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Harvest Days 2016

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Main Street
Sports Bar opens
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Coop Power
plans new
solar “garden”
4-Square
Builders
builds on
diversity
GRHS adds to
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Jail expansion
project
Page 2 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015
By Lori Copler
Editor
The McLeod County Courthouse will
look dramatically different by this time
next year, as the county launches into a
$7 million expansion project that will
add jail space and address security con-
cerns.
Sheriff Scott Rehmann said the project
is expected to start this summer and will
take about a year to a year and a half to
complete.
Getting to this point has been about a
two- to three-year process, Rehmann
said.
The project started after a courthouse
shooting in northern Minnesota prod-
ded a discussion about security in the
McLeod County Courthouse, located in
Glencoe.
Along with providing secure entrances
to the courthouse, there was a desire to
provide a secured hallway from the jail
to a second-story courtroom. There are
secured hallways to the other two court-
rooms in the courthouse, Rehmann said.
But that couldn’t be done without
some construction. Nor, said Rehmann,
could the sheriff’s department address
some Department of Correction con-
cerns about the jail be address “without
some significant construction.”
The security issue became a compre-
hensive project that included an expan-
sion of the jail; a new, secured entry to
the courthouse administration area,
which includes a larger lobby; and other
improvements.
“The security issue is what really kind
of drove the whole discussion, ” said
Rehmann. “There was a real desire to
keep the public and our workers safe in
our buildings.”
The county had originally hoped to
use money left to it by the estate of An-
namarie Tudhope, the late publisher of
the Glencoe Enterprise, to address secu-
rity concerns at the courthouse. Howev-
er, Tudhope was specific in her will that
the money be used for a new jail after an
attempt to build a new jail in 2007 was
eventually abandoned.
After that project was abandoned,
Rehmann said the sheriff’s office under-
took some projects to address some de-
ficiencies that were tagged by the De-
partment of Corrections (DOC).
But some of the DOC’s concerns —
particularly providing adequate “pro-
gram” space, including recreational areas,
and places that inmate could meet with
health, legal and other officials.
“We just didn’t have the room,” said
Rehmann.
The jail addition will provide that
room, as well as additional jail space for
boarding inmates. Currently, the sheriff’s
office has agreements in place with the
Renville and Carver county jails to board
inmates when the local jail is full.
Rehmann said that adding cell space
can virtually eliminate the need to board
Mcleod County inmates at other loca-
tions, which will save the county money.
Rehmann said the jail can add the ad-
ditional beds without adding additional
staff.
“Right now, we’re spending about
$150,000 a year to board inmates at
other facilities,” Rehmann said.
He noted that the jail will incur some
additional costs with the addition, such
as more costs in utilities and “some in-
creases with vendors for food and med-
ical services.” Those increased costs are
estimated about $15,000 annually, which
means the county will still save about
$135,000 a year.
Along with additional jail cells, the im-
provements call for a new kitchen area,
an expanded and secured sallyport for
the drop-off and pick-up of inmates, a se-
cured booking area, and the moving of
some admi ni strati ve offi ces to the
perimeter of the jail space, near the court
administration area, so that vendors and
other visitors can meet with jail staff
without walking through inmate areas.
There also will be a video visitation
area for inmates and visitors “so we don’t
have to bring people through the jail for
visits.”
Construction should start in April or
May.
“We’re excited for it,” said Rehmann.
Rehmann said construction is expect-
ed to be done with minimal impact on
the staff or inmates, but the county may
have to board some inmates elsewhere
“when they start opening up walls.”
Rehmann himself may be displaced for
two to there weeks, because one of his
Courthouse, jail expansion project to start soon
Conceptual drawings courtesy of Wold Architects
Part of McLeod County’s jail and courthouse expansion
project, set to begin construction this spring, includes a
new entryway and lobby at the juncture of the courthouse
and law enforcement center on the southeast corner of the
building. Shown above is the planned entryway and court-
yard area.
Shown above is an architectural drawing of the interior of the proposed lobby
area to be shared by courthouse administration and the law enforcement cen-
ter.
Jail
continued on page 3
McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015 HORIZON Page 3
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office walls faces the exterior of the
building, onto which the extension will
be built.
“I’m not sure where I’ll end up,” he
laughed.
The expanded jai l space and new
courthouse lobby will be attached to the
southeast corner of the courthouse, at
the juncture where the original court-
house and the law enforcement center
come together.
A small parking lot in that area will be
eliminated to accommodate the expan-
sion. And Ives Avenue, which runs north
and south on the east side of the court-
house, will be closed, and Judd Avenue,
which runs north and south on the east
end of the parking lot, will be opened to
traffic.
In the midst of all the construction
plans, Rehmann said some type of me-
morial to Tudhope is a priority, since her
bequest of over $4 million to the county
is funding the lion’s share of the actual
construction costs of the jail expansion.
“If anyone has any ideas for an appro-
priate memorial to Annamarie, please
feel free to contact me,” said Rehmann.
Jail continued from page 2
Above is a view of the new jail
space and planned entryway
from 10th Street. The drawing
at the right gives you an idea
of what the new lobby area
with elevator will look like.
Page 4 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015
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McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015 HORIZON Page 5
By Tom Carothers
Sports Editor
Main Street Sports Bar (MSSB), which is
actually located on Greeley Avenue
North in Glencoe, has quickly become a
popular place to eat and drink since it
opened its doors in February.
“We have had a very favorable re-
sponse,”co-owner Dr. Joe Mayland said.
Occupying the space that formerly
housed Al’s Sports Bar, MSSB took a while
to come to fruition.
