Horizon 2014: Progress of Glencoe

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New ECFE
addition
Framing shop under
new ownership
DaVita to
open kidney
dialysis
center
Rice Building Systems
to build in Glencoe
Page 2 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014
By Alyssa Schauer
Staff Writer
I
n January, the Glencoe-Silver Lake
Early Childhood Family Education
(ECFE) and school readiness moved
into its new location at the GSL Early
Childhood Learning Center addition at the
Lincoln Junior High School.
ECFE Director Jan Mackenthun said
the move improved many aspects of the
ECFE programs, including an upgrade in
technology and an increase in space.
“We haven’t really been included in the
K-12 technology upgrades throughout the
district, and at this new facility, we have
SMART boards for our preschool class-
room and a SMART table in our ECFE
room,” Mackenthun said.
The SMART table is a multi-user learn-
ing table with a “screen” as the table top.
Up to eight students can learn together at
the same time, interacting with activities
on the multi-touch surface.
Mackenthun demonstrated that students
can draw shapes, complete educational
lessons and more on the table top.
“I didn’t want a big screen for kids this
age in the room. We use the table to learn
shapes, as well as our ‘Shape Monster,’
that eats certain shapes,” Mackenthun
said.
She said she wanted to avoid “too much
screen time” while the children are at
school, and that the table offers more
chances for interaction.
“Students can draw shapes on the table,
and the educational lessons built in help
with motor skills. It’s a very satisfying
kind of art,” she said.
She said the move into the new addition
at Lincoln has also given the ECFE pro-
gram more space for parents, specialists
and students.
“In the ECFE program, parents come
first, and children are second. Children
cannot come to ECFE without a parent.
The goal of ECFE is to build a strong,
healthy family, and our job is to help par-
ents reach that goal,” Mackenthun said.
In the new addition, a “parent” room
was built for ECFE parents to meet and be
able to discuss any issues with their chil-
dren.
The room has a two-way mirror for par-
ents to observe their children in the learn-
ing environment. The room also contains
a flat-screen TV and live wire connection
to cameras placed in the classroom that
give parents the chance to identify any
learning or social issues in their children.
“In this room, parents can observe if
their child is having any separation issues,
sharing problems, if they are transitioning
from activity to activity well, etc.,” Mack-
enthun said.
She added: “This room is especially
great for parents of toddlers. Toddlerhood
is that conflicting time of ‘I, I, I...I want
Mommy, I need Mommy.’ This readiness
room is a great place to practice separa-
tion rituals for parents and their toddlers.
“It makes the transition to preschool
easier, since they already had practice
coming to the facility and meeting the
teachers. The readiness program also
gives the children a chance to develop re-
lationships with different adults,” Mack-
enthun said.
The extra space in the ECFE addition
also allows privacy for specialists, Mack-
enthun said.
In the past, the speech clinician often
had to use other rooms to work one-on-
one with children, “but there was not al-
ways space available,” Mackenthun said.
“This room gives our speech clinician
the quiet, one-on-one space she needs,”
she said.
Mackenthun said a major advantage to
the new space at Lincoln is the “motor
room.”
“One thing that is absolutely marvelous
about this move is having a motor room.
ECFE and school readiness programs
were low on the totem pole for gym time
at Helen Baker. Often, we would only get
a chunk of time from 11:30 a.m. to noon
for gym time, and we didn’t even have
kids at that time!” Mackenthun said.
“So this is awesome,” she said as she
opened the door to the wide space that
housed play equipment and mats.
Mackenthun said in the plans for the
motor room, she asked that there be no
false ceiling.
The lack of a false ceiling makes it pos-
sible for the occupational therapist to in-
stall a swing from the ceiling for the chil-
dren.
“The other beauty of this room, is that
we can have developing children and kids
with developmental disabilities play to-
gether. Those children have never worked
together consistently before until this was
built. They can use the motor room to-
gether, and learn from each other,” Mack-
enthun said.
“And after things get going, we will be
having a playground. We are already look-
ing at fundraising for the project,” she
said.
She said she is already writing grants
for the project, too. “We’ve never had a
playground for the kids. The one at Helen
Baker is specifically designed for K-2
children, and the playground we have de-
signed is specifically for 2-year-olds to 5-
year-olds. It will be the only playground
in Glencoe with activities specific for
those children,” she said.
“It’s really exciting. I hope it’ll be the
kind of place parents can stop by with
their children and enjoy it,” she said.
New ECFE addition opens up options
Chronicle photo by Alyssa Schauer
The new ECFE addition at the Glencoe-Silver Lake Lin-
coln Junior High School building offers upgrades and
more space for the early childhood programs, including
the technology of SMART boards. The boards allow for in-
teractive learning, and until the new addition, the ECFE
programs did not have the upgraded technology.
Chronicle photo by Alyssa Schauer
Above is the “Motor Room,” which
gives the ECFE students space to
play and move about. At Helen Baker,
gymnasium time was shared, and the
ECFE students rarely were able to
use the facility due to scheduling
conflicts.
In the school readiness room, stu-
dents have access to a “SMART
table,” which is also used for inter-
active learning.
McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014 HORIZON Page 3
Rich Glennie
Editor
D
ating back to the 1990s when a
Farr Development housing proj-
ect was planned in the west side
of Glencoe, a study of the west ditch sys-
tem was made and determined there were
major constrictions along the ditch from
north of Glencoe running south to Buffalo
Creek.
The constrictions included growth with-
in the ditch, old, deteriorating culverts
under State Highway 22 and County Road
3, issues near Seneca Foods and with
drainage through the cemetery.
Prior to that, annual complaints about
ice jams each spring caused flooding in
the nearby Haukos Trailer Park.
In the decades since, the city has been
dealing with the west-ditch issue, off and
on, without much progress.
Now after years of studies, complaints,
flooding and fits and starts on finding so-
lutions, another effort is being put togeth-
er to address the west-ditch system, now
called the Marsh Water Project.
This time, the Buffalo Creek Watershed
District (BCWD) is getting actively in-
volved to try help address what is going
into Buffalo Creek from the west-ditch
watershed that encompasses a large area
north and west of Glencoe.
BCWD has ultimate control of the sys-
tem and what it dumps into Buffalo
Creek.
Much of the watershed lies outside of
the city limits of Glencoe, but some of the
ditch runs through the west end of the
city.
Who owns the ditch system has been a
sticking point to progress over the years,
and remains a mystery.
To address that issue, it is proposed to
establish water management district with
authority to BCWD to assess costs to af-
fected property owners within that water-
shed district.
Project engineer Chris Otterness of
Houston Engineering of Maple Grove and
John C. Kolb, an attorney from Rinke and
Noonan of St. Cloud, recently met with
city and BCWD officials to explain what
is being proposed.
*****
The consultants, plus Larry Phillips of
Glencoe, a member of the BCWD Board,
said a study, funded by BCWD in August
2012, stated the purposes of the water
management project would be:
1) Reduction of sediment and nutrient
loading to Buffalo Creek;
2) Reduction of peak flows to Buffalo
Creek;
3) Reduction of flood damages in areas
along the Marsh ditch and Buffalo Creek;
4) Improvement of the function and
maintenance of the ditch as a primary
conveyance of storm water passing into
and through the city of Glencoe.
The estimated cost of a project would
be about $1.16 million.
Since the ditch system is not controlled
by any one entity; it is a private ditch. The
only entity who can control the entire
ditch system is the BCWD.
There are really three branches to the
ditch that run through the city, Seneca
property and the cemetery before crossing
under Highway 212 and into Buffalo
Creek.
One branch comes from the west and
near Miller Manufacturing, another from
the east and from the holding ponds in the
NorthCountry Estates additions, and the
main one that runs north to south between
the other two branches.
The first phase of any work would in-
clude the main branch, Otterness said.
The costs, estimated in the 2012 study,
put the west ditch work at $400,000; the
main ditch work at $521,000; storm sewer
work at $98,000; and easement acquisi-
tion at $141,000.
Each could be done independently, Ot-
terness said, but work best when done to-
gether.
Along the way, the study identified nu-
merous constrictions caused by vegetation
in the ditch, culverts in poor condition and
issues with the storm sewer running
through the cemetery.
Otterness said at issue also is the water
quality, “which is not good at all.” He
pointed to the muddy conditions caused
by solids and nutrients coming from farm
fields. Added to that are chemicals from
city streets after the winter season.
