no ti tle, Hon da,
Su zu ki, Ka wa sa ki, Ya ma ha, Tri -
umph and oth er makes. Please
call Dar ick at 507-381-3405.
BUY ING JUNK BAT TER IES
We buy used bat ter ies and lead
weights. Pay ing top dol lar for junk
bat ter ies. Pay ing $12 for au to mo tive
bat ter ies We pick up with 18 bat tery
min i mum. Call 800-777-2243.
WANT ED TO BUY: Old signs all
types, farm primi tive paint ed fur ni -
ture all types, cup boards, cub by
units, lock er and pool wire bas -
kets, wood & metal piec es with
lots of draw ers, old pre-1960 holi -
day dec o ra tions, in dus tri al/school
items such as metal racks, stools,
work bench es, light n ing rods and
balls, weath er vanes, ar chi tec tur al
items like cor bels and stain glass
wind ows. We buy one item and
en tire es tates. Don’t get a dump -
ster un til you call us first! We are
lo cal. (612) 590-6136.
Red Door Ken nel Board ing and
Train ing. Fair fax. (507) 430-1319.
www.red doorken nel.org.
11-Acre horse farm. 70x140 sand
base rid ing ar e na, 30x60 shed, 30x50
8-stall barn with a 12x40 at tached
lean-to, 50x60 6-stall barn, heat ed
tack rooms in each, barn. $199,500.
Pri or i ty One-Met ro west Re al ty, Brian
O’Don nell (320) 864-4877.
Hob by Farm F.S.B.O. Beau ti ful
5BR, 2.5BA, 3 types of heat, AC,
at tached in su lat ed ga rage, out
build ings, horse ready on 7 acr es.
Green Isle (612) 756-2021.
Arlington. 3 Bedroom, 1-3/4 bath,
house, fi repl ace, l arge fami l y
room, double garage, corner lot.
(507) 380-7675 for more details.
Bird Is land: 2BR, 1.5 story, 2BA,
ja cuz zi, 2.5 stall heat ed ga rage
with at tic, main floor laun dry, beat
board ceil ing, Wains coat ing, lam.
floor ing, porch, pa tio. Must see!
$79,900. (320) 522-0462.
House built in 1982, 5 acr es, 3BR,
1.5BA, ma chine shed, out build -
ings, new shin gles, new wind ows,
new AC. Near Hec tor. $169,000.
(320) 848-6840.
2BR Apart ment wi th ga rage, wa -
ter/sew er/gar bage in clud ed. $450/mo.
New Au burn (320) 327-2928.
New l y up dat ed apart ments i n
Ren ville. Wa ter, heat, gar bage in -
clud ed. New ap plianc es in clud ing
new air con di tion er. On-site laun -
dry facil i ties. Off-street park ing
avail able with elec tri cal out lets.
Pet friend ly. (320) 564-3351.
2BR ground floor apart ment avail -
abl e Jul y 1. Rent re duced. In -
cludes wa ter, heat, gar bage. Call
(320) 564-3351 for ap point ment.
2 BR Apartments, Arlington. Rent
starting at $653. Central AC, pri-
vate porch, walk-in closets, wash-
er/dryer in each apt. Garage avail.
AMBERFIELD PLACE APART-
MENTS. (800) 873-1736.
1BR up stairs apart ment on Main
Street in Ar ling ton. Two ref er enc es
re quired. Call Da vid (507) 964-2256.
4BR Home with walk out base -
ment in coun try. Avail able June
15. (507) 964-2546.
Arlington, 3BR, 1-3/4 bath, house,
fireplace, large family room, dou-
ble garage, corner lot. (507) 380-
7675 for more details.
2BR house with ga rage for rent in
Oli via. Also: 3BR house with 2
stall ga rage for rent in Ren ville.
Call (320) 212-3217.
5BR for rent on Main Street. 1,750
sq. ft. Yard, W/D hook-ups, 1 car
ga rage. Uti l i ti es not i n cl ud ed.
(507) 351-1324.
Re cent ly re mo deled lake home.
Coun try liv ing in town. Three-stall
ga rage. Pri vate fish ing dock. Must
see to ap pre ci ate. Avail able Au -
gust 1. (320) 864-5478 or (320)
582-1294.
Young farmer looking for land to
rent for 2014 and beyond. Com-
petitive rates and references avail-
able. Call Austin Blad at (320)
221-3517.
Hip Hop Fam i ly Shop Con sign -
ment. New/ Gent ly used. (507)
964-5654, Ar ling ton. Clip and save
50% on any one piece cloth ing
item. (GREAT STUFF!)
TWO OLD GOATS JULY SALE,
WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 12 p.m.-6
p.m.; THURSDAY, JULY 11, 12
p.m.-6 p.m. Garden furniture, fun
stuff. Everything will be 20% OFF.
317 Main Street, Arlington, MN.
Remember the Past
Occasional Sale
is Open in the Hutchinson Mall
1060 Hwy. 15 South
July 11-13
July 17-21
Hours:
Wed.-Fri. 10-8
Saturday 10-6
Sunday 12-5
Vintage, Home decor, Furniture,
Salvaged Junk, Rustic, Cottage,
Country, Victorian, Kitchen, And
Many Misc. Unique Treasures For
The Yard, Cabin, or Home.
