Harvest Days 2012

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1 Stop Realty........................................................................11
A+ Insurance Agency Inc. .................................................24
A&M Processing ....................................................................2
ADM Edible Bean Specialities, Inc..................................42
Ag Grand...............................................................................23
Ag Specialists........................................................................28
Alsleben Livestock Trucking.............................................14
Arnold’s Implement............................................................17
Auto Value Parts Stores ....................................................18
Auto Value Parts, Bird Island............................................35
Bergmann Interiors ............................................................23
Bird Island - Hawk Creek Mutual Ins. Co. ...................35
Bird Island Soil Service......................................................35
Brownton Co-op Ag Center .............................................6
Carly’s Shoes ........................................................................28
CarQuest of Bird Island....................................................35
Cenex / Farmers Co-op Oil Co.....................................11
Community Electric...........................................................42
Conklin Service - Ken Franke .........................................38
Co-op Country Farmers Elevator ...................................9
Corn Capital Innovations .................................................42
Country Wide Lumber .....................................................34
Creative Details...................................................................36
Crop Production Services................................................32
Dahlberg Boot & Trailer Sales .........................................34
Dale’s Auto Sales.................................................................32
Dale’s Plumbing & Heating, Inc........................................17
Dammann Seed...................................................................38
Danube Lumber ..................................................................24
Danube Upholstery & Shoe Repair...............................34
Dawson Co-op Credit Union.........................................27
Dobrava Brothers, Inc. ......................................................30
Duane Jindra Crop Ins. Agency.......................................28
Edward Jones - Kirk Miller...............................................32
Enestvedt Seed Company ................................................21
Ervin Well Company ..........................................................36
F & M Bank Minnesota ......................................................19
F & M Insurance.....................................................................4
Farm Bureau Financial Services, Olivia .........................36
Farmers & Merchants Ins. Agency .................................37
Farmers & Merchants State Bank ..................................37
Finish Line Seed, Inc. ..........................................................37
First Minnesota Bank.........................................................28
First Security Bank..............................................................26
Flatworks Concrete Construction, LLC........................9
Fleet Supply / True Value....................................................23
Flora Mutual Ins. Co. ..........................................................16
Foamtastic Insulation Inc. .................................................27
Frandsen Bank & Trust ......................................................41
Fred W. Radde & Sons, Inc. .................................................7
Full Throttle Services ...........................................................2
Harpel Bros. Inc...................................................................10
Harvest Land Cooperative ..............................................21
Hearing Care Specialists ...................................................10
Henslin Auctions, Inc..........................................................20
HomeTown Bank ..................................................................9
Hughes Real Estate & Auction Service.........................24
J&R Electric...........................................................................43
Jerry Scharpe........................................................................30
JR Insurance Agency .............................................................6
Jungclaus Implement...........................................................22
K & S Electric of Olivia......................................................26
Keith L. Scott Agency.........................................................37
Lake Region Insurance Agency........................................26
Larkin Tree Care & Landscaping, Inc..............................42
Linder Farm Network .........................................................8
Mallak Trucking Inc. ............................................................36
Mathews Drainage & Excavating, Inc.............................28
McLeod County Chronicle..............................................39
McLeod Publishing, Inc. .....................................................40
MidCountry Bank..................................................................6
Mid-County Co-op ............................................................22
Midwest Machinery............................................................44
Mills Fleet Farm...................................................................12
Minnesota Corn Growers Association...........................2
MinnWest Bank...................................................................25
Morton Buildings.................................................................16
Mustang Seeds .....................................................................23
Mycogen Seeds - Brad Pietig ..........................................16
Northern Plumbing & Heating, Inc. ...............................42
Olivia Chrysler Center .....................................................26
Olivia Liquor & Lounge.....................................................35
Olivia Machine Shop, Inc. ..................................................35
Olivia Pet Clinic...................................................................36
Otto Farms Operations, Inc. ...........................................38
PHI Insurance Services, Schmalz.....................................17
Precision Planting, Schmalz...............................................10
Precision Soya of Minnesota............................................34
Pro Equipment Sales ..........................................................36
RAM Buildings......................................................................38
RC Hospital & Clinics........................................................27
Renville County HRA/EDA..............................................33
Renville Sales, Inc.................................................................25
S.T. Sports..............................................................................41
Saunders Mertens Schmitz, P.A.......................................16
Schad, Lindstrand, & Schuth, Ltd. ....................................28
Schiroo Electrical & Rebuilding, Inc. ..............................14
Schmeling Oil Co., Inc..........................................................6
Security Bank & Trust Co. ................................................10
Seneca Foods Corporation..............................................30
Simonson Lumber ..............................................................18
State Farm Insurance.........................................................43
Sullivan’s Electric .................................................................27
Tall Tires - Keltgen, Inc.......................................................34
Terry’s Body Shop...............................................................34
Thalmann Seeds Inc. ..........................................................32
Tjosvold Equipment, Inc....................................................41
Two Way Communications..............................................14
UFC - Lafayette.........................................................7, 30, 32
United FCS ...........................................................................42
United Grain Systems, LLC..............................................18
Upper Midwest Management..........................................43
Valley Electric of Olivia, Inc. .............................................34
Willmar Aerial Spraying, Inc. ............................................43
Wood’s Edge...........................................................................7
Young America Mutual Insurance Co............................32
INDEX
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Our products are available at:
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Est. #625
Harvest 2011 - 2 - September 9 & 10, 2012
By Dick Hagcn
Contrihuting Rcportcr
RenvIlle County RegIster
This course is beautilul. In three short
years this course has become one ol the
most attractive in the Miowest. The
Schweiss people have oone just a splenoio
job.¨
Speaking is Steve Kath, the punctual
public aooress voice that oio the two-oay
July 1! ano 1¯ trial at Roebke`s Run, the
oramatic !0-acre equestrian center ol the
Mike ano Julie Schweiss lamily. This show
hao a recoro 130 participants this year
lrom live states gooo evioence Roebke`s
Run has inoeeo
caught the lancy
ol many rioers.
Kath an-
nounces each
rioer moving to
the starting gate
ol the cross
country event.
He also gives po-
sitions ol the rio-
ers as they tra-
verse the intri-
cate two-mile
course which in-
cluoes 3o jumps
in both open
lielo areas ano within the beautilul timber
section ol the course.
Feople neeo to recognize how lucky
they are to have a show like this on
grounos that are so beautilul ano charac-
ter rich,¨ he noteo.
Kath works lor corporate America` in
his real-lile job ano lives in the Twin Cities
area.
But coming out lor this Roebke`s Run
event is a breath ol lresh air.¨
He calls live oillerent events this season
incluoing two more in Wisconsin prior to
coming back to Roebke`s Run lor their
Iall Trials the lirst weekeno in October.
Zach Ketelbueter, a 22-year-olo stu-
oent in the University ol Wisconsin Vet-
erinary Meoicine College, Maoison, par-
ticipateo in both Roebke`s Run events
stageo in 2011, the lirst year ol competi-
tion on the course.
Horses sblne at Roebke's Run
Submltteo pbotos
Tbere are 80 stalls ln tbls taclllty tor competltor's at Roebke's Run, tbe
Scbwelss tamlly equestrlan taclllty locateo nortb ot Falrta× ln Renvllle
County. Tbe course ls belng pralseo as one ot tbe most attractlve ln tbe
Mlowest. Accorolng to one rloer, lmprovements to tbe run bave maoe
tbe ¨course blossom.¨
veterlnarlan [ennlter Selvlg, Prlor Lake, was astounoeo by tbe course at Roebke's Run.
Zacb Ketelbueter
Run
Turn to page A2
Run
Turn to page 4
September 9 & 10, 2012 - 3 - Harvest 2011
Run Contlnueo trom page A1
I coulon`t believe the aooitional ano
positive improvements this year,¨ saio
Ketelbueter. It`s a labulous course. Be-
cause ol the challenges in our economy,
it`s nice to see someone who is willing to
put together this sort ol an event.¨
Ketelbueter keeps two horses at his
larm stable at Belleville, Wis. ano tries to
lit at least one equestrian trial per month
into his University scheoule.
Because I`m going into the Veteri-
nary prolession, spenoing time on my
horse seems to just sharpen my thinking.
Ano getting out here to the Minnesota
prairie country lor an event this proles-
sional is a real treat,¨ relateo Ketelbueter.
vet servlce lt neeoeo:
Dr. Jenniler Selvig, 31 ano a veterinar-
ian lrom Frior Lake, rooe her 12-year-olo
thoroughbreo Chiel Magistrate in the
Roebke Run horse trial. She also was
available to anyone neeoing special atten-
tion to their horse, perhaps pertinent in
view ol the 90 oegree weather prevailing
both oays.
Horses can come up overheateo alter
a perlormance run. Heat exhaustion can
persist even lor up to two hours alter they
come oll the course. So keeping the hors-
es hyorateo ano hoseo oown alter their
runs is important,¨ she noteo.
Normal booy temp lor a horse is 99 to
101 oegrees but coming oll the cross
country course ouring this event, she saio,
horse temps coulo be 10¯, even 10o oe-
grees.
Ano that means the laster you can get
them cooleo oll the better,¨ relateo
Selvig.
Her comments about Roebke`s Run?
This course has really blossomeo.
This is only the thiro recognizeo event lor
the Schweiss lamily ano this course easily
stanos up to some ol the nicest courses in
the country,¨ saio Selvig.
The July event was her thiro ol the
season ano she plans at least live more be-
lore the season is out. She`ll oo events in
the Chicago area ano Kentucky.
Ano she unoerstanos the prairie com-
menting, You oon`t olten see lano own-
ers turning super gooo corn ano soybean
acres into a playgrouno lor us horse peo-
ple. It absolutely is gorgeous. We love it
out here.¨
Ann Farker, Eoina, was a volunteer
worker at the event because her oaughter,
son-in-law ano
granooaughter
,Dave ano Chris
Revier ano
Emily, were also
volunteers. She
workeo the show
last year when
there were only
70 participants
compareo with
130 at the 2012
event.
It`s unbeliev-
able ano very ex-
citing. To have
something ol this caliber in this area is
something special. We Twin Citians just
can`t believe how gorgeous the layout ano
how accommooating the Schweiss lamily
is,¨ saio Farker.
New sboes lt neeoeo:
George Favelek, age o2, is a Glencoe
area larrier going
on 38 years in
the business.
He`s also a regu-
lar at the
Schweiss stables,
especially ouring
this two-oay
event when 130
horses suooenly
are part ol the
scenario.
Quite olten
alter the cross
country runs the
shoes will loosen
up so I`m pretty
busy arouno
here getting the horses reaoy lor their
Staoium Jumping or their Dressage
events,¨ saio Favelek.
He points out horses olten neeo extra
traction while ooing the many jumps our-
ing the cross country run, so rioers will
have him screw in extra steel stuos into
both lront ano rear shoes.
Generally working with thoroughbreos
averaging about 1,¯00 pounos, Favelek`s
seeing more thoroughbreo´ warmblooo
crosses in the equestrian worlo.
A warm blooo is a European breeo
generateo lrom crossbreeoing oralt horses
with rioing horses hunoreos ol years back
to increase both the size ano enourance
ol their rioing horses.
Warm blooos were the preoominant
horse ouring Worlo War I when they
were useo to pull various military imple-
ments lrom battlelielo to battlelielo,¨ he
explaineo.
Horse shoes, perhaps like women`s
shoes, get changeo quite olten.
About every live to six weeks horses
get reshoo in the summer season, seven to
eight week intervals ouring the winter
season oepenoing upon whether the bulk
ol their rioing is outooors or in an inooor
arena,¨ saio Favelek. Just like our linger
nails ano toe nails, a horse`s loot grows, so
the neeo lor new shoes when the loot
wears away laster than it regrows.
Trimming ol the leet ano shoe place-
ment is somewhat akin to the balancing
ano alignment ol the wheels on your au-
tomobile. As the horse`s loot grows, they
come out ol balance ano thus the neeo
lor new shoes.¨
Favelek saio the cost is anywhere lrom
S1¯0 to S180 in an 80-mile Twin City ra-
oius, about S80 to S100 in rural` Min-
nesota. But take that horse to Ilorioa ano
the cost woulo be S2¯0 ano up.
Ann Parker
George Pavelek
Run
Turn to page A2
Run
Turn to page 9
Run Continued from page 3
Harvest 2011 - 4 - September 9 & 10, 2012
September 9 & 10, 2012 - 5 - Harvest 2011
By Alyssa Schauer
Staff Writer
“A
nimals first” is the guideline
Deborah and Scott Pikovsky
live by when it comes to run-
ning their business, Star Thrower Farm.
Star Thrower Farm is a 100-acre farm
located a few miles south of Silver Lake,
on County Road 2, and is home to a few
llamas and over 500 Icelandic sheep.
“The idea to run a sheep farm came to
us after Scott and I were eating French
sheep cheese for dinner one evening. We
were at a food show in San Francisco, and
I just loved the cheese, and I looked at
Scott, and I said, ‘we could make this,’”
Deborah said.