One aim of the first phase is to build
holding ponds to filter out the sediments
and nutrients before the water gets to Buf-
falo Creek.
The aim of the work is to reduce the
sediments, reduce peak flows that cause
flooding and to maintain the ditch system,
something that is not now occurring due
to questions of ownership.
A storm water wetland is being pro-
posed in low lands south of Highway 22,
and that land would be taken out of agri-
cultural production. The west ditch would
be realigned to be channeled into the new
wetland, Otterness said.
The wetland would hold, filter and slow
down the flow of ditch water to Buffalo
Creek, he said.
A second main ditch project would be a
biofilter basin to filter sediment and nutri-
ents through sand before entering into the
main part of the ditch.
The third part would be to repair the
storm sewer through the cemetery.
Otterness said the aim of the wetland
basin and biofilter basin is to retain more
flow and release it at a slower pace. “We
do not want a greater flow than is current-
ly going through,” Otterness stressed.
The final phase is to acquire easements
in order to maintain the ditch system in
the future. The easements would be con-
trolled by BCWD.
*****
Kolb, an attorney with Rinke Noonan of
St. Cloud, outlined the legal process of
setting up a water management district,
with BCWD in charge, as well as attain-
ing easements for the ditch maintenance.
Kolb said there are three ways to pay
for the ditch project: 1) secure conserva-
tion and clean water grants; 2) form a
water management district and charge af-
fected owners for the work; and 3) use a
general fund (ad valorem) tax within the
entire BCWD.
Project aims at west ditch water issues
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Flooding/
Crop Damage
Flooding
Water Quality
Issues
Stormsewer
Deterioration
The main issues involved with the proposed Marsh Water
Project are flooding and water quality control along the
ditch system on the west side of Glencoe. The east
branch runs past Haukos Trailer Park (yellow areas), the
west branch contributes to flooding either side of High-
way 22 (orange areas) and the main branch runs past
Seneca Foods, south through the city cemetery and to
Buffalo Creek (bottom of photo).
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Page 4 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014
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Glencoe Lions Club
40 Years of Service to a Progressive
Glencoe Community
Donations to the community are made possible from charitable gaming at:
Dubb’s Grill & Bar
& Glencoe Country Club
Persons in our community needing help with hearing,
vision or diabetes, or if you are interested in becoming a Glencoe Lion
member, please contact:
Glencoe Lions, Box 54, Glencoe, MN 55336
or http://www.glencoe.5m2lions.org
License Number A02235
McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014 HORIZON Page 5
By Rich Glennie
Editor
A
s the snowbanks gradually disap-
pear after a brutal winter, there
are signs of life in Glencoe with
plans for the addition of several new busi-
nesses to the community.
The new additions to the community
could add another 60 jobs to the local
workforce.
The new businesses and expansions in-
clude Rice Construction of Sauk Rapids,
building a new office/storage facility;
DaVita, a dialysis company, remodeling an
existing downtown building; and Miller
Manufacturing, expanding at its current fa-
cility.
And Starkey Labs has indicated a need
to hire 10 more employees, while the
USDA office along Ninth Street in east
Glencoe has announced plans to build a
new office in the industrial park, retaining
the 14 local jobs.
Besides that, the city plans for some
downtown renovations, including an ex-
pansion/remodeling project at the liquor
store and the demolition of the former
Mark’s Economart building and the Sunlife
Travel building, both along Greeley Av-
enue.
Also on this year’s agenda is a nearly $2
million street improvement project, as well
as the first phase of a two-phase airport
improvement project to resurface an exist-
ing runway and build a parallel taxiway.
What will not happen this year is the ex-
tension of Morningside Avenue north from
11th Street to 16th Street. That city-county
project has been scraped by the city as
being too expensive.
Rice construction
Glencoe City Council and city officials
received word earlier this year that Rice
Construction Systems of Sauk Rapids
plans to break ground as soon as possible
on a new 8,000-square-foot office/storage
building on a 1.8-acre lot in the new indus-
trial park.
Plans also call for storage not only in the
building but outside the facility on an acre
of the lot just west of the Midwest Porcine
facility. (See separate article.)
Miller Manufacturing
Another big project will be the addition
of a 60,000-square-foot addition onto
Miller Manufacturing’s facility on the west
side of Glencoe. The new expansion, on
the northwest side of the facility, is expect-
ed to add another 30 jobs. (See separate ar-
ticle.)
Starkey Labs
Nelson said Starkey Labs is advertising
for eight more sales staff members, a man-
ager and one support staff employee on ex-
panding its workforce.
Bosch/Telex
The Bosch/Telex building on 14th
Street, vacant for the past two years when
Bosch closed down the factory, was sold
last fall to West City Partnership in the
west metro area. The 97,000-square-foot
building is now available for lease or sale
for light industrial, commercial, assembly
and manufacturing,
Nelson said.
USDA plans
Nelson said the
United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture
(USDA) Service Cen-
ter, on Ninth Street in
east Glencoe, has an-
nounced plans for a
4,000-square-foot
building in the city’s
new industrial park.
He said the project
will retain 14 local
jobs.
Last year, the
USDA looked at of-
fices in the west wing
of the Glencoe City
Center for its new of-
fices, but that plan
never materialized.
Larson said a
group from Foley is
looking at purchasing
a .9-acre lot with
plans to build a
4,000-square-foot
building for the new
USDA offices.
The sale of the lot has not been closed,
Larson, and the USDA would lease the
building once built.
The lot is located adjacent to a lot for the
future Rice Building Systems office and
storage building, Larson said.
Liquor store
The Glencoe Municipal Liquor Store,
which will be renamed Glencoe Wine &
Spirits, is scheduled to be remodeled and
ready in the first or second week of April,
Glencoe City Administrator Mark Larson
said.
The interior demolition is complete,
steel support work is up, and the new cool-
ers for the liquor store will be installed
soon, Larson said.
There needed to be some additional floor
support work done before the new coolers
could be installed.
He said the liquor store may need to be
closed for a couple of weeks during
March, and a new doorway needs to be cut
and installed on the west side of the build-
ing.
The project also includes the construc-
tion of a new 29-vehicle parking lot on city
owned property west of the liquor store.
That portion of the project will include
some fill brought onto the property and a
retaining wall installed. The alley will no
longer be for through traffic, Larson added.
New shelving has been ordered, Larson
said, and when all is done, Glencoe Wines
& Spirits will have double the floor space
and cooler capacity.
The other addition will be a “beer cave,”
where customers simply walk in and pick
up their beer cases off pallets in the cooler
area.
Larson said there could be some staffing
increases at the liquor store due to the ex-
pansion, but that has yet to be determined.
Street projects
The 2014 street improvement project,
which involves mainly overlay, sealcoating
and some partial reconstruction on streets,
will begin this summer. It is the first of a
multi-phased project.
The $1.9 million project in 2014 also in-
cludes paving of the liquor store parking
lot as well as paving and some reconstruc-
tion of the hiking-biking trail from Oak
Leaf Park east along County Road 33
(First Street) to Morningside Avenue and
then north of Morningside to the connec-
Glencoe has a lot in works
Mark Larson David Nelson
Chronicle photo by Rich Glennie
Liquor store expansion
The Glencoe Municipal Liquor Store, which will
be renamed Glencoe Wine & Spirits, is undergo-
ing extensive expansion and remodeling that will
double the size of the facility. The over $400,000
expansion project is going into the former city
hall offices and takes up the entire front half of
the facility that is shared with the police depart-
ment. The new main entrance will be on the west
side (far right). The project is expected to be
completed in early April.
Several new
businesses,
projects,
expansions
set this year
City projects
Turn to page 6
Page 6 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014
By Rich Glennie
Editor
M
iller Manufacturing came to
Glencoe in 2005 and promised
to bring 90 jobs to the com-
munity. It also promised to rehab the for-
mer NordicTrack building that sat idle for
over a decade.
Almost a decade later, the local manu-
facturer of a wide variety of farm and
ranch products has grown to over 200 em-
ployees, acquired other businesses to
complement its manufacturing product
lines and is on the verge of a new 60,000-
square-foot addition.
