Harvest Days 2013

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1 Stop Realty..............................................................................17
A+ Insurance Agency Inc...................................................18
A&M Processing.......................................................................34
ADM Edible Bean Specialities, Inc ...................................9
Answer Plot.................................................................................11
Ag Specialists ..............................................................................21
Arnold’s Implement................................................................35
Auto Value Parts, Bird Island.............................................13
Bergmann Interiors.................................................................21
Bird Island - Hawk Creek Mutual Ins. Co. ...............14
Bird Island Soil Service.........................................................14
Border Collies - Lynn Schauer........................................35
Brownton Co-op Ag Center...........................................40
Carly’s Shoes...............................................................................34
CarQuest of Bird Island.......................................................13
Cenex / Farmers Co-op Oil Co. ..................................17
Citizens Alliance Bank...........................................................13
Citizens State Bank of Olivia............................................31
Conklin Service - Ken Franke.............................................6
Co-op Country Farmers Elevator ...............................17
Corn Capital Innovations ......................................................9
Creative Details ...........................................................................5
Crop Production Services....................................................6
Dahlberg Boot & Trailer Sales .........................................31
Dale’s Auto Sales ........................................................................6
Danube Lumber.......................................................................18
Danube Upholstery & Shoe Repair............................31
Dawson Co-op Credit Union........................................27
Direct Feeders Supply..........................................................26
Dobrava Brothers, Inc. ............................................................6
Duane Jindra Crop Ins. Agency......................................28
Edward Jones - Kirk Miller ....................................................6
Edward Jones - Steve Olmstead...................................19
Enestvedt Seed Company.................................................43
Exsted Realty..............................................................................34
Ervin Well Company................................................................5
F & M Bank Minnesota.........................................................42
F & M Insurance........................................................................10
Farm Bureau Financial Services, Gaylord....................7
Finish Line Seed, Inc. .................................................................5
First Security Bank...................................................................10
Flatworks Concrete Construction, LLC...................21
Flora Mutual Ins. Co. ..............................................................30
Foamtastic Insulation Inc.....................................................22
Frandsen Bank & Trust .........................................................25
Full Throttle Services .............................................................34
Grizzly Post Frame Buildings ............................................42
H&L Motors................................................................................42
Harpel Bros. Inc.........................................................................28
Harvest Land Cooperative...............................................43
Hearing Care Specialists .....................................................36
Henslin Auctions, Inc. ............................................................44
Home Solutions...........................................................................3
HomeTown Bank.....................................................................11
Hughes Real Estate & Auction Service.....................18
J&R Electric...................................................................................22
Jackpot Junction........................................................................17
Jerry Scharpe.................................................................................6
JR Insurance Agency..................................................................6
Jungclaus Implement......................................................15, 36
K & S Electric of Olivia.........................................................23
Kibble Equipment ....................................................................43
Lake Region Insurance Agency.......................................13
Lang’s Family Meats...................................................................2
Larkin Tree Care & Landscaping, Inc. ..........................23
Lindeman Seed.........................................................................12
Linder Farm Network.............................................................8
Mallak Trucking Inc. .................................................................31
McLeod County Chronicle...............................................21
McLeod/Nicollet/Sibley Corn & Soybean
Growers.......................................................................................4
McLeod Publishing, Inc. ................................................34, 38
MidCountry Bank....................................................................40
Mid-County Co-op................................................................28
Midwest Machinery................................................................20
MinnWest Bank ........................................................................23
Morton Buildings......................................................................29
Mycogen Seeds .......................................................................30
Northern Plumbing & Heating, Inc..............................24
Olivia Machine Shop, Inc.....................................................13
Olivia Pet Clinic.........................................................................31
On Trax Truck Repair............................................................36
Otto Farms Operations, Inc.............................................32
Parts City Auto Parts...............................................................2
PHI Insurance Services, Schmalz....................................35
Precision Planting, Schmalz................................................19
Precision Soya of Minnesota............................................13
Pro Equipment Sales .............................................................30
RAM Buildings............................................................................32
RC Hospital & Clinics ...........................................................24
Renville Sales, Inc..............................................................11, 24
Saunders Mertens Schmitz, P.A. .....................................30
Schad, Lindstrand, & Schuth, Ltd. ...................................41
Schauer Construction, Inc..................................................35
Schauer’s Sheep........................................................................35
Schiroo Electrical & Rebuilding, Inc. ................................6
Schmitz Custom Bagging....................................................36
Schultz & Farenbaugh Farm Drainage.......................32
Security Bank & Trust Co. ..................................................41
Seneca Foods Corporation..............................................40
Special Touch Arctic Cat......................................................25
State Farm Insurance ............................................................26
Steve’s Heating & A/C..........................................................24
Sullivan’s Electric.......................................................................22
Tall Tires - Keltgen, Inc...........................................................31
Terry’s Body Shop...................................................................31
Thalmann Seeds Inc...............................................................32
Tjosvold Equipment, Inc. .....................................................27
Two Way Communications, Inc. ....................................36
UFC - Lafayette...........................................................2, 32, 37
United FCS..................................................................................23
Upper Midwest Management.........................................24
Valley Electric of Olivia, Inc................................................31
Willmar Aerial Spraying, Inc. .............................................24
Wood’s Edge.................................................................................6
Young America Mutual Insurance Co. .......................37
INDEX
Harvest 2013 - 2 - September 7 & 8, 2013
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By Lynn Ketelsen
Farm Director
Linder Farm Network
If you look at the growing area for
both corn and soybeans,
it’s pretty evident the corn
and soybean belt is moving
north in this country.
There are several reasons
for it.
First, the types of hy-
brids and varieties avail-
able have changed what
we can grow. Shorter sea-
son corn has helped, same
with soybeans, and the
new drought-resistant
crops are helping that ef-
fort.
In addition, farmers can
farm more quickly than in the past and
get crops in the ground in a more
timely manner. All of that had helped
the northern areas grow crops that in
the past were limited to southern Min-
nesota.
In fact, the Fargo area is the fastest
growing soybean area in the country,
hard to believe, but true.
The second factor is simply weather
patterns are changing.
Weather cycles have been
part of our history, and
the growing season is
longer in Minnesota than
it was in the past.
So going north, there is
time for corn and soy-
beans to make a crop.
Corn and soybeans are
being grown all the way to
the Canadian border, and
new even in Canada. This
is something that won’t
change for the foreseeable
future. And land we used
to call marginal is growing some pretty
good yields.
So changes? Always and especially in
agriculture.
Is the corn and soybean
belt moving north?
Lynn Ketelsen
September 7 & 8, 2013 - 3 - Harvest 2013
GLENCOE NORWOOD
320-864-5161
WACONIA
952-467-2404
Harvest 2013 - 4 - September 7 & 8, 2013
Committed to producing
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Brought to you by the McLeod and Nicollet/Sibley Corn & Soybean Growers and the soybean checkoff.
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TheREALStoryMN.com
Education is huge focus of MCGA
By Dick Hagen
Contributing Reporter
A stop at the Minnesota Corn Growers
tent at recent Farmfest was indeed an edu-
cational experience. A series of miniature
billboards greeted you even before walking
inside the tent, and once inside a great dis-
play visually told you all about that kernel
of corn as it winds its way through the fer-
mentation process of becoming a major
fuel for American autos or a major feed-
stuff for American livestock.
“Education has always been a focus of
Minnesota Corn Growers, but perhaps
even more so today with the multiplicity of
communication forms engulfing the world.
The story of Minnesota corn and U.S.
corn gets even bigger in light of world
food needs and so much consumer indif-
ference to the role of the U.S. farmer,”
said Tim Gerlach, executive director/
CEO when interviewed at Farmfest.
Even though farm numbers both nation-
ally and in Minnesota are sliding down-
wards, membership in the Minnesota
Corn Growers Association is growing.
“We’re close to 6,700 members right now.
Our goal is 6,900 by 2015. I think we’ll
blow through that very quickly,” he indi-
cated.
Sitting next door to Iowa leads to the in-
evitable comparison of ‘who’s no. 1?’ Ger-
lach pointed out that Iowa Corn Growers
have had a concerted effort the past couple
years to exceed the membership of Min-
nesota. “They’re over 7,000 now. We’ve
started to catch them, but we’re still be-
hind,” was his gracious acknowledgment.
USDA census data has Iowa the no. 1 corn
production state (might not this year) with
Minnesota no. 4.
Also Iowa has a couple thousand more
corn farmers so this argument needs to be
kept in perspective.
Healthy caution, but still lots of opti-
mism is how Gerlach pegs the moods of
Minnesota farmers at Farmfest.
He referred to a Minnesota farmer stop-
ping at the Corn Growers tent and com-
menting, “This is the most farm
machinery I have ever seen at Farmfest.”
However, Gerlach also senses some cau-
tion building amongst that farm audience
this year contrary to the “gung ho” atti-
tude of the past couple of years at Farm-
fest.
He’s also cautious about yield predic-
tions for the 2013 Minnesota corn crop
but suggesting that a couple more weeks of
sunshine and adequate moisture could
make 2013 corn the equal of
2012 corn.
“The tough spring for south-
eastern Minnesota farmers,
plus a slowdown in GDDS this
late summer, puts a question
mark on the size of our crop. I
know we’re all praying for a
late frost this season,” said Ger-
lach.
Venturing into the Farm Bill
debate, he repeated the com-
ment of Congressman Colin
Peterson at the Farmfest forum.
Peterson told his audience that
day, “We don’t write farm bills
for the good times. We write
farm bills for the bad times in
agriculture. And that’s what’s
setting the mood in Congress
these days. They know farming is experi-
encing some good times.”
However Gerlach pointed out a Farm
Bill is still a no. 1 priority of Minnesota
Corn Growers Association and the Na-
tional Corn Growers. “And within that
Farm Bill is the importance of a strong
crop insurance package. I just describe the
Washington, D.C., environment as simply
being ugly with total disregard for compro-
mise and working together.”
He pointed out that the Minnesota
Corn Growers have a history of reaching
out and forming alliances with others on
behalf of agriculture. He also noted the
willingness of the Minnesota Corn Grow-
ers Association to become the no. 1 fund-
ing source of the $2 million Wally Nelson
Endowment Fund to establish a
permanent research chair at the
SWROC.
“Our board members, many of
whom know Dr. Nelson person-
ally, are very much aware of the
impact of research work at the
Lamberton station and now the
ongoing outreach and educa-
tional emphasis with students and
high school teacher.
Good research is the building
block of good agriculture so our
board has high regard for the
growing impact of the Southwest
Research and Outreach Center
for production agriculture as
well as building the connection
between producers and non-
farmers,” summed up Gerlach.
Tim Gerlach, executive director/CEO
of Minnesota Corn Growers Associa-
tion.
Photos by Dick Hagen
By ShcIhy Lindrud
Editor
Everything changes ano that incluoes
the markets. Ior the lirst time in several
years the price ol corn ano soybeans is
going oown, explaineo Tooo Hultman,
DTN marketing analyst at Iarmlest Aug.
o.
We shoulo be near long term low
prices in December corn,¨ saio Hultman.
One reason lor the oecline is the mar-
ket is linally catching up with the ethanol
manoates put in place in 200!. There is
now enough corn in the lielos to meet oe-
mano lor luel, looo ano leeo, which in
turn is bringing the prices oown. Hultman
saio corn coulo see prices anywhere lrom
S! to So this year.
We linally aojusteo,¨ Hultman saio.
In the long run not such a bao thing.¨
Over the past three oecaoes corn prices
have oroppeo below 80 percent ol average
only three times. Tooay, corn is traoing at
arouno 7¯ percent ol average, though
Hultman saio the market hasn`t quite
reacheo bearish stanoaros.
Soybeans are haroer to pin oown.
You almost have to be crazy to preoict
soybean prices this year,¨ shareo Hult-
man.
Iarmers are getting closer to meeting
the oemano lor the legume, though lost
acres lrom this year`s weather coulo keep
prices higher lor another season.
Over the years corn has pusheo its way
into wheat lielos, though wheat is also see-
ing a oownwaro treno in prices, below its
20 year average ano at 8¯ percent ol its
three year average. Wheat exports are see-
ing its best start in quite awhile this year.
Hultman believes the bullish market
that has been oriving commooity prices
over the past several years has linally
peakeo ano is now returning to what it
was in the 1990s.