The Pikovskys were living and working
in the Twin Cities before purchasing and
moving to the farm.
“The idea was to keep our corporate jobs
and travel back and forth to run the
farm,” Deborah said.
“Well, after a couple of years, I decided
to stay on the farm permanently, and at
the end of August, I’ll have been working
on the farm full time for three years,”
Deborah said.
Deborah, originally from Rhode Island,
was employed in the food safety industry
at G&K Services. “My undergrad is in
Japanese language and East Asian history,
and I got my MBA (master of business ad-
ministration) in marketing,” she said.
“Scott continues to work on the farm
and at his job in the cities. He operates
Great Ciao, a high-end food distributor
located in Minneapolis,” Deborah said.
Great Ciao provides chefs and specialty
retailers in Minnesota and around the
country with artisan-produced cheese and
other “hard-to-find ingredients,” Deborah
added.
The Pikovskys spent a few years doing
research on raising and milking Icelandic
sheep before purchasing the farm.
“We had vets train us to care for the
sheep and we even had nutritionists help
us plant the pastures,” Deborah said.
The Pikovskys purchased the farm in
2007 from Chuck Jensen and planted per-
manent grass and legume pastures for
their flock of pure Icelandic sheep.
They also planted a small orchard of
fruit trees and nut trees, as well as an herb
garden that supplies fresh herbs through-
out the summer and dried and frozen
herbs used in the winter.
The farm was a cow-dairy farm, and
the Pikovskys converted the land and the
facilities before the milking parlor and
creamery were opened in 2008.
“I know many people thought we were
crazy for tilling up great farmland to plant
grass seed, but it was for the sheep,” Deb-
orah said.
“The farm is large enough to graze the
sheep and produce grass and alfalfa hay to
feed the sheep in the winter,” Deborah
added.
“We operate the farm in a sustainable
manner. The sheep naturally fertilize the
pastures, and the waste water from milk-
ing and cheese-making goes back into the
fields.
“The hay and the manure from the
barns are composted and applied to the
fields in the fall,” she added.
The Pikovskys implement an “intensive
rotational grazing” pattern to feed the
sheep, where the sheep are moved from
pasture to pasture depending on the
growth of the alfalfa.
“With alfalfa and hay, the sheep can
bloat,” Deborah said.
She said all of the sheep are grass fed,
not corn fed.
“Grass-based diets are natural and best
for the sheep. We want to produce whole-
some food for people,” she said.
Currently, Star Thrower Farm is home
to 300 lambs, 150 dairy ewes, 100 year-
lings, 12 breeding rams and 10 dry ewes.
“The dairy ewes are milked twice a day,
and unlike cows, we don’t milk them dry,
so they have some milk yet for the lambs.
“Lambing usually occurs between mid-
April and the first week of May,” Deborah
said.
Star Thrower Farm currently employs
nine milkers, most of who are local stu-
dents in the area.
The farm also is home to three llamas,
who act as guardians to protect the sheep.
“The llamas are out in the pastures with
the sheep all year, and they help keep coy-
otes and eagles away,” Deborah said.
She said the animal population on the
farm is very diverse, with white-tailed
deer, wild turkeys, pheasants, raccoons,
songbirds, owls, wood duck, rabbits, field
mice and squirrels.
“Coyotes and eagles are the only preda-
tors we need to be concerned with. The
llamas, and the extensive high tensile elec-
tric fence have allowed us to pasture the
sheep 24 hours a day,” she said.
“Icelandic sheep are smart. They’re
very bright creatures.
They are a mountainous
type, also, so they love
climbing. She said the
sheep can be found
climbing the hay bales
in the summer and snow
piles in the winter.
She said the sheep on
the farm are “triple pur-
pose” animals because
they not only provide
rich milk for cheeses, but
they produce beautiful
fleece and delicious
meat.
“We use the rich milk
to make cheese here. We
produce six different
kinds of cheeses, includ-
ing ricotta, Camembert-style cheese and
Ubriaco, which is Italian for drunken.
Ubriaco is an aged tomme and tommes
are cheeses soaked in grape must from the
production of a local port wine,” she said.
Must is a sweetener, freshly pressed fruit
juice that contains the skins, seeds and
stems of the fruit.
“This cheese is called ‘Three Sheeps to
the Wind,’” she laughed, “and is produced
in limited quantities.
“Scott and I also invite local chefs to
come and load the sheep they are taking
so they get to see their product first,” Deb-
orah said. “We want to help people recon-
nect with the source of their food.”
Icelandic sheep also produce “premium
fleece,” and the Pikovskys shear the sheep
twice a year and sell the wool as well.
Deborah also knits using the wool, and
creates many different items, such as hats,
scarves, blankets and sweaters, and sells
them at farmers markets in the cities.
Icelandic sheep are also known for their
delicious and mildly-flavored meat, which
the Pikovskys also sell to chefs and other
interested retailers.
“The farm is not about us. It’s about the
animals. We want to challenge producers
to take care of their animals,” she said.
Scott, originally from Edina, met Debo-
rah in 1978. The couple have two daugh-
ters, Sasha, 27, and Amy, 25. Amy is a law
student and Sasha earned a master’s de-
gree in psychology.
‘Animals first’ is guideline for Star Thrower Farm
In 2007, Scott and Deborah Pikovsky (above), purchased Chuck Jensen’s farm a few miles
south of Silver Lake on County Road 2 and renovated the 100 acres in order to raise
sheep. Named Star Thrower Farm, the business is home to over 500 sheep, and the
Pikovskys, with the help of nine workers, milk 150 dairy ewes twice daily. The sheep are
kept in the pasture, where they are protected by an electric fence and three guard llamas.
Below, Deborah waters Kerwyn, one of the guard llamas, who was trying to cool off in his
pool during the hot summer days.
Photos by Alyssa Schauer
Harvest 2011 - 6 - September 9 & 10, 2012
Brownton Co-op
Ag Center
Full Service Cooperative
for over 95 Years
Agronomy (320) 328-5211
Grain Division (320) 328-5502
toll-free (877) 328-5211 • www.browntoncoop.com
~ Locally owned & controlled with
NO outside investors ~
• Fertilizers – Dry & Liquid
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• Two-Certified Crop
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• Grain Marketing –
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• Storage & Drying of Corn and Soybeans
• Full-Length Scale for Semis
• Trucking Available
Please stop in
or call to start
planning for Fall
applications of
fertilizer and
anhydrous.
From Seed in
Spring to Harvest
in Fall One
Stop will Take
Care of it All
Stay O
n Top O
f
The M
arkets...
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receive daily cash bids
via e-mail and/or text.
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MidCountry Bank
AG SERVICES
• Operating, Equipment,
Real Estate, Livestock
Loans
• Checking & Savings
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& Life Insurance
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1002 Greeley
Ave., Glencoe
320.864.5541
122 E. 2nd,
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507.647.5356
200 E. Frontage
Rd, Waconia
952-442-2141
501 N. Sibley
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320-693-2861
905 Hwy. 15 S,
Hutchinson
320.234.4553
Ag Services
Your one-stop location for all your
ag credit and insurance needs.
Schmeling
Oil Co., Inc.
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Oil Co., Inc.
Schmeling
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Wishing you a Safe and Successful Harvest
Serving area farmers with quality products since 1965
- Products for farm, home and industry
- Delivering ethanol blended gasoline and biodiesel fuels
- Offering a complete line of Chevron lubricants for your farming equipment
Call us with your fuel and oil questions.
“Give us a try.”
Phone: (320) 587-3361 or (800) 578-5636
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MPCI • Hail
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or 1-800-300-2722
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September 9 & 10, 2012 - 7 - Harvest 2011
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ST. PAUL, – A new report issued by the
Minnesota Department of Agriculture
(MDA) shows that 2011 was generally a
good year for certified organic crop produc-
ers in the state, and somewhat challenging
for organic dairy farms, although there was
a high degree of variability across farm types
and sizes.
The 2011 Minnesota Organic Farm Perform-
ance report summarizes financial data re-
ported by 61 certified organic farmers, for
both whole farm and for individual cropping
and dairy enterprises. It also includes histor-
ical data for the four previous years.
For key financial measures, such as rate of
return on assets, rate of return on equity,
and liquidity, organic farms performed, on
average, in the acceptable to strong
range. Average and median net farm income
were higher for crop farms in 2011 com-
pared to 2010, but dairy profits declined,
likely due in large part to feed and forage
prices that climbed throughout the year.
MDA’s organic program administrator,
Meg Moynihan, says the report is primarily
intended for organic producers and those
who may be considering a transition to or-
ganic production.
“Farmers can really find it helpful to com-
pare their farm’s performance against a
group of peers, to see where the farm is
doing well, and where it may be falling
short,” said Moynihan. “Similarly, farmers
thinking about going organic in the future
can use the report to get an idea of what
they might expect.”
The MDA’s systematic collection of or-
ganic farm data started in 2006 with funds
provided by the USDA Risk Management
Agency to reduce the cost of tuition for or-
ganic farms and is unique to Minnesota. All
farms participate voluntarily and their pri-
vacy is strictly protected. The report can be
viewed on the MDA website at
http://www.mda.state.mn.us/fbm.
The farms in this report, along with sev-
eral thousand other nonorganic operations,
participate in farm business management
education programs offered by Minnesota
State Colleges and Universities. Their data
is analyzed and published by the Center for
Farm Financial Management at the Univer-
sity of Minnesota in a public database called
FINBIN www.finbin.umn.edu.
Organic farm report shows fairly
strong performance last year
Organic crop producers did well while
dairy farmers saw more challenges
By Jim Willers,
United Soybean Board director, soybean
farmer from Beaver Creek, Minn.
I know how much time I spend around
diesel-powered vehicles, equipment and ma-
chinery, and I would bet that most farmers
around the United States spend similar
amounts. That is why I am so alarmed at the
recent news from the World Health Organ-
ization and its International Agency for Re-
search on Cancer, which now considers
diesel fuel exhaust to be a carcinogen as dan-
gerous as secondhand smoke.
Farmers and ranchers make up the third-
largest category of diesel fuel users behind
truck drivers and heating oil users. Since the
risk of developing cancer depends on the
amount of time spent around diesel exhaust,
anyone who works on the farm should take
note of this announcement.
Thankfully, recent clean-diesel technology
has cleaned up our emissions immensely, in-
cluding significantly reducing some of the el-
ements of diesel exhaust that prove to be so
damaging to our health.
For example, in 2007, engine manufactur-
ers began adding filters to trap soot. They
added technology to reduce nitrogen oxide
emissions starting in 2010.
You can reduce these harmful emissions
even more by using biodiesel.
Petroleum diesel exhaust contains toxic
fumes that you do not get from biodiesel.
Biodiesel is a cleaner-burning fuel that is
made from U.S.-grown, renewable and
biodegradable sources, and does not have
those toxins.
Soybean oil remains the primary feedstock
for U.S. biodiesel production and our soy
checkoff continues to support the U.S.
biodiesel industry. For example, the checkoff
funds research into biodiesel’s performance,
environmental and health benefits.
According to the American Lung Associ-
ation of the Upper Midwest, using 100 per-
cent biodiesel significantly reduces some of
the emissions that prove harmful to our
health, including:
• 67 percent drop in hydrocarbon emis-
sions.
• 48 percent decrease in poisonous carbon
monoxide.
• 47 percent reduction in particulate mat-
ter.
Additionally, the National Renewable En-
ergy Lab says a B20 blend of biodiesel (20
percent biodiesel mixed with 80 percent pe-
troleum diesel) drops particulate matter
emissions by 25 percent in engines without
clean-diesel technology and by 67 percent in
engines with the new cleaner-burning attrib-
utes.
The U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) recognizes biodiesel’s clean-
air qualities in its regulation that requires the
use of at least one billion gallons of biodiesel
this year. Under this regulation, biodiesel re-
mains the only commercially available fuel
that qualifies as an Advanced Biofuel. It
earned that distinction from the EPA be-
cause it reduces greenhouse-gas emissions by
at least 50 percent compared with petroleum
diesel.
That regulation continues to improve
biodiesel availability, which could make it
easier for U.S. farmers to find and use the
fuel.
To find biodiesel distributors or retailers
in your area, visit www.biodiesel.org. To
learn more about the soy checkoff ’s efforts
to promote biodiesel as a way of increasing
demand for U.S. soybean oil, click here.
Editorial: Use Biodiesel and Improve
the Air Quality on Your Farm
Harvest 2011 - 8 - September 9 & 10, 2012
Hi-tech
Ag Technology
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9 AM to 4 PM
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Slower economy slows borse
numbers, too:
Minnesota`s horse population hao
been continually growing, especially in
the Twin City area, but Favelek saio not
so the past three years.
When the economic squeeze starteo
three years ago, people starteo oownsiz-
ing their horse numbers. Ano there are
lewer brooo mares breo, so there`s lots
less loals ano we`ve stabilizeo, at least lor
the time being,¨ Favelek saio.
What`s aheao? It truly oepenos on
the economy. Non-oiscretionary spenoing
is taking a bite right now.¨
Both men ano women oo larrier work.