Groundbreaking on the new $2.5 mil-
lion addition actually began last fall with
major backfilling and landscaping work,
and the actual construction of the new
storage facility is expected this spring as
soon as the road limits are lifted.
Dan Ferisse, Miller Manufacturing
chief executive officer, said quotes from
construction contractors are expected by
late March and then those quotes will be
reviewed.
He said doing the site work last fall —
bringing in or taking out 500 truck loads
of soil — has allowed the ground to settle
over the winter before construction be-
gins.
The company also bought some adjoin-
ing land for future expansion, Ferisse
said, which is part of the company’s long-
term planning.
*****
Ferisse said there is a plan in play and
that included the acquisition in January
2012 of the farm division of the Double L
Group (Double-Tuff), and in January of
2014 of Allied Precision Industries Inc.
(API) of Elburn, Ill. Both fit into Miller
Manufacturing’s commercial ag products
division.
The Double L product lines included
buckets, tubs, feeders, rubber mats, Versa
Pad™flooring, horse stalls, goat products,
stall products, bale feeders and auger hop-
pers.
Allied Precision “broadens and
strengthens the product offerings of
Miller Manufacturing’s farm, ranch and
pet categories ...” the company announced
at the time of that purchase.
Right now the company is about 50 per-
cent organic growth and 50 percent acqui-
sition, Ferisse said. The aim is for more
organic growth within the company.
And Miller Manufacturing is constantly
adjusting to the market demands as well.
Ferrise said the company offers a cata-
log of over 1,000 products and keeps
adding more.
One area of new product growth is in
beekeeping. He said Miller Manufactur-
ing will be among the first in the industry
to retail beekeeping products in farm and
ranch stores.
“Thank goodness for homesteading,”
Ferisse said. He said “homesteading” is
an idea of looking toward your own re-
sources to offset costs of living, like hav-
ing backyard poultry, vegetable gardens,
canning and baking more. “There’s a
large resurgence in baking, canning and
orchards for your own fruits,” Ferisse
said. “Beekeeping falls perfectly into
what interests our consumers,” he added
of backyard hobbyists and hobby farms.
*****
Ferisse said the company is in a
“healthy growth campaign” that has 22
job vacancies right now.
He said the focus is on hiring fork lift
drivers and workers in the shipping and
packing areas, as well as direct labor.
Workers are needed in metal working and
molding as well.
“We’re having a tough time finding em-
ployees,” Ferisse said. “The aim is to re-
cruit the right people with a passion to
work, and we pay competitive wages and
offer good benefits.”
The acquisition of the Illinois company
“fit into the (company’s) plan,” Ferisse
said.
The acquisition process involved look-
ing for the ideal acquisition candidate
whose products complemented Miller
Manufacturing’s existing ag products. He
said the aim was to find companies whose
product line “filled our gaps.”
“API did just that. Miller Manufactur-
ing can now offer heated buckets and wa-
ters for livestock and pets,” Ferisse said.
“We’re busy. We’re growing. We’re
healthy and expanding,” Ferisse said of
growth both nationally and international-
ly.
The company sells its products to a
large network of farm and animal health
supply distributors in the United States
and 30 countries around the world.
“As long as we continue to grow, we
will continue to see expansion,’ Ferisse
added.
*****
But the expansion project has not been
easy. It has run the gambit of state and
local regulations, including land use rules
with the Glencoe city planning commis-
sion and Buffalo Creek Watershed Dis-
trict; it had to deal the state JOBZ pro-
gram; and Miller Manufacturing has
worked with Department of Employment
and Economic Development (DEED) on
jobs incentives and other matters.
In the end, Miller Manufacturing will
be bigger and better than before with an
expanding workforce at a time when the
effects of the “great recession” still echo
in outstate Minnesota.
Glencoe City Council has been support-
ive of Miller Manufacturing’s expansion
efforts.
Last fall, City Council supported the re-
moval of the three acres of the Miller
Manufacturing property from the state’s
JOBZ program and approved that portion
of the property going into a new pay-as-
you-go tax increment financing (TIF) dis-
trict.
In other words, 95 percent of the new
taxes generated by the expansion project
will be rebated to Miller Manufacturing.
The company, owned by Dennis and
Greg Frandsen of Corporation of North
Branch, “is a debt-free company, self-
funded,” Ferisse said.
Miller Manufacturing upfronted the
original cost of the expansion work. The
TIF runs for 10 years, after which the
property goes back onto the local property
tax rolls.
This is the latest of several projects for
the company, which bought the Nordic-
Track building that was in disrepair in
2005 and invested $3.2 million in a multi-
phase roof repair.
When the facility was ready, Miller
Manufacturing consolidated five of its fa-
cilities into the 120,000-square-foot Glen-
coe plant. By 2006, it had invested $4
million in the facility.
On Oct. 31, 2011, Miller Manufactur-
ing’s sister company, Springer Magrath of
McCook, Neb., was relocated at the Glen-
coe facility, and the Double L acquisition
occurred on Jan. 31, 2012.
Then this past January, Miller Manufac-
turing acquired Allied Precision Industries
and moved those jobs to the Glencoe fa-
cility.
But even at that, Dan Ferisse, CEO of
Miller Manufacturing, told City Council
last fall, the company has “maximized
every square foot of the facility. It’s full.”
He admits it is a good problem to have.
The company also leases additional space
in Glencoe and has the ability for more
space in Dassel.
Miller Manufacturing continues to grow
Dan Ferisse
Another expansion
in works for this
spring with a
60,000-square-foot
addition to Glencoe
plant.
tion to the Buffalo Highlands Trail.
In 2015, the street improvement project
will be more extensive when it looks at
the area around Lincoln Park in the south-
west corner of Glencoe. That project,
which includes major reconstruction of
underground utilities and streets, is esti-
mated to cost between $4 million and $5
million.
Airport work
The runway reconstruction is scheduled
for this summer at a cost of about
$700,000. Of that amount, the federal
government will pay 90 percent, Larson
said. The city’s share is about $170,000.
Next year, the $1 million parallel taxi-
way project is planned. That is more ex-
pensive because it is new construction op-
posed to the resurfacing work for the ex-
isting runway.
Larson said about two acres of property
are still needed to be acquired for the new
taxiway.
Demolition
The city sought a state loan from the
Minnesota Department of Employment
and Economic Development (DEED) to
help defray the costs of demolishing the
old Mark’s Economart building.
It was initially estimated the demolition
costs for the former grocery store, plus the
parking lot, would run at over $100,000.
The DEED demolition grant was ap-
proved March 5 for $93,500, Nelson said.
Larson said the $20,000 parking lot es-
timate was not funded in the DEED grant,
and it may be left in place as a result.
Demolition could begin this spring or
summer, and the property will be market-
ed as an empty commercial lot.
As part of the project, the city is look-
ing to return a portion of 11th Street to a
two-way traffic.
When the grocery store expanded many
years earlier, the expansion took a portion
of 11th Street, which was made into a
one-way street as a result.
The Sunlife building, located between
the former Al’s Sports Bar and Gerry’s Vi-
sion, is scheduled for demolition this
spring. Ken’s Excavating received the bid
to tear down the structure.
Hotel/motel
Still being discussed is a possible motel
in Glencoe. The proposal was made by
Cobblestone Motels over a year ago.
The city also participated in a market-
ing study for a 44-room, three-star motel
project, and results came back favorable.
Cobblestone, through BriMark Inc., its
development arm, then began pursuing
local investors for the project. It also
looked at various potential sites for the
hotel.
No decision on whether to build in
Glencoe has occurred, yet.
City projects Continued from page 4
McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014 HORIZON Page 7
By Rich Glennie
Editor
D
aVita, a division of DaVita
Healthcare Partners Inc., a For-
tune 500 company, is planning
to locate a kidney dialysis facility in
Glencoe.
The company, a leading provider of
kidney care in the United States, is leasing
the former Pam Hallmark’s building on
Hennepin Avenue and has taken out a re-
modeling permit, according to City Ad-
ministrator Mark Larson.
DaVita operates or administers services
to 2,074 outpatient dialysis centers
throughout the United States, serving ap-
proximately 163,000 patients. It also op-
erated 10 dialysis centers outside the U.S..
According to its website, DaVita means
“giving life,” in Italian. and the company
employs about 46,000 workers nation-
wide.
DaVita began in 1999.