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September 7 & 8, 2013 - 5 - Harvest 2013
Harvest 2013 - 6 - September 7 & 8, 2013
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By Dick Hagen
Contributing Reporter
Ineptocracy –(in-ep-toc’-ra-cy) - A sys-
tem of government where the least capable
to lead are elected by the least capable of
producing, and where the members of so-
ciety least likely to sustain themselves or
succeed, are rewarded with goods and serv-
ice paid for by the confiscated wealth of a
diminishing number of producers.
Perhaps a creation of “cyber space”
however we should always be learning, thus
this new word which I couldn’t find in my
1972 Webster’s Dictionary. But if I had
quizzed farmers at last week’s Farmfest, I
would wager there would have been full
agreement that ineptocracy is playing out
big time in Washington, D.C., particularly
as it pertains to Farm Bill legislation, or
lack thereof.
The reality, according to various politi-
cians sharing the stage at Farmfest, is that
at best an extension of the current farm bill
is likely to happen. That’s because when
our politicians get back to work from their
current “vacation” the end of August, they
have only nine days to get passage by the
House and then agreement by the Confer-
ence Committee of both bodies on the lan-
guage of a new farm bill.
“And that’s just not likely to happen,”
said Congressman Collin Peterson pointing
out that House Speaker John Boehner and
the Tea Party crowd simply won’t let it
happen.
Then what? Peterson was matter of fact
saying a two-year extension of current
farm bill is the only “doable alternative”
right now and come 2015, there simply
won’t be a farm bill.
In essence, Congressman Peterson is pre-
dicting U.S. agriculture will be winging it
thereafter. He noted, “There are 435 of us
in the House of Representatives. Today,
only about 30 of us represent rural Amer-
ica. Yes, the
cards are de-
cidedly cast
against agri-
cultural legis-
lation in the
future.”
So then
what? Perhaps
the inevitable
optimism of
farmers will
still prevail. It
may have too.
Surprisingly, a
goodly number of producers responded to
me in this fashion:
• This world economy keeps expanding
especially in China, India and Southeast
Asia.
• We’ll have two billion more people to
feed in the next 30 years.
• We can’t afford any more new regula-
tions by government.
• If fair trade are the rules across the
world’s landscape, I think we can make a
free market economy work for agriculture.
So apparently a goodly number of farm-
ers are okay about tossing the government
umbrella. And I’m somewhat surprised
how often a farmer will venture to me that
farm programs have outlived their useful-
ness because they now mostly perpetuate
the inefficient farmers.
But in their next breath, crop insurance
has to survive the cutting block somehow.
So if plenty of food at affordable prices
are important to the political existence of
members of Congress, my prediction is
that some version of Federal Crop Insur-
ance will survive. And so, too, will be some
version of food aid. Millions in America
now depend on their food stamps to feed
their bodies. And logically they vote for
who best feeds them …. draw your own
conclusions.
This year’s Farmfest was blessed with
two super weather days. Even morning
showers on the final day, Thursday, Aug. 8
dampened crowds only slightly.
For us media people Farmfest is like a
homerun every time at bat. The big event
literally packs in interview opportunities
with the brightest and best informed wiz-
ards of every aspect of agriculture. Plus for
me a tremendous opportunity to talk with
farmers from every corner of Minnesota
plus the Dakotas and Iowa. In a nutshell, it
is an ag reporter’s field day.
My take on farmer attitudes at Farmfest
2013? Cautiously optimistic. No, not the
gung-ho optimism that prevailed at Farm-
fest 2012. Last year $15 soybean prices and
$7 corn were glittering the landscape for all
of us. But this year $12 soybeans and $4.50
corn have interjected the word “caution”
into the moods of Farmfest visitors. And
obviously southeast Minnesota farmers
have been looking at ugly, unplanted acres
since May so the economic squeeze already
is in progress for many farmers in this area.
Crop insurance is easing the pain on
these prevent-plant acres, but it doesn’t re-
place the mental stress. And because of the
late planting for many farmers, talk of fir-
ing up crop dryers this fall seemed in-
evitable.
Long-time University of Minnesota cli-
matologist Mark Seely, however, told his
Farmfest audience that a late and warm fall
was shaping up across the midlands.
Walking the streets of Farmfest ab-
solutely created positive impressions about
the future of this amazing industry called
agriculture. Over 500 exhibitors touting
whatever you could imagine in modern
agriculture.
And for a nostalgic look at agriculture ‘in
the good old days’ walking through the
shaded lanes of the Gilfillan Estate farm-
stead was a delightful study of early farm
history.
Plus food stands galore. Whether it was
the super-sized beef cuts served at the Cat-
tlemen’s food tent or those incredibly tasty
grilled pork chops at the Farm Bureau tent
at the north end or various church stands
elsewhere, the reality is that Farmfest caters
to a hungry mind and a hungry belly.
Also, despite the absence of carnival
rides, etc., Farmfest has definitely become a
family affair. “Never seen so many kids,”
commented several exhibitors. Even at
Farmfest candy at the exhibit booth table is
now a fixture.
September 7 & 8, 2013 - 7 - Harvest 2013
Prep: 15 min. Cook Time: 2 hrs. Serves: 14-16.
7-8 lb. spiral-sliced smoked ham, bone-in
2 1/2 lbs. asparagus
2 T. oil
1/2 tsp. lemon pepper
1/4 C. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 tsp. chicken bouillon granules
1/4 tsp. white pepper
1 1/4 C. water
1 C. lemon juice
1 T. lemon zest, finely shredded
1/4 C. butter
2 T. fresh thyme, OR parsley, snipped
Heat oven to 350 degrees F. Place ham on rack
in a shallow baking pan. Cover pan tightly with foil.
Roast until an instant-read thermometer inserted
in the thickest portion (not touching bone) registers
135 degrees F. (about 15 minutes per pound).
Meanwhile, remove and discard woody stems
from asparagus spears. Arrange asparagus in a 15
x 10 x 2-inch baking pan. Drizzle with cooking oil.
Sprinkle with lemon pepper seasoning. When ham
reaches 135 degrees F., add asparagus to oven.
Roast about 30 minutes more or until asparagus is
tender and ham registers 140 degrees F.
For lemon sauce, in a 1-1/2-quart saucepan
combine cornstarch, sugar, bouillon granules and
pepper. Stir in water, lemon juice and lemon peel.
Bring to boil; reduce heat. Cook and stir until mix-
ture is bubbly. Cook for 2 minutes more. Stir in but-
ter and snipped thyme or parsley.
To serve, slice ham. Serve with asparagus and
lemon sauce. (Use remaining ham for sandwiches
or another recipe.)
Spiral-Cut Ham with
Slow-Roasted
Asparagus and Lemon-
Thyme Sauce
My take on Farmfest 2013
Dick Hagen
Harvest 2013 - 8 - September 7 & 8, 2013
Olivia
KGLB
Glencoe
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Future ot renewable energy oepenos on tooay
By ShcIhy Lindrud
Editor
Renewable energy was on the minos ol
those at Iarmlest Aug. o as a panel ol leg-
islatures, government ollicials ano energy
businessmen oiscusseo what coulo be
coming ano what neeos to be oone so
Minnesota can meet the luture heao on.
Minnesota is not a lossil luel state,¨
saio Mike Rothman, Minnesota commis-
sioner ol commerce, ano as such is cur-
rently oepenoent on others to provioe the
energy the state neeos. Iinoing ways to in-
crease renewable energy, whether it`s bio-
luels or wino, coulo help the state both
meet its energy neeos ano bring more jobs
ano opportunities to the state.
We have to make sure we`re ooing the
right thing. This stull works ano shoulo be
consioereo,¨ Rothman saio.
Rothman aooeo Minnesota is on track
to meet the oeaoline to have 2¯ percent ol
its energy coming lrom renewable sources
by 202¯.
We want to continue to be consioereo
leaoers,¨ saio Rothman.
Taking proactive steps in renewable en-
ergy has alreaoy leo to many benelits lor
Minnesota. Since the state manoateo
ethanol make up 10 percent ol the gaso-
line bleno, 21 ethanol plants have come
online ano tooay proouce over one billion
gallons.
It took courage,¨ lrom all sioes to pass
the manoate, saio Minnesota Commis-
sioner ol Agriculture Dave Ireoerickson.
The ethanol manoate was passeo lor
lour reasons, explaineo Ireoerickson: to
reouce the country`s oepenoency on lor-
eign oil, to create Minnesota jobs, to im-
prove the state`s air quality ano to aoo
value to corn.
The courage has paio great oivi-
oenos,¨ Ireoerickson saio.
The next step in renewable luels is bio-
luels, incluoing biooiesel maoe with soy-
beans.
We want to move lorwaro with that,¨
saio Ireoerickson.
In aooition to the state`s ethanol man-
oate, the Renewable Iuel Stanoaro ,RIS,
is also ooing its part to grow renewable
luels ano help larmers. The RIS says 3o
billion gallons ol transportation luel is to
come lrom renewable sources by 2022.
It`s working, it`s helping our corn
growers,¨ saio Tom Haag, presioent ol
the Minnesota Corn Growers Association.
We`re growing more corn on less corn
acres. We`re going to light big oil.¨
On the leoeral level, Senator Al
Iranken has been working haro to keep
renewable energy moving lorwaro. He
wrote the energy title ol the larm bill,
calleo the Rural Energy Investment Act.
The section establishes programs like the
Rural Energy lor America Frogram that
helps agriculture prooucers ano businesses
in rural areas invest in energy elliciency
ano renewable energy projects so they can
cut energy bills ano earn aooitional in-
come by selling the energy they proouce,
the Biorelinery Assistance Frogram, which
assists in the oevelopment ol new ano
emerging technologies lor aovanceo biolu-
els through support lor the construction
ano retrolitting ol biorelineries lor the
proouction ol aovanceo bioluels, the Bio-
mass Crop Assistance Frogram, which
provioes linancial assistance to owners
ano operators ol agricultural lano ano
Senator Al Franken.
Pboto by Sbelby Llnoruo
Renewable
Turn to page C2
Renewable
Turn to page 10
September 7 & 8, 2013 - 9 - Harvest 2013
Harvest 2013 - 10 - September 7 & 8, 2013
non-inoustrial private lorest lano who
wish to establish, proouce, ano oeliver
biomass leeostock to energy prooucers,
ano the Biomass Research ano Develop-
ment Initiative, which provioes competi-
tive lunoing in the lorm ol grants, con-
tracts, ano linancial assistance lor re-
search, oevelopment, ano oemonstration
ol technologies ano processes leaoing to
signilicant commercial proouction ol bio-
luels, biobaseo energy, leeostocks, ano
prooucts, incluoing the oevelopment ol
cost-competitive cellulosic ethanol.
This is very important lor Minnesota
larmers ano rural communities,¨ saio
Iranken. We`re leaoers ano we have to
be leaoers.¨
Doug O`Brien, USDA unoer secretary
lor Rural Development, explaineo renew-
able energy is one ol the lour pillars ol
rural America
ano it benelits
agriculture, the
economy ano the
environment.
We`re just
starting to see the
potential, even in
grain baseo
ethanol,¨ saio
O`Brien.
While all on
the panel saw op-
portunities lor re-
newable, State
Representative
Mike Bearo was
less enthusiastic
about just what
renewable energy
coulo achieve. He
believes 100 years
lrom now human-
ity will still be
using energy like
coal, lossil luels
ano oil because they are a stable luel
source.
You cannot make plywooo with wino
mills,¨ saio Bearo.
The reason why the nation can oabble
with renewable is because there is a stable
source to lall back on il things oon`t pan
Renewable Contlnueo trom page C1
Rep. Mlke 8earo.
Pboto by Sbelby Llnoruo
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Renewable
Turn to page C2
Renewable Continued from page 9
Renewable
Turn to page 11
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out.
Show me how it makes sense eco-
nomically,¨ Bearo saio ol renewable en-
ergy. This is the perspective I come
lrom. Let`s oo it where it touches reality.¨
Others think it will be possible to over-
come humanity`s aooiction to lossil luels.
Doug Berven, vice presioent ol corporate
allairs lor FOET, a biorelining company,
talkeo about Froject Liberty, commerical-
scale cellostic ethanol plant, which in-
cluoes a sell-generating power system.
I oo think it`s impossible,¨ to turn
away lrom lossil luels, saio Berven,
aooing that lor most ol its history, man
relieo on renewable energy sources. It
was only the last 200 when lossil luels re-
ally took over.
We can`t alloro another event that
quaoruples the price ol oil,¨ continueo
Berven.
To Berven, perlecting ethanol not only
makes environmental ano economical
sense, but also to better humanity.