Favelek saio there are
about 100 members
in the Minnesota
Iarrier`s Association
ano 2¯0 to 300 total
larriers in the state,
the National Iarri-
er`s Association has
about !,000 mem-
bers, but totally
about 2¯,000 people
are ooing larrier
work in the Uniteo
States.
Like others he
too is amazeo with
the growth ano oe-
velopment ol the
Schweiss equestrian
lacility.
This remarkable
lacility out here in
the mioole ol
nowhere is just phe-
nomenal,¨ saio
Favelek. Everyone
here lor the lirst
time is just amazeo
to see what the lacili-
ty has to oller.¨
Cinoy Hengel, Wooolano, was in the
company ol her 1¯-year-olo oaughter
Elena who brought two horses, Beethoven
ano Quick Step, to the Roebke Run.
Alreaoy rioing lor live years, this was
Elena`s lirst eventing perlormance ,mean-
ing the cross country run, staoium jump-
ing ano oressage,.
Beethoven, because ol his more
princely look, will be ooing oressage.
Then Elena will switch to Quick Step lor
the cross country run. So this is a trial-
by-error oay` lor both Elena ano her
horses,¨ saio Cinoy.
This is an absolutely lovely place ano
the lacility is unbelievable. Flus they are
such great hosts. You just leel lortunate to
be here.¨
Ano lrom a moth-
er`s perspective
Cinoy Hengel com-
menteo, So much
better lor my oaugh-
ter ano I to be here
than wanoering
arouno in a Twin
Cities shopping mall.
You learn so many
lile skills. I know my
oaughter will never
lorget this lirst-time
experience.¨
She aooeo,
Compareo with the
Twin Cities, it`s a
much more relaxeo
ano calmer leeling
out here ano every-
booy`s nice. You get
waveo to on the
roao, you get high-
lives here in the stable lrom other horse
lolks, it`s just a lovely environment.¨
Irom Marshalltown, Iowa, Faul Barr
prolessionally works as a linancial aovisor
but he`s hao the horse lever since he was
seven years olo. His six-year olo thor-
oughbreo is nameo Subtle Funch ano
they oo six or seven oillerent events each
season.
His lirst trip however to Renville
County ano Roebke`s run ano his quick
assessment was, It`s beautilul. This is a
lantastic, unbelievable layout here in the
mioole ol corn ano soybean lielos.
They`ve oone a remarkable job in putting
this together.¨
A veteran horseman who trains in hot
weather, he simply saio he has to pay at-
tention to the respiration rate ol Subtle
Funch ano then shower him ano keep
him cool alter his cross country run.
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Run Contlnueo trom page A1
Submltteo pbotos
Clnoy Hengel, Wooolano, came wltb ber oaugbter
Ll ena ano ber two borses Qul ck Step ano
8eetboven.
Run
Turn to page A2
Paul 8arr trom Marsballtown, |owa, brlngs a banoler
wben be competes ln events to cool oown tbe
borse lmmeolately atter an event.
Run
Turn to page 11
Run Continued from page 4
September 9 & 10, 2012 - 9 - Harvest 2011
Harvest 2011 - 10 - September 9 & 10, 2012
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But most horses are conoitioneo to
these weather conoitions. Olten it`s more
a challenge lor the rioer than the horse.
It`s okay lor your horse to breathe haro
ouring the event but you want to see that
respiration orop within a couple ol min-
utes alter completing the run.¨
Yes, it`s a bit ol a chore. Barr explains
you shower your horse alter a run, then
scrape the moisture oll because moisture
acts as a blanket, then you shower them
again ano scrape again, ano then you
walk your horse. That is why each rioer
usually has a hanoler` to oo these oetails
so the rioer can also just relax alter the
run.
Warm up gets rloer ano borse reaoy:
Belore the cross country run Barr saio
both horse ano rioer oo warm-up jumps,
both right ano lelt turning, in the warm-
up area about 30 minutes belore the run.
You graoually work up to the higher
jumps in the warm-up. Your horse knows
you ano he are getting reaoy to compete.
Your horse is beginning to leel the aoren-
alin. They then call your name, you ano
your horse get walkeo to the start box`,
your horse knows something is about to
happen. So when you say go` you want
to keep your horse in a controlleo canter
even though your horse is primeo ano
reaoy to run.
These are timeo events so you oon`t
want to go too last or too slow. You oon`t
have a practice run so this is the lirst time
lor both rioer ano horse on this particular
course. You can`t go laster than lour min-
utes ano 22 seconos without a time lault,
also you lose points il slower than live
minutes ano 20 seconos, you`re eliminat-
eo il your time is beyono o minutes ano
1¯ seconos.¨
You sense Barr`s experience when he
comments, When you`re training your
horse, they are going to look lor a jump.
Like raoar they lock on these jumps ano
aojust their caoence accoroingly. Its un-
believable how quickly a gooo horse picks
up the caoence his rioer wants to meet
the time limits ol a particular cross coun-
try run.
This is a game lor the horses. It`s lun
ano you can tell because as they pick out
the next jump their ears will prick lor-
waro. Sometimes you have to reoirect
them because they may have pickeo out a
jump other than the next one in your par-
ticular run.¨
Rioers get to walk the course earlier.
Barr saio this is when you memorize the
lay ol the lano ano the jumps.
In my mino I can then see all 18
jumps ano obstacles lor this particular
run. The wooos in the north eno ol this
run are beautilul ano aoo a totally new
oimension. The tree shaoows aoo some-
what ol a challenge to horses.¨
Jump juoges ano volunteers lor this
year`s event incluoeo: Lark Schweiss,
Brook Schweiss, Keith Renner, Waoe
Kutz, Kelly Cross, Jaime Lewis, Emily
Revier, Alex Revier, Sue Goeplert, Alex
Renner, Mark Warner, Lena Warner,
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Rosemary Dixon, Marjie Newton, Laura
Markhare, Rachel Holen, Anne Farker,
Wanoa Renner, Jan Simonsen, Faul Si-
monsen, Dave Revier, Tim Soukup, Chris
Revier, ano Maria M.
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Run Contlnueo trom page A1 Run Continued from page 9
September 9 & 10, 2012 - 11 - Harvest 2011
Harvest 2011 - 12 - September 9 & 10, 2012
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September 9 & 10, 2012 - 13 - Harvest 2011
7.3 million bushels and 8-hour loadouts
New grain terminal open in Brownton
By Dick Hagen
Contributing Reporter
With 2.8 million bushels of “upright”
storage capacity plus 4.5 million bushels of
horizontal capacity, the incredibly big
grain terminal about to open at Brownton
ranks as one of the biggest single site loca-
tions in America, according to Jeff
Nielsen, general manager, United Farmers
Cooperative, Winthrop.
“CCC was at the site this morning and
officially registered us as 7.3 million
bushels total capacity,” said Nielsen in an
Aug. 17 interview.
You get some idea of the scope of this
project when you are told that this facility
will have the capacity to load out 110-car
unit trains (440,000 bushels) in less than
eight hours.
Construction contract on this massive
project calls for a Sept. 15 “ready date”
and Nielsen feels that date would be met a
week in advance.
Perhaps a big
question for
many: in view
of some
drought stress,
will there be
enough corn
to fill his facil-
ity this first
harvest? Or
will it take a
couple years
before this new
location identi-
fied as United
Grain Systems
fits into the
marketing de-
cisions of area grain producers?
Nielsen simply responded, “If I had a
crystal ball I’d gladly share the answer.
The challenge got a bit bigger after our
board, which initially approved a 4.3 mil-
lion bushel grain handling facility, last
March decided to add an additional 3 mil-
lion bushels of storage.”
He explained, “Because this facility has
the capability of dumping 500 to 600
trucks per 24-hour day, we did not want to
run the risk of filling up in just a couple
weeks. So our board agreed on an even
bigger facility to accommodate deliveries
over a longer harvest time frame.
“Yes, I will be pleasantly surprised if we
do fill up this year. Clearly the market
right now with $8 corn is screaming ‘get
rid of it.’ So both market conditions and
quality of the crop when combines start
running will be key drivers on the volume
we will be handling.”
He shared the flip side, suggesting
they’d look a bit foolish running like crazy
to get this facility built and suddenly they
were turning people away because it was
full.
He credits his board for being visionary
about expanding its initial plans into a sig-
nificantly larger facility. Nielsen indicated
that because agriculture today has become
such an aggressive industry, especially in
the Upper Midwest, wisdom suggests al-
ways build for the future.
With the new identity as United Grain
Systems, a partnership of ADM and
UFC, Nielsen is pleased with the seamless
transition when Archer Daniel Midland
came on board. When asked if this has
been a good marriage, he responded, “I’ve
been in this business for 27 years now.
I’ve been involved in various partnerships.
ADM has absolutely exceeded our expec-
tations in every way as a new partner.
They have done everything they said they
would do. They are extremely conscien-
tious about wanting us to run this new op-
eration.
“The resources they bring into this part-
nership are huge whether it be access to
markets, their expertise in movement of
volumes of grain, access to capital, etc.
We’re feeling very good about this entire
business package.”
Added UFC Board Chairman Kevin
Lauwagie, “This new complex very well
prepares us for the future. We don’t know
details of the future of agriculture but we
do know change will always be with us.
We as a farm cooperative need to be in a
position to adapt to this future. There’s no
perfect scenario out there, but we feel con-
fident this was the thing to do.
“We have feed, we have ethanol and
now we have rail, which gives us rapid ac-
cess to markets across America and over-
seas through three major railroad
United Grain Systems grain terminal facility recently opened in Brownton.
Perhaps reflecting the tremendous in-
crease in export activity of U.S. feed
grains, Bob Zelenka, executive director,
Minnesota Grain & Feed Association,
said Minnesota and American agriculture
need more unit-train load-out terminals.
Visiting the Aug. 20 open house event
of United Farmers Cooperative at its new
7.3 million bushel Brownton facility, Ze-
lenka said, “This very much reflects the
future of grain marketing in America. Ef-
ficiency is the name of the game when
you’re talking millions of bushels of
grain. Being able to load 110 cars in 15
hours or less and get this entire unit train
to the West Coast, for example, in less
than three days, is the wave of the fu-
ture.”
Because grain marketing is becoming a
very competitive business, there’s no as-
surance this new complex will be the
marketing “choice” of most area farmers.
But because unit train facilities provide
significant cost savings to railroads, Ze-
lenka ventured that UFC is now in a posi-
tion to get the best rates the railroads
offer. “This can mean 8 to 10 cents per
bushel better pricing to area producers
than elevators who aren’t on rail.”
Because Minnesota appears to be the
only “bright spot” in corn and soybean
production this year, Zelenka anticipates
Minnesota grain handlers will play a
huge role in providing that grain for do-
mestic use, for much of the ethanol in-
dustry, and for export markets. Currently,
nearly 40 percent of the U.S. corn crop
gets utilized for ethanol production. Sim-
ply because of “supply-and-demand”
economics, he thinks that percentage will
drop because many ethanol plants are
cutting back on production, some shut-
ting down entirely at least for the time
being.
How many unit-train facilities in Min-
nesota? Obviously this huge new complex
at Brownton is the latest. But perhaps sur-
prising is the fact that Zelenka indicated
there are now nearly 40 unit-train facili-
ties in Minnesota and there will continue
to be more. “Obviously, they need some
space and separation but that depends on
rail access and grain production capabili-
ties. From a railroad perspective, perhaps
30 to 40 miles distance between locations
works best.”
South Central Grain and Energy, Fair-
fax, is just now building a unit-train load-
ing facility for its Buffalo Lake operation,
only about 20 miles west of this new
Brownton complex.
And why is “speed” so important in
moving railroad grain cars in and out of
elevator facilities? Demurrage is the word.
It’s that somewhat volatile fee that a rail
company slaps on its bill to the local ele-
vator if/when the local elevator doesn’t
get rail cars loaded out fast enough, often
within that 15-hour time frame on unit
trains. “It can be up to $100 per car per
day. So if you’re loading 110-120 cars
that demurrage charge adds up real fast,”
noted Zelenka.
Jeff Nielsen
General Manager
Minnesota needs unit-train load outs
Grain terminal
Turn to page 14
Harvest 2011 - 14 - September 9 & 10, 2012
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networks, the BNSF, the CP and the UP.
This facility has three truck dumping pits.
Time, especially during harvest, is always
important so getting unloaded and back to
your fields shouldn’t be an issue.”
UFC had total net earnings of $4.8 mil-
lion last year, which resulted in patronage
refunds of $1.1
million (35 per-
cent of earn-
ings) to its
members.
“We’ve bene-
fitted greatly
from the pric-
ing and pro-
ductivity of
agriculture in
recent years
and I believe
there will be
more ‘golden
years’ ahead of
us. World pop-
ulation keeps
growing, food demand keeps growing espe-
cially amongst third-world countries. And
despite the challenges of this drought-
stressed year, I think American agriculture
will keep responding with more productiv-
ity,” summed up Lauwagie.
Brad Berger, Gibbon/Fairfax-area
farmer and UFC member attending the
Aug. 20 event commented, “This is big.