“There wasn’t one thing that wasn’t
touched,” Mayland said. “There was so
much mold and asbestos, and we took
the floor all the way down to the dirt.”
Mayland had hoped to have his estab-
lishment open last fall in time to catch at
least some of the football season. Howev-
er, negotiations regarding the property
as well as the extensive renovation work
led to delays and instead he had to settle
for an opening deep into basketball sea-
son.
“I think we will do well during March
Madness,”he said.
Glencoe’s MSSB is the sister establish-
ment to one owned by Mayl and i n
Hutchinson. The first location, opened in
2012, was successful. Mayland and his
wife Amanda looked to expand their op-
erations to another town. Among the op-
tions being considered were Waconia,
Monticello and Glencoe. After some mar-
keting studies and a look at the demo-
graphics, Glencoe was the choice.
“I looked at Glencoe and really thought
it would fill a need,” he said. “No discredit
to other bars and restaurants in town, but
I think (MSSB) provides something that
wasn’t there before.”
With a look and feel of a traditional
sports bar, as well as a large selection of
libations, MSSB is popular with those
seeking a sleek new establishment in
which to socialize. With plenty of televi-
sions on the walls, any sports-minded
bar-goer is sure to find their game.
“Basically, we are a pizza place,” May-
land said. “Hutchinson was an established
business and people knew to come there
for great pizza. Glencoe is all-new, so it is
a constant worry as to whether people
will come and enjoy the place.”
So far, so good.
MSSB also does a brisk food business.
Many customers come for the pizza,
which is a 50-plus-year-old recipe that
came from Jay’s Pizza in Hutchinson —
the establishment that was the original
MSSB when purchased by the Maylands
in 2012. Glencoe customers are enjoying
pizza during lunch buffets, by the pie at
dinner, and also by carryout.
However, what came as a shock was
the number of hamburgers that are
being sold.
“Our burgers are in very high demand
– through the roof,” Mayland said. “We are
selling four times the number of burgers
in Glencoe that we are in Hutchinson. We
had a hard time keeping up with de-
mand at first. It was a nice problem to
have.”
With summer months on the way,
MSSB plans to expand outside with a
patio to open in the spring.
“We’re just waiting for things to thaw,”
Mayland said. “We’re hoping at some
point in the future to have a building out
there for bands, etc. That is likely a year or
two out.”
Main Street Sports Bar opens up in Glencoe
Horizon photos by Tom Carothers
A new awning proudly proclaims that the former Al’s
Sports Bar has been reborn as the Main Street Sports Bar.
The establishment’s interior underwent a top-to-bottom re-
modeling and now houses a modern sports-themed bar
and restaurant, patterned on a sister establishment that
has been popular in Hutchinson.
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Page 6 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015
By Lori Copler
Editor
Even before she was officially hired as
the Glencoe Area Chamber of Com-
merce’s executi ve di rector, Barbara
Woida was coming up with ideas.
Traveling around the area, she would
come across a community event or activ-
ity and think, “we should do that here
(Glencoe),” said Woida. “Or what can we
do that’s different? What can we do
that’s fun?”
As one can see, Woida is excited about
the job, which she just started on March
9. And while she’s brimming with ideas,
she’s trying to get familiar with the com-
munity and what’s been going on here.
“My first goal is to get to know the
community,” Woida said. “See what peo-
ple want from the Chamber … what’s
worked well, what fresh, new ideas we
can come up with, what we can do even
better than we have.”
Woida said she feels that she will fit
well with the Chamber.
Although she grew up in Blooming-
ton, her parents had rural roots — her
dad grew up on a dairy farm and her
mother grew up on a vegetable farm. A
good part of her summers were spent in
rural areas near smaller communities.
“I became very comfortable with a
small, rural area,” said Woida. So much so,
in fact, that she and her husband chose
to live in rural Norwood Young America,
a short commute to Glencoe.
She has a bachelor’s degree in indus-
trial organizational psychology, and has
spent much of her career in the human
resources field. The company she worked
for had plants in several smaller commu-
nities, including Montgomery and Ar-
lington.
“It helped me become attuned to the
challenges of smaller communities, how
to attract workers, economic develop-
ment, that type of thing,” said Woida.
She said the Chamber position ap-
pealed to her “because it’s a nice fit. It
works with my people skills and my
background.”
Along with organizing Chamber and
community events, Woida will work in
economic development and grant writ-
ing, with which she also has experience.
Woi da sai d her previ ous j ob al so
taught her to “work independently and
without a lot of supervision,” skills which
will also benefit her in her new Chamber
position. Although she will be guided by
the Chamber’s Board of Directors, Woida
expects to “set priorities and schedules
and keep organized so everything runs
smoothly.
While Woida is still trying to get out
and about in the community, meeting
with Chamber members and others, she
has been “overwhelmed and overjoyed
that people have been so welcoming
and so friendly.”
One of the Chamber of Commerce’s
member businesses hosted a “meet-and-
greet” for Woida last week, which also
served as a farewell for outgoing director
Dave Nelson. Woida said she met a lot of
people there.
“There also have been a lot of people
reaching out with e-mails, phone calls or
j ust poppi ng i n to i ntroduce them-
selves,” said Woida. “I just wish I could re-
member all the names, but I’m getting
there.”
In her spare time, she and her husband
enjoy outdoor activities and spending
time with their 2-year-old son.
“It’s just so much fun watching him ex-
plore and discover new things,” Woida of
her toddler.
Which is probably much like her new
job — exploring and discovering new
things within the community and for the
community.
“There will be a lot of variety, a lot of
working independently, a lot of working
in the community and a lot of getting to
know people,” said Woida. “I think it’s
going to be a fun job.”