It is helping leeo people all over the
worlo,¨ saio Berven.
Jon Brekke, vice presioent ol Great
River Energy, also subscribes to the train
ol thought renewable energy is impera-
tive lor a bright luture in rural America,
because the ongoing oevelopment ol
rural areas neeos alloroable energy.
This is a state where electricity is a
lileline,¨ saio Brekke. We want to oo re-
newable, but in a sensible way.¨
Brekke also saio lor coal ano other los-
sil luel baseo power to have a luture, they
will have to upgraoe ano become cleaner.
Utilities know they have to become
more ellicient,¨ saio Brekke.
Whatever happens going lorwaro, the
gentlemen on the panel know things
won`t be staying the same, but there will
be a lot ol haro work aheao.
We can`t keep the oepenoency
going,¨ saio Rothman. Minnesota is on
the right track.¨
We have to lace this stull squarely,¨
aooeo Iranken.
Rural has a huge role to play,¨ shareo
O`Brien.
Renewable Contlnueo trom page C1
Renewable Continued from page 10
September 7 & 8, 2013 - 11 - Harvest 2013
Harvest 2013 - 12 - September 7 & 8, 2013
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Wishing everyone
a safe harvest!
By David Nicolai
Extension Educator-crops
U of M Extension
Regional Center, Farmington
Minnesota crops continued to make
progress with the warm to hot conditions.
However, topsoil and subsoil moisture lev-
els continued to decline and were rated 66
and 56 percent very short or short, respec-
tively, according to the recent USDA Na-
tional Agricultural Statistical Service,
Minnesota Field Office crop weather re-
port for this last week.
Eighty-five percent of the corn crop was
at or beyond the milk stage, compared to
the five-year average of 94 percent.
Corn at or beyond the dough stage ad-
vanced to 44 percent, compared with 96
percent last year, and the average of 66
percent. Corn is 5 percent dented, two
weeks behind normal.
Eighty-five percent of soybeans were
setting pods, lagging behind last year’s 100
percent and the normal 95 percent.
Soybean aphid management strategies
for late season aphids, as summarized by
Bob Koch, University of Minnesota Ex-
tension soybean entomologist:
Maintain soybean aphid scouting
through R6.5 (pods and leaves beginning
to yellow), regardless of calendar date.
Through R5 (seeds developing and filling
pod cavity), use the university created and
validated threshold of 250 aphids per
plant with 80 percent of plants infested
and populations increasing.
Yield loss is possible into early R6 (pod
cavity filled by seeds), but a valid eco-
nomic threshold has not been developed.
However, this value is likely much higher
in R6 than in earlier growth stages.
Complicating matters is the fact that the
duration of soybean aphid populations
and their impacts on yield are less pre-
dictable in R6. Regular scouting and use
of the 250-aphid-per-plant threshold
through R5 should prevent development
of large aphid populations on R6 soy-
beans, when management decisions are
more difficult to make.
Large aphid populations (thousands per
plant) in early R6 may require treatment,
particularly if plants are experiencing
other stresses (for example, drought or nu-
trient deficiency).
What is the yield impact of August
weather conditions as we approach the
end of the soybean growing season?
The final soybean reproductive stage is
known as its seed-filling phase. It starts at
R5 (begin seed) and nominally ends at R6
(full seed), when each soybean seed has
enlarged to fill the width of its pod cavity.
However, from the end of R6 to stage
R7 (physiological maturity) soybean seeds
can still enlarge a bit more lengthwise to
fill the space between seeds in adjacent
pod cavities.
If
there
is no
stress
prior to R7,
the enlarging
seed can ex-
pand (bulge
out) the pod
cavity. At stage
R7, the mother
plant stops deposit-
ing carbon and nitro-
gen metabolites into its
seeds. R7 in soybean is
equivalent to the “black layer” stage in
corn.
At this time of the season (mid to late-
August), the primary factor af-
fecting final seed size is
invariably a lack of suf-
ficient soil water to
supply the transpi-
ratory needs of the crop for the rest of the
season on up to R7. Plant leaves open
their stomates during the day to capture
CO2 for photosynthesis, but water is tran-
spired from the leaf through those open
stomates.
Clearly, the last yield component to be
fixed by the soybean crop in the season —
seed size — will be substantively dimin-
ished if soil water is not sufficient for
crop transpiration each day dur-
ing August and early Septem-
ber. This point should not
be lost on those who irri-
gate their soybean fields
— make sure that your
last seasonal soybean ir-
rigation is scheduled
with the proper timing
and water amount to
ensure no loss in
seed size by late-
season water
stress.
Late-season strategies to address soybean
aphid management, effects of moisture stress
September 7 & 8, 2013 - 13 - Harvest 2013
By ShcIhy Lindrud
Editor
Without it nothing woulo grow, but too
much ol it can cause the same problem.
Dealing with water on lielos is a lot like
poor Goloilocks trying to lino her place in
the home ol the three bears it takes
something just right lor it all to lall into
place.
There are thousanos ol miles ol oitch-
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Dralnage
Turn to page C2
Use water on your own terms
A oralnage water management system allows tarmers to control tbe level ot water ln tbelr soll.
Dlagram trom tbe NRCS
Drainage
Turn to page 14
Harvest 2013 - 14 - September 7 & 8, 2013
while those systems oo orain water oll the
lielos, they also allow soil ano lielo chemi-
cals to orain right along with it. Ano
woulon`t it be a gooo thing to have a
water reserve in the soil lor those ory
months when Mother Nature isn`t being
helplul?
While there isn`t a perlect lix just yet,
practicing orainage water management
,DMW, coulo be a step in the right oirec-
tion.
Consioer the benelits ol a smart
orainage system,¨ saio Charlie Schalter ol
Agri Drain ouring a lorum on orainage at
Iarmlest Aug. o.
DMW is the practice ol using a water
control structure in a water orain to vary
the oepth ol the orainage outlet. Ior
water to orain out ol the lielo the water
table must rise above the outlet. Iarmers
can lower ano raise the outlet oepenoing
on how much, or little, water is neeoeo.
Only oraw as much
water as necessary lor
proouction,¨ explaineo
Schalter.
The water control
structures, which make
it possible to lower ano
raise the orainage outlet
oepth, can be retro lit-
teo into existing pattern
tile systems, or when a
new system is put in.
DMW works best on
llat lano, with a slope ol
less than .¯ percent.
We can put it in last
ano accurate,¨ saio
Schalter.
The cost ol a man-
ageo system varies, oe-
penoing on height, size
ol tile, structure oesign,
manulacturer ano il the
system is automateo.
On average a manageo
program coulo cost be-
tween S20 to S110 an
acre.
Belore tillage the
riser boaros in the
control structure are
removeo, to allow the
water table to orop be-
lore planting ano
other lielo work. Dur-
ing the growing season
the riser boaros can be
stackeo up to raise the
water table ano keep
water available lor the
crop`s roots. Right be-
lore harvest the risers
are again removeo to
allow lor orainage be-
lore work begins in the
lielos. Over winter the
water table can be
raiseo to keep nutri-
ents in the lielos over
the winter.
Brian Hicks, a
larmer with a DMW
system, starteo the program in 200o with
the University ol Minnesota, gathering
oata to see how the systems work. He in-
stalleo a ¯3-acre test zone in 2009 to con-
tinue the research.
We`ve hao some challenges with the
equipment,¨ aomitteo Hicks, but, when
it works we`ve seen some gooo results.¨
Research has shown a markeo increase
in both corn ano soybean yielos, about
live percent over the long-term. The sys-
tems also oecrease the amount ol nitrates
lost into oitches ano waterways.
I`m sellish. When I pay S200 an acre
lor nutrients, I really oon`t want to share
them with the Gull ol Mexico, who real-
ly oon`t want them,¨ Hicks saio.
Being able to orain ano keep water at
will allows larmers to use the mositure as
another tool to bring about the best crop
possible, to treat it as a resource.
I neeo to manage what I have to the
best ol my ability,¨ saio Hicks. Think
about installing tile the right way, so it can
be manageo.¨
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8rlan Hlcks bas been uslng a DWM succestully tor
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Cbarlle Scbatter, Agrl Draln, talkeo about tbe olt-
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Pbotos by Sbelby Llnoruo
Drainage Continued from page 13
By Alyssa Schauer
Staff Writer
A familiar business to McLeod County
has opened up shop in Glencoe, and closed
its doors in Hutchinson.
Randy Lang and wife, Tami, along with
their children, Mitch, Tyler, and Caden,
opened “Lang’s Meats” on 12th Street E for
retail sales in July.
“We remodeled the building to be able to
sell retail,” Lang said.
Early in his life, Lang worked at a meat
market in the Twin Cities. “There, I spe-
cialized myself in the trade and moved back
to Glencoe. I opened up a meat shop here,
before moving the shop to Hutchinson and
opening one in Gaylord,” Lang said.
He said he sold his meat shop in
Hutchinson about three years ago, and
about six years ago, he sold his meat shop
in Gaylord.
“We owned all three shops at one time,
and I used to just travel delivering product,
back and forth between all three shops. It
was as if I was spinning my wheels and not
getting anywhere,” Lang laughed.
He added: “It’s amazing the comments
I’ll get. People ask me, ‘Why did it take you
20 years to come to Glencoe?’”
“Everything is actually going really well
with our location in Glencoe,” Lang said.
Currently, the product at the meat mar-
ket is local produce. “Everything is basically
from McLeod County. Specifically, we get
meat from local farmers Kevin Lindeman,
Cory Schiroo and Kevin Miller. They are
the main suppliers for McLeod County,”
Lang said.
“And I just verbally committed with Mike
Keenan to supply beef,” Lang added.
The meat available ranges from pork to
beef to poultry. “Locally, I can get lamb and
goat, too,” Lang said.
He said some meat is also from
Rademacher chains and from Family
Farms Wholesale.
“Everything comes direct from the farms
to here. We mainly deal with fresh meats
here,” Lang said.
Lang said his business is very “family-or-
eiented.”
“Everybody in the family works here, and
Mitch and Tyler have plans to grow the
business,” Lang said.
Lang said the meat market is also adver-
tising wild game processing.
“I’ve always done it for family and
friends, and now we have a complete
sausage kitchen in the back. Nothing is or-
dered in. Everything is made right here in
the building,” Lang said.
The meat shop has been busy with orders
from all over the state.
“The Chanhassen football team con-
tacted us for a hog roast for their team
meal; we prepared 500 patties for the Glen-
coe Light and Power customer appreciation
open house last Thursday; we provided the
meat for Heat in the Street, and for Napa’s
anniversary open house,” Lang said.
He added that they have catered in
Chaska and Winthrop also.
“And now we are starting to get ready for
the wild game processing and developing
what we call ‘gourmet stuffed burgers.’ It’s
our spinoff of the ‘Jucy Lucy,’” Lang said.
He said he created six different gourmet
stuffed burgers, including Cheddar, Ched-
dar and bacon, jalapeno pepperjack, mush-
room and swiss, three-cheese, and a sort of
“pizza burger.”
“Those are going over so well. We are
making new patties every day. We use this
high-temperature cheese so the patties are
cooked just right. Everything here is ‘home-
style,’ or what’s consdered, ‘homemade,’”
he said.
Lang said he and his wife are “remodel-
ing” and “upgrading plans for the business,
too.
“Tami wants to put in bistro tables out
front so we can provide a sort of lunch serv-
ice, ‘Build Your Own Sub.’ We are also
looking at adding a bakery to make and
bake our own buns and dinner rolls,” Lang
said.
To see the complete line of product, stop
in at Lang’s located next to the McLeod
County Emergency Food Shelf on 12th
Street E in Glencoe. The market is open 9
a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fri-
days.
September 7 & 8, 2013 - 15 - Harvest 2013
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520 Chandler Ave.
Glencoe, MN 55336
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Lang’s Meats returns to Glencoe
A ribbon cutting was held in July for Lang’s Meats, pictured are Tami Lang,
Caden Lang, Tyler Lang, Richard Pomplun, and Randy Lang. Missing was Mitch
Lang, who is also a part of the family business.
Harvest 2013 - 16 - September 7 & 8, 2013
By Dick Hagen
Contributing Reporter
Seats are very limited but for a most un-
usual riding the rails adventure catching
one of the events of the North American
Railcar Operations ranks at the very top.