For the long term this certainly looks like
the right move. I doubt there’ll be enough
corn and soybeans to fill it up this fall,
however. I’m sure they’ll have a better bid
because of better rates they’ll be getting
with this unit train capability.”
ADM reports this is one of the largest
partnerships of this multi-national business
corporation on a single site. “I think this
terminal represents one of the highest ca-
pacity inland grain handling facilities in
the country,” said Nielsen. Admitting to his
own bias, he concluded that it really is
quite impressive.
With perfect weather, the big Aug. 20
open house at this new facility drew an es-
timated 3,000+ people. They were treated
to wagon tours of the entire complex, plus
delicious barbeque pork chop sandwiches
with all the trimmings.
Kevin Lauwagie
Board Chairman
There was a ribbon cutting held recently to commemorate the opening of the new United Farmers Cooperative
grain terminal facility in Brownton.
Grain terminal
Continued from page 13
September 9 & 10, 2012 - 15 - Harvest 2011
Ethanol plant reopens in Buffalo Lake
By Dick Hagen
Contributing Reporter
He’s vice president/CFO of Purified
Renewable Energy, LLC, at Buffalo Lake.
His name is Patrick Riggs, with an exten-
sive background in the financial world.
And he and staff (including Steve Walker,
president) are in the process of completely
rebuilding the old Minnesota Energy
ethanol plant which was “moth balled”
about four years ago.
Already operational, this redesigned fa-
cility will soon be producing 25 million
gallons of ethanol plus 8,000 to 10,000
tons of distillers dried grains per year, and
corn oil extract, another valuable product
of the distillation process. And if EPA and
the state of Minnesota can facilitate the
permitting process more quickly than
their usual time frame, Purified Renew-
able Energy, LLC, eventually will be a 35-
million gallon facility.
What’s driving this enthusiasm for refur-
bishing an old, abandoned ethanol plant,
especially in the face of the current eco-
nomic squeeze facing the ethanol indus-
try?
Riggs is a good pitch man. His several
years in the investment arena prepared
him well for going after “new money” for
the restoration and rebirth of one of Min-
nesota’s oldest ethanol plants. Plus, he’s
sold on the future of renewable fuels in
the American energy arena.
“Ethanol fuels are only 10 percent of
the American fuel industry right now. It
employs 500,000 people. It’s a $35-40 bil-
lion industry. I don’t see this industry over
night being ‘pen stroked’ away,” said
Riggs. In essence, despite the political
bantering of the RFS (Renewable Fuels
Standard) in this contentious election year,
Riggs thinks it will stay in place.
He understands the ethanol industry is
in a flux right now but, because of RSF, it
should have a solid future. “I’ve been in
and out of this industry over the
years. It goes through violent
changes. I once wrote a
report on the indus-
try and I labeled
it ‘the
Charles
Dick-
ens
tale of two cities’ because it sometimes re-
flects the best of times; sometimes the
worst of times. Within the same calendar
year, I’ve seen the best margins and the
worst margins.” Current price on ethanol
fuel is about $2.50 per gallon.
“Yes, we’re getting established in what
some would label the worst of times. But I
and our board of directors know the
volatile history of this industry. We know
that good times will happen again. This
industry the past three years has gone
through a fundamental business shift.
There’s more intelligence, more matu-
rity, and for certain more savvy, espe-
cially in the political arena.
Today the oil industry
isn’t fighting the
ethanol in-
dustry
and
that has huge implications.
“Yes, the government can do any stupid
thing at any time. But I don’t believe there
is an alternative to ethanol blending right
now. Yes, it could happen, but I don’t
know if they want to send a 500,000 em-
ployee industry into turmoil for the sake of
a handful of complainers who really don’t
understand what they’re talking about,”
observed Riggs.
This new operation will be state of the
art, employing the latest technologies for
maximum extraction of ethanol from
corn. A few years back, 2.75 gallons
ethanol per bushel of corn was an accept-
able standard. Not so today. “We’re closer
to 2.9 with a goal of 3 gallons per bushel
eventually,” indicated Riggs.
Currently, the facility employs 27 people
and operates on a 24/7 schedule. It
sources its corn directly, with much of it
conveniently provided through South
Central Grain and Energy right there at
Buffalo Lake. However all sourcing of
grain and raw materials, plus all market-
ing of products, is through Tenaska Biofu-
els, LLC, a major energy business
headquartered in
Omaha, Neb. Riggs indicated the bulk of
their DDGs (dry product) might be mar-
keted locally since Renville County has
become one of Minnesota’s larger beef
cattle producers.
Two plus million gallons of ethanol per
month is still perhaps three months away.
Lots of extraction of old equipment and
replacement with new takes time. Steve
Walker, president, is deep in experience in
the ethanol industry, having worked with
POET, Broin and US Bio. Both men are
on a “first-name” basis with Ron Fagen,
the Granite Falls entrepreneur who built
ethanol plants across America and now in
Europe.
Purified Renewable Energy, LLC, is
professionally financed through a private
equity hedge fund group in New York.
Riggs said it has a limited ownership of
less than 10 people, one of which is the
shareholder group of Minnesota Energy
which retains a “preferred-stock” position
with the new entity. “I’m a corporate fi-
nance guy and my job is to raise money,”
he summed up. And he apparently is very
good in his role.
Purified Renewable Energy, LLC, plant located in Buffalo Lake.
Jüo ó. MutH óÍt££Í * bttu IStuHu, MN oodJU
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E XT RE ME PROT E CT I ON.
The Evolution
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Extreme heat pump pushes the boundaries of what electric
heating is capable of. To pull off this achievement required building with
high-quality components and state-of-the-art electronics. Then, with the
right pieces in place, we put the heat pump through rigorous testing in the
harshest of conditions until we were absolutely certain of the durability of
this year-round dynamo. Year after year.
E XT RE ME PAYBACK.
Whether it’s heating or cooling season, the Evolution Extreme heat pump
starts to pay for itself from the get-go. And as a year-round solution, this
unit is saving money ‘round the clock. Homeowners will see the difference
in their energy bills, especially if they are going from a furnace system to
an all-electric system. Because the difference between the cost to heat
with gas or oil versus the cost to
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EXTREME EXTREME
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YEAR
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The system that can start to pay for itself from
Day One and continues to 365 days a year.
COMFORT
Temperature and humidity levels are
matched to the desired demand no matter
what it’s like outside.
ZONING
Efficiency and comfort are room-specific
when part of an Evolution
®
Zoning system.
EFFICIENCY
Delivering energy savings beyond belief in
both heating and cooling.
PROTECTION
Components are constantly monitored to
make sure they run within safe limits even
when pushed to the limit.
COMMUNICATION
The Evolution control talks to all enabled
components for optimum performance
and efficiency.
QUIET
Complete comfort includes keeping sound
levels to a minimum.
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extreme?
This panel is also available as a great leave-behind for homeowners (01-8110-1043-50).
PAYBACK
The system that can start to pay for itself from
Day One and continues to 365 days a year.
COMFORT
Temperature and humidity levels are
matched to the desired demand no matter
what it’s like outside.
ZONING
Efficiency and comfort are room-specific
when part of an Evolution
®
Zoning system.
EFFICIENCY
Delivering energy savings beyond belief in
both heating and cooling.
PROTECTION
Components are constantly monitored to
make sure they run within safe limits even
when pushed to the limit.
COMMUNICATION
The Evolution control talks to all enabled
components for optimum performance
and efficiency.
QUIET
Complete comfort includes keeping sound
levels to a minimum.
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Dale’s
Plumbing & Heating, Inc.
2110 9
th
St. E., Glencoe, MN 55336
320-864-6353
www.glencoephinc.com
INDUSTRY LEADING FEATURES. Enjoy the smooth ride and comfort with the new optional suspended cab feature and the
fngertip control with the New MultiControl Armrest console. The new generation of Magnum tractors will keep you
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FINANCING FOR 36 MONTHS ON
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lnuuS18? LLAulnC lLA1u8LS. Ln[oy Lhe smooLh rlde and comforL wlLh Lhe new opuonal suspended cab feaLure and Lhe
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Kimball
320-398-3800
Willmar
320-235-4898
Glencoe
320-864-5531
St M ti N M k t Ald
h W . L n e l c m e e r o m d n a g n l v o m , e l b a L r o f m o c
l o r L n o C u l u M w e n e h L h L l w l o r L n o c p u r e g n ñ
m s e h L y o [ n L . S L 8 u 1 AA1 L l C n l u A L L ? 8 1 S u u n l
r e v l l e d e w d n a d l d u o ??o ? e r o m r o f k s a d l u o c o h
g a M f o n o u a r e n e g w e n e h 1 . e l o s n o c L s e r m r A
l a n o u p o w e n e h L h L l w L r o f m o c d n a e d l r h L o o m
. y a d o L s u e e s d n a n l p o L S ! d e r
u o y p e e k l l l w s r o L c a r L m u n g
e h L d n a e r u L a e f b a c d e d n e p s u s
t k M N ti M t S
320-235-4898
illmar W
320-398-3800
imball K
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h W . L n e l c m e e r o m d n a g n l v o m , e l b a L r o f m o c
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507-387-5515
Alden
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Case lP and CnP CaplLal are reglsLered Lrademarks of CnP Amerlca LLC.
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o t a ank M . o N
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tin ar M . t S
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imball K
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lden A
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o
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Case lP and CnP CaplLal are reglsLered Lrademarks of CnP Amerlca LLC.
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o t a ank M . o N
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tin ar M . t S
a m e d a r L d e r e L s l g e r e r a l a L l p a C P n C d n a P l e s a C
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lden A
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o
. C L L a c l r e m A P n C f o s k r a
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Case lP and CnP CaplLal are reglsLered Lrademarks of CnP Amerlca LLC.
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o t a ank M . o N
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tin ar M . t S
a m e d a r L d e r e L s l g e r e r a l a L l p a C P n C d n a P l e s a C
507-874-3400
lden A
507-387-5515
o
. C L L a c l r e m A P n C f o s k r a
Lots of Choices
I f you want a crop i nsurance agent that
can hel p you make choi ces from a
farmer’s perspecti ve cal l . . .
This agency is an equal opportunity employer.
Cloud photos: www.sxc.hu ©SXC or its Image providers.
®, TM, SM
Trademarks and service marks of Pioneer Hi-Bred.
© 2010 PHII. 10-3170
Crop Insurance today offers..
Independent Agent
Chad Schmalz
54362 805
th
Ave, Buffalo Lake, MN 55314
320-296-5422
chad.schmalz@plantpioneer.com
The McLeod County Chronicle Online At
www.glencoenews.com
Harvest 2011 - 18 - September 9 & 10, 2012
By Susan WiIIians
Editor
The Jell Agre lamily ol Sacreo Heart
was selecteo as the University ol Min-
nesota`s 2012 Iarm Iamily ol the Year
lor Renville County ano were recognizeo
at both IarmIest Aug. 9 ano at the
Renville County Iair Aug. 1o.
Throughout the larm has hao live-
stock ano raiseo grain. Currently, Jell,
who heaos the operation, raises sugar
beets, corn, soybeans ano wheat. He also
contracts with Seneca Iooos to proouce
peas ano sweet corn. In aooition, the
larm raises Holstein steers as leeo cattle.
I`ve knew all along I wanteo to
larm,¨ saio Jell, a graouate ol BDRSH.
He went to work lor his lather, Faul,
right out ol high school ano while at
times he helo other jobs to supplement
the larm income KRF Enterprises,
Gibson Trucking, Southern Minnesota
Beet Sugar Cooperative he talks as il
he ooesn`t regret a moment.
I like the people you oeal with,¨ Jell
saio. You`re your own boss.¨
There are challenges, however, the
greatest ol which is the weather.
But alter going to Wyoming,¨ Jell
Pboto by Susan Wllllams
Mltcb, [ett ano Amy Agre ot Sacreo Heart are tbe Unlverslty ot Mlnnesota's 2012 Farm Famlly ot tbe Year tor
Renvllle County. Not plctureo, otber son 8ranoon.
Sacreo Heart's [ett Agre U ot M's 2012 Farm
Famlly ot tbe Year tor Renvllle County
Agre
Turn to page A2
Agre
Turn to page 21
September 9 & 10, 2012 - 19 - Harvest 2011
Harvest 2011 - 20 - September 9 & 10, 2012
Enestvedt Seed
Company
0akc ríc rcaa rc 1ucsrvcars,
'
0íc wa¸ rc bcrrcr ¸:cías¨
Established in 1900
Certilied Hybrid Seed Corn
(Conventional, VT3, RR, CRW, CB and Stacked Varieties}
Enestvedt`s RR Soybean Seed And
North Star Genetics
M.P.S. Seeds
QUALITY PRODUCTS FOR A REASONABLE PRICE
Contact
Enestvedt Seed Company
75802 Co. Rd 12, Sacred Heart, MN 56285
320-765-2728
or one of our dealers
Producers and Processors of
www.enestvedtseeds.com
saio relerencing the nearly nation-wioe
orought, we`ve got nothing to complain
about.¨
The secono biggest challenge is no
surprise to other larmers the rules ano
regulations within which larming now
has to work.