Woida brings skills, enthusiasm to Chamber
Horizons photo by Lori Copler
Barbara Woida joined the Glencoe
Area Chamber of Commerce on March
9 as its new executive director.
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McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015 HORIZON Page 7
By Rich Glennie
Correspondent
Years in the making, work to improve
the west-end drainage ditch in Glencoe
is getting nearer to reality.
Continual flooding along the ditch,
which drains 2,463 acres of watershed to
the nor th and west of Gl encoe, has
posed problems for decades. Efforts to
correct some of the drainage ditch prob-
lems, as well as remove or repair con-
stricted areas along the ditch, have come
up short for a lack of funding or lack of
information about who actually owns
the ditch system that drains through
Glencoe’s west end, through the ceme-
tery and Seneca Foods property on the
way to Buffalo Creek.
A public informational meeting is
scheduled for March 31 at 5 p.m. at the
Glencoe City Center by the Buffalo Creek
Watershed District (BCWD) concerning
the proposed Marsh Water Project (west
ditch). The goal of the meeting is to pres-
ent the proposed purpose of the ditch
project, describe each component of the
project and the costs to do the work.
Following the informational meeting,
the BCWD will hold a public hearing at a
later date to gather more public input.
In April 2014, the city of Glencoe peti-
tioned the BCWD to establish the Marsh
Water Project as a multi-phased basic
water management project.
The petition came after a 2012 engi-
neer’s report by Houston Engineering,
Inc., studied the goals of the project, and
planning began on the next phase, a re-
gional comprehensive storm water man-
agement plan. That phase was complet-
ed in October 2014.
To implement the plan, a Clean Water
Partnership loan of $294,540 from the
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
(MPCA) was obtained. Also, the MPCA
awarded a $10,000 grant to administer
the loan. The engineering design, permit-
ting and easement acquisition will likely
occur concurrently beginning this sum-
mer, with project construction to be initi-
ated in 2016 if approval is granted.
At an October 2014 meeting, which in-
cluded representatives of the city of
Glencoe and the BCWD, it was agreed
the features of the project would in-
clude:
• Construction of a storm water wet-
land just upstream of the main trunk of
the west branch of the ditch system;
• Completion of repairs to the main
trunk storm sewer through the Glencoe
Cemetery;
• Acquisition of easements along the
east branch and a portion of the main
trunk downstream from the east branch
for maintenance purposes;
• Replacement of culverts at five pri-
vate driveway crossings of the main
trunk, including installation of pipe
aprons;
• Creation of buffer strips along the
east branch and main trunk downstream
from the east branch.
Cost of the work was estimated at
$941,000.
Who pays what is another question,
and that will be tied to who benefits
from the improved drainage and the
better water quality.
For the Marsh Water Project, two dis-
tinct groups benefit from the work, ac-
cording to a memo from Houston Engi-
neering — landowners who dispose of
water into the drainage system and the
entire watershed district and state.
Of the 2,463 acres in the watershed,
about 16 percent is located within the
city limits and the rest in Glencoe Town-
ship. The city will pay 16 percent of the
project cost under the plan.
At its Oct. 18, 2014, meeting, the BCWD
Board of Managers established a policy
for the costs to benefiting groups. The
policy set the costs to contributing
acreages ($478, 000) and di stri ct
wide/statewide ($463, 000). The dis-
trictwide costs will be raised through an
ad valorem or property tax, as well as
state grants and funding programs. Con-
tributing acres would be assessed.
Houston Engineering estimated the
average cost to landowners benefiting
from the project to be $200 per acre. The
BCWD may opt to spread that payment
out over several years to ease the burden
on landowners.
The BCWD also may utilize a portion of
its administrative funds raised through a
regular tax levy, the Houston Engineer-
ing memo stated, but those funds are
limited for other BCWD projects. Under
state statute, BCWD can collect addition-
al district wide funds through a “project
tax levy.”
But BCWD’s district wide taxing au-
thority, based on estimated market value
for a period not to exceed 15 years has a
maximum annual levy not to exceed
$152,111.
The terms of the MPCA loan is for 10
years, beginning in 2018, with a payment
of $16,975 twice annually.
Years in the making, ditch project nears reality
Graphic courtesy of Houston Engineering, Inc.
The west ditch, or Marsh Water Project, extends about
three miles in length with its three branches of the ditch
system. It takes in a large area of drainage to the north and
northwest of Glencoe. The area lies within the larger Buffa-
lo Creek Watershed District (inset).
Glencoe
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716 E. 16th St., Glencoe, MN 55336
320-864-5518 • Fax: 320-864-5510 • trishak@glencoenews.com
Online subscriptions also available at a lower rate @
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Page 8 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015
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Donations to the community are made possible from charitable gaming at:
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Persons in our community needing help with hearing,
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• Doors
• Windows
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• Misc. Projects
30+ Years
Construction
Experience
6293 100
th
St
Glencoe
By Tom Carothers
Sports Editor
The future is soon to be on the rise on
the southwestern end of Glencoe with
the bui l di ng of the McLeod Co-op
Power Association’s community solar
garden. Members of the co-op with me-
tered residential and commercial ac-
counts are eligible to participate in the
program.
The garden will be located on land
owned by the co-op at 591 Lindbergh
Trail near Highway 212, and will feature
two 50-panel solar arrays that will help
defray the energy costs for co-op mem-
bers that subscribe to the service.
It’s a convenient alternative for those
interested in solar, but are not able or
inclined to construct panels on their
own land. Each of the co-op’s 100 panels
at the garden will measure 6.5 feet by
4.5 feet. They will be manufactured by
tenKsolar, a Minnesota-based company.