We’re talking about 26 track motor cars
called ‘Speeders’ gathered at the rail line
adjoining the North Redwood Elevator on
June 15-16. Long-time railroad buff Gene
Short (former Redwood County commis-
sioner and now a Curry resident) de-
scribed this gathering of hobbyists who
have purchased some of the old two-pas-
senger unit used by railroad employees to
periodically check the rails for safety in-
spection.
And on June 16, 26 of these speeder
cars departed the 24-mile run to Hanley
Falls for a hands on experience of what
riding the rails was really all about.
Short says this association is now a na-
tionwide organization and whenever a
group can reserve a section of rail for a
half-day or all-day run, these folks with
pickups and trailers haul their speeders to
that location for another riding-the-rail ad-
venture. Short explained that each of these
little rigs has its own gas engine and can
speed up to 20-22 mph on a good track.
“Some don’t have mufflers, so they can
be a bit noisy. Most drivers and their pas-
sengers wear ear mufflers, however,” said
Short, who also indicated this era of rail
checking speeders dates back to the late
1940s and ’50s with many of them manu-
factured by a railroad firm at Farmington.
And if you’re old enough you might re-
member the days when pumper cars were
the means of moving rail employees each
day. Yes, just as the name implies two men
facing each other would pump their way
down the rail line.
“When you can find a speeder, prices
run from $2,500 to $10, 000,” said Short.
Outside of nostalgia, especially if you’ve
been a long-time railroad admirer, a pri-
mary purpose of these events is to remind
people that rail used to be a primary
means of moving people and should still
be a major tool for transporting people.
“Drawing attention to what railroads are
all about is a mission of this National Rail-
road Association,” said Short, and he sees
no reason why this particular line from
Hanley Falls to Norwood-Young America
can’t once again be a people mover, too.
“There used to be four passenger trains
each day running through Belview. We’re
talking expanded commuter rail in the
Twin Cities. So who knows, maybe some-
day we’ll have daily passenger train service
between this area and the Cities. It used to
run twice daily from Minneapolis to Wa-
tertown, S.D.”
On this June’s run to Hanley Falls, a
lunch was served to all 46 train “engi-
neers” and passengers. These little rigs
don’t need a turn table to get going the
other direction. Some have a hydraulic
cylinder that lifts the speeder, then driver
and passenger simply twists the car 180
degrees and drops it back on the rails.
Others merely lift their car off the track
and then also do the 180-degree turn-
around.
Short recalls when this particular rail-
road line was virtually abandoned in 1992-
93, but thanks to hard work and some ded-
icated volunteers, the line reopened and
was upgraded so that it is now a function-
ing 98.6 mile freight line owned by the
Minnesota Valley Rail Authority funded
by major users of the line such as Twin
Cities & Western (TC&W) out of Glencoe,
hauling grain, ethanol (from a major
ethanol facility at Winthrop), gravel, salts
and other commodities.
Short also said upgrading and restoring
this venerable rail line cost nearly $40 mil-
lion, assisted with a $4.8 million loan with
zero percent interest from Minnesota De-
partment of Transportation. Government
grants and state bonding covered the rest
of this restoration; apparently money well
spent, too.
Short indicated this line moves about
8,000 cars per year currently. “And that
equates to about 32,000 trucks removed
from Minnesota highways,” he noted.
Rick Randall, Minneapolis, purchased
his first “speeder” car in 1995. He calls his
involvement “an obscure hobby. I’ve al-
ways been interested in railroads. So when
this came into my world I couldn’t resist.”
According to Randall, there are now
about 2,000 members in the Association
but not likely to grow since “speeder” cars
are hard to find and most operators are
senior citizens with a special love for the
rail and some unused cash they like to put
to work riding the rails.
His rig is powered by a four-cylinder en-
gine. Some use a kerosene/gasoline mix-
ture. Obviously, pickups with special
hydraulic rail car wheels are the inspection
vehicle of choice these days.
David Voeltz, a program coordinator of
the South Dakota Highway Department,
was coordinator of this special two-day
central Minnesota event and said events
like this occur across the nation virtually
every weekend. Go www.railspeeders.com
for locations and dates of excursion events.
“These start as early as March depend-
ing upon what section of the country we’re
in and often run into December as well,”
said Voeltz.
He said younger people, under age 40,
likely have no idea of what speeder cars
are all about since they were replaced with
pickups and special rail line wheels in the
early 1970s. Voeltz admits to owning two
of these unique rigs but says the associa-
tion has members who own as many as 10
of these little rail road scuttle bugs.
Voeltz has another interesting diversion
…. the rehabbing and training of dis-
carded Brittney dogs and dog rescue in
general. And when not on a dog rehab
mission, or riding his speeder on a week-
end event, he’s into camping and fishing
on the Missouri River camping areas
around Pierre, S.D. But a day or two with
other speeders is his special way of seeing
America at the grass-roots level.
Rail travel, thing of the past? Maybe not
Speeder cars traveling the rails last June heading for Hanley Falls.
For the return trip, speeder cars must be turned around.
Photo by Dick Hagen
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By ShcIhy Lindrud
Editor
Ior the 11th year the Governor ol
Minnesota took time to speak at Iarmlest.
This year Mark Dayton oescenoeo on the
lourth largest larm show in the nation on
Thu., Aug. 8.
We surviveo many obstacles,¨ this
year, saio Dayton, incluoing less than co-
operative weather, lower prices ano oeao-
lock in Congress that has stalleo the all-
important larm bill.
Dayton saio he knows unoerstanoing
all the rules, regulations ano programs in
the larm bill can be oaunting.
It is all greek to a city boy like me,¨
saio Dayton.
However, he ooes unoerstano how im-
portant larming ano agriculture is to the
overall health ol Minnesota.
When larms oo well, Main Street
business ooes well,¨ explaineo Dayton.
Over the past several years Dayton has
seen the state`s agriculture sector grow
right along with its crops, helping the en-
tire state in the process.
Through your innovation ano plain
haro work,¨ complimenteo Dayton.
Even the oecrease in prices isn`t as bao
as it coulo be, il one just looks back 10
years, saio Dayton. Corn was S2.27 per
bushel in 2003. Tooay, it is hovering above
S¯.
It really moveo,¨ Dayton saio.
The importance ol agriculture in Min-
nesota is not something St. Faul ignores.
Iarming agriculture is wioely recog-
nizeo in St. Faul,¨ promiseo Dayton, ano
both parties are working haro to oo what
they can to help.
Without larming, the past lew years
might have playeo out quite oillerently in
Dayton wants to keep movlng torwaro
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September 7 & 8, 2013 - 17 - Harvest 2013
Dayton
Turn to page 18
Harvest 2013 - 18 - September 7 & 8, 2013
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Govenor Mark Dayton gave tbe keynote aooress at Farmtest Aug. 8 ln Morgan.
Pboto by Sbelby Llnoruo
Minnesota.
The strength ol Minnesota`s larm
economy boosteo the state`s economy
ouring the Great Recession,¨ saio Day-
ton.
Over the past lour years Dayton ano
the legislature have been able to oecrease
the state`s oelecit by millions ano begin
paying back the schools.
We can see the oaylight,¨ shareo
Dayton. We`re making progress lor a
better Minnesota. We neeo to stay on this
course.¨
What also is neeoeo lor a better ano
brighter Minnesota, in Dayton`s mino, is
a reinvestment in eoucation.
I want Minnesota to be known again
as a provioer ol the best eoucational ex-
perience¨ lor all ages, saio Dayton.
Dayton wants the state as a whole to
lollow in the larmers` lootsteps, by being
gooo stewaros ol the lano ano leaving it
better than it was louno.
Even with all the oilliculties ano chal-
lenges lacing larmers tooay, Dayton
knows they will persevere.
A successlul larmer ooesn`t just neeo
physical strength,¨ saio Dayton, but also
a spine ol platinum ano nerves ol
steel.¨
In Dayton`s eyes Minnesota larmers
have that ano more.
The worlo`s best ano most proouc-
tive larmers,¨ Dayton saio prouoly.
Dayton Contlnueo trom
page C1
Dayton
Continued from page 17
September 7 & 8, 2013 - 19 - Harvest 2013
75572 AG
Contact Chad Schmalz • 320-296-5422
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Financial strategies.
One-on-one advice.
By Lynn Ketelsen
Farm Director
Linder Farm Network
I’ve always felt that government
takes simple problems and makes them
difficult. That is the case with our Na-
tional Energy Policy. Right now we
continue to rely on buying
the bulk of our oil from an
area of the world that
doesn’t really like us, and
many there would rather
destroy us. In essence, we
are funding our enemies.
At the same time, we are
spending billions and even
trillions of dollars trying to
find sources of energy that
are not working very well.
And on top of that, we are
ignoring what is right in
front of us labeling it as
bad and sources of global warming.
I’m referring to coal and oil.
My policy is simple. With some of
the money we are throwing into new
energy, let’s make coal and oil cleaner.
Energy is energy. It uses carbon when
you burn it or use it. If we take the
dollars we have been wasting on non-
starters in energy and work it towards
better use of what we have, we can get
the job done.
I would do extensive exploring in
Alaska, in the Gulf and off shore so we
know what we have. Same for natural
gas and coal. By most estimates, we
have hundreds of years of energy from
all three sources available to us.
With my model, we make the most
of what we have. Drill in Alaska in an
environmentally friendly
way. It CAN be done, and
it should be done.
To take it further, if we
cut back on our Mid East
purchases, the price of oil
will drop dramatically.
That would be good. With
energy costs down, the
U.S. would instantly be-
come more competitive in
the world for manufactur-
ing, farming and virtually
all production. Good
wages, cheap energy. A
winning combination.
The other thing I would do is work
to help Mexico add wealth to their
country through energy production.
We need them to have money. If there
are jobs in Mexico, people will stay
there, and they will be a friend.
We also need to work with Canada,
buy their oil and form a North Ameri-
can energy alliance.
All of this seems simple. But from
my experience, the simpler the better.
Lynn’s energy policy
Lynn Ketelsen
The McLeod County Chronicle
Online At
Glencoenews.com
Harvest 2013 - 20 - September 7 & 8, 2013
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By Lynn Ketelsen
Farm Director
Linder Farm Network
Question: Why is unemployment so
high in this country?
Lynn: That’s easy, there
are not enough jobs. The
question is, how do we cre-
ate jobs? That is what we
need to concentrate on.
And the answer is to sup-
port small business and
help them grow, cut down
on regulations that hurt in-
dustry, and develop new
and existing products that
we know make jobs.
Question: How about
some examples?
The most obvious is close to home.
North Dakota is developing their oil
industry and the state is going crazy
with growth. The state government has
opened the door for business to grow
and it’s growing. Agrculture is the
greatest single example, from dairy to
processing to growing crops. It’s about
growth.
Question: But aren’t jobs in agricul-
ture and energy anti environment?
Lynn: No, nothing could be further
from the truth. Jobs create wealth for
individuals and wealth for the country.
Without the jobs, we don’t have the
money for projects that are good for
the environment.
Question: What is holding back agri-
culture?
Lynn: Actually, there are a lot of
things that should change. I was in
Hawaii just a couple of weeks ago, and
much of the land that would produce
pineapple is fallow. Reason? The rules
and regs are just too tough
and raise the cost of pro-
duction so much that it’s
cheaper to buy from
Brazil. What in the world
does that do for our coun-
try? Same goes for many
of the fruits and vegeta-
bles we eat. They are no
longer being grown in the
United States because we
as a country have put the
farms out of business.
How is that good for any-
one?
Question: So what needs to change?
Lynn: We need to quit letting people
run the country that don’t understand
how important it is to create jobs and
have a strong economy. We are listen-
ing to the wrong people, the wrong
groups and not doing what is best for
our country.
We need jobs, we need to grow and
produce products here and we need to
see capitalism as a good thing, not bad.
What is good about record unemploy-
ment, record numbers on food stamps,
record numbers on disability, record
numbers on welfare, record numbers
using food shelves...it goes on and on.
What we are doing is not working.
Time to get back to what made this
country great. Individual opportunity
and growth, and freedom to produce.
September 7 & 8, 2013 - 21 - Harvest 2013
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Above, [oole Get-
tlg, ano lett, Lee
Klossner, sboweo
tbe women arou-
no tbe center on
[uly 31.
Tour oI the SWROC
A oralnage pono at tbe Unlverslty ot Mlnnesota Soutbwest Researcb ano Outreacb Center ln
Lamberton. Women trom tbe 'Women Carlng tor tbe Lano¨ semlnar were treateo to a guloeo
tour ot tbe center. Tbe above pono sbows bow a water conservatlon practlce can aoo more
tban just water. |t also creates a beautltul place tor plants, anlmals ano bumans to gatber.