Jell is the lourth generation to larm on
the lano settleo by his great-granolather,
Hans, a hall-mile north ol town. His la-
ther, although retireo, still continues to be
active in the operation.
The couple`s sons Branoon ano Mitch
are looking to continue to aoo their loot-
steps to the lano cultivateo so long by
their ancestors.
Both sons were active in IIA atteno-
ing RCW High School. Mitch, now a
senior at North Dakota State University
in the Ag Systems Management Fro-
gram, will be joining Syngenta selling
seeo corn, a job he louno at the career
lair, so he will be able to also work on the
larm.
Branoon, who`s attenoing Riogewater
College in the GFS´GIS program ano
was not available ouring the interview,
also plans to work on the larm, saio his
parents. Ol note, Branoon maoe it to na-
tionals in bull rioing.
I`ve always been arouno it,¨ saio
Mitch ol his motivation to larm. I like
the small community. I plan on staying
arouno. Times are gooo right now.¨
While the men may be able to claim
they`ve always been arouno larming,¨
that`s not so lor wile ano mother, Amy.
I`m a city girl,¨ she saio.
Amy grew up in Berthouo, Colo.
present population ¯,000 o0 miles
north ol Denver. Her mom, Donna John-
son, is Renville City born ano raiseo.
They hao to teach me all about when
corn was reaoy to combine,¨ saio Amy.
They were very patient. It was a very big
aojustment, but I woulon`t traoe it now
lor anything.¨
Since 199!, Amy has workeo in the ol-
lice at Renville County`s Fublic Health
Department. Smiling, she saio she helps
out as neeoeo on the larm.¨
Besioes larming Jell is also a volunteer
lirelighter lor Sacreo Heart ano is active
in the Jaycees. Amy has been active on
their church council ano Sunoay school
ano is a member ol the Sacreo Heart
Iirst Responoers team. Mitch ano Bran-
oon are also members ol the Jaycees.
In aooition, the men in the lamily are
avio hunters ano enjoy lishing, also. Jell
will be hunting Alrican cape bullalo in
Mozambique about the time this article
comes out.
The lamilies honoreo by the U ol M
were selecteo by their local Extension
committees, having oemonstrateo a
commitment to enhancing ano support-
ing agriculture ano agriculture proouc-
tion,¨ the press release reporteo.
Recent previous honorees lrom the
area have incluoeo Neubauer Iarms,
Inc., Kramer Iarms, Triple I Iarms, ano
many more making it look like the coun-
ty`s own J/`· J/ io J¸ri.oltor·.
Agre Contlnueo trom page A1 Agre Continued from page 19
September 9 & 10, 2012 - 21 - Harvest 2011
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By ShcIhy Lindrud
Staff Writcr
Only a lew short years ago the Uniteo
States was the number one beel prooucer
in the worlo. Then the entire lean, linely-
textureo beel controversy, better known as
pink slime,¨ hit the inoustry ano Aus-
tralia raceo to the top.
Il we oon`t all get involveo in the poli-
cy,¨ explaineo Trent Loos, national agri-
culture speaker ano sixth generation
larmer who owns a
ranch in Nebraska,
at Iarmlest Aug. 8,
then other examples
ol public hysteria
will continue to
push agriculture
oown.
Teaching the
public is also imper-
ative.
Il we`re going to
communicate with
the non-larm people
we neeo to speak
their lingo,¨ saio
Loos, who has hao many cases ol lost in
translation¨ when an ag outsioer hears a
conversation about his ranch work.
One example he shareo was when he
was sitting in an airport talking to his wile
on the phone about their goats giving
birth. He askeo il they hao anymore kios.
When his wile saio tripletts, Loos ex-
claimeo, outlouo, that they hao another
set ol three. A laoy who overhearo Loos`
part ol the conversation laio into him lor
leaving his pregnant wile alone while she
gave birth to three kios.
Feople who oon`t live in or arouno
agriculture many times oon`t unoerstano
the business or why larmers ano livestock
prooucers oo certain things, like keeping
laying hens in cages.
It is about managing the stress,¨ Loos
saio. Hens that leel
sale ano unstresseo
will lay more. Now
we just neeo to lig-
ure our how to ex-
plain it.¨
Loos is not shy
about explaining his
business to people.
We can change
public perception
one person, one oay
at a time,¨ saio Loos.
On many occa-
sions he has been
practically ambusheo by concerneo citi-
zens, wanting to know why agriculture is
ooing such terrible¨ things. Case in
point the estrogen given cows is causing
America`s girls to enter puberty a year be-
lore their mothers ano nearly two years
belore their granomothers.
Beel isn`t the culprit though, Loos saio.
There is more estrogen in a garoen salao
than conventionally raiseo beel.
Also, girls ol tooay have a higher lat
content than their mothers ano grano-
mothers ano have better access to stimu-
lating content lrom tv, movies ano maga-
zines. Higher lat ano higher hormones
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Sbare tbe gooo news about ag
Trent Loos urgeo tellow tarmers ano rancbers to spreao all tbe gooo
agrlculture ooes tor bumanlty.
Submltteo pboto
1here is more estrogen in a
garoen salao than
conventionally raiseo beel.
- 1rcnl lcc-
¦cbra-ka Ranchcr
Gooo news
Turn to page A2
Good news
Turn to page 27
Harvest 2011 - 24 - September 9 & 10, 2012
By Dick Hagcn
Contrihuting Rcportcr
RenvIlle County RegIster
Twenty-nine Minnesota soybean larm-
ers took a bit ol a trip last March. They
traveleo to China as part ol a See lor
Yoursell ` mission ol the Minnesota Soy-
bean Growers Asso-
ciation.
Explaineo Faul
Simonson, Renville
County prooucer
ano Vice Chairman,
Minnesota Soybean
Growers Research
ano Fromotion
Council, We want-
eo to show our soy-
bean prooucers the
positive things that
are happening as a
result ol their check
oll oollars.` Ano
since China is the
largest international
market ol Minneso-
ta soybeans, China was our oestination.¨
None ol these Minnesota growers hao
ever been to China, lew hao even traveleo
overseas belore.
So it was inoeeo an eye-opening expe-
rience right lrom the very start. Most
coulon`t believe the mooern, sky-scraper
look ol these big cities in China. They
saw the huge sea port lacilities where
most U.S. ano Minnesota soybeans come
into China. They saw soybean processing
plants, even tolu plants where special
Minnesota soybeans
get processeo into a
hugely popular Chi-
nese looo.
Iarm-to-larm
contacts were limit-
eo since the purpose
was to show the
marketing impact ol
check oll oollars.
But Simonson saio
in their train ano
bus tours between
cities, the Chinese
larms they vieweo
were mostly very
small plots with just
a couple ol people
working ano no ma-
chinery.
One oay we orove about ¯0 miles in
Submltteo pbotos
Paul Slmonson (c), Falrta× soybean grower, sbakes banos wltb tbe man-
ager ot tbe Sbangbal veterlnary Center ourlng bls vlslt ln Marcb 27 to
Aprll 5. Lett ls [oel Scbreurs.
Mlnnesota soybean
tarmers see Cblna
ªCur larmers got to see
oirectly how check oll oollars are
being useo to generate new
markets lor our beans.`
- laul ¬|ncn-cn
Rcnv|llc Ccunlq Crcwcr: V|cc Cha|rnan,
l|nnc-cla ¬cqbcan Crcwcr- lrcncl|cn
and Rc-carch Ccunc|l
Cblna
Turn to page A2
China
Turn to page 26
September 9 & 10, 2012 - 25 - Harvest 2011
the country ano saw only two small trac-
tors. Hano labor is still how much ol
China`s crops are hanoleo. Ano every
square loot that can grow some crop is
being useo lor looo proouction,¨ Simon-
son saio.
Making a huge impact on this group
ol Minnesota larmers was the tremen-
oous inlrastructure ,roaos ano brioges, al-
reaoy in place, or being built, wherever
they traveleo. Simonson saio the commu-
nist ioeology may not be the most elli-
cient but when projects get unoerway,
money ano neeo` aren`t an issue.
We saw miles ol lreeways with lew
cars ano trucks traveling on them,¨ saio
Simonson. This huge highway system
apparently to accommooate the continu-
ous consolioation ol country people mov-
ing into the cities lor better jobs, better
living conoitions.¨
Ferhaps even the Chinese economy is
slowing oown. He saio in the big cities,
like Shanghai, huge builoing cranes were
everywhere but they were mostly just sit-
ting there ooing nothing.
Yet wherever they traveleo Simonson
saio you coulo sense tremenoous amounts
ol activity. The younger generation is
oelinitely on the go in China, too.¨
Accoroing to Simonson, about hall ol
U.S. soybean proouction is now being ex-
porteo ano about hall ol this total now
goes to China. But Southeast Asia, espe-
cially Vietnam, Inoonesia, Japan, Korea
ano the Fhilippines are also growing mar-
kets lor U.S. soybeans.
He mentioneo two new soybean pro-
cessing plants recently openeo in Vietnam
so U.S. soybeans will likely be a major
source ol soybeans lor these plants.
Our larmers got to see oirectly how
check oll oollars are being useo to gener-
ate new markets lor our beans,¨ saio Si-
monson. They sat oown across the table
lrom Chinese business people who are
buying our Minnesota beans so they got a
leeling ol what it`s like to sit oown ano
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Cblna Contlnueo trom page A1
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Cblna
Turn to page A2
China
Turn to page 27
China Continued from page 25
Harvest 2011 - 26 - September 9 & 10, 2012
both oirectly ellect the onset ol puberty.
I`m a little lrustrateo,¨ people are
quick to blame beel, saio Loos, when they
have no problem popping birth control
pills into their booies, which are lull ol es-
trogen.
It is not only the estrogen in beel that
is getting attention, but also the nitrates
louno in our looo.
I`m perplexeo that the government
labels nitrate as a toxin,¨ when some
stuoies have shown it to be benelicial,
Loos saio.
The government`s nitrate level in
water is 10 parts per million, but there is
100 parts per million in breast milk, Loos
saio. There is more nitrates in a lettuce
leal than a hot oog.
It is not an
issue,¨saio Loos.
Actually, Loos
believes a lot ol looo
lears are unlounoeo.
I oon`t unoer-
stano why we`re
alraio ol bacon,¨
Loos saio, when it
has the same lat as
olive oil. All looo
groups are gooo in
mooeration.¨
Tying the looo
prooucing sector up with strick regula-
tions, saying what can ano can`t be
aooeo, is not the way to a bright luture,
especially il one looks at the European
Union, who has very regulateo larming,
shareo Loos.
The EU is on a path to starvation,¨
Loos saio seriously, pointing out most ol
the EU`s looo is importeo. How is it
working lor them?¨
With all ol these organizations going
out ano slamming
agriculture lor caus-
ing everything lrom
oirty water to cli-
mate change to looo
salety, Loos ex-
plaineo there is an
even worse oanger.
The greatest
enemy to agriculture
is ourselves because
ol complacency,¨
saio Loos. We just
neeo to lay it out.¨
Loos can boil the
entire conversation oown to a very sim-
ple, but haro hitting message.
Everything lives, everything oies. Ano
oeath with a purpose gives meaning to
lile.¨
It is the cycle ol lile ano agriculture
takes the resources given to mankino by
Goo, manages them ano uses them to
make lile on Earth better lor everyone.
Agriculture is that important,¨ Loos
saio. It is about improving human lives.¨
OIivia CIinic
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Cblna Contlnueo trom page A1
Gooo news Contlnueo trom page A1
ªIverything lives, everything
oies. Ano oeath with a purpose
gives meaning to lile.`
- 1rcnl lcc-
¦cbra-ka Ranchcr
oo some bargaining` on the value ol our
proouct.
We weren`t buying ano selling but it
was a prime example ol how the business
worlo lunctions when it comes to buying
ano selling U.S. soybeans. These people
like sitting at the table with Minnesota
larmers. They`o rather talk to a larmer
than the big corporation guys. They trust
our larmers ano they want their opin-
ions,¨ summeo up Simonson.
He saio most ol the Chinese business
people speak English because English is
now taught beginning in early graoes in
their schools. But the oloer people who
run these traoing houses oon`t speak Eng-
lish, so interpreters were provioeo.
With signilicant reouctions apparent
in the 2012 U.S. soybean crop, will there
likely be signilicant cutbacks in check oll
oollars?
Very likely acknowleogeo Simonson,
inoicating that at some point when linal
proouction ligures are available there will
be some oecisions on what to oo ano
what not to oo lor 2013 programs.
Good news Continued from page 24
China Continued from page 26
September 9 & 10, 2012 - 27 - Harvest 2011
Harvest 2011 - 28 - September 9 & 10, 2012
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September 9 & 10, 2012 - 29 - Harvest 2011
By Lori Copler
Staff Writer
D
aggett Brook Farm, located
south of Brownton and just
north of the Sibley County line,
is home to this year’s McLeod County
Farm Family of the Year, Duane and
Mary Nelson.
The Nelsons have run their dairy farm
since 1988 — nearly 25 years — but peo-
ple still refer to it “as the Delfert Bussler
farm,” laughs Mary Nelson.