Subscribing to a panel will amount to
a small portion of the average cus-
tomer’s total power usage, but it is an
attractive option for those interested in
getting in on a renewable resource to
assist in their power needs.
“Some of our customers can’t do a
solar panel in their backyard, some just
want to do a little (solar),” said the co-
op’s Sue Pawelk. “So, by subscribing to
this, they will receive a credit on their
bill for the next 20 years.”
The power generated by each panel,
which is estimated to average 42.6 kilo-
watts per month according to the co-
op’s figures, will go directly into the co-
op’s distribution wires to serve cus-
tomers as a whole. The co-op estimates
that each subscriber would see their
electric bill reduced by just over $5 a
month at current rates. As rates in-
crease, so will the savings.
Customers choosing to participate in
the garden do not purchase the panel
itself, rather they are subscribing to pur-
chase the kilowatt output of however
many panels for which they have signed
up. Panels are currently going for $1,550
each.
“The co-op maintains ownership and
has to take care of insurance, mainte-
nance, repairs, etc. for the 20 years, ”
Pawelk said.
The MCPA, along with several other
electrical co-ops in the state, looked to
build the solar farm at this time in order
to benefit from construction savings
due to an en masse effort with their en-
ergy supplier, Great River Energy.
Great River Energy is building its own
power array at the MCPA site, as it is
with other co-op sites in the state. Con-
struction costs will be shared in part by
Great River, with other savings due to
discounts on mass purchase of solar
panels from tenKsolar.
The co-op hopes to begin excavation
on the property to start the project by
April 1. Currently, subscribers have spo-
ken for 60 percent of the panels.
“It’s very exciting,” Pawelk said.
To participate in the program, contact
the co-op at 320-864-3148 or log on to
the co-op’s website at www.mcleod
coop.com. Those wishing to subscribe
wi l l compl ete a Customer Li cense
Agreement that will remain in effect for
20 years.
McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015 HORIZON Page 9
MCPA planning solar ‘garden’ for spring
Photos courtesy of MCPA
This field (above) located near the McLeod Cooperative Power Association
building on Lindbergh Trail, Glencoe, will soon look like the field below. The co-
op is hoping for an April 1 start to begin construction on a solar “garden.”
Page 10 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015
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McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015 HORIZON Page 11
By Lori Copler
Editor
Glencoe Regional Health Services
(GRHS) had no doubt that the new pro-
grams it launched in the past year
would be successful, but those success-
es exceeded expectations.
In particular, the Urgent Care pro-
gram GRHS launched just under a year
ago has been heavily used.
“We served over 6,000 patients in the
first year,” said Jon Braband, chief exec-
uti ve offi cer of GRHS. “We’ ve been
pleased — and a little surprised — at
how well it’s been received. It’s really
filled a niche and is truly meeting a
need for our clients.”
Urgent Care is open seven days a
week, 12 hours a day, and is a walk-in,
first-come, first-served service for pa-
tients with conditions that don’t require
an emergency room, but won’t neces-
sarily wait for an appointment with a
primary care doctor at the clinic.
Braband said the Urgent Care unit is
staffed by “mid-level” professionals,
such as nurse practitioners and physi-
cian assistants.
The staff follows physician-developed
protocols, referring more serious inci-
dents to the emergency room — which
is conveniently right next door. After
treating patients for everything from
si nus i nfecti ons to broken bones,
arrangements are made for follow-up
appointments with primary care physi-
cians.
Another niche GRHS is fulfilling is
providing transitional care beds in its
hospital.
Braband said transitional care is for
patients with “complex medical issues”
who don’t need the level of intensive
care of a Methodist or Abbott hospital,
but “are not well enough to go home.”
Typically, they may be stroke victims or
patients who had an intensive surgery
that requires substantial recovery and
rehabilitation.
The transitional care program pro-
vides those patients with extended-
care rehabilitation services, such as
physical therapy, occupational therapy,
speech therapy and wound care. A typi-
cal stay at GRHS will be a couple of
weeks or longer, and the patient will be
discharged once they reach the point
that they can move to a nursing home,
assisted-living facility or their own
home.
Braband said the transitional care
program draws from a wider area than
GRHS’ 25- to 30-mile range for its usual
patients, with referrals coming from
larger metro hospitals that don’t offer
similar programs. The transitional care
program averages about six patients on
a daily basis, although that number can
drop to as few as one or two or as many
as eight or nine, Braband said.
The transitional care program started
in January 2014 and, again, has proved
GRHS launches new, successful programs
Photos courtesy of Glencoe Regional Health Services
Glencoe Regional Health Services
(GRHS) is now providing transitional
care for patients with complex med-
ical issues who are too well for inten-
stive care, but not well enough to re-
turn home. Among services is a week-
ly conference between patients are
GRHS care staff. Pictured with a pa-
tient are respiratory therapist Dan
Werth, RRT, internal medicine physi-
cian Bryan Fritsch, DO, and case man-
ager/care coordinator Cathie Hueser,
RN, BSN.
GRHS
continued on page 13
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Page 12 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015
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to be a successful one for GRHS.
Braband said that Medicare takes a
hard look at incidents in which a pa-
tient is re-admitted to a hospital within
30 days of his or her initial admission.
Only one of GRHS’ transitional care pa-
tients has needed to be re-admitted
within that 30-day period.
“The success rate is very, very good,”
said Braband. “The program has been
pretty well accepted, and it’s growing.”
GRHS partnered with Allevant and
the Mayo Clinic to develop its transi-
tional care program.
A complement to the transitional
care program, which is “just ramping
up,” according to Braband, is a ventila-
tor care program.