Tbe Llwell Agroecology Farm ls completely organlc ano ls
valuable researcb acres tor tbe Unlverslty ot Mlnnesota.
Above, tbere were nearly
24 varletles ot eolble beans
ln tbls trlal. 8elow, blgb tun-
nels wbere tresb vegetables
are grown, tben enjoyeo.
Tbe tractor took tbe group arouno tbe 860 acres
ot SWROC, tbrougb many oltterent tlelos.
Pbotos by Sbelby Llnoruo
September 7 & 8, 2013 - 23 - Harvest 2013
By ShcIhy Lindrud
Editor
It has been a rollercoaster ol a rioe
when it comes to weather in the past sev-
eral months.
It`s a year with a lot ol tension,¨ saio
DTN Senior Agriculture Meteorologist
Bryce Anoerson at Iarmlest. A lot ol
unanswereo questions. It`s been an increo-
ible year.¨
The orought that starteo last year ano
oio great oamage to crops across the mio-
west was the most intense orought since
193!, ouring the height ol the Dust Bowl.
Iarmers weren`t even sure il there was
going to be enough soil moisture to plant
a crop this spring, let alone harvest one
come lall, saio Anoerson.
But, as She is known to oo, Mother
Nature threw everyone a curve ball.
Things turneo arouno,¨ Anoerson
saio simply.
The turning point came when a high
latituoe blocking high pressure system set-
tleo arouno the North Fole, about 1¯,000
to 20,000 leet above grouno.
A very large area,¨ explaineo Anoer-
son. It`s just existeo since Ieb. 1¯.¨
Usually systems like this oissipate as
winter turns to spring, but lor some reason
this one is hanging arouno. It has causeo
recoro rains ano cooler temperatures,
which have both helpeo ano hinoereo this
year`s crop. The high pressure system has
pusheo weather events south, causing a
cooling treno over the miowest.
Even with the cooler temperatures ano
the slow growth ol some crops, Anoerson
is pretty comlortable with how the majori-
ty ol lielos look. He expects corn yielos to
be between 1¯¯ ano 1o0.
The weather hasn`t only be wreaking
havoc in the Uniteo States. Ior the past
years the rest ol the worlo has laceo some
serious challenges, but just like here it
mooerateo.
Fretty lavorable weather patterns in-
ternationally,¨ saio Anoerson.
One worry larmers oo have is the oate
ol the lirst lrost. With many crops behino
in the oevelopment, larmers are betting
on a longer growing season. Anoerson
currently is estimating an average lirst
lrost oate arouno the eno ol September.
There is always a chance lor an earlier
lrost though.
I think it`s 30 percent,¨ reporteo An-
oerson. That is kino ol high.¨
The main issue is what an early lrost
woulo oo to crop yielos, a question Anoer-
son really ooesn`t have an answer lor.
He also can`t answer how many acres
ol crop were lost by the oeluge ol rain
earlier in the growing season.
We`re not going to be able to answer
that until we are well into harvest,¨ An-
oerson saio.
What he ooes expect is a slower har-
vest.
Ior the lirst time in lour years it`s
going to be a slower harvest ano more ex-
pensive harvest,¨ shareo Anoerson. Dry-
ers are going to have to run.¨
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Pboto by Sbelby Llnoruo
Harvest 2013 - 24 - September 7 & 8, 2013
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September 7 & 8, 2013 - 25 - Harvest 2013
Monday - Friday · 8:00am - 5:30pm
Women taklng control ot tbelr lano
By ShcIhy Lindrud
Editor
Iarming is no longer just a man`s
game. Tooay, over hall the larmlano is
owneo by women ano they are making the
oecisions about what to plant ano how to
protect the lano.
You sitting here are the luture ol agri-
culture,¨ saio Lynn Heuss ol Women Car-
ing lor the Lano, ouring a seminar at the
University ol Minnesota Southwest Re-
search ano Outreach Center in Lamber-
ton on July 22. You will be making oeci-
sions about your lano. You are the voice ol
agriculture lor the luture.¨
Women Caring lor the Lano is an or-
ganization lormeo to eoucate ano support
women larmlano owners on soil ano
water conservation, lano transler, hunting
ano habitat management ano more. At
Lamberton the subject was conservation
ano a group ol nearly two oozen lemale
lanoowners attenoeo the oiscussion.
All the women introouceo themselves
ano explaineo how they came to own their
lano. Ior some it was inheritance, either
lrom parents or oeparteo spouse. Many in
the room hao some conservation practices
in place at their larm while others were at-
tenoing to get ioeas on what they coulo
oo.
To help these women lino programs
that coulo work lor them ano their situa-
tion stall lrom the Reowooo County Soil
ano Water Conservation Ollice ano lrom
the Lano Stewaroship Frogram were on
hano.
Terry Van Der Fol, Lano Stewaroship
Frogram, talkeo about the growing popu-
larity ol cover crops to protect the lano
once the main row crop is harvesteo.
Soil, the lounoation ol the lano,¨ saio
Women lanoowners convergeo on tbe Unlverslty ot Mlnnesota Soutbwest Researcb ano Outreacb Center ot
Lamberton to learn about conservatlon practlces.
Pboto by Sbelby Llnoruo
Women
Turn to page C2
Women
Turn to page 26
Harvest 2013 - 26 - September 7 & 8, 2013
We Are More
Than A
Feed Store!
320.848.62/2 º 0e 0e//rer/
Downtown Hector
Women Contlnueo trom page C1
Terry van Der Pol ot tbe Lano Stewarosblp Project sbows bow cover
crops can protect tbe soll.
Pboto by Sbelby Llnoruo
Van Der Fol. It`s our primary asset.¨
Cover crops can be anything that cov-
ers the bare grouno ano protects it lrom
either being washeo or blown away by
the elements. The cover crop also works
to keep the soil in tip-top shape. Some
popular cover crops incluoe rye grass,
lielo raoishes ano peas ano other types ol
grasses.
It leeos the microbes in the soil, keeps
it healthy ano alive,¨ explaineo Van Der
Fol.
Flanting cover crops has shown an in-
crease in yielos in both corn ano soy-
beans. Cover crops also help oiminish the
ellect ol orought on the soils because the
extra plant matter helps keep the water in
the soil, rather than it just running oll
bare grouno.
Van Der Fol oio an experiment where
she hao water llow through three types ol
Women
Turn to page C2
Women Continued from page 25
Women
Turn to page 27
September 7 & 8, 2013 - 27 - Harvest 2013
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Women Contlnueo trom page C1
soil. One was just plain top soil alter years
ol row crops. The secono was native
prairie that hao never been tilleo ano the
thiro was pasture. Water rusheo right
through the row crop soil, washing away
valuable soil as it went. The native prairie
ano pasture lano kept the soil in place
better.
The oillerence I think is biological
material,¨ saio Van Der Fol.
The Lano Stewaroship Frogram ollers
many programs to help larmers incluoing
the beginning larm programs ano is also
a connecting link between growing looo
ano being a gooo stewaro ol the lano.
Reconnecting people to larming,¨
Van Der Fol saio.
Marilyn Bernharoson ano Kristy
Zajac lrom the Reowooo County Soil
ano Water Conservation District ,SWCD,
went over many oillerent conservation
programs ano opportunities available to
larmers ano lanoowners.
We are olten relereo to as the
brioge,`¨ Bernharoson saio ol the
SWCD. The ollice olten helps lanoown-
ers navigate the many oillerent leoeral
ano state programs ano organizations out
there to assist larmers.
One ol the main missions ol the
SWCD is to lino a balance between pro-
ouction agriculture ano water conserva-
tion.
We neeo to lino ways to holo water
on the lano,¨ saio Bernharoson, but still
make it possible lor larmers to oo their
jobs.
Nitrogen washing oll larm lielos ano
into waterways is one ol the main causes
ol the hypoxia in the Gull ol Mexico ano
the SWCD is trying to lino ways to keep
the nitrogen in the lielos insteao ol in the
water.
Cover crops are the most ellective
way to utilize the nitrogen,¨ explaineo
Bernharoson, because it uses the extra
nutrient lelt behino when the row crops
are harvesteo. It won`t be washeo away
with the rain or through tile lines.
Keeping water on ano in the lano has
another very important benelit as well.
Eventually that water will seep into the
grounowater, which is sullering greatly
oue to the orought ano tiling.
We are in serious trouble when it
comes to grounowater,¨ explaineo Bern-
haroson. Some cities are even worrieo
they won`t have enough to provioe water
to their resioents in the very near luture.
Frojects like wetlano restoration, rain gar-
oens ano manageo orainage systems are
some ol the ways lanoowners coulo help
recharge the grounowater.
Zajac went over a oillerent type ol
conservation, one not having to oo with
water. Insteao, she talkeo about the im-
portance ol protecting native pollinators.
They`re in trouble ano they neeo our
help,¨ saio Zajac.
While corn ano soybeans are wino
pollinateo, almost everything else neeos
the help ol pollinators, like many variety
ol bees. Keeping areas ol native grasses
ano llowers will give these pollinators a
place to live ano work.
With the help ol the SWCD there
plenty are ol cost-share oollars available
to oo conservation programs, as much as
7¯ percent ol project costs.
Opportunities have openeo greatly,¨
Bernharoson saio.
With all the ioeas ano thoughts given
to the women at the seminar in Lamber-
ton, they were armeo with several ways to
improve their lano ano larming opera-
tions through conservation practices.
It is your lano ano you can oo with it
what you will,¨ Heuss saio. You provioe
looo, leeo ano luel.¨
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Women Continued from page 26
Harvest 2013 - 28 - September 7 & 8, 2013
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A brlgbt tuture posslble, lt wllllng to work
By ShcIhy Lindrud
Editor
When looking lor luture opportunities
in agriculture, it makes sense to speak with
those on the lront lines ol that luture the
eoucators, recent graouates ano stuoents.
We`ve got a very youthlul panel,¨ saio
Brao Schloesser, oean ol agriculture lor
the Southern Minnesota Center ol Agri-
culture, at the start ol the Iuture Oppor-
tunities in Minnesota Agriculture` at
Iarmlest Aug. 8.
Dave Ireoerickson, Minnesota com-
missioner ol agriculture, was pleaseo with
the turnout on the panel.
We`ve got such great opportunities in
ag,¨ saio Ireoerickson. I`m so pleaseo
young leaoers are stepping up,¨ ano lilling
the olo larmsteaos ano new agriculture
baseo jobs.
However, there is a great neeo lor
many more young people to turn to agri-
culture lor a career, to make sure this
bright luture is possible. Il ag businesses
ano larms only rely on larm kios, it will be
even more oillicult to lill those open posi-
tions.
We neeo to look at a oiverse popula-
tion,¨ saio Kim Lippert, chairperson ol
the Riogewater College Agriculture De-
partment.
Companies are clammering lor every
stuoent we have,¨ saio Aoam Iischer, oi-
rector ol corporate ano lounoation rela-
tions at the University ol Minnesota.
A great place to start is high school,
with agriculture classes, !-H ano, ol
course, IIA.
I never hao a connection to ag,¨ be-
lore joining IIA, saio Mallory Fagel, state
IIA presioent.
Through IIA ano all ol its competi-
tions ano training, Fagel learneo to not
only appreciate ag, but love it enough to
turn it into a career.
Ag touches all aspects ol lile,¨ saio
Fagel, a high schooler lrom Iuloa who
plans on attenoing the University ol Min-
nesota lor agriculture. It is our job to
leeo the nations.¨
IIA helps open ooors to many oiller-
ent careers in agriculture, ano not just
larming, but science ano technology as
well.
IIA is a wonoerlul organization to
help them prepare lor their luture ca-
reers,¨ Fagel saio. There are many ca-
reers in agriculture, ano they neeo to be
lilleo.¨
One IIA goals is to spreao the woro
about the wioe variety ol jobs available to
all ol its members.
We want to reach out to those metro
members,¨ explaineo Fagel. It is really
important to aovocate lor agriculture.¨
Those IIA stuoents coulo one oay be
the leaoers, not just in agriculture, but in
all aspects ol lile.
Look out lor those stuoents in the blue
jackets, because they`re going to be ooing
great things,¨ saio Fagel.
Enrolling in high school agriculture
classes is also an important lirst step. But,
to oo that, those classes neeo to exist.
We neeo more ag teachers,¨ saio Lip-
pert. We oepeno on high school ag pro-
grams to spreao the woro.¨
Ag eoucation is a tremenoous career,¨
saio Schloesser.