During an earlier interview, Larson said
the facility will be a heavy user of water
and electricity, and the building, owned
by the Wedin family, needs an upgrade of
its water service in order for the building
to have a sprinkler system.
Larson and Dave Nelson, chamber pres-
ident, said the city and DaVita have been
in discussions since last fall and the com-
pany will lease the building from the
Wedins.
It was originally thought the facility
would be opened in June this year, but
that will not happen, Larson said. Digging
for the new water line could begin about
mid-May.
The company also is requesting an
awning/canopy permit for the north side
of the building, and the facility will be
handicap accessible.
The designs also indicate parking stalls
will be along side the building, Larson
added.
Larson and Nelson estimated DaVita
could invest about $1 million in remodel-
ing the building and in purchasing new
equipment.
It is estimated the company will estab-
lish six to eight dialysis stations in the fa-
cility and create about 20 medical-techni-
cal jobs.
The facility could open up later this
year.
Nelson, who also acts as the city’s eco-
nomic development director, said having
an empty building available definitely
helped attracting DaVita to Glencoe. He
called the Wedin building “a shoe fit
store,” and that DaVita “is very much a
lease-tenant company” with about 20
other kidney dialysis facilities in Min-
nesota.
DaVita’s Heartland Division is located
at 825 South 8th St., Minneapolis. Any-
one interested, can call 612-852-7102 to
schedule a tour of the dialysis center and
find out about its personalized approach
to kidney care.
Chronicle photo by Rich Glennie
The Hennepin Avenue building housing Pam’s Hallmark,
which went out of business earlier this winter, did not stay
vacant for long. DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc. leased the
facility from the Wedin family to operate a kidney dialysis
center in Glencoe.
DaVita to open kidney dialysis center
in former Pam’s Hallmark building
By Rich Glennie
Editor
A
spring groundbreaking is expected
for the newest business to locate in
Glencoe’s second industrial park
when Rice Building Systems of Sauk Rapids
begins work on a new 8,000-square-foot office
and storage facility.
The new business, a commercial builder and
prime contractor for Coborn’s, is expected to
bring seven to 10 jobs to the area.
Last spring, Rice acquired Raske Building of
Cosmos and was seeking a regional presence in
this area, and specifically along the Highway
212 corridor, said David Nelson, chamber pres-
ident and city’s economic development consult-
ant.
The company purchased a 1.8 acre lot in the
city’s second industrial park, just west of Mid-
west Porcine, for $65,340.
On the lot, Rice plans to build an 8,000-
square-foot building for office space and ware-
house use, and there will be parking for up to
10 people. The plans also call for about an acre
of fenced outdoor storage area
Nelson said Glencoe’s industrial park site
was favored by Rice officials after looking at
both public and private lots on both sides of
Highway 212, “because it was shovel ready”
and close to Highway 212.
Founded in 1953, Rice Building Systems is a
third-generation, family owned design/build
construction services business.
President Chris Rice said, with the purchase
of Raske Building Inc., Rice Building will ex-
pand into southern Minnesota and increase its
workforce by 20 percent. At the time of the
purchase, Rice Building indicated it would re-
tain the Raske Building name and its employ-
ees.
Rice said his company is currently teaming
with Coborn’s on development projects for the
grocery chain in North Dakota. “The addition
of Raske and its employees will give us addi-
tional capabilities to continue to serve our cus-
tomers at a high level.”
Rice Building Systems to build in Glencoe
Rice Building Systems purchased a lot
(Block 1, Lot 1 on bottom left) in Glencoe’s
new industrial park. The lot is located north
of 11th Street and west of the Midwest
Porcine/Miromatrix facility (hatched area).
The lot with the shaded edges is being
looked at by a Foley company that is deal-
ing with possible relocation of the USDA of-
fices in Glencoe.
Page 8 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014
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McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014 HORIZON Page 9
By Lori Copler
Staff Writer
H
istory buffs will soon have a
place of their own at the Glen-
coe Public Library. Actually,
two places, according to Head Librarian
Jackee Fountain.
The library is located in the Glencoe
City Center, which was renovated from
what was once the former Henry Hill
school building. And its roots in the
Henry Hill era will be honored in one of
two former classrooms set to be renovated
this summer.
Fountain said the Friends of the Glen-
coe Library, the Geraldine Tews Trust and
the city of Glencoe are partnering with the
Minnesota Historical Society on the reno-
vation of the two rooms.
The first room, located on the west side
of the library on the second floor of the
City Center, is currently home to the used-
book sale area.
The used books will remain there for
sale, but the room also will be restored to
replicate a 1932 (the year Henry Hill was
built to serve Glencoe school children)
classroom, Fountain said.
Fountain said the Historical Society in-
dicated that the used-book room was the
most suitable for replicating a classroom
because it still has the old slate chalk-
boards, original woodwork and built-in
cabinet.
The ceiling will have exposed mechani-
cal pipes for heating, and the carpet will
be removed and the original wood floor
refinished. The windows were restored as
part of the original renovation of the
building, Fountain said.
“Jerome Ide found us some 1932 period
lighting, and we can get replicas of
those,” said Fountain. “And we have a
couple of people looking for school desks
from that era. In fact, if anyone knows
where we can find some, please give us a
call. Sometimes people have those types
of things stored in a shed or a barn, and
don’t know what to do with them.”
Fountain said the library hopes to find
enough desks to create at least one row.
Another room is being restored on the
east side of the library as an historical re-
search room.
Like the classroom on the west side, the
former east-end classroom has had full
windows restored and the wood floor will
be sanded and varnished.
There are built-in display cases along
wall, that currently house classical litera-
ture books, including at least one of the
original 200 books that were purchased
for the Glencoe Library.
Another wall, which never gets direct
Past to come alive at Glencoe Library
Jackee Fountain, head librarian at the Glencoe Public Library, stands by
some of the built-in display cabinets that were part of an original class-
room in the former Henry Hill school, now the Glencoe City Center. The
room will be renovated for historical research purposes, and will be home
to bound copies of the former Glencoe Enterprise, classic books and his-
torical accounts, copies of the Glencoe High School yearbooks, and other
materials.
By Lori Copler
Staff Writer
T
he various facilities within the
Glencoe City Center have been
so busy that event coordinator
Hannah Huttner-Hallahan had difficulty
finding a time slot to have the floors re-
done.
“It’s been
pretty consis-
tent,” said Hut-
tner-Hallahan
of the City
Center sched-
ule. “We’re in a
little bit of a
lull right now,
so we had the
floors redone
last week. We
needed at least
13 days to let
them sit and
cure.”
The City
Center ball-
room has be-
come an increasingly popular spot for
wedding receptions, and Huttner-Hallahan
said the bulk of the wedding season
stretches from April through October.
“Right now, we only have a couple of
weekends open in that timeframe for re-
ceptions,” said Huttner-Hallahan.
Last year, the event center hosted over
175 events, including wedding receptions,
anniversaries, birthday parties and gradua-
tion receptions, as well as other gather-
ings, such as class reunions.
That is above and beyond what Huttner-
Hallahan calls the “usual meetings” of the
various organizations that call the event
center home.
Huttner-Hallahan said there has been a
steady increase in “smaller-scale” events
such as bridal showers, birthday parties
and confirmation receptions.
But the event center also is home to
larger events, such as the hospice pro-
gram’s “Blizzard Blast” and others, as
well as live entertainment.
“Sometimes community members will
approach us about trying to get in a cer-
tain comedian or other act, and sometimes
those performers will contact us and say,
‘here’s what we think we can do for
you,’” said Huttner-Hallahan.
The remodeling of the former Henry
Hill school building into the City Center
and event center has been ongoing, said
Huttner-Hallahan.
The historical room sponsored by the
Glencoe Historic Preservation Society is
nearing completion, and other rooms are
awaiting work. A bathroom is being in-
stalled in the basement. There are still
plans for a woodworking club to install
equipment in the basement, Huttner-Hal-
lahan added.
And once spring finally arrives, work
on the grounds will begin.
“We’re still working on the courtyard
area with plantings and an irrigation sys-
tem,” said Huttner-Hallahan. “We’re also
looking at building a trellis with a con-
crete patio underneath it that can be used
as a place for wedding and graduation pic-
tures. We’ve had requests for a site like
that.”
Huttner-Hallahan said the event center
offers a full range of services, from help-
ing set up and clean up for special occa-
sions, to providing custodians and other
staff to help.