The program will help patients who
are on ventilators to either “be liberat-
ed” from their ventilators through respi-
ratory therapy, or to help them learn to
live with ventilators if their situations
become permanent.
GRHS is adding to its respiratory ther-
apy staff to help get the program under
way.
Another protocol that has been
adopted at GRHS is the “hospitalist”
service.
GRHS has six primary physicians, Bra-
band said. The past practice was to have
those physicians tend to their hospital-
ized patients as well as keep their regu-
lar appointments at the clinic.
Now, the doctors rotate as the “hospi-
talist” at the hospital. A doctor will
spend a week as the hospital doctor,
and not take appointments at the clinic.
That doctor tends to all the patients at
the hospital.
Braband said the rotation provides
better continuity of care for patients.
And staff will only need to consult with
one doctor, rather than trying to keep
touch with several different doctors.
“Before, we would have five or six
doctors following patients in the hospi-
tal,” said Braband. “Now, it’s just one.”
Patients can schedule follow-up ap-
pointments with their primary care
doctors after their discharge.
Some other notes of progress at
GRHS:
• The Stewart Medical Clinic is now
open five days a week rather than four,
thanks to additional staffing.
• Additional doctors have been hired
for the emergency room, “providing a
lot more consistency,” according to Bra-
band.
• GRHS has been re-certified as a
Level III trauma center for its emer-
gency medical status.
• GRHS is now offering tele-genetic
counseling, in which patients with pre-
disposed medical conditions, such as
certain cancers, can connect with a ge-
netics specialist on such topics as can-
cer risk evaluation and genetic testing
services.
• GRHS, in 2014, was designated an
“acute stroke-ready hospital” through
the Minnesota Department of Health.
Braband said GRHS had already met
the standards outlined by the depart-
ment of health before the designation
program started, so it received its desig-
nation fairly easily.
McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015 HORIZON Page 13
GRHS has started several new programs the past year, including Urgent Care, lo-
cated in the hospital next to the emergency room.
GRHScontinued from page 11
When you get your nose out of joint
Our Urgent Care department is open 8 am – 7:30 pm,
7 days a week. Even Sundays.
No appointment needed. Just come on over.
Check in at the Emergency Room entrance.
1805 Hennepin Ave. N., Glencoe
We have what you need.
• Runny noses and sinus infections
• Sore throats and coughs
• Sprains and strains
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• Broken bones and noses
• Bruises, cuts and scrapes
• Insect bites and stings
• Nausea and diarrhea
Page 14 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015
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McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015 HORIZON Page 15
By Rich Glennie
Correspondent
Diversification was the saving grace of
many businesses during and after the
Great Recession and the slow economic
recovery since about 2007, and 4 Square
Builders’ owner Preston Fox knows well
the ups and downs of the construction
business during that time.
“Being diversified has helped us over
the bumps of the economic road,” Fox
said recently.
In fact, his business is on the upswing
as he descri bed the expansi on of 4
Square Builders currently under way at
its Ninth Street location and the dou-
bling of its storage capacity with a ware-
house project completed last year.
Fox remains optimistic about the com-
pany’s future because it had capitalized
on agricultural building needs to get
over the early recession bumps; it has
now taken advantage of the current
commercial building boom going on in
the Twin Cities area; and it expects resi-
dential building to continue to grow in
the metro area, too.
But the tough times are still fresh in his
memory.
In 2009, 4 Square Builders was down to
a few employees as all construction
seemed to come to a halt as the reces-
sion and the banking crisis deepened.
“We were down to three people, but
we didn’t lay anyone off,” Fox said. “The
older guys retired and one moved to an-
other job.”
One of the remaining workers added,
“and we took turns sweeping the floor.”
Then, in 2010, a Fourth of July storm
swept through west central Minnesota,
destroying a lot of farm structures, Fox
said. As a full-service lumber company,
he said 4 Square Builders not only of-
fered the sales service and supplied ma-
terials, but also constructed many new
farm buildings ever since.
“There was so much work in the agri-
cultural area,” Fox said in the storm’s af-
termath. “It was shed after shed (being
rebuilt) in the Danube area.”
While the residential building was
down, agriculture building was up.
“That went on for about three years,”
Fox added.
When crop prices began to fall, the
farm building construction slowed as
well. Now it has been commercial build-
i ng i n the Twi n Ci ti es area that has
picked up, and 4 Square Builders has
been supplying materials for some of
those 150-unit apartment projects.
“It’s our ability to perform service,” Fox
said and added when building framers
need materials, “they can’t wait. We can
be there tomorrow. ” He sai d he has
loaded semis full of building materials
for such large projects.
Fox said it has taken him years to build
up rel ati onshi ps wi th these metro
builders, “and more is coming.”
The residential construction market in
the metro area is heating up again, too,
Fox said, especially in the Edina and
Wayzata areas. “And we continue to work
wi th other bui l ders to the east, ” he
added.
As to residential construction in the
Glencoe area, Fox predicted that will
come, too, but at a lot slower pace.
“It will get out here, but going further
west (from the metro) takes time.”
Fox said there are four or five new
Glencoe-area construction projects in
the works already this year.
One is 4 Square Builders’ 1,500-square-
foot addition, which will house a larger
showroom as well as other office space.
The goal, Fox said, is to improve efficien-
cy, provide a bigger and better show-
room of materials and supplies, and to
make it easier for the customer. He said
the upswing in building work has pro-
vided customers with a different, more
optimistic attitude now.
After the addition is completed, Fox
said he will try to update the showroom
with more and new trendy items.