Alter high school it is so very important
lor those interesteo in agriculture to enroll
in an ag-baseo program at a two-, or lour-
year college or university.
It is key, it is critical, it is the base,¨
saio Ireoerickson.
There is no better time to be enrolleo
in, or graouating lrom, an ag program,¨
State FFA Presloent Mallory Pagel talks about tbe lmportance ot FFA.
Pboto by Sbelby Llnoruo
Future
Turn to page C2
Future
Turn to page 30
Harvest 2013 - 30 - September 7 & 8, 2013
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Future Contlnueo trom page C1
saio Lippert. You can`t oo this without
post-seconoary learning.¨
Kristi Schaller, a summer intern with
Wakelielo Fork ano an NDSU agriculture
stuoent, spoke on the importance ol in-
ternships lor ag stuoents.
Internships are a critical part ol the
ag eoucation process,¨ saio Schaller. Ex-
pano your horizons.¨
Internships allow stuoents a chance to
get their hanos oirty in the lielo ol their
choice. It also establishes a network ol in-
oustry people those stuoents can lall back
on alter graouation to help lino employ-
ment.
Schaller urges businesses to think haro
about hiring interns lor the summer.
Open your ooors ano let interns in,¨
Schaller saio.
Besioes the right eoucation ano intern-
ships, there are other qualilications a per-
son neeos to succeeo in agriculture.
Those incluoe gooo communication ano
technical skills, ano a willingness to learn
ano go that extra mile.
A passion lor what you oo,¨ Lippert
saio.
Excitement when coming in,¨ aooeo
Schaller. Get involveo as much as you
can, put up your time.¨
Luke Daninger, a recent University ol
Minnesota graouate, now works lor Lano
O` Lakes. He knows lirst hano the oilli-
culty companies are having in lilling posi-
tions with traineo inoiviouals.
There are ag jobs available all over
the place,¨ shareo Daninger. There are
just not enough people.¨
The ever-growing worlo population,
changing international oiets ano ever-
changing technology, are moving agricul-
ture lorwaro.
We neeo to continue that commit-
ment towaro continueo improvement,¨
saio Karen Richter, National Fork Boaro
presioent. We neeo to continue on that
path.¨
Believe or not, social meoia is also
bringing agriculture into the luture, with
many schools ano businesses hooking into
it.
Social meoia is a very powerlul tool,¨
saio Schaller. It is a great way to stay
connecteo ano spreao the love ol agricul-
Recent Unlverslty ot Mlnnesota graouate Luke Danlnger, wbo now
works tor Lano O' Lakes.
Pboto by Sbelby Llnoruo
Future
Turn to page C2
Future Continued from page 29
Future
Turn to page 31
September 7 & 8, 2013 - 31 - Harvest 2013
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It is a better way to connect to our
consumers,¨ aooeo Richter.
There are, ano will be, opportunities
in both the corporate ano private sectors
ol agriculture.
Alternatives can be quite successlul,¨
explaineo Glen Groth, a oairy prooucer
in Winona County. We can raise all ol
them up at the same time,¨ by supporting
local businesses at the same time as the
big companies.
The University ol Minnesota is going
to take a closer look at that topic, with a
new major, looo systems, starting this lall.
The course has lour tracks, incluoing or-
ganic ano local looo proouction ano con-
sumers ano markets. The program will
teach stuoents how to aooress the issues
ano opportunities louno in the worlo`s
looo systems.
There is also a lot ol help available to
ag businesses, coming lrom places like
government programs.
There are tools available to all pro-
oucers,¨ saio Richter.
Even with all the right eoucation, in-
ternships ano connections, stuoents ano
new graouates will neeo to be prepareo
to work haro.
I oon`t think my struggles have ever
stoppeo. It ooes require personal sacri-
lice,¨ aomitteo Groth. There is no easy
way to get into larming, no lree rioe.¨
But, even those struggles can turn into
opportunity, as Daninger ano his lamily
learneo when their oairy larm in Iorest
Lake louno itsell oealing lirst hano with
urban sprawl. Suooenly they hao to oeal
with city zoning ano oroinances. But, it
turneo out to be gooo lor business to be
locateo near a population center.
There is plenty ol opportunity il you
have orive,¨ saio Daninger.
Even with the work, risk ano some un-
certainty, all on the panel believeo a suc-
cesslul luture ano lullilling lile is possible
in agriculture.
Because its challenging, it makes it
lun,¨ saio Groth.
Seize those opportunities when they
come belore you,¨ aooeo Richter.
Future Contlnueo trom page C1
Dalry prooucer Glen Grotb.
Pboto by Sbelby Llnoruo
Future Continued from page 30
Harvest 2013 - 32 - September 7 & 8, 2013
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September 7 & 8, 2013 - 33 - Harvest 2013
By Dick Hagen
Contributing Reporter
Brian Hefty thinks technology will con-
tinue to explode in the exciting world of
agriculture, but as technology keeps ramp-
ing up so, too, are some new issues as we
keep pushing for more production out of
that acre of land.
Speaking at Case/IH tent at Farmfest,
he mentioned micro nutrients, sulfur and
other elements are often now showing up
as a factor in yield limits.
“We’ve addressed the N, P and K issues
for many years. Now, as an agronomist,
I’m trying to figure out what is the limit-
ing yield factor on this guy’s farm, even
down to these last two acres,” said Hefty.
Down the road he sees biological prod-
ucts absolutely becoming a big part of
agriculture as we go forward. “That’s why
many companies have invested tens of
millions of dollars in buying biological
companies and are stepping up the pace
on introduction of new bio products into
the ag market,” he noted.
Hefty added that he asked a CEO of a
major ag chemical manufacturing com-
pany about biological products. “He told
me, ‘Brian, here’s the main reason why
we’re getting involved. Yes, there is some
yield gain but Europe is trying to elimi-
nate ag chem usage, even with our safe
products. So what are they going to be
down too? They’ll be moving to biological
products.’
“This gentleman continued, ‘Do I think
these biologicals will be as good as our
synthetic products? No, but it’s at least an
option for the European farmers. If we
can combine the biologicals with our syn-
thetics, we’re going to gain more yield,
more total production from each acre.’”
Hefty suggested that when Monsanto,
Pioneer and other major seed outfits
started talking about doubling yields they
didn’t foresee this happening just because
of improved genetics. “That’s why they’ve
been cranking hard on traits, and I see bi-
ological products being next in their tool
boxes. And that also includes seed treat-
ments, equipment and all aspects of farm-
ing to make this hurdle.”
Hefty said they have been using biologi-
cal products for quite a few years in their
own farming operation at Baltic, S.D. He
also indicated most soybean producers
have been into biologicals on a small scale
using inoculation products.
He said they’ve looked at quite a few
products with some showing real promise.
His company is also getting into plant
growth hormones and did say one product
they used on corn this year “…. looks like
a winner. Also a product that we used with
our early fertilizer applications looks real
good, too.
“The point being there are a lot of ex-
citing things in both plant growth hor-
mones and biological products that I think
will be the next step in ramping up pro-
ductivity. These will be other tools out
there that will help us go further in this
feeding the world challenge.”
When farmers ask Hefty what single
thing can I do to gain 25 bushels yield, he
responded that anymore there doesn’t ap-
pear to be a single new input that will do
that job. “But if I can suggest a few five-
bushel ideas he can do, then we can get
that extra 25 bushels he’s pushing for.”
How about cover crops? Are they the
next trick to maximizing crop yields and
reducing soil erosion?
Commented Hefty: “That’s another
tool waiting to be looked at. On our own
farm I don’t think we’ve done a good
enough job on the erosion side. We’ve
made good progress, but there’s more we
can do. Cover crops aren’t exactly new,
but we haven’t been using them. Case/IH
surveyed their farmer customers about the
no. 1 new technology they were going to
use in 2014. Cover crops ranked no. 1.
“So apparently the strategy thinking of
farmers is that cover crops are something
worth considering. I think we’ll be doing
more on cover crops in our own program,
and the Extension world is definitely pro-
viding farmers more inputs on crops that
work, how they work, when to seed, and
how to seed.”
Anything new on row width of corn
and soybean crops? Obviously 22-inch
and 30-inch are now the norm, but Hefty
said, “When we go to narrow rows we
have other issues. The equipment costs
more. It’s very heavy equipment so we
have soil compaction. Plant populations
go up and that leads to more disease prob-
lems as rows get narrower. So that means
breeding hybrids that work better in this
environment. We’re seeing 40,000; even
45,000 plant per acre research projects so
breeders are expecting narrower rows
going forward.”
At Farmfest, Hefty questioned the ear-
lier USDA projection of 155 bushel aver-
age yields, and he also doubted the
accuracy of 97 million acres of corn get-
ting planted this spring. The Aug. 12
USDA projection was13.763 billion
bushel corn crop, a 28 percent increase
from drought-hit 2012 but 2 percent
smaller than traders expected. He’s opti-
mistic about grain prices going forward,
but said the flip side is a better opportu-
nity for livestock producers, ethanol plants
and other end users of corn to lock in
prices significantly cheaper than a year
ago.
USDA estimated this year’s corn crop
will sell for an average of $4.80 a bushel at
the farm gate, down $2 a bushel from
2012. Soybeans are pegged at $11.35 a
bushel, down $3 from the record season-
average price for the 2012 crop.
Hefty Seed Company now operates in
eight states. Hefty indicated they are
opening this fall in Nebraska. But with
their Hefty Ag PhD program their mission
is simply to help farmers wherever they
may be. “We just have a passion for agri-
culture, a passion for farming. We want to
help farmers make farming work better
regardless of where they live,” he summed
up. For more information go: www.hefty-
seed.com
Microbiology next on your farming agenda?
Brian Hefty
Photo by Dick Hagen
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Harvest 2013 - 34 - September 7 & 8, 2013
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The McLeod County Chronicle
& Silver Lake Leader
Harvest 2013 - 36 - September 7 & 8, 2013
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Trust Your Hearing to a “Doctor of Audiology!”
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September 7 & 8, 2013 - 37 - Harvest 2013
Serving You for 144 Years!
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Property Insurance for
Farm • Business • Home
By Nathan Winter
University of Minnesota Extension
Many homeowners start forgetting about
their lawn this time of year. However, this is the
ideal time for using post-emergence chemical
applications for weed control.
According to the
University of Min-
nesota Extension,
post-emergence herbi-
cides may be applied
any time the weeds are
actively growing, the
air temperature is 60
to 80 degrees F, there
are no winds, and
there is no rain in the
forecast for 48 hours.
Most effective con-
trol of perennial
broadleaf weeds is ob-
tained when applied in early fall (Aug. 15
through Oct. 15) or in spring (May 1 through
June 1).
For some weeds, repeated application at 20-
to 30-day intervals may be required for control.
For dandelions, use 2, 4-D or a combination
of 2, 4-D, MCPP (Mecoprop), and dicamba
can also be utilized.
The ideal timing for applying these products
for dandelion control is September.
The non-chemical option is to manually dig
out the plants. A weeding fork, dandelion dig-
gers may be a couple of options for that task.
Get as much of the dandelion root as you can
so the dandelion does not start growing again.
For creeping charlie, use a combination of
2, 4-D and MCPP or a combination of 2, 4-
D, MCPP, and dicamba.
The ideal timing for applying these products
to creeping charlie is in September or autumn
once temperatures have cooled to the 60s and
70s.
The non-chemical approaches are to pull
the plant out or utilize a dethatching rake. It
may be necessary to start over with the lawn if
the creeping charlie gets out of control.
Most other broadleaf weeds can be con-
trolled by herbicide applications of 2, 4-D
and/or a combination of 2,4-D, MCPP, and
dicamba.
It is always a good idea to know what you
are spraying to be sure that the herbicide will
control the desired pest. The herbicide label
should list the weeds it will control.
Another option is to utilize a non-selective
herbicide like glyphosate. Use of these types of
products should only be used when spot spray-
ing targeted weed pests. Drift on to lawns and
ornamental plants will injure or kill the desired
plants as well as the targeted weed pests.
A healthy lawn is very important to limit the
competition of lawn weeds. Work on improv-
ing the lawn while trying to slow down and
eliminate weed competition. Try to seed grass
into bare areas of the lawn, fertilize, and aerate
your lawn this fall to help it compete against
the weeds. When using herbicides, read and
follow all of the directions for using the specific
product.