“We make sure everything is taken care
of and the rooms are set up the way peo-
ple want,” said Huttner-Hallahan.
Huttner-Hallahan can be reached at
320-864-6951, or by e-mail at
hhuttner@ci.glencoe.mn.us.
City Center is busy, but more to be done
Event Center staff will help renters customize decorations to their taste for
event such as wedding receptions, anniversaries, graduation and confir-
mation parties and others.
Hannah
Huttner-Hallahan
Library
Turn to page 13
Page 10 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014
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By Josh Randt
Sports Editor
T
here should be a new addition
coming to Oak Leaf Park this
spring that will improve the over-
all quality of the already heavily-used
recreational area.
A new frisbee golf course is slated to be
installed that would remove the existing
one, which currently plays through picnic
areas and playgrounds.
The nine-hole course featuring two tee
pads and pin locations per hole, will hope-
fully be installed by June 1, according to
Kenny Fillbrandt of the Glencoe Parks
Board.
Fillbrandt is an avid frisbee-golfer him-
self, and brought the idea to the Parks
Board before he was even a member.
Two pin locations would allow for mul-
tiple course setups, while two tee pads
would offer a novice and experienced ap-
proach for park goers.
The pins, or baskets, are DGA Mach 3s,
and are removable. “They’re top of the
line,” Fillbrandt said.
Designer of the course is Minnesota
PDGA certified course designer Tim
Mackey of St. Cloud, whom Fillbrandt
sought out for the project.
Mackey has designed multiple courses
in the state for nearly two decades, includ-
ing the Riverside Park course in St.
Cloud.
The new course would start just north
of the softball fields and continue around
them toward the animal sanctuary, back
along the Buffalo Creek.
The final hole tees off behind the right-
field fence of Vollmer Field and ends in
the space between the Aquatic Center and
Vollmer.
Course design is tentative, but notable
holes include:
Hole 6, which plays onto the island of
the pond north of the sanctuary, and bor-
ders the Buffalo Creek. Plans for a bridge
to the island are in the works, Fillbrandt
said.
Hole 8 is set to play along the creek and
is in the range of 600 feet, potentially
making it “the longest hole in McLeod
County,” said Fillbrandt.
The Parks Board has been flirting with
the idea of expanding the campground at
Oak Leaf for some time. Removing the
existing course was already part of the
equation, so adding a new one that goes
around the park made sense, Fillbrandt
added.
One pending issue yet to be delved into
is the placement of 15 trees the Park
Board purchased for the course.
Currently, Fillbrandt said Mackey wants
at least some of the trees placed as a di-
vider between holes 1 and 2. That could
possibly pose a problem, as that area is
heavily used for parking during Glencoe
Days.
A decision needs to be made on what to
do with the old baskets from the current
course, too.
Fillbrandt said there had been talks of
possibly moving them to Oscar Olson
Park and setting up a smaller course, or
selling them. Currently, nothing has been
decided on the matter.
An annual tournament hosted by Fill-
brandt the past two years dubbed “The
Rusty Chains Classic” raised $445. Fill-
brandt hopes to put the money toward a
bulletin board featuring information on
the course and park. Though, he said he
was open to suggestions on how to spend
the money from the players who have do-
nated.
“It’s going to be their course, and it’s
their money,” Fillbrandt said of the $445.
“So if anyone has any ideas on what to
put the money toward, I would definitely
take some input.”
Kenny Fillbrandt
Parks Board: ‘Goal for new
disc golf course is June 1’
Page 12 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014
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• Personal Banking
• Investments & Trusts
www.security-banks.com
McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014 HORIZON Page 13
Community
starts with
neighbors
who care.
a h
®
m r Fa e t a t S
s w ’ t a h T
n i p l e f h e o g a t i r e g h n o s a l a
w o r t u t o a h s w
. y t i n u m m o e c h n t t i u g o n
f e o d a s m n i w
. f
r S e tte t e o a b t t e G
.
®
e t a t r S
5 7 3 01 2 1
L , I n o t ng i m o o l m, B r a e F t a t S
Larry G. Anderson, State Farm Agent
806 10th Street, Suite 102
Glencoe, MN 55336
(320) 864-5515
www.larryanderson.us
sunlight despite the high windows, is currently
home to bound copies of the former Glencoe
Enterprise.
Fountain said the room also will be home to
collections of Glencoe High School yearbooks,
sets of history books and encyclopedia and,
hopefully, to local genealogical research that
can be shared among patrons.
Fountain said the room will have data cabling
and Internet service so that people can do re-
search on their personal laptops or tablets.
While the west room will have a 1932 class-
room feel, Fountain said the east room will be
furnished “much like a college study area,” as
well as having comfortable furniture where peo-
ple can just sit and read. Fountain said the li-
brary’s micro-film reader will be moved to the
east room to aid patrons with their research.
The total cost of the renovation of the two
rooms is about $61,000, Fountain said. The
grant from the Minnesota Historical Society is a
50-50 matching grant, so the Friends of the
Glencoe Library have dedicated about $30,000
toward the local match.
Schatz Construction of Glencoe will be the
project manager, Fountain said, and work is ex-
pected to begin at the end of March or the be-
ginning of April, and will take a couple of
months to complete.
Chronicle photo by Rich Glennie
Redevelopment plans
The former Mark’s Economart building, vacant for a
number of years, is destined for demolition this year if
the city can obtain a Department of Employment and
Economic Development (DEED) demolition loan. The
loan application to DEED asked for about $100,000 for
demolition costs and another $20,000 for the parking
lot excavation. Up to 50 percent of the loan is forgiv-
able if “a project develops and a business/building is
established on the property,” during the 15-year loan
period, according to Dave Nelson, chamber president
and city economic development director. On March 5,
the city was approved for a $93,500 DEED demolition
loan, Nelson said. The city bought the property from
Security Bank & Trust several years ago and has at-
tempted to find developers for the former grocery
store. It has since fallen into disrepair. The building and
parking lot will be cleared and the property marketed
for future development. Also in the plans is to remake
11th Street, between Ford and Greeley avenues, a two-
way street again.
Library
Continued from page 9
Page 14 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014
729 10
th
Street E.,Glencoe, MN 55336
320-864-3518
Email: cutnedgesalon@embarqmail.com
www.cuttingedgeglencoe.com
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Ceramic Tile Wallcoverings
Pictures, Accent Furniture & Decor
Benjamin Moore Paint
Custom Blinds & Valances
Over 20 Years of Serving the Glencoe Community
McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014 HORIZON Page 15
To view more styles go to www.engagementglobal.com
Large Selection of: Loose diamonds; past/present/future rings,
necklaces, earrings; watches & many other items.
We now carry Fiesta Ware!
1106 Hennepin Ave., Glencoe
320-864-4414
HOURS: Mon. 10am-5pm;
Tues.- Fri. 9am-5pm; Sat., 9am-1pm
After hours appointments available
Layaways always welcome
a i r
There should be an
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button
Check out our new Amish Gallery
410 10
th
Street E.,
Glencoe
320-864-5352
Great Bedding Selection!
Newly remodeled reclining section.
Lift & Power Recliners
Chronicle photo by Rich Glennie
Set to be demolished
The former Sunlife Tanning building
on Greeley Avenue, center, now
owned by the city, is scheduled to be
demolished this spring. The city was
given the property by Leon “Bud” Ko-
pitski of Bloomington in late 2013.
Ken’s Excavating of Glencoe was
awarded the bid to demolish the
building for $18,410, and demolition is
expected to begin late in May. The ad-
jacent former Al’s Sports Bar, also re-
mains vacant, but there has been
some interest expressed in the former
bar and building.
Other potential projects
include campground,
creamery site, flooding
T
he city also has several potential
projects on the radar, according
to City Administrator Mark Lar-
son. They include:
• Expansion of the Oak Leaf Park
campgrounds, placing the campsites
along the existing ring road in the park.
Some utility improvements will be need-
ed.
The city staff is currently waiting to
stake out potential campsites, and get es-
timates of costs for possible sewer and
electrical upgrades in the park.
• Discussion of a reuse or demolition of
the former AMPI creamery building on
Ninth Street. It has been identified by
FEMA for possible acquisition because
of flood plain issues.