320-583-9519
Buying and Selling
CUS TOM LOG SAW ING- Cut at
your place or ours. White oak lum -
ber deck ing and fire wood. Give
Vir gil a call. Schau er Con struc tion,
Inc. (320) 864-4453.
Pro fes sion al Care tak ers on per -
son al ba sis with rea son able rates.
In teri or and ex te ri or sched uled
clean ing, pet care, grounds keep -
ing, main tenance, bob cat work,
de bris re mov al. Matt and Mary
(320) 510-2211.
AGRICULTURE
Misc. Farm Items
AUTOMOTIVE
Cars
EMPLOYMENT
Business Opportunity
Help Wanted
Work Wanted
FOR SALE
Give Aways
Heating/Air Cond.
Miscellaneous
Wanted To Buy
LIVESTOCK, PETS
Animal Care
REAL ESTATE
Hobby Farm
Houses
RENTAL
Apartment
House
Lake Home
Want To Rent
SALES
Sales
SERVICES
Misc. Service
FOR SALE REAL ESTATE
Hobby Farm
RENTAL
Apartment
Independent Living
55+ Arlington Sr. Apartment ONLY
FREE Application
FREE Damage Deposit
FREE 1
st
Month Rent
Apply by July 15
th
Move in by September 1
st
Lease Today!
800-873-1736 or 507-642-8701
kanderson@amberfieldplace.com
www.amberfieldplace.com
A24-27E,25-28Sa
Arlington Enterprise, Thursday, July 4, 2013, page 10
www.arlingtonmnnews.com
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507-964-5547
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AGRICULTURE AUTOMOTIVE EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE LIVESTOCK
& PETS
LIVESTOCK
& PETS
REAL ESTATE SERVICES RENTAL RENTAL
All ads appear online
at GlencoeNews.com
Enterprise
To place an ad: Call: 507-964-5547; Fax: 507-964-2423; E-Mail: info@ArlingtonMNnews.com; Mail: P.O. Box 388, Arlington, MN 55307
Advertising
Deadlines
The McLeod County Chronicle Mondays at Noon
The Arlington Enterprise & The Silver Lake Leader Tuesdays at Noon
The Glencoe Advertiser, The Sibley Shopper
& The Galaxy Wednesdays at NOON
Commercial
Building and
Business
Opportunity
Call (507) 964-2256
A22-25E,23-26Sa
Sibley Electric Inc, located in Gaylord, has
an opening for a permanent, full-time, experi-
enced Apprentice or Journeyman Electrician.
Applicant must possess a valid driver’s license.
Must be willing to travel, if the project requires it.
Travel pay and perdiem will be negotiated. Com-
petitive wages, holiday and vacation pay, along
with 401K.
Contact Becky at 507-237-2025 for more
information and an application.
A24-25CE25-26ASj
Great Pay • Great
Company • Great People
Family Owned Business
for 65+ years.
We have an immediate
need to expand our company
and owner operator fleet.
If you have a valid class A
CDL at lest 2years of experi-
ence and are at least 23
years of age. Have a clean
driving record and a GREAT
work ethic call us.
We currently have full time
and part time positions avail-
able hauling Local, Regional
and OTR.
Give us a call and we will
put you to work: Shelly at 800-
422-1347 or email shellyg@
bartelstruckline.com.
BARTELS
TRUCK LINE, INC.
A23-26E24-27Sj
Available...
1 & 2 Bedroom
Apartments Available
All utilities,
except electric
Income based
Must be 62 or older
or handicapped
Highland Commons
Arlington
507-964-5556
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HANDICAP
ACCESSIBLE
Job Opportunities...
The Good Samaritan Society – Arlington
is seeking the following positions:
Hiring Bonus up to
$
500
• Full-Time Benefit eligible LPN/RN –
evening shifts with every other weekend
for Full-Time LPN/RN position
• LPN/RN - every other weekend with potential to pick
up more hours
• Certified Nursing Assistant - every other weekend with
potential to pick up more hours as needed
Please apply online at www.good-sam.com
Click on Job Opportunities in left column, then Job Openings in right column.
For more information,
call Tiffany Brockhoff,
Human Resource Director at
507-964-2251 or email:
tbrockof@good-sam.com
AA/EOE, EOW/H.M/F/Vet/Handicap Drug-Free Workplace
Caring can be a job, a career, ... Or a way of life.
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Due to continued growth & expansion at
Miller Manufacturing in Glencoe,
The Work Connection is currently recruiting
for the following positions:
Metal Assemblers, Molding Machine
Operators & Warehouse
All shifts available!
These are long term to hire positions based on
attendance & performance. Ability to pass a
pre-employment drug screen & criminal background
check required. Weekly pay & affordable benefits.
Casual, super clean work environment!
Please call to schedule an appt (320) 587-0400
or e-mail resume to:
tkorson@theworkconnection.com
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in partnership with
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This document is © 2013 by admin - all rights reserved.