Fall lawn weed
control is important
Nathan Winter
Lafayette, MN • 800-642-4104 • www.ufcmn.com
is your
area dealer
for Wishek
Creamy Chicken and
Wild Rice Soup
Prep time: 5 min. Cook time: 20 min. Serves: 8.
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups water
2 cooked, boneless chicken breast halves,
shredded
1 (4.5 ounce) package quick cooking long
grain and wild rice with seasoning packet
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup butter
2 cups heavy cream
In a large pot over medium heat, combine
broth, water and chicken. Bring just to boil-
ing, then stir in rice, reserving seasoning
packet. Cover and remove from heat.
In a small bowl, combine salt, pepper and
flour. In a medium saucepan over medium
heat, melt butter. Stir in contents of seasoning
packet until mixture is bubbly. Reduce heat
to low, then stir in flour mixture by table-
spoons, to form a roux. Whisk in cream, a lit-
tle at a time, until fully incorporated and
smooth. Cook until thickened, 5 minutes.
Stir cream mixture into broth and rice.
Cook over medium heat until heated
through, 10 to 15 minutes.
* * *
Swedish Meatballs
Prep time: 15 min. Cook time: 1 hr. Serves: 4-5.
1 egg
1/4 cup milk
1 pound ground beef
1/4 cup dry cream of wheat cereal
1/4 cup minced onion
1 (10.75 ounce) can condensed cream of
chicken soup
1 (10.75 ounce) can condensed cream of
mushroom soup
1 (12 fluid ounce) can evaporated milk
1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
In a large bowl, whisk together the egg and
the milk. Add the beef, cream of wheat and
onion and mix well. Shape into 1 inch balls.
Place balls on a lightly greased baking sheet.
Bake at 350 degrees F for about 20 min-
utes.
Drain meatballs on paper towels, if
needed. Then place meatballs in a lightly
greased 2 quart casserole dish. In a separate
medium bowl, combine the soups with the
evaporated milk, stirring until smooth. Pour
over the meatballs.
Bake uncovered at 350 degrees F for an-
other 40 minutes. Sprinkle with parsley be-
fore serving.
* * *
Minnesota Pork Chops
Prep time: 20 min. Cook time: 2 hrs. Serves: 4.
6 pork chops
salt and pepper to taste
1 cup uncooked wild rice
1 1/2 cups water
1 (8 ounce) can canned mushrooms
1 tablespoon chicken bouillon granules
1 (10.75 ounce) can condensed cream of
mushroom soup
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
In a skillet with a small amount of oil,
brown the chops seasoned with salt and pep-
per. Spray a large 9x13 inch casserole dish
with nonstick spray. Sprinkle the washed rice
evenly in bottom of dish.
Add water and mushrooms. Sprinkle with
chicken bullion. Arrange the chops on top
and spoon soup over chops and rice. Cover
casserole with aluminum foil and seal tightly.
Bake for 1 1/2 hours to 2 hours or until rice
and chops are tender.
* * *
Homemade Pumpkin Pie
Makes 1 large pie, or 2 small pies.
1 pie pumpkin
1 1/4 cup sugar
1.5 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground cloves
1 teaspoon ground allspice
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon of vanilla extract (optional)
4 large eggs
1.5 cans (12oz each) of evaporated milk
1 large pie crust, or 2 small crusts
Wash the exterior of the pumpkin in cool
or warm water, no soap. Cut the pumpkin in
half with a serrated knife. Scoop out the
seeds.
Cook the pumpkin. Baking method: Pre-
heat oven to 350 degrees F. Place pumpkin
halves cut side down into a covered oven con-
tainer, cover and bake until soft, checking pe-
riodically for doneness by poking with a fork,
45-90 minutes. Microwave method: Remove
the stem, and put the pumpkin into a mi-
crowaveable container with a cover. You may
need to cut the pumpkin further to make it
fit. Put a couple of inches of water in the
bowl, cover it, and put in the microwave. Mi-
crowave on high for 15 minutes, check for
softness, if not done, cook an additional 5
minutes. Repeat until soft.
Scoop the cooked pumpkin out of the skin.
Puree the pumkin in a blender, or in a bowl
using a hand blender.
Place pie crust(s) in pan(s).
In a large bowl, put 3 cups of the cooked
pumpkin and add remaining ingredients.
*You may substitute 4 teaspoons of “pump-
kin pie spice” instead of the cinnamon,
cloves, allspice and ginger.
Pour into the pie crust.
Bake at 425 degrees F for the first 15 min-
utes, then turn the temperature down to 350
degrees F and bake another 45 to 60 min-
utes, until a clean table knife inserted into the
center comes out clean.
A few great Minnesota recipes
Be sure to look for locally-raised meats and locally-grown vegetables
Recipes
Turn to page 38
Blueberry Cream Tart
Serves: 8-10.
3/4 c. (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, at
room temperature
1 c. powdered sugar, divided
2 c. flour
Pinch of salt
8 oz. cream cheese, at room temperature
1/2 c. sour cream
1 c. water
1 c. granulated sugar
3 c. fresh blueberries
Preheat oven to 300ºF. In a bowl of an elec-
tric mixer on medium-high speed, beat butter
until creamy, about 2 minutes. Reduce speed
to low, add 1/2 cup powdered sugar, flour and
salt, and mix until just crumbly. Press dough
into bottom and sides an 11-inch tart pan with
a removable bottom. Bake until slightly golden,
20 to 25 minutes. Remove from oven and
transfer pan to a wire rack to cool completely.
In a bowl of an electric mixer on medium-
high speed, beat cream cheese until light and
fluffy, about 2 minutes. Reduce speed to
medium, add remaining 1/2 cup powdered
sugar and sour cream and beat until smooth,
scraping down sides of bowl as needed. Pour
into cooled tart shell, smooth top with a rubber
spatula and refrigerate until firm, at least 1 hour.
In a saucepan over medium heat, bring 1
cup water and granulated sugar to a simmer
and cook for 1 minute. Place blueberries in a
strainer and place strainer over a large bowl.
Pour sugar water over berries. Then place
strainer over sink and pour sugar water over
berries a second time. Drain berries com-
pletely, then evenly distribute over top of re-
frigerated tart. Refrigerate.
* * *
Strawberry Rhubarb Crisp
Prep time: 25 min. Cook time: 1 hr. Serves: 6.
4 cups fresh rhubarb, 1-inch diced (4 to 5
stalks)
4 cups fresh strawberries, hulled and
halved, if large
1 1/4 cups granulated sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons grated orange zest
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1/2 cup freshly squeezed orange juice
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup light brown sugar, lightly packed
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1 cup quick-cooking (not instant) oatmeal,
such as McCann's
12 tablespoons (1 1/2 sticks) cold unsalted
butter, diced
Vanilla ice cream, for serving
Preheat the oven to 350ºF.
For the fruit, toss the rhubarb, strawberries,
3/4 cup of the granulated sugar and the or-
ange zest together in a large bowl. In a meas-
uring cup, dissolve the cornstarch in the
orange juice and then mix it into the fruit.
Pour the mixture into an 8-by-11-inch baking
dish and place it on a sheet pan lined with
parchment paper.
For the topping, in the bowl of an electric
mixer fitted with the paddle attachment,
combine the flour, the remaining 1/2 cup
granulated sugar, the brown sugar, salt and
oatmeal. With the mixer on low speed, add
the butter and mix until the dry ingredients
are moist and the mixture is in crumbles.
Sprinkle the topping over the fruit, covering
it completely, and bake for 1 hour, until the
fruit is bubbling and the topping is golden
brown. Serve warm with ice cream.
* * *
Herb-Topped Beef Roast with
Roasted Cauliflower
Total time: 1-3/4 to 2-1/4 hrs. Serves: 12-16.
1 beef Strip Roast Boneless (about 3 to 4
lbs.)
4 teaspoons minced garlic, divided
1 T. plus 1 tsp. fresh thyme leaves
2 heads (about 2-1/2 lbs. each) cauli-
flower, separated into florets
6 T. olive oil, divided
Salt and pepper
2/3 c. dry Italian-seasoned bread crumbs
Preheat oven to 325°F. Press 2 teaspoons
of garlic evenly onto all surfaces of beef roast.
Press thyme evenly over roast.
Place roast, fat-side up, on rack in shallow
roasting pan. Insert ovenproof meat ther-
mometer so tip is centered in thickest part of
beef, not resting in fat. Do not add water or
cover. Roast on center rack in 325°F oven 1-
1/4 to 1-1/2 hours for medium rare; 1-1/2
to 1-3/4 hours for medium doneness.
Meanwhile, toss remaining 2 teaspoons
garlic, 4 tablespoons oil and cauliflower on
rimmed baking sheet. Season salt and pepper,
as desired. Cover with aluminum foil; bake
on lower rack 45 minutes. Combine bread
crumbs and remaining 2 tablespoons oil. Re-
move foil; sprinkle bread crumbs evenly over
cauliflower. Continue to bake, uncovered, 30
to 45 minutes or until crumbs are golden
brown and cauliflower begins to brown.
Remove roast when meat thermometer
registers 135°F for medium rare; 150°F for
medium. Transfer roast to carving board; tent
loosely with aluminum foil. Let stand 15 to
20 minutes. (Temperature will continue to
rise about 10°F to reach 145°F for medium
rare; 160°F for medium.)
Carve roast into slices; season with salt and
pepper, as desired. Serve with cauliflower.
* * *
Smoky Pork, Bacon, and
White Bean Chili
Prep time: 20 min. Cook time: 1 hr. 20 min. Serves: 6.
1 1/2 lbs. pork loin roast, cut into 3/4-
inch dice*
8 ounces thick-cut bacon (5 or 6 slices), cut
crosswise into 1/4-inch strips
1 large onion, cut into 1/2-inch dice
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 tablespoon smoked paprika
2 14.5-ounce cans diced fire-roasted
tomatoes
1 1/2 cups water
2 15-ounce cans cannellini (white kidney)
beans or other white beans, drained
Salt
1/2 cup sour cream (optional)
In a large saucepan or small stockpot over
medium heat, cook the bacon, stirring occa-
sionally, until crisp, 8 to 10 minutes. Use a
slotted spoon to transfer the bacon to a paper
towel-lined plate and set aside.
Add the onion to the bacon fat and cook,
stirring occasionally, for 2 minutes. Increase
the heat to medium-high, add the pork, and
cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions
are crisp-tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Stir in the
chili powder and paprika. Stir in the tomatoes
(with their juices) and water. Bring to a boil,
reduce to a simmer, and cook, stirring occa-
sionally, until the pork is tender, 35 to 45 min-
utes.
Stir in the beans and about 2/3 of the
bacon and cook, stirring occasionally, until
heated through, about 10 minutes. Add salt
to taste. Serve the chili garnished with the re-
maining bacon and the sour cream and scal-
lions, if using.
* You can also make this recipe with pork
shoulder.
Harvest 2013 - 38 - September 7 & 8, 2013
in the McLeod County Chronicle, the
Silver Lake Leader, and the Arlington Enterprise.
2
m
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Harvest Subscription Offer 2013 - 2 months free - Choose one of the following papers:
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Recipes Continued from page 37
September 7 & 8, 2013 - 39 - Harvest 2013
By Dick Hagen
Contributing Reporter
Dr. Mike Rosmann, well-known clinical
psychologist living at Harlan, Iowa, points
out farmers today work much more in iso-
lation than previous generations. This lack
of social interaction with neighboring
farmers stymies their opportunity to “un-
load” thoughts and feelings.
He said that farming has one of the
highest injury-related rates for any occupa-
tion in America, annually ranking in the
top three. And if we include fishing and
forestry as agricultural occupations, as the
USDA does, then farming is the most haz-
ardous occupation.
“But what most people don’t under-
stand is that farming is also a psychological
hazard because the suicide rate for farmers
is higher than most any other work group.
The suicide rate correlates directly with
economic stress,” noted Rosmann.
He points out a farmers’ behavioral
health is linked with their economic suc-
cess. Behavioral issues includes things such
as substance abuse, arguing and fighting
among family members, as well as mental
health difficulties, such as depression. Sub-
stance abuse has always existed in farm liv-
ing, however today that abuse has
worsened more among younger farmers
and teenagers in rural communities.
“The substance misuse rate among
farmers is about the same as for non-farm-
ers after they reach their mid-30s,” said
Rosmann. But alcohol has always been an
issue with many farmers. They drink to
numb pain and to lessen psychological
stress.
“If you drink enough you don’t think
about bothersome issues such as getting
bills paid, crop losses, or bad decisions
about marketing,” he said.