“We want to try to keep the showroom
fresh.”
Currently, 4 Square Builders has eight
employees and the expansion could
bring in more workers as the summer
progresses, Fox said. But finding skilled
construction workers is getting more dif-
ficult, he added.
“There are fewer trades people than
before,“ Fox said. “There are not a lot of
younger ones coming up. The The labor
force is not there. A lot of young people
went into IT (information technology) in-
stead and do not work with their hands.”
He said he has worked with trade
schools and technology schools in the
past to find workers.
If another expansion is warranted in
the future, Fox said 4 Square Builders
also has purchased an adjacent property
to its west on Ninth Street in the east
side of Glencoe.
Fox said he appreciates the support of
his long-term customers.
“They have been wonderful to work
with on a daily basis and yearly basis.”
4 Square successfully builds on diversification
Horizon photo by Rich Glennie
Preston Fox and 4 Square Builders took advantage of a
booming agricultural building market to ride out the Great
Recession’s impact on the residential housing and com-
mercial sectors. The company is now back to assisting with
residential and commercial building.
Page 16 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015
910 E. 10
th
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HOURS: M-F 7:30 am-8 pm
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McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015 HORIZON Page 17
By Rich Glennie
Correspondent
“I t’s going to be a mess. There are
going to be disruptions,“ said Glencoe
City Administrator Mark Larson.
After more than three years of plan-
ning and designing, the second phase of
the city’s comprehensive street improve-
ment plan will begin this spring.
This year’s $6.5 million reconstruction
project involves a 30-block area sur-
rounding Lincoln Park and could begin
in mid-May or as soon as the spring road
restrictions are lifted, Larson said. When
the project begins is up to the contrac-
tor, Duininck Brothers of Prinsburg. Sub-
stantial completion of the work is ex-
pected by November, and the final layer
of street bituminous will be completed
in June 2016.
The first phase of the comprehensive
street work was completed in 2014 and
included mainly street surface improve-
ments throughout the western one-third
of Glencoe. This year’s work involves
more extensive total reconstruction of
streets and upgrading of underground
sewer and water lines around Lincoln
Park, one of the oldest sections in the
community.
“It will be segmented, ” Larson said
with one segment of the work to be
done at a time and then move to the
next segment. Larson said the streets will
be torn up and filled in three times as
new water, sanitary sewer and then
storm sewer lines are installed in the
streets.
Larson said power poles also will be
removed as underground electrical,
cable and phone lines are installed in
what he calls the city’s “single trench pol-
icy.” All will be placed in the same trench,
he added.
Added to the project are the three in-
tersections on Chandler Avenue at Sev-
enth, Eighth and Ninth streets. Larson
said the Minnesota Department of Trans-
portation (MnDOT) requires those inter-
sections to be done as part of the recon-
struction, and the city has a two-week
window to get it completed.
Larson said Chandler Avenue traffic
will be detoured around to Morningside
Drive to get on and off Highway 212, and
then using 10th Street to get into the
city.
Some of the avenues also will be nar-
rowed, while a hiking-biking trail on one
side of Eighth Avenue will be construct-
ed from near Seneca Foods east to Hen-
nepin Avenue.
Another factor is the city’s water treat-
ment plant, which lies right in the middle
of this year’s street reconstruction. New
lines are scheduled for the water plant as
well, and that could cause some incon-
venience, too, Larson said. Those in the
construction area may need the use of
temporary water and sewer connections
to their homes while new lines are in-
stalled in the streets.
Larson said the cast iron water lines at
the water plant need to be replaced. He
said pressure tests were recently done at
the plant, and the rusty bolts holding the
cast iron pipes together failed. “It’s due,”
Larson said of replacing the plant’s old
water lines.
He said when those pipes are replaced,
the plant will be down to a temporary
six-inch line, and there may be some
water restrictions required for extra
things like lawn sprinkling. For normal
daily usage, Larson said the city’s water
towers have the capacity for 800,000 gal-
lons of water.
The city will issue $7 million in bonds
to pay for the project, but at least 20 per-
cent of the cost will be assessed to af-
fected property owners. That is required
by state statute, according to the city’s
bond experts.
Weekly progress meetings will be held
at the Glencoe City Center throughout
the construction, Larson said.
In 2011, the city authorized a street in-
ventory be done to determine the condi-
tion of city streets throughout the com-
munity. That survey was accepted by the
City Council in June 2012. After several
public informational open houses, delet-
ed from the plan were most of the area‘s
sidewalks, except for the east side of
DeSoto Avenue that leads to the walk
bridge over Highway 212. Also eliminat-
ed from the plans was a proposed trail
system leading to Helen Baker Elemen-
tary School on 16th Street.
The 2015 plans also call for the re-
moval of about 30 trees, and most will ei-
ther be damaged by the street recon-
struction or are diseased.
Two alternates have been included in
the 2015 work. Both involve the lining of
existing sanitary sewer lines south of
Buffalo Creek. The sewer lines include an
18-inch diameter line from about Ford
Avenue traveling east to a 15-inch line at
about McLeod Avenue that then travels
farther east to the city’s wastewater
treatment plant.
Those sanitary sewer lines are clay
pipes that are leaking at the joints, allow-
ing a lot of infiltration of clear water into
the sewers.
Cost of the two al ternates are
$315,000. That cost would not be as-
sessed ,but picked up by the city.
The city will bond for the the $6.25
million project. The bonds will be repaid
using funds from the city’s wastewater
and water funds, as well as at least 20
percent assessments to property owners.
The new city bonds will be replacing old
bonds that are coming off the city’s debt
service. Those coming off will offset the
new bond.
