Will passage of amendments address the state's real issues?

Will passing the marriage amendment, or the voter ID amendment for that matter, improve the economy, create more jobs or get more people back to work in Minnesota? Will passing either of these amendments make the state’s budget balance? Will it improve our roads, bridges and highways? Will it make our schools better and our children better educated?
If the answer is no, perhaps you should seriously consider rejecting both of these amendments this fall.
The Nov. 6 general election is about the economy; it is about the future of our state’s finances, its educational system and funding and its infrastructure needs.
It is not, nor should it be, about a rancorous social issue in which there is no absolute right or wrong, only divisiveness. Nor is it about one party’s concept that there is rampant voter fraud in Minnesota, a claim yet to be proven.
So when you go to the polls this year, keep the economy in mind. What, or who, will best get us up and moving again? Vote for those who have plans to move the state’s economy forward, not those who want to inflame the passions these amendments generate.
A look at both amendments indicates the ultimate aim is to be exclusive, not inclusive. The aims are to make things more difficult, not more workable, for Minnesotans.
If the aim of the Founding Fathers was to craft a Constitution that protects the minority from the rule of the majority, do either of these amendments to the Minnesota Constitution accomplish that? No.
There are solid arguments for and against the marriage and voter ID amendments. All sides can justify their stands in their own minds.
But you need to ask yourself, will you be better off two years from now if these amendments pass? Instead, you should ask yourself, will you be better off two years from now by electing legislators who will concentrate on fixing the economy first?
— R.G.