Perhaps surprising in view of the stress-
related environment of modern farming,
the divorce rate among farmers has re-
mained stable since the farm crisis era of
the 1980s. Back in the 1960s and
1970s about 25 percent of farm cou-
ple marriages ended in divorce, said
Rosmann. But when the farm crisis
occurred, the divorce rate among
farm couples increased to about 40
percent, matching the rate of the
general public. Today’s rate is 44-45
percent, but that also includes
some second and third
marriages.
So does this directly
relate to economic con-
cerns? He indicated so-
ciologists aren’t in full
agreement about pri-
mary cause factors of
farm divorce rates. It likely
does have something to do with
the economic turmoil of family
living these days.
“Perhaps it also reflects the
changing structure of farm families,”
he suggested. During the farm crisis
many farm wives started working off the
farm, sometimes husbands also, and the
farm population became more like the rest
of society.
“There’s a lot more similarity today in
the social structure of farm families and
non-farm families,” he noted. Plus, the de-
cision-making process on many farms
today now involves both husband and
wives, and younger members of the family
if they are transitioning into membership
responsibilities in the operation of the
farm.
“We don’t have a shortage of farmers
who want to begin, but we do have a
shortage of farmers wanting to quit,” ob-
served Rosmann. He pointed out that
farmers today farm into their 70s, even
into their 80s, thanks to technology and
enterprise opportunities that have substan-
tially reduced the “physical work load.”
Obviously these changes are causing
some issues. “It’s human nature that chil-
dren and parents see things differently, per-
haps even more so among farm families,
because farming is such a hands-on voca-
tion. This strife often accelerates when
someone who doesn’t have a country back-
ground marries into the family.
Rosmann also pointed out that women
today are entering into farming at much
higher rates than formerly. “About 17 per-
cent of all U.S. farmers today are now
women, and they are getting into farming
at a rate twice as fast as men,” he indi-
cated.
The average farm size for women is
about 220 acres nationally versus about
440 acres for farming operations
owned/operated by men.
Also women farmers are more likely to
specialize in organic crops, specialized ani-
mal production (long-haired
sheep, for example), or direct
farm to consumer programs.
He said that about two-
thirds of women farmers are
married. He also said about
40 percent of farm women
are secondary operators, such as going to
the local FSA office as needed, providing
additional help hauling grain, and fetching
parts, etc.
Seeking outside counsel
How does a farmer find help? “More
services are being offered through Exten-
sion; through Beginning Farmers pro-
grams; even through local churches in
some situations. Minnesota has a Sustain-
able Farming Association directed by John
Mesko. The number of people who un-
dertake transition planning is slowly in-
creasing,” indicated Rosmann.
Somewhat shocking is that about 40 per-
cent of farmers have neither a will nor a
transition plan, Rosmann said. The tax
consequences alone can be huge for the in-
heritors. Rosmann suggested that getting a
will or transition plan in writing should be
an immediate priority.
Rosmann compliments farmers on their
social awareness today. Obviously the ex-
plosion of social media via email, Face
book, Twitter and Smart Phones has
speeded the entire process. So, too, has ed-
ucation, for most younger farmers have
advanced training beyond high school.
“Beginning farmers today average 3.2
years of college. College-educated farmers
are more likely to develop a business plan
that does a systematic analyses of their op-
eration. In a sense, they take advantage of
the resources available better. Farmers
without that extra education might have a
few more hurdles,” he concluded.
So because of the
high stakes of farm-
ing today are we
seeing more
“behavioral health” issues among farmers?
“Yes, behavioral health of farmers is
linked with their economic success. At
present, U.S. agriculture is in a fairly opti-
mistic position. But agriculture could fall
apart rapidly if grain prices decline consid-
erably.
My summary advice to farmers is that
they need to stay open minded about seek-
ing outside counsel, preferably before the
stress syndrome starts ripping at their per-
sonal health, their family environment and
their marriage.
“Feelings of success and coping are tied
to the financial success of the farm opera-
tion. Behavioral issues may in fact be re-
lated to a farmer’s DNA, which programs
their ability or lack thereof to reach out for
assistance. We now have located on the
human genome, the site which impacts de-
pression, anxiety and the struggles when
things don’t go right. This bit of DNA
helps us to be successful, but it also has a
cutting side that hurts us when we get to be
overwhelmed with difficulties.”
Rosmann is working on a text book that
explains the new knowledge of human ge-
nomics and the implications of choosing a
farming vocation. He has popularized the
term, Agrarian Imperative, as genetically
programmed instincts which may be driv-
ing the decision-making processes of farm-
ers and would-be farmers. The objective is
to better understand the psychological fac-
tors that affect the well-being of people en-
gaged in farming.
Could the growing stress of farming
today be mostly of social origin?
Harvest 2013 - 40 - September 7 & 8, 2013
Brownton Co-op
Ag Center
Full Service Cooperative
for over 95 Years
Agronomy (320) 328-5211
Grain Division (320) 328-5502
toll-free (877) 328-5211 • www.browntoncoop.com
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• Storage & Drying of Corn and Soybeans
• Full-Length Scale for Semis
• Trucking Available
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AG SERVICES
• LOANS
Operating, Equipment,
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• INSURANCE
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• CHECKING & SAVINGS
• ESTATE PLANNING
1002 Greeley
Ave., Glencoe
320.864.5541
122 E. 2nd,
Winthrop
507.647.5356
200 E. Frontage
Rd, Waconia
952-442-2141
501 N. Sibley
Ave., Litchfield
320-693-2861
305 10th Ave.
S, Buffalo
763-682-3035
905 Hwy. 15 S,
Hutchinson
320.234.4553
Ag Services
Your ag credit and insurance
headquarters, serving the
farm businesses in this area.
A World Leader in Agribusiness
Producing Top Quality Canned & Frozen
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A Community Leader & Supporter in the
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Seneca Foods, started in 1949, has been dedicated to providing
quality food products and service excellence to our customers.
We began by concentrating on one product, concord grape juice,
and carved out a successful niche in a growing market. Today,
the breadth of our operations encompasses a vast array of fruit
and vegetable products. We are involved in multiple aspects of
agribusiness, from growing crops to manufacturing and market-
ing the packaged goods. And we remain committed to delivering
high quality products that our customers can trust and depend
on.
Seneca Foods Corporation
101 8th Street West, Glencoe, MN 55336
Main Human Resources 320.864.2316
Toll Free Human Resources 800.252.4875
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September 7 & 8, 2013 - 41 - Harvest 2013
Security Bank & Trust Co.
www.Security-Banks.com
Banking • Investments • Mortgage • Trust
Call
Today!
Joel Ebert
864-2014
Jeff Boesche
328-5222
Adam Lindeman
864-2016
Jeff Engen
485-3831
We are proud of what you do.
Have a safe and productive harvest.
When you need to expand your land base,
upgrade equipment or purchase grain or
livestock, our experienced loan officers will
develop a business plan to keep your operation
running smoothly toward success.
Contact us to find out how our deep roots
in agriculture will work for you.
Do you have a financial PLAN?*
We’re more than just tax preparers.
WE GIVE ADVICE!
Let the local professionals – John, Kevin,
Tim and Chip – help you with your life’s issues.
Anyone can manage your money*
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Service Areas Include: Accounting • Tax • Investments*
Insurance • Retirement • Rollovers* • Estate Planning
and Much More
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214 West Elm St.
Norwood
(952) 467-2407
105 West Main St.
Arlington
(507) 964-5868
1721 10th St. East
Glencoe
(320) 864-6166
*Securities offered through HD Vest Investment ServicesSM, Member: SIPC, Advisory services are offered through
H.D. Vest Advisory ServicesSM, non-bank subsidiaries of Wells Fargo & Company.
John Schad CPA* Kevin Lindstrand CPA* Tim Schuth CPA*
Total Recipe Time: 30 to 35 minutes. Makes: 4 servings.
INGREDIENTS
1 pound beef top sirloin steak, cut 1 inch thick
3 teaspoons olive oil, divided
2 cups jicama strips (cut 1-½ x ¼-inch)
1 package (8 ounces) sugar snap peas
1 red bell pepper, cut into thin strips
1 cup fresh mango chunks
⅓ cup reduced-sodium soy sauce
3 cloves garlic, minced
3 cups hot cooked instant rice
Cut beef steak lengthwise in half, then crosswise into ¼-inch strips.
Heat 1 teaspoon oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until hot. Add half of
beef; stir-fry 1 to 2 minutes or until outside surface of beef is no longer pink. Remove from
skillet. Repeat with 1 teaspoon oil and remaining beef. Remove from skillet; keep warm.
Heat remaining 1 teaspoon oil in same skillet over medium-high heat. Add jicama; stir-fry
1 minute. Add sugar snap peas and bell pepper; stir-fry 2 minutes or until vegetables are crisp-
tender.
Return beef to skillet. Carefully stir in mango, soy sauce and garlic. Cook 2 minutes or until
heated through. Serve over rice.
NUTRITION INFORMATION
Calories 581 Niacin 11.6 mg
Fat 9 g Vitamin B6 0.9 mg
(2 g saturated fat;
4 g monounsaturated fat)
Cholesterol 70 mg Vitamin B12 1.4 mcg
Sodium 780 mg Iron 7.9 mg
Carbohydrate 88 g Selenium 32.0 mcg
Fiber 7.0 g Zinc 5.3 mg
Protein 36 g Choline 129.2 mg
This recipe is an excellent source of fiber, protein, niacin, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, iron,
selenium, zinc and choline.
Vegetable-Mango Beef Stir-Fry
The Minnesota Municipal Power
Agency (MMPA) has named a new board
chair, Steve Schmidt of Anoka, and has is-
sued its Annual Report.
Steve Schmidt, City of Anoka council
member, has been named Chairman of the
MMPA’s board of directors. Each member
community is represented on the board,
which shapes strategy and makes energy
policy decisions for MMPA.
MMPA is comprised of twelve municipal
electrical utilities in Anoka, Arlington,
Brownton, Buffalo, Chaska, East Grand
Forks, Elk River, Le Sueur, North St. Paul,
Olivia, Shakopee and Winthrop.
Highlights from the Agency’s Annual Re-
port include:
• Elk River Municipal Utilities (ERMU)
became an MMPA member in 2013 after
a multi-year search for a power provider.
Significant factors in the city’s decision
were favorable rates for electricity and its
ability to be part of the governing body of
MMPA. MMPA’s electrical load increases
by approximately 20 percent with the addi-
tion of ERMU.
• The Oak Glen Wind Farm LLC sub-
sidiary of MMPA received a $25.4 million
stimulus grant from the U.S. Department
of Energy under the American Recovery
and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Ratepayers
in MMPA member cities will benefit from
renewable energy at a lower cost because
the grant reduces costs for Oak Glen Wind
Farm.
• MMPA’s unrestricted cash balance and
rate stabilization fund both increased by
more than $10 million, further improving
the Agency’s strong financial position.
• MMPA significantly expanded its En-
ergy Education program by inaugurating
energy tours at the Agency’s Faribault En-
ergy Park for fourth graders. About 1,250
students from 18 schools participated in the
2012-13 school year, learning about energy
issues including renewable energy produc-
tion.
• In addition, MMPA won two important
awards. For its two wind energy programs
-- Hometown WindPower and Oak Glen
Wind Farm -- the organization was
awarded the 2012 Public Power Wind
Award for its “leadership, innovation, proj-
ect creativity and benefits to customers.”
And MMPA’s Faribault Energy Park won a
“Best of the Best” award from prestigious
energy trade magazine Combined Cycle
Journal for its innovative water manage-
ment system.
MMPA’s mission is to provide reliable,
competitively-priced energy to its members
while creating value for the Agency and its
members. Its long-time management part-
ner, Avant Energy of Minneapolis, directs
the Agency’s strategic planning, day to day
management and operations, and energy
facility development.
MMPA names new board
chair, reports on progress
www.handlmotors.com
320-329-8328 · 800-890-8328
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Harvest 2013 - 42 - September 7 & 8, 2013
Enestvedt Seed
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Enestvedt`s RR Soybean Seed And
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Contact
Enestvedt Seed Company
75802 Co. Rd 12, Sacred Heart, MN 56285
320-765-2728
or one of our dealers
Producers and Processors of
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September 7 & 8, 2013 - 43 - Harvest 2013
Harvest 2013 - 44 - September 7 & 8, 2013
This document is © 2013 by admin - all rights reserved.