*****
In other city developments, Larson
said the second phase of the airport
project will get under way this summer.
That phase includes the construction of
a parallel taxiway at a cost of about $1.3
million. That comes on the heels of the
2014 reconstruction of the airport run-
way, which also cost about $1.3 million.
Larson said both projects received 90
percent federal dollars and 5 percent
state dollars. The city’s 5 percent share
amounts to about $100,000, Larson said.
A bid opening for the 2015 airport
project will be April 23, Larson said.
*****
The north wall of the Glencoe City
Center will be completed this year. Using
a state Legacy grant, the north wall of
the City Center was worked on late last
year, but the final washing of the wall
was delayed due to the cold, wintery
weather. Larson said the late start on the
work last year was due to delays by the
state in approving the work.
Al so at the Ci ty Center, two more
rooms were remodeled on the second
floor for the Glencoe Library, and the
new woodworking group has remodeled
spaces in the City Center basement for
its use.
*****
Clean-up work at the former Mark’s
Lincoln Park improvements will begin soon
Graphic courtesy of SEH Engineering, Inc.
The above drawing shows the scope and area of the pro-
posed Lincoln Park improvement project. Construction is
expected to start this spring and continue into 2016 for a
final layer of bituminous.
Lincoln Park
continued on page 18
Page 18 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015
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Economart site on Greeley Avenue is
nearly complete, Larson said. The city re-
ceived a Department of Employment
and Economic Development (DEED)
grant to demolish the former grocery
store building, which was started last fall.
But early winter weather hampered
compl eti on of the demol i ti on and
cleanup until this spring. Black dirt was
hauled onto the site recently, and the
ground leveled.
The site is being redeveloped for other
uses. If that redevelopment occurs in the
next several years, a portion of the DEED
grant will be forgiven.
In a related issue and a block to the
north, the former Denny’s Barber Shop
building will be demolished once all the
asbestos is removed from the two-story
building. MJ Neisen of Brownton re-
ceived the bid for the demolition and is
expected to begin the work in early
April, Larson said.
Other development issues:
• The possible construction of an office
and storage facility for Rice Construction
of Sauk Rapids is still uncertain, Larson
said. The site chosen is in the new indus-
trial park near the newly opened USDA
Service Center building.
• Archer Midland Daniels (ADM) is
preparing plans to construct a new $15
million feed mill and warehouse facility
on its current location at 10th Street and
Elliott Avenue. The plans call for the new,
larger feed mill to replace the current
one that will eventually be removed.
• Seneca Foods is asking a special use
extension from the city for its migrant
housing unit to remain open for 165
days this year. Larson said Seneca Foods
is adding carrot processing to its corn
and pea packs.
• The city also completed its $500,000
municipal liquor store remodeling and
expansion in 2014, and it purchased the
former subdivision near Miller Manufac-
turing for use as a Glencoe Technology
Park. Larson said the lone residential
home in the subdivision is scheduled to
be moved to Hutchinson around the
third week in April. The home was ob-
tained by Crow River Habitat For Hu-
manity. As to the technology park, Lar-
son said the city has not put any efforts
into marketing the property, yet.
Miller Manufacturing has purchased a
portion of that subdivision for its future
expansion plans.
Lincoln Parkcontinued from page 17
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Stop
Shopping
Place an ad for any of our papers:
The Glencoe Advertiser • The Sibley Shopper • The Galaxy
The McLeod County Chronicle • Arlington Enterprise
at either of our locations:
716 E. 10th St.,
Glencoe
320-864-5518
advertising@glencoenews.com
402 W. Alden St.,
Arlington
507-964-5547
info@arlingtonmnnews.com
McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015 HORIZON Page 19
We’re more than just your home-town paper!
Our graphic design team is here to help
with all of your business needs.
Contact our office to get started.
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716 E. 10 St., Glencoe, MN • 320-864-5518 • info@glencoenews.com
Visit www.McPubDesigns.com for more ideas!
Snap Fitness – Glencoe
The Glencoe Area Chamber of Com-
merce welcomed Snap Fitness to their
new location in Glencoe with a ribbon
cutting on Wednesday, August 27. The
Snap Fitness new location is at 712 11th
Street East, Glencoe. Pictured, left to
right are Kurt Kramer, Glencoe Family
Chiropractic; Keith Ortloff, Franklin
Printing, Inc.; Sarah Friberg, Snap Fitness
Manager; Alyssa Bergemann, Snap Fit-
ness General Manager; Scott Rhodes,
Coborn’s; and Ellen Felmlee, Security
Bank & Trust / PrimeVest Financial.
File photos
Glencoe Wine and Spirits
The Glencoe Area Chamber of Com-
merce celebrated the newly remod-
eled Glencoe Wine and Spirits with
a ribbon cutting on Wednesday
Sept. 17. The newly remodeled and
expanded Glencoe Wine and Spirits
is located at 630 10th St. East in
Glencoe. Pictured from left to right
are: Ellen Felmlee (Primevest Finan-
ci al Servi ces), Scott Rhodes
(Coborn’s), Sue Deckert (Glencoe
Wine and Spirits), Mark Larson
(Glencoe City Administrator), Kelly
Rach (Ameriprise Financial), Dave
Nelson (Glencoe Area Chamber of
Commerce), Kurt Kramer (Glencoe
Family Chiropractic).