The farm may seem small by today’s
standards — 40 tillable acres and an aver-
age herd size of 50 cows — but it is more
than enough to keep both Nelsons busy, as
well as some area youths whom they hire
to help out.
Duane Nelson, Mary will contend,
works “full-time and a half,” while she also
works full time while also teaching two
English classes a day at GFW High School
in Winthrop.
*****
The Nelsons are not native to the area.
Mary Nelson grew up near Randolph, be-
tween Cannon Falls and Northfield, while
Duane Nelson grew up near Brainerd.
They met as students at the University
of Minnesota at a dorm mixer.
“I think he liked the way I skated,”
Mary Nelson jokes.
Duane Nelson will contend their mutual
love of cows drew them together. Mary
Nelson, back in the day, was once a con-
tender in the Princess Kay of the Milky
Way pageant (as was her daughter,
Brenda, some 20 years later). Duane Nel-
son was once an “FFA King.”
They both graduated with bachelor de-
grees in agriculture with an emphasis in
dairy operations.
After they were married, the Nelsons
went looking for a place to start their own
dairy herd, and rented a farm near Owa-
tonna.
“We started with 27 cows,” said Duane
Nelson.
The couple soon realized that the herd
would not support them both, so Mary
Nelson agreed to stay home with the cows
while Duane Nelson got off-the-farm work
as a hoof trimmer and a job with 21st
Century Genetics.
All three of their children, Tracy,
Brenda and Erik, were born in Owatonna,
Duane Nelson said.
But the farm’s owner decided to move
back to the farm, and the Nelsons were
again on the lookout for a place to call
home.
Which is how they ended up at Dagget
Brooke, where they built their herd to
about 50 cows, mostly registered Holsteins
and a few registered Ayrshires.
They buy most of their feed, but also
grow corn for silage, also used for feed.
With all three kids grown and on their
own, the Nelsons hire area teens to help
with the milking, giving them an occa-
sional night off or to go to meetings.
“There aren’t a lot of jobs for kids
around here,” said Mary Nelson. “It gives
them some experience in farming and
milking.”
*****
Along with the farm, the Nelsons are
active in agriculture in many other ways.
They belong to both the Holstein and
Ayrshire associations. Duane Nelson is on
the board of directors for both Gen X and
Farm Systems of Melrose. He also is the
president of the Winthrop Lions Club.
Mary Nelson is active with 4-H, helps
coach the GFW FFA dairy judging team
and is part of the Dairy Profitability En-
hancement Program.
In 1995, Duane and Mary Nelson were
awarded the Distinguished Young Breeder
award by the National Holstein Associa-
tion.
*****
The Nelsons’ children were all active at
McLeod West Schools.
Their son, Erik, and his wife, Megan,
live northeast of Brownton and have two
children, Charlie and Levi.
Erik Nelson is an agronomist. His wife,
Megan, was formerly the agriculture
teacher and FFA adviser at Glencoe-Silver
Lake High School. She recently began a
new job with UFC in Winthrop.
Erik Nelson was diagnosed with
leukemia during his junior year at
McLeod West. The Nelsons are happy to
say that he has been cancer-free for nearly
13 years.
Daughter Tracy teaches agriculture at
Kimball Area High School, and daughter
Brenda, and her husband, Alex Miller, live
at Sauk Centre and are expecting their
first child in November.
*****
The Nelsons were honored as the
McLeod County Farm Family of the Year,
along with other county farm families, at
Farmfest near Redwood Falls in early Au-
gust, a family activity they enjoyed.
*****
Duane Nelson said that after 30 years of
dairying, he still likes working with cows.
“I can see us doing this for at least an-
other 10 years,” he said.
Nelsons named 2012 U of M’s Farm
Family of the Year for McLeod County
The Duane and Mary Nelson family, McLeod County Farm Family of the Year, were among
families honored at Farmfest in early August. The Nelsons’ farm is located on the McLeod-
Sibley border, south of Brownton. From left to right are, Tracy Nelson, Brenda Nelson
Miller, Erik Nelson, Duane Nelson and Mary Nelson.
Submitted Photo
St. Paul, MN – USDA Farm Service
Agency (FSA) State Executive Director,
Linda Hennen for Minnesota, announced
that continuous sign-up for the Highly
Erodible Land Initiative (HELI) under the
Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)
started on July 23. Minnesota received a
total allocation of 11,200 acres to enroll in
the HELI CRP program. Offers will be ac-
cepted until either the state acreage allo-
cation limit is reached or Sept. 30,
whichever occurs first.
“CRP is a voluntary program that has
protected environmentally-sensitive land
for more than 25 years,” said Hennen.
“This initiative will accept offers with an
erosion rate of at least 20 tons per acre per
year for new cropland or CRP acres that
expire on Sept. 30; however, existing grass
stands that are not considered expiring
CRP will not be considered eligible,” she
said.
Producers can stop by the local USDA
FSA Service Center to determine if their
land qualifies for the Highly Erodible Land
Initiative and to receive additional loca-
tion-specific details.
Landowners enrolled in CRP receive
annual rental payments and cost-share as-
sistance to establish long-term, resource
conserving covers on eligible farmland. In-
centive payments are not authorized under
this initiative.
New land contracts approved during this
continuous sign-up initiative will become
effective the first day of the month follow-
ing the month of approval and are valid
for 10 years.
CRP contracts set to expire on Sept. 30,
may be offered for consideration and
approved contracts will become effective
Oct. 1, and are also valid for 10 years.
Producers are encouraged to contact
their local FSA service center or visit FSA’s
website at http://www.fsa.usda.gov/crp
for additional information regarding CRP.
Farm Service Agency Announces Continuous Sign-up
for CRP Highly Erodible Land Initiative
By Lynn Ketelsen
Farm Director
Linder Farm Network
In a year of drought, high grain
prices and tight feed supplies, it’s criti-
cal that American Agriculture keep the
long term picture in mind. Short term
fixes often create long-
term problems, and that is
what we need to be aware
of in a changing ag econ-
omy.
This has been one of
those years for weather. In
some areas, the season
began with too much rain,
followed by dry. In Min-
nesota, it has been one of
the most variable years for
rain that I can remember.
Some areas had super
rains; others continually
missed showers their
neighbors received. And it’s like that
across the state.
The Eastern Corn belt is much
worse off. The worst drought since the
1980s, and the total impact won’t be
known until all of the crops are har-
vested.
So where does this leave us?
Right now ethanol is being pointed
to as a “bad guy” for high grain prices
by those who need to buy feed or grain
for commercial use or export. Ethanol
uses close to 40 percent of U.S. corn,
and in a short year, there is no doubt it
is at least partly responsible for high
prices. The national media has
jumped on the food price issue, and
ethanol is under attack.
What we have to re-
member is that without
ethanol, we could well
have seen much lower
grain and livestock prices
than we have today. I
doubt anyone wants the
ethanol industry to just go
away. So any short-term
adjustments must be that
short-term.
The livestock industry is
facing tough times. Feed
costs are soaring, hay is
tight and profit margins
are slim to none. The same goes for
dairy and poultry. Is there a way to
limit use of corn for ethanol, but still
keep plants open and make more grain
available? I don’t know, but we will
hear more and more about it.
And grain farmers need a strong
livestock industry to use their product.
If enough get out, and livestock con-
tinue to be liquidated, the impact
could be huge.
So again, my point in this is we need
to think out what we do for agriculture
in a long-term way.
Here’s my thinking:
-We must keep a strong livestock in-
dustry. Without it, food prices will
soar, grain prices will plummet and it’s
a vital part of American Agriculture
-We must keep the ethanol industry
solvent. For the long-term health of
agriculture, plants need to stay open,
even if it’s at reduced output.
-We need grain farmers to be prof-
itable.
The key to all of this is to find solu-
tions that will work in the long term. If
the ethanol mandate is a problem,
maybe a compromise can be worked
out between grain and livestock
groups. And if feed and hay is short,
maybe we need to get creative is mov-
ing supplies around. But we have to be
careful not to totally change the way
we farm, for a one-year drought.
Finally, exports are an important
part of this picture of both grain and
livestock. We need enough grain and
meat products to keep our overseas
partners supplied, or we could lose
those customers. The whole thing is
not easy, but it can be done
We have tremendous opportunities
in agriculture now and in the future.
The weather this year has been a chal-
lenge, next year may be the best we’ve
ever had. American farmers are the
best producers in the world.
My main point is let’s react with
short-term solutions for short-term
challenges. Not long-term fixes for a
one-year drought. American agricul-
ture is a complex machine driven by
supply and demand. Ag groups need
to be proactive and work together to
come up with a way to make things
work. After all, we are all in this to-
gether.
Harvest 2011 - 30 - September 9 & 10, 2012
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September 9 & 10, 2012 - 31 - Harvest 2011
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The University of Minnesota Extension
Service has announced that the 2012 Sibley
County Farm Family of the Year is the
Melvin and Genny Neyers family, Gibbon.
Melvin and Genny met in country school
in rural Sibley County and were eventually
married in 1960. They began farming 140
acres with Melvin’s dad, which they contin-
ued until 1978 when Melvin’s dad was no
longer able to continue with the farming.
They finished hogs and beef cattle and
raised between 300-900 broiler chickens
each year. They also grew corn, soybeans,
alfalfa, and wheat.
In 1988, their son, Alan, joined their
farming operation. Since then, they have
increased the number of acres they own
and rent to around 900 acres.
The Neyers family is also part of the Sib-
Bro-Nic farrowing co-op, along with their
daughter Maria and husband, Bill Kapol-
czynski.
Sib-Bro-Nic was founded approximately
35 years ago and is one of very few farrow-
ing co-ops in the area that has continued
with its original owners. Bill and Maria are
also the managers of the farrowing co-op,
which farrows out 1200 sows. The Neyers’
share in the co-op means their family fin-
ishes out between 6,000-7,000 hogs annu-
ally.
The Neyers are also active in their com-
munity. Both Melvin and Genny were Sib-
ley County 4-Hers, and they served as adult
leaders for the Gibbon Gophers 4-H club
for many years. Their seven children were
all active in Sibley County 4-H. They are
members of St. Willibrord’s Catholic
Church in Gibbon, where Melvin has
served as trustee for several years, and
where Genny is director of religious educa-
tion. In addition, Melvin was a member of
the board which founded Heartland Corn
Products Ethanol Plant in Winthrop.
Melvin and Genny are one of 76 families
from participating counties around Min-
nesota who have been given the distinction
of 2012 Farm Family of the Year. In addi-
tion to being recognized at the Sibley
County Fair, they were also recognized at a
ceremony on Thursday, Aug. 9, at Farmfest
near Redwood Falls. To see all 76 Farm
Families of the Year recognized in Min-
nesota for 2012 visit http://mnfarm
families.cfans.umn.edu/.
“Farm families and agriculture are a
major driver of Minnesota’s economy and
the vitality of Minnesota’s rural communi-
ties,” said Bev Durgan, dean of University
of Minnesota Extension. “The University
of Minnesota is proud to recognize these
outstanding families for their contributions
to agriculture and their communities.”
Families were selected by their local county
Extension committees for having demon-
strated a commitment to enhancing and
supporting agriculture.
Harvest 2011 - 32 - September 9 & 10, 2012
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By Dick Hagcn
Contrihuting Rcportcr
RenvIlle County RegIster
The intrigue ol IarmIest is the re-
markable oiversity ol prooucts ano ioeas.
Such as Ryan Fierce who was pitching
growing raoish, specilically Tillage
Raoish,` as a lall seeoeo cover crop which
can markeoly improve soil lertility, reouce
lall tillage ano proouce higher yielos in
both corn ano soybeans.
Working lor Frooucer`s Choice Seeo
Company, Joroan, Fierce saio their pri-
mary objective at IarmIest was to push
the ioea ol late summer´early lall seeoing
ol Tillage Raoish.
We want a 30-oay growing cycle min-
imum so getting it seeoeo at least 30 oays
aheao ol lirst lrost is important,¨ saio
Fierce.
Breaking up the haropan is the lirst
bonus ol Tillage Raoish. With the ex-
treme moisture this spring lolloweo by this
hot, ory growing season, Fierce contenos
soil compaction is huge in most lielos.
But the aooitional bonus is better lertility.
He explaineo, The oeep taproot ol
the raoish brings soil nutrients back to the
subsurlace. The raoish uses the F, K, ano
nitrogen that leacheo into the grouno in
previous years back up to where it`s reaoi-
ly available lor newly planteo crops come
spring.
You`re going to be having 2¯ to !0
units ol aooitional N brought back up lor
your crop. An Iowa larmer stoppeo at our
IarmIest booth to share his experience
last year when he planteo raoish as a lall
cover crop. His corn last year ran 1o0 to
17¯ bushels. Where he oio not have the
raoishes planteo, he estimates only o0 to
70 bushel corn this year because ol the
orought ano heat, but he conlioently pre-
oicts 120 bushels on the raoish` grouno.