• Continue its program of sanitary
sewer repairs with some lining of sewer
lines along Buffalo Creek. Also being
looked at are some kind of bank stabiliza-
tion work on Buffalo Creek near the
wastewater treatment plant.
• Look at a McLeod County fiber proj-
ect tying the courthouse in Glencoe to the
HATS facility in Hutchinson. The county
has set aside $500,000, and Glencoe is
looking at partnership possibilities with
Creekside in Hutchinson, the hospital and
other city facilities.
• The next phase of the Buffalo High-
lands Trail east from Glencoe to Plato.
The completed first phase extends from
Morningside Avenue east two miles to
County Road 1.
Phase two would extend the hiking-
biking trail farther east to the bridge near
Boone Avenue, where it would cross
under the bridge to the north side of
Highway 212.
But in early March, Glencoe City
Council rejected the next phase after re-
ceiving a rejection letter for state Legacy
funding for the local share of the cost.
McLeod County is the lead agency for
the next phases of the trail.
• Work on an Oak Leaf Park swale and
overflow project to address flooding is-
sues in that area. Plans have been com-
pleted, and quotes will be sought. The
area, among others, received extensive
flooding during last June’s rain event of
four inches in 90 minutes.
• The next phase of the comprehensive
street improvement project is scheduled
for 2015 in the area around Lincoln Park.
That includes utility and street recon-
struction at an estimated cost of $3.5 mil-
lion to $4 million.
Neighborhood meetings and public
hearings are expected this fall with an as-
sessment hearing planned for the spring
of 2015.
• Municipal state aid projects for 2015
include Armstrong Avenue and Seventh
Street improvements. These will be coor-
dinated with the 2015 street improvement
project scheduled for the streets around
Lincoln Park.
The Armstrong Avenue project extends
from Seventh Street to 13th Street, and
the Seventh Street work goes from Arm-
strong to Chandler Avenue/Highway 22.
Estimated cost is $2 million.
• A facility plan is being developed for
improvements at the city’s wastewater
treatment plant as part of the state permit-
ting process.
The state has strengthened limits of
phosphorus and chlorides coming from
treatment plants. The plan, once devel-
oped, would be done in phases.
• Continue to complete an origin-desti-
nation study, primarily for Highway 22
traffic, and work with the Minnesota De-
partment of Transportation (MnDOT) and
McLeod County on a cost sharing
arrangement.
Also, review the state’s Corridors of
Commerce program as a possible source
of funding for the “connectivity” up-
grades for Highway 22.
The McLeod
County Chronicle
Page 16 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014
Fine Food &
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702 E. 10th St., Glencoe
(320) 864-3062
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Bump’s has been serving the Glencoe Area for over 25 years.
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Gavin,
Winters,
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Attorneys at Law
www.goslawfirm.com
Lawyers:
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Jason M. Thiemann
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Gavin Law Building • 1017 Hennepin Ave. N
Glencoe, MN 55336 • 320-864-5142
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McLeod County Chronicle
716 E. 10
th
St. • Glencoe, MN 55336 • 320-864-5518
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McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014 HORIZON Page 17
Bought The Frame Shop
with ‘direct call from God’
By Alyssa Schauer
Staff Writer
L
ast year, Glencoe artist Bonnie
Mohr took a chance and made an
unexpected decision to purchase
“The Frame Shop,” formerly operated as
Framed Gallery Expressions — a decision
she felt was a “direct call from God.”
“In early September of last year, some-
body told me The Frame Shop was for
sale. Had I not been in church when they
told me, I would have dismissed the idea
altogether. I thought, ‘That’s more work
than I have time for,’ and my first thought
was that I was not going to check it out,”
Mohr said.
“But I felt hearing it in church was like
God calling me direct and I said to my-
self, ‘Okay fine, go check it out,’” she
said.
The next day, Mohr headed to the fram-
ing business and talked with previous
owners, Larry and Kathy Aldape.
“I always thought they had a great shop.
I really always admired the look of the
shop, inside and outside. It was so beauti-
ful,” she said.
She said the Aldapes were retiring to
Arizona and were closing their frame shop
at the end of September, whether they
sold their business or not.
Mohr said the Aldapes were selling
everything with the business, including
framing equipment, moldings, mats, etc.
“It was a turn-key operation. I really
thought it was too good to be true. All I
would have to do is walk in, turn on the
lights, and I’d have a business. How many
times in life does anything get easier than
that?” Mohr said.
She said she prayed and thought about
the decision, and recognized the fact she
had framing needs of her own for her art-
work.
“I’m adamant about living life to the
fullest. I never want to look back and say,
‘Why didn’t I?’ And I also thought that if
it really doesn’t work out, I could always
sell it,” Mohr said.
On her birthday, one week before head-
ing to World Dairy Expo, her biggest art
show event of the season, Mohr wrote a
check and purchased the business.
“I’ll never forget the feeling leaving
World Dairy Expo. After a week in Madi-
son, you feel exhausted, like you’ve been
trampled by a herd of elephants. And here
I had to think about opening The Frame
Shop. So the shop is sitting here, not
open, not doing anything. But time is
money, and it really came down to getting
somebody to run it,” Mohr said.
She said the end of the year is also peak
time for sales at her Bonnie Mohr Studio.
“It was the holiday season. We were
having our open houses at the studio, and
I decided not to stress about the shop. I
thought we could even wait to open it in
spring,” she said.
But she had a revelation at the end of
October when she heard the Aldapes were
returning to Glencoe from Arizona.
They were coming to the area to sell
their house, and had agreed to help Mohr
train a new framer for the shop.
“Their house sold the first week it was
on the market, and they told me they were
leaving at the end of November. So I had
three weeks to find somebody to hire so
they could be trained before Larry and
Kathy left,” Mohr said.
She said she received four applications
with only two having framing experience.
After a couple of interviews, she hired
Carolyn Fiecke to manage The Frame
Shop.
“Carolyn and I had a work relationship
before. I trusted her. I felt she had the en-
ergy and enthusiasm to do this job. I need-
ed someone who could do it all — work
well with the public, be able to chop
wood, run the computer, etc.
“And, she had 30 plus years of experi-
ence in framing. Really, she was every-
thing I needed. Not everybody has fram-
ing experience. It’s really a specialized
thing,” Mohr said.
She said framing is “quite an invest-
ment,” and said the sale of the shop was
an inviting proposition as all the equip-
ment was there.
“Larry set this up to be a framing shop.
He built a matting room, a cutting room,
everything. Once I knew we were ‘under
the gun’ to find a framer, I hired Carolyn.
It worked out really well. She had good
training from them, and we opened Dec.
1,” Mohr said.
She said Christmas time definitely
“drummed up business, but January and
February were our months to bring our
shop up to the level we want. We updated
the moldings, Carolyn familiarized herself
with the equipment, and we rearranged,”
she said.
Mohr said The Frame Shop also houses
a collection of her artwork, giftware, and
much more. “It’s great for people who just
want to stop in and pick up a little gift, or
a pack of cards,” she said.
The Frame Shop is open Wednesdays
through Fridays, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.,
and will be open on Saturdays seasonally.
“We will be open Saturdays in April
from 9 a.m. to noon. And if that goes well,
maybe in May, too. Spring is a busy time
with graduations and weddings, and often
a time for people to spruce up their
homes,” Mohr said.
And The Frame Shop does more than
just frame prints.
“We don’t just do traditional framing.
We offer far beyond that, including shad-
owboxes, needlework, photography,”
Mohr said.
Fiecke added that she is currently work-
ing on framing a 100-year-old wedding
dress for a customer.
“And I’m also in the process of framing
a paramedic shirt and license for some-
one. I can frame jerseys, uniform shirts,
paint-by-number sets, coloring books,
etc.” Fiecke said.
She said she had even framed a favorite
book and jewelry in shadowboxes.
“We are also preparing for the rush be-
fore county fairs, when people really like
to frame their needlepoint work, stitching,
their photography, etc.,” Mohr said.
“Had I not been an artist with framing
needs myself, I don’t know if I would
have ventured into buying this shop. But
it seemed like a natural tie-in to my art.
And I’m also happy to be able to accom-
modate the framing needs of the commu-
nity.
“I’m actually doing something I thought
I’d never do — owning a retail business in
a local community. It’s a wonderful thing,
and it keeps the town alive,” Mohr said.