DaVita
The Glencoe Area Chamber of Commerce
celebrated the Grand Opening of DaVita
Dialysis Center with a ribbon cutting on
Tuesday, Oct.28. DaVita is located at 1123
Hennepin Ave. North in Glencoe. Pictured
from left to right are: Laura Berman
(DaVita), Pam Eichens (DaVita), Chip An-
derson (Schad, Lindstrand and Schuth),
Loreen Schroepfer (DaVita), Kurt Kramer
(Glencoe Family Chiropractic), Cari Dock
(DaVita), Keith Ortloff (Franklin Printing),
Dawn Sarringar (DaVita), Tammy Horner
(DaVita), Ellen Felmlee (Primevest Finan-
cial Services), Dave Nelson (Chamber).
Business ribbons cut
Page 20 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015
137
YEARS
Gould’s
Jewelry
Est.
1878
Wm. B. Gould &
Pamela K. Gould
80
YEARS
Security
Bank &
Trust Co.
October, 1935
Member F.D.I.C.
134
YEARS
First
Minnesota
Bank
864-3161
93
YEARS
Harpel
Bros., Inc.
GM Dealership
Since
November 1922
68
YEARS
Professional
Insurance
Providers
Since 1947
74
YEARS
Glencoe
Regional
Health
Services
Established
1941
46
YEARS
Jungclaus
Implement
Motorsports
Auto Parts
Lawn & Garden
Since 1969
76
YEARS
Gavin,
Winters,
&
Long Ltd.
1017 N Hennepin, Glencoe
48
YEARS
Bernie’s
Furniture
Quality Brand
Name Furniture
June 1, 1967
Tim Ardolf, Owner
77
YEARS
Light and
Power
Commission
81
YEARS
Glencoe
Wine &
Spirits
Started Jan., 1934
46
YEARS
Glencoe
NAPA
910 E. 10th St.
320-864-5525
62
YEARS
KDUZ
Radio
1260 AM
80
YEARS
McLeod
Cooperative
Power
Assn.
1231 Ford Ave.
Glencoe
165
YEARS
Glencoe-
Silver
Lake
Public
Schools
110
YEARS
NU-
Telecom
Established in 1905.
Serving the
community of Glen-
coe since 2010.
320-864-2818
44
YEARS
Jerry
Scharpe
Ltd.
Certified Public
Accountant
45
YEARS
Glencoe Area
Chamber of
Commerce
Established in 1970
75
YEARS
State Farm
Agent Larry G.
Anderson
806 10th St.,
Suite 102
Glencoe, MN
44
YEARS
Exsted
Realty
Since April 21, 1971
Willard Exsted
41
YEARS
Glencoe
Lions Club
Making a
difference in our
community
since 1974
McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015 HORIZON Page 21
25
YEARS
Fashion
Interiors
2108 E. 10th St.
Glencoe 864-6664
Owners: Randy &
Renee Wawrzyniak
37
YEARS
Bergmann
Interiors
Floor Coverings
Window Treatments
June 1978
31
YEARS
Dave
Witthus Con-
struction
320-510-1617
31
YEARS
Alsleben
Trucking
320-864-4509
33
YEARS
Kevin’s Auto
Service Inc.
864-5909
31
YEARS
RDV
Companies
Started July, 1984
Owner Ryan Voss
35
YEARS
Kevin Post
Agency
Atlas Insurance
Brokers
320-864-3943
35
YEARS
Happy
Hour
Inn
815 11th St. E.
Glencoe
36
YEARS
Gerry’s
Vision
Shoppe, Inc.
September 1979
Heidi Klockmann, Owner
320-864-6111
34
YEARS
Schiroo
Electrical
Rebuilding
Started Feb., 1981
320-864-6200
37
YEARS
Gruenhagen
Insurance
Started in 1978
36
YEARS
Myron
Schuette
Construction,
LLC
Since 1979
30
YEARS
Dobrava
Bros.
Plumbing &
Heating
864-6335
28
YEARS
Bump’s
Family
Restaurant
Mike McGuire &
Eileen Popelka
28
YEARS
Gauer
Chiropractic
Clinic
Dr. Scott Gauer
Dr. Robert Brown
32
YEARS
Dubb’s
Grill & Bar
Gene Moske,
Owner
26
YEARS
Priority 1
Metrowest
Realty
Brian O’Donnell
24
YEARS
Orchard
Estates
864-7798
38
YEARS
McLeod
Publishing,
Inc.
November 1977
23
YEARS
Hearing
Care
Specialists
Kurt T. Pfaff, Au.D.
320-864-5262
41
YEARS
Glencoe
VFW
Post 5102
Established
Sept., 1974
Page 22 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015
15
YEARS
Coborn’s
2211 11th St. E.
Glencoe
17
YEARS
RE/MAX
Homes
Team Jenkins
864-6870
16
YEARS
Edward
Jones
Kirk Miller
320-864-4397
13
YEARS
The Hair
Studio
1220 Hennepin Ave.
Glencoe, MN
320-864-6033
Owners Wayne &
Tanya Mathews
12
YEARS
Coldwell
Banker
Realty
Fred Werth
11
YEARS
Southwest
Eye Care
1201 Greeley Ave. #3,
Glencoe
864-2020
6
YEARS
Grand
Meadows
1420 Prairie Ave.
Glencoe
6
YEARS
KGLB-AM
1310
July 15, 2009
13
YEARS
Glen Knoll
Park &
Storage/
Glencoe
Laundry
6
YEARS
Dominion
Cares
1205 10th St.
Glencoe
320-864-9926
4
YEARS
Glencoe
City Center
320-864-6951
22
YEARS
KARP
106.9 FM
Radio
22
YEARS
Cutting
Edge
729 10th St. E.
Glencoe 864-3518
Lisa Ahlbrecht,
Owner
22
YEARS
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The McLeod
County
Chronicle
McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015 HORIZON Page 23
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Page 24 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 25, 2015
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