Yes, that`s extreme but he theorizes that
the corn root lolloweo oown the tap root
oepth ol the raoishes. We reler to that as
the tunnel system,`¨ saio Fierce.
All that aooitional yielo isn`t oue to
micro nutrients being relracteo back up
into the soil. His corn plants in the raoish
lielo also likely hao access to moisture be-
cause the oeep tap roots ol the raoish last
lall provioeo the same oelivery system lor
the corn roots.
A hanoout useo this language:
Tillage Raoish helps bring the gooo
critters while keeping bao guys at
bay, all without the use ol pesti-
cioes¦ Earthworms love it, nema-
tooes hate it. How? The oeep
Tillage Raoish taproot lractures
ano loosens your soil, creating
micro pores. The results are water
ano oxygen ellectively inliltrating
Raolsb tor cover crop?
Submltteo pboto
Ryan Plerce, worklng tor Prooucer's Cbolce Seeo Company ln [oroan,
talkeo about tbe benetlts to a tall cover crop ot Tlllage Raolsb at Farm-
Fest.
Raolsb
Turn to page A2
Radish
Turn to page 35
September 9 & 10, 2012 - 33 - Harvest 2011
F.0. ßox 88
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Harvest 2011 - 34 - September 9 & 10, 2012
the soil which works to increase or-
ganic matter ano microbial activity.
Tillage Raoish is both a magnet to
highly benelicial earthworms ano a
virtual shielo to suppress pesky ne-
matooes.
Fierce oescribes it as a Bio-Drilling
Taproot. The tuber narrows at the com-
paction point in the soil, senoing out the
taproot, boring oown into the subsoil up
to 30 inches oeep.
Tillage Raoish seeo lor 2013 is being
harvesteo now in August by oillerent
growers lor Cover Crop Solutions, corpo-
rate name ol a lamily ol cover crop seeos
which also incluoes annual ryegrass, win-
ter triticale, phacelia ano nitrogen-pro-
oucing cover crop legumes such as winter
pears, crimson clover, lupin ano hairy
vetch.
Seeo cost lor Tillage Raoish is S3.30 a
pouno. It can be applieo with precision
planting equipment, a normal orill, even
aerial seeoing which olten is the best
route lor August seeoing in stanoing lielos
ol corn ano´or soybeans. Fierce saio a
ballpark average is S20 to S30 per acre.
Aerial seeoing is becoming quite common
with southern larmers but he sees Min-
nesota growers giving it a try also.
He suggesteo, Ferhaps a better way
to get useo to raoish as a cover crop is to
grow small grains in the heaolanos ol
your corn ano soybean lielos, then alter
harvesting the small grain orill in a seeo-
ing ol raoish. Technically we`re not sell-
ing the raoish, we`re selling a tillage
process.¨
He cautions about seeoing into soy-
beans too early. Get too much raoish
growth ano you`re clipping raoish tops as
you`re cutting your soybeans. So timing
is a bit ol a challenge. He suggests Sep-
tember 1 as latest lor seeoing raoish in
south central Minnesota, northern Iowa.
Ior more inlormation go: ooo.Prco.-
·r·C/i.·S··c..o. Or call Fierce at 701-
!00-338¯.
Raolsb Contlnueo trom page A1
8lrd lslaad · hawk 0reek
Mutual lasuraace 0oæpaay
l.0. 8ox 0
8lrd lslaad, Mh ââ310·0?00
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Ph: (320) 523-1681
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Supporter of Community Projects
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Radish Continued from page 33
September 9 & 10, 2012 - 35 - Harvest 2011
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Harvest 2011 - 36 - September 9 & 10, 2012
By Dick Hagcn
Contrihuting Rcportcr
RenvIlle County RegIster
There`s a new group ol Americans out
there ano talking to them pretty much oe-
penos on your electronic skills with iFao,
Twitter, lacebook, cell phone ano perhaps
an occasional e-mail message.
Don Schiellelbein, presioent, Minneso-
ta State Cattlemen`s Association, spoke at
the IarmIest Iorum on luture changes lor
the livestock inoustry. He relers to this
new consumer group as the new millenni-
um` ano categorizes them in the 20 to 3¯-
year-olo age group.
They access inlormation instantly ano
they oisburse inlormation instantly. They
teno to be very reactive so you oon`t know
where they are sitting on issues. A case in
point that relates to the cattle inoustry is
the lean linely textureo beel issue.
As soon as this new millennium got a
holo ol it, what happeneo? The thing
went viral on us. It was instantly conta-
gious across America. It caught us terrili-
cally oll guaro. We hao no immeoiate oe-
lense. Ano suooenly pink slime` cost the
U.S. beel inoustry millions ol oollars.
So the question tooay lor the beel in-
oustry is how gooo a lront line` oo we
have. I`m talking about those people who
are squarely in lront ol a consumer. Il an
issue comes up how reaoily, how quickly
can our lront line` people rise to the occa-
sion?¨
Are some ol these CEOs in major looo
chain stores willing to say what`s gooo lor
the beel inoustry is gooo lor Saleway?
Absolutely not, saio Schiellelbein, inoi-
cating these CEOs ano other important
spokespersons in the looo chain are now
usually the lirst to lall to questions ano as-
saults lrom this new millenium out there.
Ano when they lall, what impression
ooes it put on the proouct? When Saleway
starteo pulling linely textureo beel oll the
meat counter, we know what happeneo.
Ano we`re still recovering. Through beel
check-oll lunos ano other programs what
we neeo to oo in the beel inoustry is inun-
oate with lacts. This new millennium
seems to leeo oll electronic souno bites.
We neeo to bombaro the electronic meoia
with lactoios about the salety ano nutri-
tional value ol linely textureo beel.¨
Schiellelbein askeo the questions,
Does lact lighting lact typically work?
Who usually wins when lacts take on more
lacts?¨
He suggesteo emotion usually becomes
the winner.
Ano when emotions surlace, our lu-
ture image boils oown to how are we
going to ramp up to the speeo ol the Mil-
lennium?
We`ve got to strengthen that lront line.
We`ve got to make our lront line absolute-
ly, positively oelenoable so that when an
issue arises belore these new millenniums,
Saleway comes to bat ano says No way,
we`re not pulling that proouct. It`s USDA
graoeo. It`s nutritionally superior ano it
tastes gooo.¨
When the question about chickens in
cages gets raiseo we have to say yes they
are ano oo you know why that is the
smartest way ol prooucing your eggs?`
Summing up, Schielelbein saio, I
think what we really neeo to oo when
these speeo ol inlormation` events occur
is immeoiately share our positive reaction.
A story in tooay`s worlo blows up real
quick because ol instantaneous meoia ex-
plosion. But it`s almost like a weather
maker. We see il there are any takers ano
il there aren`t any takers, it blows over
ano they rapioly are on the next meoia
story.
Ano that`s why the neeo lor a stronger
lront line in the livestock inoustry. They
neeo to be able to oeleno the inoustry in-
stantly until the story blows over. Then we
can go about the business ol relaying the
lacts, explaining why it maoe sense, etc.¨
Keith L. Scott Agency
Keith Scott
P.O. Box 340 · Bird Island, MN 55310
320-365-3400 · 1-800-815-6367
Submltteo pboto
Don Scbletelbeln, presloent Mln-
nesota Cattleman's Assoclatlon
salo ag neeos to respono mucb
taster to crltlclsm.
Scbletelbeln on tbe new mlllennlum
A Commitment To AgricuIture
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Telephone: (320) 765-2261
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September 9 & 10, 2012 - 37 - Harvest 2011
Technology to the rescue?
By Dick Hagen
Contributing Reporter
Livestock producers are fully aware of
the ‘big pain’ building in their cost ac-
counting ledger. Feed prices, especially
corn, keep escalating. On August 2
Chicago Board of Trade had September
12 futures for corn hovering around $8;
September soybeans at $16.35. Chicago
Mercantile meat futures were trading at
$76.85 for October 12 hogs; cattle at
$140.12.
The dilemma? Processors can’t ramp
up prices enough to offset increasing pro-
duction costs of producers without signifi-
cant resistance from consumers. In
essence increasing meat prices at the retail
counter inevitably generates shrinking
sales. Rationing is setting in at all levels of
the food chain, including pork producers.
Unfortunately no one has the ‘inside
intelligence’ to predict how long the belt
tightening will last, nor how severe the
pain will become. So how do you survive
the current squeeze, especially when it
continues with such hour-by-hour volatil-
ity? Well, after you have answered the
question: “How many of my barns will
continue to have pigs in them?”, you need
to reduce mortalities and improve feed ef-
ficiency.
EPI Air to the rescue? Murphy-Brown,
LLC thinks so. Their results were solid.
They tested EPI technology on 44,000
nursery pigs. Check these rather remark-
able results:
• Average daily gain increased 12.2 per-
cent.
• Average weights increased by 9.3 per-
cent.
• Mortalities were reduced by 26.1 per-
cent.
Workers in these Murphy-Brown facili-
ties also appreciate the ‘cleaner air’ envi-
ronment. Here’s why: The EPI barns had
a 55 percent reduction in ammonia versus
the control barns; a 58.6 percent reduc-
tion in hydrogen sulfide.
Comments John Baumgartner, BEI
President, “My question to pork producers
is simply this:Is an investment that returns
your money within 18 months a good in-
vestment? Murphy-Brown estimated their
payback at half of that. And that was be-
fore the drought. In today’s ‘crunch time’
economy, with increased feed costs, those
return-on-investment (ROI) calculations
are even faster.”
Proof of the cost-effectiveness of EPI
technology is Murphy-Brown going ‘sys-
tem wide’ throughout their en-
tire Western
Division with
EPI units.
We’re talking
655,000 nursery
spaces plus
864,000 wean-
to-finish
spaces.
Said Dr.
Steve Pollmann,
President, Murphy-Brown Western Divi-
sion, “This is a significant step change in
environmental systems. We’re excited.
The science is sound. The take away is
that EPI in our test runs provided docu-
mented evidence of the potential benefit
of this technology.”
Sums up Baumgartner, “We think EPI
technology is on the threshold of becom-
ing ‘must have’ technology. Especially
during these difficult times, improved per-
formance is the key to sustainability and a
quick ROI has always made business
sense. For more information go to
www.epiair.com or call 800-823-4234.
Harvest 2011 - 38 - September 9 & 10, 2012
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September 9 & 10, 2012 - 39 - Harvest 2011
By Lori Copler
Staff Writer
D
uWayne and Marna Paehlke can
keep plenty busy on the farm
DuWayne’s great-grandfather
bought in 1912, which achieved Century
Farm status this year.
There are buildings to maintain, a wind-
break to grow, deer to feed and the installa-
tion and maintenance of tile on the
quarter-section farm located along Nature
Avenue south of Brownton.
The Paehlkes are not active farmers —
they rent the land to neighbors for crop
production, but DuWayne Paehlke can re-
member when the farm was a bustling en-
terprise.
His great-grandfather, Albert Schuett
(later an “e” was added to the end of the
family’s last name, making it Schuette)
bought the land from Bernhard and Au-
gusta Rettig for a total sum of $8,500 on
June 26, 1912, and shortly after began
building a home for his wife, Martha, and
himself.
Albert Schuett lived to be 99 years old,
and DuWayne Paehlke remembers him
well.
“He was always very, very good to me,”
said Paehlke. “He would take me fishing.”
In fact, Paehlke said, his oldest daughter,
Janae, also can remember him. Her great-
great-grandfather would hold her on his
lap and comb her hair, Paehlke said.
In 1921, Albert Schuett deeded the farm
over to his son, Edward, and eventually Al-
bert and Martha moved into Brownton.
Edward Schuett and his wife had one
child, a daughter, LaVerna, DuWayne
Paehlke’s mother.
DuWayne Paehlke grew up on the farm
with his parents, LaVerna and Rudy
Paehlke, and his two brothers, Glenn and
Ron.
Besides growing crops, the family raised
sheep, hogs, chickens, turkeys and ducks,
and milked 15 to 25 cows and usually had
two to four horses on the place.
Back then, Paehlke said, tiling of farm-
land was rare, and the poorer, low-lying
ground was used as pasture and farmers
“farmed the hilltops.” During wet years,
the pastures filled with water and created
ponds.
The area was flush with wildlife, and
families could supplement what they grew
themselves with what they could hunt.
Paehlke said he can remember his
mother talking about
how her father would
go out to shoot prairie
chickens for a meal.
“He’d be back with a
couple birds in about
10 minutes,” said
Paehlke. “The prairie
chickens were plentiful.
Now you don’t see
them any more.”
The family never
bought more land be-
yond the original quar-
ter section, but did rent
land from neighbors.
At one time, they
farmed what is now
known as Schaefers
Prairie after the origi-
nal owner left it to the
the Nature Conser-
vancy, which restored it
to original Minnesota
prairie.
Besides the farm,
Rudy Paehlke also
owned two trucks and
did trucking, and also
did custom fieldwork.
But Rudy Paehlke
had asthma, DuWayne
said, and his doctor
told him he needed to
give up either the trucking or the farming.
Rudy Paehlke gave up the trucks.