She said the benefit of The Frame Shop
is that it is local and has a “quick turn-
around.”
“We’re excited to be here and we’re
going to give it our best shot,” she said.
The Frame Shop is located at 718 13th
St. in Glencoe, near the intersection of
13th and Hennepin Avenue.
A grand opening of the business is set
for April 10-12 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
For more information, visit www.the-
frameshopglencoe.com or their Facebook
page at www.facebook.com/the
frameshopglencoe or call the shop at 320-
864-6476.
Photos by Alyssa Schauer
Local artist Bonnie Mohr (left) is pictured with Carolyn Fiecke, the framing
manager of her new adventure, The Frame Shop in Glencoe.
Carolyn Fiecke works with mats and frames for one of her projects.
Page 18 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014
910 E. 10
th
St., Glencoe
320-864-5525
www.napastargroup.com
HOURS: M-F 7:30 am-8 pm
Sat. 7:30 am-5 pm; Sun. 9 am-3 pm
The Glencoe NAPA Auto & Truck Parts store serves as
your headquarters for all your auto, truck, farm and
industrial needs. We have access to over 422,000 quality
parts and accessories for autos, trucks, tractors and
imports. If we don’t have the parts you need on hand, we
can get them with our mid day delivery service or overnight
delivery from our many sources. We have expanded our
NAPA showroom along with our sporting goods
department including guns & licenses, ammo and bait.
Joyce with our large selection
of batteries.
Donn showing bait and tackle
available.
Glencoe Post 5102
VFW
Pull Tabs
Membership Welcome
Open: Monday-Friday 4 p.m.-12 Midnight
Saturday 10 a.m.-12 Midnight
923 Chandler Ave. • Glencoe, MN • 320-864-5992
GLEN KNOLL MANUFACTURED HOME PARK
707 13th St. W (Hwy. 22 NW), Glencoe 320-864-5294
Licensed 157 unit park within the Glencoe City Limits
707 13th St. W (Hwy. 22 NW), Glencoe 320-864-5294
GLENCOE
LAUNDRY CENTER
707 13th St. W (Hwy. 22 NW), Glencoe • Open Daily
McLeod Cooperative
Power Assn.
Providing reliable electric power
for decades.
Today the Cooperative
also provides Exede
high-speed internet,
emergency medical
pendants and home
security services.
1231 Ford Ave., Glencoe • 320-864-3148
Serving the
community
for
79 Years
GSL
To Connect To Lead To Inspire
RESPECT INTEGRITY RESPONSIBILITY HONESTY
Proudly serving the communities of Biscay, Brownton, Glencoe, New Auburn, Plato and Silver Lake
Mission
Statement:
Creating an environment
where education is valued,
excellence is expected, and
lifelong learning thrives.
Together...
We can accomplish anything!
Independent School District #2859 320-864-2499
1621 E. 16th St., Glencoe
Chris Sonju, Superintendent CSonju@gsl.k12.mn.us
McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014 HORIZON Page 19
File photo
CJP Auto Sales
The Glencoe Area Chamber of
Commerce welcomed CJP Auto
Sales with a ribbon cutting on Jan.
28. The new auto sales business is
located at 2248 Hennepin Ave. N.,
Glencoe. From left are: Ellen Felm-
lee, Chip Anderson, Cory Polifka
(owner), Kei th Ortl off, Scott
Rhodes and David Nelson.
Submitted Photo
Take Shape For Life
The Glencoe Area Chamber of Com-
merce welcomed Take Shape For
Life with a ribbon cutting on Tues-
day, October 15. The new business
is located in Gauer Chiropractic at
1706 10th Street, Glencoe. Pictured
from left to right are: Shawna Gru-
ber (Twin Cities & Western Rail-
road), Dipo Ajay (Dominion Home
Health), Dr. Robert Brown (Gauer
Chiropractic), Laurie Gauer (Certi-
fied Health Coach, Take Shape For
Life), David Nelson (Glencoe Cham-
ber), Chip Anderson (Schad, Lind-
strand, Schuth), Ellen Felmlee (Se-
curity Bank & Trust / PrimeVest Fi-
nanci al ), and Scott Rhodes
(Coborn’s).
File photo
Hometown Landscape & Design
The Glencoe Area Chamber of
Commerce welcomed Hometown
Landscape and Design to its new
location in Glencoe with a ribbon
cutting on May 1. Hometown Land-
scape and Design is located at
2712 9th St. E., Glencoe. From left
to right are: Myranda VanDamme,
Kelly Rach, Jeremy and Katie Pier-
son, Hometown Landscape and De-
sign owners, Sue Keenan, Dave
Johnson and Scott Rhodes,
Coborn’s.
File photo
Lang’s Family Meats opens
A ri bbon cutti ng was hel d for
Lang’s Family Meats located at 820
12th St. E, Glencoe. From left are
Ellen Felmlee, Dave Nelson, Tami
Lang, Caden Lang, Tyler Lang,
Richard Pomplun, Randy Lang,
Scott Rhodes, Shauna Gruber, and
Kelly Rach. Missing was Mitch
Lang, who is also a part of the fam-
ily business.
File photo
Panther Point Nutrition
The Glencoe Area Chamber of Com-
merce welcomed Panther Point Nu-
trition with a ribbon cutting on Nov.
13. The new “good health on the
go” busi ness i s l ocated i n the
Franklin Printing building at 719
13th St., Glencoe. From left are
Shawna Gruber, Sharon Doxtator
(Panther Point Nutrition employee),
Keith Ortloff, Janelle and Bryan
Wilkens (owners), David Nelson,
Tiffany Tieche, and Dipo Ajay. Miss-
ing was Breanne Alberts (co-owner).
File photo
PJ’s How 2 Spirits
The Glencoe Area Chamber of Com-
merce welcomed PJ’s How 2 Spirits
with a ribbon cutting on Oct. 1. The
new wine making kits and supplies
store is located in the Star Plaza
building at 2017 10th St., Glencoe.
From left David Nelson, Dipo Ajay,
Shawna Gruber, Peter Goettl and
Jean Weber (owners), Chip Ander-
son, and Scott Rhodes.
Business ribbons cut
Also having ribbon cuttings were Unhinged! Pizza, formerly Pizza Ranch,
on May 1 for its name change, and Shopko Hometown’s new optical de-
partment on Aug. 6. The new optical department is located within Shopko
Hometown at 3225 10th St. East, Glencoe.
Page 20 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014
136
YEARS
Gould’s
Jewelry
Est.
1878
Wm. B. Gould &
Pamela K. Gould
79
YEARS
Security
Bank &
Trust Co.
October, 1935
Member F.D.I.C.
145
YEARS
Young
America
Mutual
Insurance
Co.
133
YEARS
First
Minnesota
Bank
864-3161
92
YEARS
Harpel
Bros., Inc.
GM Dealership
Since
November 1922
Connie Jaskowiak,
Manager
67
YEARS
Professional
Insurance
Providers
Since 1947
73
YEARS
Glencoe
Regional
Health
Services
Established
1941
75
YEARS
Gavin,
Winters,
Thiemann &
Long Ltd.
1017 N Hennepin, Glencoe
47
YEARS
Bernie’s
Furniture
Quality Brand
Name Furniture
June 1, 1967
Tim Ardolf, Owner
45
YEARS
Denny’s
Barber
Shop
Started July, 1969
Owner,
Dennis Wendlandt
76
YEARS
Light and
Power
Commission
80
YEARS
Glencoe
Wine &
Spirits
Started Jan., 1934
45
YEARS
Glencoe
NAPA
910 E. 10th St.
320-864-5525
61
YEARS
KDUZ
Radio
1260 AM
79
YEARS
McLeod
Cooperative
Power
Assn.
1231 Ford Ave.
Glencoe
164
YEARS
Glencoe-
Silver
Lake
Public
Schools
109
YEARS
NU-
Telecom
Established in 1905.
Serving the
community of Glen-
coe since 2010.
320-864-2818
43
YEARS
Jerry
Scharpe
Ltd.
Certified Public
Accountant
44
YEARS
Glencoe Area
Chamber of
Commerce
Established in 1970
74
YEARS
State Farm
Agent Larry G.