The Paehlkes both used and sold what
they produced. A grocery store in the Twin
Cities was willing to buy as many fresh
turkeys as the farm could provide.
“I can remember my dad lining the bed
of the truck with a sheet and laying the
turkeys in there one by one in rows, with
their heads tucked under their wings,” said
DuWayne Paehlke.
On Friday evenings, the truck was
loaded with crates of fresh eggs and taken
to New Auburn, where they were sold and
traded.
“We’d go to New Auburn with chickens
and come home with our groceries,” said
Paehlke.
But things change as time passes. In
1975, the family got out of the dairy busi-
ness, selling off the cows and auctioning off
the associated equipment. Eventually, the
other animals went, too.
Rudy Paehlke died in 1988, and LaV-
erna Paehlke indicated that she did not
want to continue to live alone on the farm.
DuWayne and Marna Paehlke lived in
Brownton (DuWayne worked at 3M and
Marna worked at the Brownton Bulletin
and later for McLeod Publishing), and
worked out a purchase in which LaVerna
moved into their home, and they moved
back to the farm.
As part of the process, the Paehlkes had
the properties appraised, and learned that
farmland was worth about $890 an acre
then.
Which is not true today, with assessed
values hovering around $4,500 an acre.
Paehlke said he has been approached a
couple of times by buyers who are inter-
ested in both the home place and the for-
mer Frauendienst farm, which Paehlke
bought after moving back to the farm.
But though the prices were good — and
tempting — Paehlke just did not quite
have the heart to sell.
Although he is not actively farming,
Paehlke still puts a lot of effort in keeping
up the place — the house was completely
remodeled and older buildings have been
razed and replaced as needed. Plus he
“buys enough corn to feed deer that
Marna doesn’t think we can afford to go to
the grocery store any more.”
His son, son-in-law and grandson come
to the farm each year to bow-hunt deer.
And while he does not expect any of his
own three children — or his grandchildren
— to ever live on the farm, “I think they
want to keep it in the family,” said Paehlke.
Century Farm: A lot has changed
Photo by Lori Copler
DuWayne and Marna Paehlke live on the farm purchased by
DuWayne’s great-grandfather in 1912. The farm achieved Cen-
tury Farm status this year. The Century Farm program is spon-
sored by the Minnesota Farm Bureau and the Minnesota State
Fair.
Photo courtesy of DuWayne Paehlke
The aerial photograph above shows the
Schuette/Paehlke farm in the 1950s, with
the original house and farm buildings. The
Century Farm is located on Nature Avenue
southeast of Brownton.
Harvest 2011 - 40 - September 9 & 10, 2012
in the McLeod County Chronicle, the
Silver Lake Leader, and the Arlington Enterprise.
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O
R

Tjosvold
Equipment, Inc.
5352 285th Ave., Granite Falls, MN
320-564-2331 800-337-1381
Monday - Friday: 9:00am - 5:30pm
By Dick Hagcn
Contrihuting Rcportcr
RenvIlle County RegIster
Yes, it looks weiro.sort ol like plastic
pans with a couple ol nozzles that lloat`
on the grouno between your corn rows.
Mounteo on a Hagie power unit with 1o-
row boom, it got lots ol attention at
IarmIest. It`s calleo the YDROF lertilizer
attachment maoe by Ag Alternatives,
Garner, Iowa. It`s so new the patent
penoing` process is still unoerway.
Anoy Mull, Marketing Technician lor
Ag Alternatives, explaineo, YDROF is a
lertilizer attachment lor sell-propelleo ano
pull-type sprayers lor applying nitrogen,
or even pesticioes when corn is knee high
ano up to tasseling. We can put on 10 to
¯0 gallons ol proouct per acre ano apply
in either 20-inch or 30-inch rows.¨
The Y oesign spreaos the lertilizer out
at the base ol the corn plants, oirectly
below the oew orop` line ol the growing
crop.
Getting your lertilizer within two to
three inches ol the corn plant is key to the
value ol those extra pounos ol lertilizer,
especially nitrogen ,N,, just when the
plant is getting into its most active growth
stage,¨ saio Mull.
He oescribes oew orop as a natural
night time occurrence with the corn
leaves lunneling this moisture onto the
grouno surlace. With the YDROF mecha-
nism placing the lertilizer in that same
area, the oew helps move this nitrogen
into the root zone ol each corn plant.
Extra N just when the plant neeos it
most is the theory behino this system. It
can also lit into a variable application rate
where N levels neeo to be bumpeo up in
certain areas ol a lielo. A llexible metal
tube leeos the lertilizer or insecticioe
oown to the Y` shapeo pan.
Cost ligures on the YDROF system
mounteo on a o0-loot bar on the Hagie
STS 12 at their IarmIest location was
about S1o,000. No customer complaints
ano over one million acres ol usage so lar
across seven states saio Mull.
Mike Greenough, Lake Crystal area
prooucer, useo the YDROF system on
nearly 3,000 acres this year.
I`ll know at harvest what the results
will be. But I can oelinitely see my corn
getting the extra N treatment is looking
healthier ano hanoleo the heat ano
orought stress better,¨ saio Greenough.
He applieo 1¯ gallons ol 28 percent N
at V8, V10 stage ol plant growth. That
ligures to about !¯ pounos ol actual N.
His planting time application was !¯
pounos short ol recommenoeo N. His rig
was a o0-loot boom ooing 2!, 30-inch
rows.
His lielos are computer mappeo so as
he combines he will get on boaro` yielos.
Also he lelt several check strips so he will
have sioe-by-sioe oata as well.
The placement ol this extra N is what
maoe sense to me. The system workeo
L×tra N at lay by tlme?
By Dick Hagcn
Contrihuting Rcportcr
RenvIlle County RegIster
Yes, it looks weiro.sort ol like plastic
pans with a couple ol nozzles that lloat`
on the grouno between your corn rows.
Mounteo on a Hagie power unit with 1o-
row boom, it got lots ol attention at
IarmIest. It`s calleo the YDROF lertilizer
attachment maoe by Ag Alternatives,
Garner, Iowa. It`s so new the patent
penoing` process is still unoerway.
Anoy Mull, Marketing Technician lor
Ag Alternatives, explaineo, YDROF is a
lertilizer attachment lor sell-propelleo ano
pull-type sprayers lor applying nitrogen,
or even pesticioes when corn is knee high
ano up to tasseling. We can put on 10 to
¯0 gallons ol proouct per acre ano apply
in either 20-inch or 30-inch rows.¨
The Y oesign spreaos the lertilizer out
at the base ol the corn plants, oirectly
below the oew orop` line ol the growing
crop.
Getting your lertilizer within two to
three inches ol the corn plant is key to the
value ol those extra pounos ol lertilizer,
especially nitrogen ,N,, just when the
plant is getting into its most active growth
stage,¨ saio Mull.
He oescribes oew orop as a natural
night time occurrence with the corn
leaves lunneling this moisture onto the
grouno surlace. With the YDROF mecha-
nism placing the lertilizer in that same
area, the oew helps move this nitrogen
into the root zone ol each corn plant.
Extra N just when the plant neeos it
most is the theory behino this system. It
can also lit into a variable application rate
where N levels neeo to be bumpeo up in
certain areas ol a lielo. A llexible metal
tube leeos the lertilizer or insecticioe
oown to the Y` shapeo pan.
Cost ligures on the YDROF system
mounteo on a o0-loot bar on the Hagie
STS 12 at their IarmIest location was
about S1o,000. No customer complaints
ano over one million acres ol usage so lar
across seven states saio Mull.
Mike Greenough, Lake Crystal area
prooucer, useo the YDROF system on
nearly 3,000 acres this year.
I`ll know at harvest what the results
will be. But I can oelinitely see my corn
getting the extra N treatment is looking
healthier ano hanoleo the heat ano
orought stress better,¨ saio Greenough.
He applieo 1¯ gallons ol 28 percent N
at V8, V10 stage ol plant growth. That
ligures to about !¯ pounos ol actual N.
His planting time application was !¯
pounos short ol recommenoeo N. His rig
was a o0-loot boom ooing 2!, 30-inch
rows.
His lielos are computer mappeo so as
he combines he will get on boaro` yielos.
Also he lelt several check strips so he will
have sioe-by-sioe oata as well.
The placement ol this extra N is what
maoe sense to me. The system workeo
into the root zone ol each corn plant.
Extra N just when the plant neeos it
most is the theory behino this system. It
can also lit into a variable application rate
where N levels neeo to be bumpeo up in
certain areas ol a lielo. A llexible metal
tube leeos the lertilizer or insecticioe
oown to the Y` shapeo pan.
Cost ligures on the YDROF system
mounteo on a o0-loot bar on the Hagie
STS 12 at their IarmIest location was
about S1o,000. No customer complaints
ano over one million acres ol usage so lar
across seven states saio Mull.
Mike Greenough, Lake Crystal area
prooucer, useo the YDROF system on
nearly 3,000 acres this year.
I`ll know at harvest what the results
will be. But I can oelinitely see my corn
getting the extra N treatment is looking
healthier ano hanoleo the heat ano
orought stress better,¨ saio Greenough.
He applieo 1¯ gallons ol 28 percent N
at V8, V10 stage ol plant growth. That
ligures to about !¯ pounos ol actual N.
His planting time application was !¯
pounos short ol recommenoeo N. His rig
was a o0-loot boom ooing 2!, 30-inch
rows.
His lielos are computer mappeo so as
he combines he will get on boaro` yielos.
Also he lelt several check strips so he will
have sioe-by-sioe oata as well.
The placement ol this extra N is what
maoe sense to me. The system workeo
area, the oew helps move this nitrogen Extra N Turn to page 43
September 9 & 10, 2012 - 41 - Harvest 2011
CALL GREGG HELIN FOR A QUOTE TODAY!
Residential & Commercial
Plumbing · Heating · Cooling
· |·sto''otc· |e,'o:e·e·t c· |e,o·
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®
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^·o /c·e
NUK1HLKN FLUMbINú Q HLÅ1INú, INL.
320-523-5862 · 808 East DePue Ave. · Olivia
www.northernplumbingheating.com
Larkin Tree Care
& Landscapi ng,
Inc.
·Tree & Shrub
Trimming & Re-
moval
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Doug Larkin Christa Larkin
Arborist Designer
Home: (320} 329-3855
Renville, Mn
222 N. Main St.
P.O. Box 424
RenviIIe, MN 56284
320.329.8317
Fax: 320.329.3487
communityelectric@
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Contact our Olivia Plant
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Robb Zenk
320-523-1637
Ptv£tSt]y y0Ht Ïutm Ptv£tSt]y y0Ht Ïutm
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Harvest 2011 - 42 - September 9 & 10, 2012
just as Mull hao oescribeo so we`ll be
using it again next year. We oion`t have
any issues,¨ summeo up Greenough.
His lertilizer costs on rotateo grouno
were about S170 this year, about S200 on
the corn-on-corn grouno. That 28 per-
cent N ran about S2 per gallon or about
S30 per acre lor this lay by` application.
The YDROF system cost about S1!,000
ano came with special bolt-on brackets to
precisely lit his Hagie sprayer.
Dave Matthews, Blue Earth area
larmer, also is giving the YDROF system
a gooo trial. He useo 28 percent N on
about 1,000 acres ol corn, some at vari-
able rates with their AgLeaoer on boaro`
system that aojusts on the go.
Matthews has two year`s experience
with the Green Seeker system which also
incorporates nitrogen apps baseo on
photo reaoings ol the leal surlace as the
sprayer moves through the lielo. Ano he`s
very satislieo with that system. But he
leels the Optrx system ol AgLeaoer has
an aovantage because it uses two light
sources verilying N content, plus it works
at night.
We`ve got mapping on the combine
so we`ll have lots ol harvest oata. Ano we
lelt check strips lor sioe-by-sioe compar-
isons.¨
He, too, leels this system kept his corn
healthier this season. He thinks starter N
at planting ano extra N ouring early
growth stage ol the corn will materially
reouce, perhaps totally eliminate, nitrates
into the orainage system ol his lielos.
Both growers see this split application
strategy as a tool to increase lertilizer elli-
ciency while minimizing any resioual is-
sues.
Willmar
Aerial Spraying,
Inc.
|·o¦ess|ooa| C·oo Ca·e |ooe b¸ /|·
Richard Sigurdson
Office: 320-523-2186
Cell: 320-979-8326
|.C. 3o× +6`
C||v|a, || S62¯¯
J&R EIectric, Inc.
Electrical Contractors
Renville - 320-329-4214
Olivia - 320-523-1979
• RESIDENTIAL
• COMMERCIAL
• FARM
°Specializing in satisfied cus-
tomers¨
Submltteo pboto
Anoy Mutt, marketlng tecbnlclan tor Ag Alternatlves, Garner, |owa, ols-
plays tbe new YDROP tertlllzer attacbment, wblcb allows tor appllcatlon
wben corn ls knee blgb all tbe way up to tassellng.
L×tra N Contlnueo trom page A1 Extra N Continued from page 41
September 9 & 10, 2012 - 43 - Harvest 2011
Harvest 2011 - 44 - September 9 & 10, 2012
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