Anderson
806 10th St.,
Suite 102
Glencoe, MN
40
YEARS
Glencoe
Lions Club
Making a
difference in our
community
since 1974
McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014 HORIZON Page 21
24
YEARS
Fashion
Interiors
2108 E. 10th St.
Glencoe 864-6664
Owners: Randy &
Renee Wawrzyniak
36
YEARS
Bergmann
Interiors
Floor Coverings
Window Treatments
June 1978
30
YEARS
Dave
Witthus Con-
struction
320-510-1617
30
YEARS
Alsleben
Trucking
320-864-4509
30
YEARS
RDV
Companies
Started July, 1984
Owner Ryan Voss
34
YEARS
Kevin Post
Agency
Atlas Insurance
Brokers
320-864-3943
34
YEARS
Happy
Hour
Inn
815 11th St. E.
Glencoe
35
YEARS
Gerry’s
Vision
Shoppe, Inc.
September 1979
Heidi Klockmann, Owner
320-864-6111
33
YEARS
Schiroo
Electrical
Rebuilding
Started Feb., 1981
320-864-6200
36
YEARS
Gruenhagen
Insurance
Started in 1978
35
YEARS
Myron
Schuette
Construction,
LLC
Since 1979
29
YEARS
Dobrava
Bros.
Plumbing &
Heating
864-6335
27
YEARS
Bump’s
Family
Restaurant
Mike McGuire &
Eileen Popelka
27
YEARS
Gauer
Chiropractic
Clinic
Dr. Scott Gauer
Dr. Robert Brown
31
YEARS
Dubb’s
Grill & Bar
Gene Moske,
Owner
25
YEARS
Priority 1
Metrowest
Realty
Brian O’Donnell
23
YEARS
Orchard
Estates
864-7798
37
YEARS
McLeod
Publishing,
Inc.
November 1977
40
YEARS
Glencoe
VFW
Post 5102
Established
Sept., 1974
22
YEARS
Hearing
Care
Specialists
Kurt T. Pfaff, Au.D.
320-864-5262
21
YEARS
Al’s Auto
Sales
Scotty Lilienthal
Page 22 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014
14
YEARS
Coborn’s
2211 11th St. E.
Glencoe
16
YEARS
RE/MAX
Homes
Team Jenkins
864-6870
15
YEARS
Edward
Jones
Kirk Miller
320-864-4397
12
YEARS
The Hair
Studio
1220 Hennepin Ave.
Glencoe, MN
320-864-6033
Owners Wayne &
Tanya Mathews
11
YEARS
Coldwell
Banker
Realty
Fred Werth
10
YEARS
Southwest
Eye Care
1201 Greeley Ave. #3,
Glencoe
864-2020
6
YEARS
Step In,
Knot Out,
LLC
Therapeutic Massage
320-864-4566
19
YEARS
Bergmann
Homes, LLC
Since 1995
Owners Bruce &
Deb Bergmann
5
YEARS
Grand
Meadows
1420 Prairie Ave.
Glencoe
5
YEARS
KGLB-AM
1310
July 15, 2009
5
YEARS
Glencoe
Fleet Supply
True Value
Hwy 212,
1305 10th St. E. Glencoe
864-4304
12
YEARS
Glen Knoll
Park &
Storage/
Glencoe
Laundry
20
YEARS
Flatworks
Concrete
Construction,
LLC
James Rosckes, Owner
864-5729
21
YEARS
KARP
106.9 FM
Radio
5
YEARS
Dominion
Home Health
Services &
Dominion PCA
320-864-9926
21
YEARS
Cutting
Edge
729 10th St. E.
Glencoe 864-3518
Lisa Ahlbrecht,
Owner
3
YEARS
Pro Nails
Since June 2011
702 11th St. E, Glencoe
320-864-4666
3
YEARS
Glencoe
City Center
320-864-6951
SHOP LOCALLY!
Your area businesses appreciate it!
McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014 HORIZON Page 23
One of the oldest businesses in the area
has served its policy holders for 145 years!
Young America Mutual Insurance Co.
615 West 13
th
St., Glencoe, MN 55336‑1000
320‑864‑3069 ‑ Connie Jaskowiak, Manager
Hours: Mon.‑Thurs. 8 a.m.‑4 p.m.; Fri. 8 a.m.‑12:30 p.m.
www.youngamericamutual.com
Property Insurance for Farm • Business • Home
Now is the time to review your insurance
coverage before the spring storms.
Let us help you with
your next project
Everything from A to Z
CONSTRUCTION
• New Homes & Additions
• Remodeling & Design
• Excavation & Sewer Repair
• Masonry & Concrete
• Central Vacs & Roofing
Residential & Commercial
Reliability • Durability • Value
www.rdvcompanies.com
Call Ryan at 320-864-4243
Step In, Knot Out L.L.C.
Therapeutic Massage
Lee Lemke
Certified Massage Therapist
Member ABMP
1327 Elliott Ave. N., Glencoe, MN
320-864-4566
stepinknotoutllc@embarqmail.com
Buy One Massage, get a Second of
the same length for HALF PRICE!
Massages are by appointment only.
Step In, Knot Out L.L.C. Offer expires 12-31-14
GLENCOE FLEET SUPPLY
START RIGHT. START HERE.
SM
• Paint & Supplies
• Farm Supplies
• Carhartt
• Power Tools
• Sporting Goods
• Automotive
• Farm Gates &
Feeders
• Seasonal Items
• Pet Supplies
• Animal Feed
• Electrical
Supplies
• Plumbing
Supplies
• Toys
• Housewares
• Clothing & Boots
• Propane
• Fishing Licenses
Hwy 212, 3105 10
th
St. E., Glencoe • Next to Shopko
320-864-4304
Mon.–Fri. 8 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Since 1905
Page 24 HORIZON McLeod County Chronicle, March 19, 2014
2211 11
th
St. E., Glencoe, MN • (320) 864-6132 • www.coborns.com
❒ Fresh Produce
❒ Fresh Meat & Seafood
❒ Fresh Bakery
❒ Fresh Deli
❒ Little Dukes on-the-go
gas & groceries
❒ Video Superstore
❒ Pharmacy
Open
24 Hours
7 Days
a W
eek
Why Shop Coborn’s?
Convenient for you, and always something fun in
the store! We have the freshness you want, with
service that can’t be beat!
F
r
e
s
h
F
r
e
s
h
21 Years in Business! 1993-2014
Featuring:
• Automatic Dynawash
Express Car Wash
• 3 Self-Service Bays
• All NEW Equipment
• Heated Bays
• Complete Detail Center
Connie Stock
Car Wash
Manager
320-587-5611
Al’s Car Wash & Detail Center
595 Jefferson, Hutchinson
CHECK OUT OUR COMPLETE INVENTORY ON-LINE AT
www.alsautosales.com
1.99
%
or lower APR financing available! OAC
Member of Northland Independent Automobile
Dealers Association, the National Independent
Automobile Dealers Association.
Glencoe, MN
Dir. Lic. #21692
A
l

s
Auto S
a
l
e
s
A
l

s
Auto S
a
l
e
s
9522 Hwy. 22, Glencoe
320-864-6897
HOURS: Mon.-Thurs. 8-7,
Fri. 8-5:30, Sat. 8-4
Customer Satisfaction…It’s our Trademark
W
e
h
a
v
e
th
e
k
e
y
s
to
y
o
u
r n
e
x
t
v
e
h
ic
le
!
With over 62 years of combined experience in the auto-
mobile business, our friendly sales staff will be more than
happy to meet your transportation needs! We also offer
TOP dollar for your trade-in vehicle!
WANT TO SPECIAL ORDER?
We Specialize in Getting
the Vehicle You Want
CALL US TODAY
We’ve got a great
variety to choose from!
* WE OFFER TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR
TRADE-IN VEHICLE!
* EVERY MAKE & MODEL FROM
NEARLY ALL MANUFACTURERS
* FIND US ON CARSOUP.COM
* DAILY RENTALS AVAILABLE
* EXTENDED WARRANTIES
* CARFAX HISTORY ON ALL VEHICLES
* 29-POINT INSPECTION & SAFETY
CHECK ON ALL VEHICLES!
* 11-YEAR ACCREDITED BUSINESS
WITH BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU
START WITH TRUST!
55+
Vehicles in
Inventory!
Scotty Jerry Dawn
This document is © 2014 by admin - all rights reserved.